Archive for March, 2017

Liberals vs. Mother Nature: Freddie Mercury, AIDS, and Minority-Worship

Who is the biggest hate-criminal in the world? There’s only one contender and you may be shocked to learn that it’s a female. Worse still, that female is as immortal as she is immoral. For millennia, she’s been hating on humanity, discriminating between different groups and imposing inequality, preventing women from matching the intellectual, cultural […]

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Liberals vs. Mother Nature: Freddie Mercury, AIDS, and Minority-Worship

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Pittsburgh

In the wake of the Pittsburgh Synagogue shootings, the long-running hysteria about Donald Trump promoting anti-Semitism, racism, and “White supremacy” has been intensified. It’s at the point now that it is morphing into an obvious attempt to shut down or at least pathologize public discussion of critical issues. Particularly important are globalism and nationalism, and […]

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Pittsburgh

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World War I: Macron rebukes nationalism at commemoration

French President Emmanual Macron delivers remarks on the armistice that ended WWI, and decries the ‘nationalism’ that he claims is resurfacing. USA TODAY

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, left, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the World War I commemoration in Paris on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018.(Photo: Francois Mori, AP)

PARIS Bells tolled across France and Europe on Sundayas President Donald Trump and other global leaders gathered to honor the dead of World War I and heed its harshlessons to prevent conflicts.

French President Emmanuel Macron, who has criticized Trump’s “America First” foreign policy,decriedexcessive “nationalism” at the root of World War I and successiveconflicts.

“Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism,” Macron told a gathering of world leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin,German Chancellor Angela Merkel andTrump.Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism by saying, Our interest first, who cares about the others? “

Hosting an event to mark the centennial of the armistice that ended World War I, Macron told fellow leaders theyhavea “huge responsibility” to defeat modern forces that threaten a “legacy of peace” from the two world wars of the past century.

“I know there are old demons coming back to the surface,” the French president said. “They are ready to wreak chaos and death.”

Macron did not refer specifically to Trump, who occasionally frowned during the speech.

Trump did not respond to Macron publicly. During a speech later Sunday at a World War I-era cemetery, Trump praised the French leader for hosting the event he called”very beautiful” and “well done.”

In defending “America First,” Trump has often said the United Statesneeds to address its own needs. During a meeting with Macron on Saturday, Trump said other countries need to share the burdens of mutual defense and free trade: “We want to help Europe, but it has to be fair.”

Before the ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe,the bells at Notre Dame and other cathedrals in Paris and across the continentrang at the exact time thearmisticetook effect: the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11thmonth, 100 years ago.

The event itself ran a little lateas Macron and other leaders marched up the Champs-Elysees towardthe event site.

Trump arrived separately, not withoutincident: A topless womanran toward the presidential motorcadebut was quickly caught by police. She hadthe words “fake peacemakers” written on her body.

Anti-Trump demonstrators were arrested throughout the day.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said Trump went to the event separately “dueto security protocols.”

Holding umbrellas, the president and first lady Melania Trump greeted Macron and other guests, including Putin.

The Russian president gave Trump a thumbs upand patted him on the upper arm.

During the ceremony, amilitary band played “La Marseillaise”; a choir of veterans later sang the French national anthem a capella. Yo-Yo Ma, seated near the eternal flame at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier beneath the arc, performed cello solos. The French air force staged a flyover.

Other countriesheld similar World War I commemorations,fromAustralia and New Zealand to England and India.

To safeguard Trump and more than 60 other world leaders in attendance, the Paris event took place amid heavy security.

Saturday night, siren-blaring police vehicles began lining the streets around the Arc de Triomphe, commissioned by Napoleon in 1806 to celebrate his military victories and finished more than a decade after his death in exile.

Domestic politics also occupied Trump’s mind.

In a tweet 20minutes before the program, Trumpattributedthe California wildfires to poor supervision of forest lands. “With proper Forest Management, we can stop the devastation constantly going on in California. Get Smart!” he said.

For the American president, the program at the Arc de Triomphebegan a day of commemorations before he boarded Air Force One to head back to Washington.

After aluncheon with other leaders, Trump traveled to a World War I cemetery.

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Trumpcanceleda trip Saturday to another cemetery.The White House cited rainy weather, saying it would have created problems for the helicopters that would have ferried the president.

Except for tweets aboutthe wildfires in California and electionrecounts in Florida, Trump has kept a relatively low profile during his weekend in Paris.

Duringa ceremonial dinner Saturday, the Turkish government released a photo of Trump seated next to its president, Recep TayyipErdogan, hours after Erdogan said he had provided the United Statesand other countries with audiotapes of last month’s murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

“I can confirm they sat next to one another and they discussed the ongoing tragic situation with Khashoggi,” Sanders said.

A century ago, many in the USAand Europe recoiled from the mass destruction of World War I, the horrors of trench warfare and gas attacks. The warwiped out monarchies and forged new countries in Europe and the Middle East, but it did not end international rivalries that led to the war.

Germany, angry over war reparations imposed by rivals and eager for revenge, turned to Adolf Hitler. World War II began in 1939.

During events over the weekend, Macron said the global community must work together to prevent conflicts.

“The message, if we want to live up to the sacrifice of those soldiers who said, Never again!, is to never yield to our weakest instincts, nor to efforts to divide us,” Macron told a group of youngsters during a visit Saturday to the Compiegne Forest.

Merkel attended the event atCompiegne, the site where Germany surrendered to France and allies after World War Iand where France surrendered to Hitler’s Germany at the start of World War II.

“A century on, as we see nationalist voices again on the rise across the globe,” tweeted Anders Fogh Rasmussen, former secretary-general of NATO. “we must keep in mind the price we paid to build the peace and enjoy the freedoms we do today.”

Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, said Macron made a good point: “We’re seeing a very concerning trend toward nationalistic, anti-democratic leaders; they are abandoning multilateralism.”

Trump “certainly speaks like that,” she said. “America First.”

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World War I: 100 years on, the US remembers the end of the …

‘War to end all wars’: How World War I still resonates today

As the world marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, the National World War I Museum and Memorial serves as a reminder of the sacrifices U.S. troops made in ‘The Great War.’ Eric Shawn reports from Kansas City, Missouri.

It was called the “Great War,” because no one could conceive that there would ever be another one.

But there was.

And now, at the 11th hour, on the 11th day, of the 11th month, Sunday, November 11th, the world marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War One. The global conflict cost an estimated 9 million military lives, cemented the United States as a world power, reshaped history and altered the global order.

“The world came undone during those years. And if it was ever really put back together, it was put back together differently wearing the wounds of World War One that we continue to live with today,” said Matthew Naylor, the president and C.E.O of the National World War One Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri.

“It was a war which completely changed the trajectory of the United States and had such a profound bearing on the globe, the first war that people from all inhabited continents of the globe participated in, truly a global war” he notes.

WORLD WAR I POSTERS OFFER UNIQUE GLIMPSE INTO SOLDIERS’ STORIES 100 YEARS AFTER THE ARMISTICE

“The Europeans themselves, of course, experienced losses that are unheard of today, thank God, we would not tolerate. The type of carnage that there was, 7,200 deaths a week, 300 a day, 5 a minute for more than four years, every minute, every hour of every day, every week for more than four years.

“There never was enough coffins, never enough ways to bury the dead, such was the degree of carnage. It reoriented the world, helped us learn what we can do to one another, and caused the world to gasp and step back.”

Naylor oversees the nation’s preeminent institution that marks the conflict. The stunning and imposing limestone memorial is unique. It was funded in 1919 by local residents who raised $2.5 million dollars in just ten days, or $40 million in today’s dollars, to build it. The memorial was dedicated in 1926, and all five allied commanders from the war attended, as did President Calvin Coolidge.

The museum and Kansas City’s skyline is dominated by the imposing Liberty Memorial Tower that rises above the museum and surrounding 47-acre hilltop park. It commands a sweeping view of the city and serves as apowerful, poignant and solemn reminder of the sacrifices of so many.

Today the museum is visited by half a million people each year, and the horrors from a century ago continue to resonate. Visitors can see tanks, machine guns, gas masks and the other weapons of war that are on display, as well as read the touching personal letters from troops and study the patriotic art of the era, including the famous “Uncle Sam Wants You” recruiting poster. The museum was renovated and vastly enlarged in 2006.

THIS BULLET-SCARRED BIBLE SAVED THE LIFE OF A WORLD WAR I SOLDIER

The first global conflict was so barbaric that it introduced the role of modern mechanized warfare, such as the use of gas on the Western Front and untold new ways for mass killing.

The war started in 1914 and America entered on April 6th, 1917, joining allies Britain, France and Russia against Germany and its allies.

The trench warfare was especially brutal.

“35,000 miles of trenches were created, even though the front was only 436 miles,” says Naylor. “Your friends are going up over the top, and many of them are going to be killed. When is it going to be your turn to do that?”

Chemical weapons like mustard and chlorine gas and phosphates were first deployed on the modern battlefield that all added to the barbaric losses.

AMERICA’S DEADLIEST BATTLE: WORLD WAR I’S MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE 100 YEARS LATER

“We soon learned the horrors of their use. The legacies of death and horror remain,” Naylor notes.

The United States’ involvement also marked the emergence of our nation’s role in international affairs.

“In many respects, you cannot think of the 20th century, you can’t think of the American Century without understanding the impact that World War One had in drawing the U.S onto the world stage. It retreated somewhat after the war, but soon found itself drawn back in, arguably a position from which it has never retreated,” Naylor says.

“World War One birthed what we know as modern America, a major player in international affairs, a tremendous industrial and financial powerhouse, a champion of ideals, that’s what drew the U.S. into the war, were those ideals and it has had a profound bearing on the last 100 years and the role of the United States in world affairs.”

The war also advanced social and cultural change here at home.

INCREDIBLE WORLD WAR I DIARY SURFACES

“There was a deconstruction of the previous age and an emergence of the new that World War One really helped birth. We see from the war the impact on civil rights, the experience of African Americans serving with the French, primarily,” Naylor says. “That really added momentum to the civil rights movement and the suffragette movement and the changing roles of women during World War One. “

But today, the war and our country’s contribution to victory, have largely receded from the national consciousness.

The last American veteran, Frank Buckles, died seven years ago at age 110.

“The Civil War and World War Two occupy the public imagination in the way World War One does not,” Naylor explains.

“It’s a very messy war. It is complicated, and so its difficult for people to get their head around. Secondly, the United States involvement was relatively short despite the fact that the largest military campaign in American military history occurred during World War One.”

100-YEAR OLD LETTER FROM WWI UNCOVERED

But the sacrifices of the more than 4 million Americans who served, and of the more than 116,000 U.S. troops who were killed, remain a focal point of the museum.

“The tragedy is once you get past the third or fourth generation, we tend to forget. Part of our work here is to remember those who served and to continue to tell the story and learn from the enduring impact of the war,” notes Naylor.

“Our work now is about interpreting, remembering and understanding the great war. It’s 100 years ago, so we need to continue to protect and preserve those memories, to honor those who served and then to alsoexamine its enduring impact. The reality is that we live in the war’s shadow here, one hundred years later. Every day we wake up dealing with the consequences of decisions made and actions taken during World War One and so our work is about examining that with the hope to create a more just and prosperous future.”

Despite the war’s historical significance, there is no national memorial in Washington, D.C., but one is planned. It will, like the museum, commemorate what was once called “the war to end all wars,” a noble goal that so sadly was not achieved.

“Its legacy cannot be underestimated,” says Naylor. “Our work is to be able to tell that story, and to help people understand and learn.”

Ben Evansky and Lloyd Gottschalk contributed to this report.

Follow Eric Shawn on Twitter: @EricShawnTV

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In photos: World War I, then and now – CNN

But, of course, we now know that it was just the first World War — and a preview of more conflict to come.

Associated Press photographer Laurent Rebours recently visited sites across the former Western Front and took pictures, comparing the scenes now to what they look liked in 1918. The “before” photos below came from the US National World War I Museum and Memorial:

Before: American troops march in Paris during a Fourth of July parade in 1918.After: The same view in 2018, with the Guimet Museum on the right.

Before: A street scene in Bouillonville, France, in September 1918, two months before the armistice was signed. The hill in the background protected the village from German shells.After: Bouillonville in March 2018. Before American troops moved in during World War I, the village was the center of a medical unit for a large part of the German Army.

Before: Wounded Allied troops are treated in an old church in Neuvilly-en-Argonne, France, in September 1918.After: A look inside the same church in 2018.

Before: US Army Gen. John J. Pershing addresses officers of the First Division in Chaumont-en-Vexin, France, before they would leave for the line in April 1918.After: The same estate in April 2018.

Before: An American soldier, left, guards German prisoners as they draw water from a well on November 9, 1918, two days before the armistice was signed. The Germans were captured in the Battle of Argonne.After: The same street in Pierrefitte-sur-Aire, a commune in eastern France.

Before: The first American trucks enter Beauclair, France, with supplies on November 4, 1918.After: A World War I memorial now stands in front of the church.

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Court Case Reveals Alan Dershowitz Had a Contract With a …

Alan Dershowitz at the Jerusalem Post Annual Conference in New York City on May 7, 2017.Michael Brochstein/ZUMA Wire

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Alan Dershowitz, whose TV appearances denouncing the Russia investigation have endeared him to President Donald Trump, has for more than a year been informally advising the president and his administration on the Middle East peace process. But while counseling Trumpand regularly sounding off in op-eds about Middle East politicsthe Harvard law professor earlier this year agreed to acontract to provide advice to an American lobbyist who represented Qatar, according to court records.Dershowitz did not disclose the existence of the agreement in public statements or to the White House.

Joseph Joey Allaham, a former kosher restaurant owner and at the time aregisteredlobbyist for Qatar,said in a sworn deposition taken on June 19 that he had contracted with Dershowitz for the attorney to provide him with advisory and consulting services in many matters that involved [the] Middle East, especially Israel. He also said Dershowitz worked with him on issues related to Qatar and the Arab regions [of the] Middle East or Africa. And he noted, Whatever I do, he works with me as a consultant.Allaham refused during the deposition to say whether he had made any payments to Dershowitz.

A heavily redacted transcript of the deposition was recently made public in connection with a federal lawsuit filed by disgraced Republican fundraiser Elliott Broidy over what he alleges was a Qatari effort to hack and leak his emails.Broidy has contended that Allaham, who registered in June as an agent for Qatar for work dating back to October 2017, and another lobbyist for the country, Nick Muzin, a former top aide for Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) who worked on the Trump presidential transition, were involved in this alleged operation to discredit him. The lobbyists and the government ofQatar deny the allegations, and a judge threw out the suit in August on technical grounds. But recently disclosed records from the case haveshed light on aspects of the pro-Qatari lobbying effort.

Allahams lawyer, Craig Engle of Arent Fox, said that the contract with Dershowitz called for the famous lawyer to provide advice on cultural, international relations, and legal issues. Dershowitz disputed that description of the deal, insisting that the contract solely covered legal advice. He told Mother Jonesthat he never received a single penny pursuant to that contract or from any other work with Allaham and that the deal was never implemented.Dershowitz said that following a discussion with Allaham in early 2018, Allaham drafted a retention letter but my legal advice was never actually sought or given. Dershowitzmaintained that he did not advocate on behalf of any nation Allaham was representing or courting as a lobbying client. I have done nothing and will do nothing on behalf of any country, he said. Neither Dershowitz nor Engle would agree to allow Mother Jones to review the contract, citing attorney-client privilege.

Any connection that Dershowitz had to lobbying related to the Middle East is notable because of his role advising the Trump administration on policy in the region.Last year, Dershowitz, a vocal backer of the Israeli government, reportedly delivered a message regarding peace talks from Trump to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He subsequentlymet with Trump on the same topic in the fall of 2017.In April, he attended White House meetings with Trump and White House aides, advising them on negotiations with the Palestinian Authority.The April meetings came on thesame day that the Emir of Qatar met with Trump to discuss topics including Qatars relationship with Israel.

Dershowitz said that he never advised the White House on issues related to Qatar, and he asserted that by the time of his April visit to the White House, he knew he would not be advising Allaham on matters related to Israel. If I did any work, I would immediately disclose it, to anybody, he noted. It never happened.

Dershowitz bristled when asked by Mother Jones if his agreement with Allaham could raise questions about the independence of his advice to the White House. He repeatedly threatened to sue for defamation if Mother Jones reported that he had a conflict of interest.

Dershowitzs relationship with Allaham began in the fall of 2017, when Allaham approached him at the Park East synagogue in Manhattan and invited the attorney to visit Qatar. He said he had a relationship with the Qatari government, Dershowitz told Mother Jones.

At the time, Qatar was mounting an aggressive lobbying campaign to counter the influence of its regional rivals. In June 2017, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates had led an effort by Middle Eastern states to impose a blockade on Qatar. The countries cited various causes for the action. But Trump, who expressed support for the blockade, seized onthe allegation advanced by Saudi Arabia and its allies thatQatar funds terrorist groups, including Hamas.

Allahams invitation to Dershowitz to visit Qatar was part a larger effortto convince prominent US allies of Israel with access to the Trump White House to reconsider their critical views of Qatar. Allaham and Muzin have said they developed a list of around 250 people, among them Dershowitz, who might be able to influence Trump in favor of their client. The lobbyists then sought to cultivate people on the list, arranging junkets for some of them to Doha, Qatars capital, and direct payments to others, hoping to at least temper criticism of Qatar from people on the list.

In early January, Allaham arranged for Dershowitz to visit Doha along with Mort Klein, the president of the Zionist Organization of America, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, the father of the White House press secretary, who calls himself an ardent Israeli ally. The Americans met with Qatars Emir, Tamim bin Hamadal-Thani, and Mohammed Al Emadi, Qatars ambassador to Gaza, who plays a key role in Qatars courtship of Israel and Washington. (Allaham said in his deposition that he had a contract with Huckabee, and he noted in a lobbying report that he paid Huckabee $50,000 around the time of the trip.)

Dershowitz continued on to Morocco after the Doha trip, a visit Allaham also helped organize. Dershowitz said he first discussed a contract with Allaham following this trip.

After getting back from Qatar, Dershowitz wrote a January 12op-edfor the Hillsupporting Qatar and questioning claims about the nations financial support of Hamas. Qatar is quickly becoming the Israel of the Gulf States, he wrote. (He later said he meant only that both nations face boycotts and are surrounded by enemies, and that he never intended to compare Israel, a vibrant democracy, to any Gulf monarchy.)

In a January 25, 2018, exchange of WhatsApp messages that were turned over during discovery in the Broidy lawsuit, Allaham and Muzin seemed to cite Dershowitzs efforts as helpful to their lobbying campaign for Qatar. Alan is doing something tomw himself, Allaham wrote in a message to Muzin, which Mother Jones reviewed. He helped so the hill one which I think its great.

Yes its great, Muzin responded.

Asked about the exchange, Dershowitz said Muzin and Allaham were likely referencing his Hill piece, adding that the article reflected my own conclusions, as did the subsequent op-eds. He alsosent to Mother Jonesan image of his calendar for January 26, 2018, noting it shows that he did nothing related to Qatar on that day.

On January 26, the Washington Examiner published an op-ed by Dershowitz devoted mostly to disputing criticism of his prior column about Qatar in the Hill. In the article, he faulted his detractors for ignoring Saudi Arabias flaws yet slamming Qatar. Dershowitz denied he was willing to express views I dont believe for money. He called that an argument I would expect from anti-Semites, who stereotype Jews as money hungry, not from reasonable people.’

Do my critics really believe I can be bought? he asked.

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Morris Dees – Civil Rights Activist, Journalist, Lawyer …

Civil rights lawyer Morris Dees co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center, which addresses cases of racial discrimination and combats the power of hate groups.

Attorney Morris Dees was born on December 16, 1936, in Shorter, Alabama. In 1971, Dees co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC gained attention for its innovative tactics against hate groups, such as filing civil suits claiming damages for the violence incited by these groups. After the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, the SPLC helped his mother receive a $7 million judgment.

Civil rights lawyer Morris Dees was born Morris Seligman Dees Jr. on December 16, 1936, in Shorter, Alabama. He was the oldest of five children. Dees’s parents were tenant farmers who also operated a cotton gin.

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Dees was a resourceful child. At a young age, he started earning money by buying, rearing and selling pigs. As a teen, he sold scraps from his parents’ cotton gin as mulch. Dees managed to accumulate approximately $5,000 in savings by the time he graduated from high school in 1955.

At his parents’ urging, Dees enrolled at the University of Alabama, where he would earn both his undergraduate and law degrees. In 1956, while he was an undergraduate, Dees witnessedcrowds of white peopleincluding members of the Ku Klux Klanverbally and physically harassAutherine Lucy, a classmate who was the first African-Americanto attend the University of Alabama. The scene revolted Dees and would resonate with him in the years to come.

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While he was still in school, Dees teamed up with a friend, Millard Fuller, to start a direct-mail business. When Dees graduated from law school in 1960, he and Fuller formed their own law practice in Montgomery, Alabama. They also grew their business, Fuller and Dees Marketing, to include a multimillion-dollar publishing venture. Dees bought out Fuller’s share of the business in 1965.

Stuck at an airport one night, Dees happened to read Clarence Darrow’s autobiography, a book that would change the direction of his career. In his own autobiography, A Season for Justice (1991), Dees explained: “I had made up my mind. I would sell the company as soon as possible and specialize in civil rights law. All the things in my life that had brought me to this point, all the pulls and tugs of my conscience, found a singular peace.”

After deciding to refocus his career, Dees handled cases such as filing a suit to integrate Montgomery’s YMCA. In 1969, he sold his company for several million dollars, which gave him more time to defend others’ civil rights.

In 1971, Dees worked with fellow attorney Joseph J. Levin Jr. and civil rights activist Julian Bond to found the Southern Poverty Law Center. Based in Montgomery, the not-for-profit agency was formed to “combat hate, intolerance and discrimination through education and litigation.”

While at the SPLC, Dees worked on a strategy of filing civil suits against hate groups, claiming damages for the violence incited by these groups. One high-profile case where he applied this strategy was the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, a crime committed by three Klan members. With the assistance of Dees and the SPLC, Donald’s mother was awarded a $7 million settlement from the United Klans of America, bankrupting the group.

Over the years, the kinds of cases Dees handled led to his receiving death threats, but that has not kept him from continuing to investigate hate activity throughout the United States. In a 2009 letter to Congress, Dees requested that measures be taken to prevent members of extremist groups from serving in the military. In 2012, Dees was awarded the American Bar Association’s ABA Medal for his dedication to the pursuit of tolerance, justice and equality.

Dees’s autobiography was reissued by the ABA in 2001, retitled as A Lawyer’s Journey: The Morris Dees Story. In addition to his autobiography, Dees has written Hate on Trial: The Case Against America’s Most Dangerous Neo-Nazi (1993) and Gathering Storm: America’s Militia Threat (1996). He was also the subject of a made-for-television movie, Line of Fire: The Morris Dees Story (1991).

During his senior year of high school, Dees married Beverly Crum. The couple had two sons together before divorcing in the late 1960s. Dees next married Maureene Buck, a former employee. Dees and Buck had one daughter together. After they divorced, Dees married his third wife, Mary Farmer, the director of an abortion clinic. Following the end of his marriage to Farmer, he wed Elizabeth Breen. Dees’s fifth wife is Susan Star.

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STEALING THE ELECTION: Broward County elections supervisor mixed invalid provisional ballots into valid batch

Senior Democrat leadership, all the way up to President Obama, spied on Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump and then tried to cover it up with some bogus Russia story. Put nothing past these usurpers. Evil.

How is a clown with a history of illegal vote tampering in charge of this circus?

Broward County elections supervisor mixed invalid provisional ballots into valid batch

by Caitlin Yilek | November 10, 2018:

Broward County’s elections supervisor mixed 20 invalid ballots with a pile of 205 valid ballots, giving more fuel to Republicans who have alleged Democrats are trying to steal the U.S. Senate election from Gov. Rick Scott, R-Fla., who faces incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson.

The mistake was discovered after Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes agreed to turn over 205 provisional ballots to the county’s canvassing board for inspection, according to the Miami Herald.

County officials collected more than 600 provisional ballots on Election Day, a majority of which were deemed invalid for reasons such as registering to vote too late or voting at the wrong precinct.

However, a couple hundred provisional ballots were set aside because of a connectivity issue with the system used to look up voter registrations. Precinct workers had 205 voters fill out provisional ballots when the system at the precincts showed they weren’t registered voters, which differed from information at Broward election headquarters.

Upon reviewing those provisional ballots, the canvassing board found 20 of those 205 votes had mismatched signatures and said they were illegal. Those votes have already been counted in a voting machine, but have not been added to the final vote count.

“The ballots cannot be identified,” Snipes confirmed when a lawyer for the Republican Party asked, according to the Miami Herald.

It’s unclear what happens next, but both parties cried foul upon hearing the news.

“This process doesn’t exist. The process is that the ballots aren’t opened. I would suggest to the board that this process would stop,” said Leonard Collins, a lawyer for the Florida Republican Party.

Want more lawlessness?#BrowardCounty elections opened 208 provisional ballots without canvassing boards approval as required by law

After admitting error submitted them to board which found at least 12 are invalid

Guess what? They are going to count all 208 of them anyway

— Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) November 10, 2018

Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio called the matter “lawlessness.” Democratic lawyer Marc Elias said he expected some of the voters affected to “fight for their votes.”

MEDIA ALERT: The GOP is trying to throw out 205 valid ballots in Broward County due to alleged signature mismatch on 22 of them. The County Board will decide tomorrow am. We expect some of affected voters there in person to fight for their votes. #CountTheVotes

— Marc E. Elias (@marceelias) November 10, 2018

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Where are the West’s solidarity marches for Asia Bibi? Where are the t-shirts?

If there were a more powerful example of left-wing hypocrisy, I can’t think of one.
Is there a more powerful example of the islamization of the West than Asia Bibi, the harsh recriminations of Charlie Hebdo or our AFDI free speech event in Garland, Texas? It’s all of a piece.

After 9/11, ignorance of Islam and sharia law was understandable. Seventeen years later and tens of thousands of jihad attacks later, it is not. People have a choice and they will have to live with their lily-livered cowardice. It won’t be pretty,

The abandonment of Asia Bibi

Why Western progressives are not fighting for this persecuted Pakistani woman.

By Brendan O’Neill, Editor, Spiked, November 2018:

Where are the West’s solidarity marches for Asia Bibi? Where are the t-shirts? Why aren’t ‘Free Asia Bibi’ flags flying on campuses? Why haven’t student progressives elected Asia as the symbolic head of their unions, as they did with persecuted Eastern European writers in the 1970s or African liberation leaders in the 1980s.

Bibi, after all, comes across as an ideal person for those of a genuinely liberal or leftist persuasion to get behind. She’s a woman. She’s a farm labourer. She is part of a persecuted minority (Christians in Pakistan). And she has been subjected to awful punishments and deprivations merely for saying something.
In a different era, Asia would have been a cause célèbre in certain Western circles. But not today. Why? Because many in the West now agree that the thing Bibi is alleged to have done, and for which she has been so severely punished, is indeed immoral – that is, mocking Muhammad.
Bibi is a Roman Catholic and a former farm worker from the Sheikhupura district of Punjab. In June 2009 she was harvesting berries with other women in Sheikhupura when she picked up a cup to take a drink of water. Some of the other women, Muslims, accused her of polluting the cup, given she is a Christian and therefore unclean, or ‘filthy’, as they branded her. And they allege that Bibi fired back with some swipes at Muhammad. Bibi has always denied this. Nonetheless, a mob visited her house and beat her up. She was then arrested, charged with blasphemy, and, in November 2010, sentenced to death by hanging.

She was sent to death row. She was attacked in prison. Other prisoners were arrested for conspiring to kill her. There were regular anti-Bibi protests by hardline Islamists waving placards saying, ‘HANG ASIA’. They wanted her execution hurried along so that the world might be rid of this poor, filthy Catholic woman who allegedly disrespected the Prophet.

Last week, however, Pakistan’s Supreme Court overturned Bibi’s sentence. It accused the women who made the accusations against her of lying – their story was ‘concoction incarnate’, it said – and it decreed that Bibi was ‘free to go’.

Only Bibi has not been free to go. In response to the Supreme Court’s acquittal there have been massive and violent Islamist protests across Pakistan. ‘Kill Asia’, they have demanded in their thousands. They have burned rickshaws, cars and lorries. The protests are thought to have caused damage in the region of £900million.

And in response to this intolerant mob uprising, Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan has agreed to refuse Bibi’s right to leave the country. In the words of Wilson Chowdhry of the British Pakistani Christian Association, this is akin to ‘signing her death warrant’. Indeed, Bibi’s lawyer has already had to flee Pakistan, though he intends to continue fighting for Bibi’s full freedom once he has established asylum somewhere. Forcing Bibi to stay in a country in which many thousands of people want to kill her is cruel and inhuman treatment.
Of course there has been much disquiet in the West over the past eight years, from human-rights outfits and most notably from Christian groups. The Vatican called for clemency. Pope Francis said he felt a ‘spiritual closeness’ with Bibi. Groups such as Voices of the Martyrs, which campaigns on behalf of persecuted Christians, organised petitions for Bibi’s freedom that got up to 400,000 signatures.
In Pakistan itself, brave Christians protested in Lahore and elsewhere, calling for Bibi’s release and for the abolition of Pakistan’s blasphemy laws. First introduced by the British Raj in 1860, and then severely strengthened under the military rule of General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in the 1980s, these laws forbid the insulting of religious beliefs, the desecration of a Koran (life imprisonment), and the mocking of the Prophet (death).
Yet something has been notable by its absence amid the admirable pro-Bibi efforts of Pakistani and Western Christians: the full and loud raising of the Western liberal voice.

 

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Where are the West’s solidarity marches for Asia Bibi? Where are the t-shirts?

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Liberals vs. Mother Nature: Freddie Mercury, AIDS, and Minority-Worship

Who is the biggest hate-criminal in the world? There’s only one contender and you may be shocked to learn that it’s a female. Worse still, that female is as immortal as she is immoral. For millennia, she’s been hating on humanity, discriminating between different groups and imposing inequality, preventing women from matching the intellectual, cultural […]

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Pittsburgh

In the wake of the Pittsburgh Synagogue shootings, the long-running hysteria about Donald Trump promoting anti-Semitism, racism, and “White supremacy” has been intensified. It’s at the point now that it is morphing into an obvious attempt to shut down or at least pathologize public discussion of critical issues. Particularly important are globalism and nationalism, and […]

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World War I: Macron rebukes nationalism at commemoration

French President Emmanual Macron delivers remarks on the armistice that ended WWI, and decries the ‘nationalism’ that he claims is resurfacing. USA TODAY President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, left, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the World War I commemoration in Paris on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018.(Photo: Francois Mori, AP) PARIS Bells tolled across France and Europe on Sundayas President Donald Trump and other global leaders gathered to honor the dead of World War I and heed its harshlessons to prevent conflicts. French President Emmanuel Macron, who has criticized Trump’s “America First” foreign policy,decriedexcessive “nationalism” at the root of World War I and successiveconflicts. “Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism,” Macron told a gathering of world leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin,German Chancellor Angela Merkel andTrump.Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism by saying, Our interest first, who cares about the others? ” Hosting an event to mark the centennial of the armistice that ended World War I, Macron told fellow leaders theyhavea “huge responsibility” to defeat modern forces that threaten a “legacy of peace” from the two world wars of the past century. “I know there are old demons coming back to the surface,” the French president said. “They are ready to wreak chaos and death.” Macron did not refer specifically to Trump, who occasionally frowned during the speech. Trump did not respond to Macron publicly. During a speech later Sunday at a World War I-era cemetery, Trump praised the French leader for hosting the event he called”very beautiful” and “well done.” In defending “America First,” Trump has often said the United Statesneeds to address its own needs. During a meeting with Macron on Saturday, Trump said other countries need to share the burdens of mutual defense and free trade: “We want to help Europe, but it has to be fair.” Before the ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe,the bells at Notre Dame and other cathedrals in Paris and across the continentrang at the exact time thearmisticetook effect: the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11thmonth, 100 years ago. The event itself ran a little lateas Macron and other leaders marched up the Champs-Elysees towardthe event site. Trump arrived separately, not withoutincident: A topless womanran toward the presidential motorcadebut was quickly caught by police. She hadthe words “fake peacemakers” written on her body. Anti-Trump demonstrators were arrested throughout the day. White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said Trump went to the event separately “dueto security protocols.” Holding umbrellas, the president and first lady Melania Trump greeted Macron and other guests, including Putin. The Russian president gave Trump a thumbs upand patted him on the upper arm. During the ceremony, amilitary band played “La Marseillaise”; a choir of veterans later sang the French national anthem a capella. Yo-Yo Ma, seated near the eternal flame at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier beneath the arc, performed cello solos. The French air force staged a flyover. Other countriesheld similar World War I commemorations,fromAustralia and New Zealand to England and India. To safeguard Trump and more than 60 other world leaders in attendance, the Paris event took place amid heavy security. Saturday night, siren-blaring police vehicles began lining the streets around the Arc de Triomphe, commissioned by Napoleon in 1806 to celebrate his military victories and finished more than a decade after his death in exile. Domestic politics also occupied Trump’s mind. In a tweet 20minutes before the program, Trumpattributedthe California wildfires to poor supervision of forest lands. “With proper Forest Management, we can stop the devastation constantly going on in California. Get Smart!” he said. For the American president, the program at the Arc de Triomphebegan a day of commemorations before he boarded Air Force One to head back to Washington. After aluncheon with other leaders, Trump traveled to a World War I cemetery. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Trumpcanceleda trip Saturday to another cemetery.The White House cited rainy weather, saying it would have created problems for the helicopters that would have ferried the president. Except for tweets aboutthe wildfires in California and electionrecounts in Florida, Trump has kept a relatively low profile during his weekend in Paris. Duringa ceremonial dinner Saturday, the Turkish government released a photo of Trump seated next to its president, Recep TayyipErdogan, hours after Erdogan said he had provided the United Statesand other countries with audiotapes of last month’s murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. “I can confirm they sat next to one another and they discussed the ongoing tragic situation with Khashoggi,” Sanders said. A century ago, many in the USAand Europe recoiled from the mass destruction of World War I, the horrors of trench warfare and gas attacks. The warwiped out monarchies and forged new countries in Europe and the Middle East, but it did not end international rivalries that led to the war. Germany, angry over war reparations imposed by rivals and eager for revenge, turned to Adolf Hitler. World War II began in 1939. During events over the weekend, Macron said the global community must work together to prevent conflicts. “The message, if we want to live up to the sacrifice of those soldiers who said, Never again!, is to never yield to our weakest instincts, nor to efforts to divide us,” Macron told a group of youngsters during a visit Saturday to the Compiegne Forest. Merkel attended the event atCompiegne, the site where Germany surrendered to France and allies after World War Iand where France surrendered to Hitler’s Germany at the start of World War II. “A century on, as we see nationalist voices again on the rise across the globe,” tweeted Anders Fogh Rasmussen, former secretary-general of NATO. “we must keep in mind the price we paid to build the peace and enjoy the freedoms we do today.” Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, said Macron made a good point: “We’re seeing a very concerning trend toward nationalistic, anti-democratic leaders; they are abandoning multilateralism.” Trump “certainly speaks like that,” she said. “America First.” Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/11/11/macron-world-leaders-rebuke-nationalism-world-war-event-attended-trump/1966474002/

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World War I: 100 years on, the US remembers the end of the …

‘War to end all wars’: How World War I still resonates today As the world marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, the National World War I Museum and Memorial serves as a reminder of the sacrifices U.S. troops made in ‘The Great War.’ Eric Shawn reports from Kansas City, Missouri. It was called the “Great War,” because no one could conceive that there would ever be another one. But there was. And now, at the 11th hour, on the 11th day, of the 11th month, Sunday, November 11th, the world marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War One. The global conflict cost an estimated 9 million military lives, cemented the United States as a world power, reshaped history and altered the global order. “The world came undone during those years. And if it was ever really put back together, it was put back together differently wearing the wounds of World War One that we continue to live with today,” said Matthew Naylor, the president and C.E.O of the National World War One Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri. “It was a war which completely changed the trajectory of the United States and had such a profound bearing on the globe, the first war that people from all inhabited continents of the globe participated in, truly a global war” he notes. WORLD WAR I POSTERS OFFER UNIQUE GLIMPSE INTO SOLDIERS’ STORIES 100 YEARS AFTER THE ARMISTICE “The Europeans themselves, of course, experienced losses that are unheard of today, thank God, we would not tolerate. The type of carnage that there was, 7,200 deaths a week, 300 a day, 5 a minute for more than four years, every minute, every hour of every day, every week for more than four years. “There never was enough coffins, never enough ways to bury the dead, such was the degree of carnage. It reoriented the world, helped us learn what we can do to one another, and caused the world to gasp and step back.” Naylor oversees the nation’s preeminent institution that marks the conflict. The stunning and imposing limestone memorial is unique. It was funded in 1919 by local residents who raised $2.5 million dollars in just ten days, or $40 million in today’s dollars, to build it. The memorial was dedicated in 1926, and all five allied commanders from the war attended, as did President Calvin Coolidge. The museum and Kansas City’s skyline is dominated by the imposing Liberty Memorial Tower that rises above the museum and surrounding 47-acre hilltop park. It commands a sweeping view of the city and serves as apowerful, poignant and solemn reminder of the sacrifices of so many. Today the museum is visited by half a million people each year, and the horrors from a century ago continue to resonate. Visitors can see tanks, machine guns, gas masks and the other weapons of war that are on display, as well as read the touching personal letters from troops and study the patriotic art of the era, including the famous “Uncle Sam Wants You” recruiting poster. The museum was renovated and vastly enlarged in 2006. THIS BULLET-SCARRED BIBLE SAVED THE LIFE OF A WORLD WAR I SOLDIER The first global conflict was so barbaric that it introduced the role of modern mechanized warfare, such as the use of gas on the Western Front and untold new ways for mass killing. The war started in 1914 and America entered on April 6th, 1917, joining allies Britain, France and Russia against Germany and its allies. The trench warfare was especially brutal. “35,000 miles of trenches were created, even though the front was only 436 miles,” says Naylor. “Your friends are going up over the top, and many of them are going to be killed. When is it going to be your turn to do that?” Chemical weapons like mustard and chlorine gas and phosphates were first deployed on the modern battlefield that all added to the barbaric losses. AMERICA’S DEADLIEST BATTLE: WORLD WAR I’S MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE 100 YEARS LATER “We soon learned the horrors of their use. The legacies of death and horror remain,” Naylor notes. The United States’ involvement also marked the emergence of our nation’s role in international affairs. “In many respects, you cannot think of the 20th century, you can’t think of the American Century without understanding the impact that World War One had in drawing the U.S onto the world stage. It retreated somewhat after the war, but soon found itself drawn back in, arguably a position from which it has never retreated,” Naylor says. “World War One birthed what we know as modern America, a major player in international affairs, a tremendous industrial and financial powerhouse, a champion of ideals, that’s what drew the U.S. into the war, were those ideals and it has had a profound bearing on the last 100 years and the role of the United States in world affairs.” The war also advanced social and cultural change here at home. INCREDIBLE WORLD WAR I DIARY SURFACES “There was a deconstruction of the previous age and an emergence of the new that World War One really helped birth. We see from the war the impact on civil rights, the experience of African Americans serving with the French, primarily,” Naylor says. “That really added momentum to the civil rights movement and the suffragette movement and the changing roles of women during World War One. ” But today, the war and our country’s contribution to victory, have largely receded from the national consciousness. The last American veteran, Frank Buckles, died seven years ago at age 110. “The Civil War and World War Two occupy the public imagination in the way World War One does not,” Naylor explains. “It’s a very messy war. It is complicated, and so its difficult for people to get their head around. Secondly, the United States involvement was relatively short despite the fact that the largest military campaign in American military history occurred during World War One.” 100-YEAR OLD LETTER FROM WWI UNCOVERED But the sacrifices of the more than 4 million Americans who served, and of the more than 116,000 U.S. troops who were killed, remain a focal point of the museum. “The tragedy is once you get past the third or fourth generation, we tend to forget. Part of our work here is to remember those who served and to continue to tell the story and learn from the enduring impact of the war,” notes Naylor. “Our work now is about interpreting, remembering and understanding the great war. It’s 100 years ago, so we need to continue to protect and preserve those memories, to honor those who served and then to alsoexamine its enduring impact. The reality is that we live in the war’s shadow here, one hundred years later. Every day we wake up dealing with the consequences of decisions made and actions taken during World War One and so our work is about examining that with the hope to create a more just and prosperous future.” Despite the war’s historical significance, there is no national memorial in Washington, D.C., but one is planned. It will, like the museum, commemorate what was once called “the war to end all wars,” a noble goal that so sadly was not achieved. “Its legacy cannot be underestimated,” says Naylor. “Our work is to be able to tell that story, and to help people understand and learn.” Ben Evansky and Lloyd Gottschalk contributed to this report. Follow Eric Shawn on Twitter: @EricShawnTV

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In photos: World War I, then and now – CNN

But, of course, we now know that it was just the first World War — and a preview of more conflict to come. Associated Press photographer Laurent Rebours recently visited sites across the former Western Front and took pictures, comparing the scenes now to what they look liked in 1918. The “before” photos below came from the US National World War I Museum and Memorial: Before: American troops march in Paris during a Fourth of July parade in 1918.After: The same view in 2018, with the Guimet Museum on the right. Before: A street scene in Bouillonville, France, in September 1918, two months before the armistice was signed. The hill in the background protected the village from German shells.After: Bouillonville in March 2018. Before American troops moved in during World War I, the village was the center of a medical unit for a large part of the German Army. Before: Wounded Allied troops are treated in an old church in Neuvilly-en-Argonne, France, in September 1918.After: A look inside the same church in 2018. Before: US Army Gen. John J. Pershing addresses officers of the First Division in Chaumont-en-Vexin, France, before they would leave for the line in April 1918.After: The same estate in April 2018. Before: An American soldier, left, guards German prisoners as they draw water from a well on November 9, 1918, two days before the armistice was signed. The Germans were captured in the Battle of Argonne.After: The same street in Pierrefitte-sur-Aire, a commune in eastern France. Before: The first American trucks enter Beauclair, France, with supplies on November 4, 1918.After: A World War I memorial now stands in front of the church.

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Court Case Reveals Alan Dershowitz Had a Contract With a …

Alan Dershowitz at the Jerusalem Post Annual Conference in New York City on May 7, 2017.Michael Brochstein/ZUMA Wire Looking for news you can trust?Subscribe to our free newsletters. Alan Dershowitz, whose TV appearances denouncing the Russia investigation have endeared him to President Donald Trump, has for more than a year been informally advising the president and his administration on the Middle East peace process. But while counseling Trumpand regularly sounding off in op-eds about Middle East politicsthe Harvard law professor earlier this year agreed to acontract to provide advice to an American lobbyist who represented Qatar, according to court records.Dershowitz did not disclose the existence of the agreement in public statements or to the White House. Joseph Joey Allaham, a former kosher restaurant owner and at the time aregisteredlobbyist for Qatar,said in a sworn deposition taken on June 19 that he had contracted with Dershowitz for the attorney to provide him with advisory and consulting services in many matters that involved [the] Middle East, especially Israel. He also said Dershowitz worked with him on issues related to Qatar and the Arab regions [of the] Middle East or Africa. And he noted, Whatever I do, he works with me as a consultant.Allaham refused during the deposition to say whether he had made any payments to Dershowitz. A heavily redacted transcript of the deposition was recently made public in connection with a federal lawsuit filed by disgraced Republican fundraiser Elliott Broidy over what he alleges was a Qatari effort to hack and leak his emails.Broidy has contended that Allaham, who registered in June as an agent for Qatar for work dating back to October 2017, and another lobbyist for the country, Nick Muzin, a former top aide for Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) who worked on the Trump presidential transition, were involved in this alleged operation to discredit him. The lobbyists and the government ofQatar deny the allegations, and a judge threw out the suit in August on technical grounds. But recently disclosed records from the case haveshed light on aspects of the pro-Qatari lobbying effort. Allahams lawyer, Craig Engle of Arent Fox, said that the contract with Dershowitz called for the famous lawyer to provide advice on cultural, international relations, and legal issues. Dershowitz disputed that description of the deal, insisting that the contract solely covered legal advice. He told Mother Jonesthat he never received a single penny pursuant to that contract or from any other work with Allaham and that the deal was never implemented.Dershowitz said that following a discussion with Allaham in early 2018, Allaham drafted a retention letter but my legal advice was never actually sought or given. Dershowitzmaintained that he did not advocate on behalf of any nation Allaham was representing or courting as a lobbying client. I have done nothing and will do nothing on behalf of any country, he said. Neither Dershowitz nor Engle would agree to allow Mother Jones to review the contract, citing attorney-client privilege. Any connection that Dershowitz had to lobbying related to the Middle East is notable because of his role advising the Trump administration on policy in the region.Last year, Dershowitz, a vocal backer of the Israeli government, reportedly delivered a message regarding peace talks from Trump to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He subsequentlymet with Trump on the same topic in the fall of 2017.In April, he attended White House meetings with Trump and White House aides, advising them on negotiations with the Palestinian Authority.The April meetings came on thesame day that the Emir of Qatar met with Trump to discuss topics including Qatars relationship with Israel. Dershowitz said that he never advised the White House on issues related to Qatar, and he asserted that by the time of his April visit to the White House, he knew he would not be advising Allaham on matters related to Israel. If I did any work, I would immediately disclose it, to anybody, he noted. It never happened. Dershowitz bristled when asked by Mother Jones if his agreement with Allaham could raise questions about the independence of his advice to the White House. He repeatedly threatened to sue for defamation if Mother Jones reported that he had a conflict of interest. Dershowitzs relationship with Allaham began in the fall of 2017, when Allaham approached him at the Park East synagogue in Manhattan and invited the attorney to visit Qatar. He said he had a relationship with the Qatari government, Dershowitz told Mother Jones. At the time, Qatar was mounting an aggressive lobbying campaign to counter the influence of its regional rivals. In June 2017, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates had led an effort by Middle Eastern states to impose a blockade on Qatar. The countries cited various causes for the action. But Trump, who expressed support for the blockade, seized onthe allegation advanced by Saudi Arabia and its allies thatQatar funds terrorist groups, including Hamas. Allahams invitation to Dershowitz to visit Qatar was part a larger effortto convince prominent US allies of Israel with access to the Trump White House to reconsider their critical views of Qatar. Allaham and Muzin have said they developed a list of around 250 people, among them Dershowitz, who might be able to influence Trump in favor of their client. The lobbyists then sought to cultivate people on the list, arranging junkets for some of them to Doha, Qatars capital, and direct payments to others, hoping to at least temper criticism of Qatar from people on the list. In early January, Allaham arranged for Dershowitz to visit Doha along with Mort Klein, the president of the Zionist Organization of America, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, the father of the White House press secretary, who calls himself an ardent Israeli ally. The Americans met with Qatars Emir, Tamim bin Hamadal-Thani, and Mohammed Al Emadi, Qatars ambassador to Gaza, who plays a key role in Qatars courtship of Israel and Washington. (Allaham said in his deposition that he had a contract with Huckabee, and he noted in a lobbying report that he paid Huckabee $50,000 around the time of the trip.) Dershowitz continued on to Morocco after the Doha trip, a visit Allaham also helped organize. Dershowitz said he first discussed a contract with Allaham following this trip. After getting back from Qatar, Dershowitz wrote a January 12op-edfor the Hillsupporting Qatar and questioning claims about the nations financial support of Hamas. Qatar is quickly becoming the Israel of the Gulf States, he wrote. (He later said he meant only that both nations face boycotts and are surrounded by enemies, and that he never intended to compare Israel, a vibrant democracy, to any Gulf monarchy.) In a January 25, 2018, exchange of WhatsApp messages that were turned over during discovery in the Broidy lawsuit, Allaham and Muzin seemed to cite Dershowitzs efforts as helpful to their lobbying campaign for Qatar. Alan is doing something tomw himself, Allaham wrote in a message to Muzin, which Mother Jones reviewed. He helped so the hill one which I think its great. Yes its great, Muzin responded. Asked about the exchange, Dershowitz said Muzin and Allaham were likely referencing his Hill piece, adding that the article reflected my own conclusions, as did the subsequent op-eds. He alsosent to Mother Jonesan image of his calendar for January 26, 2018, noting it shows that he did nothing related to Qatar on that day. On January 26, the Washington Examiner published an op-ed by Dershowitz devoted mostly to disputing criticism of his prior column about Qatar in the Hill. In the article, he faulted his detractors for ignoring Saudi Arabias flaws yet slamming Qatar. Dershowitz denied he was willing to express views I dont believe for money. He called that an argument I would expect from anti-Semites, who stereotype Jews as money hungry, not from reasonable people.’ Do my critics really believe I can be bought? he asked. Read the transcript of Joey Allahams deposition:

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Morris Dees – Civil Rights Activist, Journalist, Lawyer …

Civil rights lawyer Morris Dees co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center, which addresses cases of racial discrimination and combats the power of hate groups. Attorney Morris Dees was born on December 16, 1936, in Shorter, Alabama. In 1971, Dees co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC gained attention for its innovative tactics against hate groups, such as filing civil suits claiming damages for the violence incited by these groups. After the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, the SPLC helped his mother receive a $7 million judgment. Civil rights lawyer Morris Dees was born Morris Seligman Dees Jr. on December 16, 1936, in Shorter, Alabama. He was the oldest of five children. Dees’s parents were tenant farmers who also operated a cotton gin. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Dees was a resourceful child. At a young age, he started earning money by buying, rearing and selling pigs. As a teen, he sold scraps from his parents’ cotton gin as mulch. Dees managed to accumulate approximately $5,000 in savings by the time he graduated from high school in 1955. At his parents’ urging, Dees enrolled at the University of Alabama, where he would earn both his undergraduate and law degrees. In 1956, while he was an undergraduate, Dees witnessedcrowds of white peopleincluding members of the Ku Klux Klanverbally and physically harassAutherine Lucy, a classmate who was the first African-Americanto attend the University of Alabama. The scene revolted Dees and would resonate with him in the years to come. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Thanks for watching!Visit Website While he was still in school, Dees teamed up with a friend, Millard Fuller, to start a direct-mail business. When Dees graduated from law school in 1960, he and Fuller formed their own law practice in Montgomery, Alabama. They also grew their business, Fuller and Dees Marketing, to include a multimillion-dollar publishing venture. Dees bought out Fuller’s share of the business in 1965. Stuck at an airport one night, Dees happened to read Clarence Darrow’s autobiography, a book that would change the direction of his career. In his own autobiography, A Season for Justice (1991), Dees explained: “I had made up my mind. I would sell the company as soon as possible and specialize in civil rights law. All the things in my life that had brought me to this point, all the pulls and tugs of my conscience, found a singular peace.” After deciding to refocus his career, Dees handled cases such as filing a suit to integrate Montgomery’s YMCA. In 1969, he sold his company for several million dollars, which gave him more time to defend others’ civil rights. In 1971, Dees worked with fellow attorney Joseph J. Levin Jr. and civil rights activist Julian Bond to found the Southern Poverty Law Center. Based in Montgomery, the not-for-profit agency was formed to “combat hate, intolerance and discrimination through education and litigation.” While at the SPLC, Dees worked on a strategy of filing civil suits against hate groups, claiming damages for the violence incited by these groups. One high-profile case where he applied this strategy was the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, a crime committed by three Klan members. With the assistance of Dees and the SPLC, Donald’s mother was awarded a $7 million settlement from the United Klans of America, bankrupting the group. Over the years, the kinds of cases Dees handled led to his receiving death threats, but that has not kept him from continuing to investigate hate activity throughout the United States. In a 2009 letter to Congress, Dees requested that measures be taken to prevent members of extremist groups from serving in the military. In 2012, Dees was awarded the American Bar Association’s ABA Medal for his dedication to the pursuit of tolerance, justice and equality. Dees’s autobiography was reissued by the ABA in 2001, retitled as A Lawyer’s Journey: The Morris Dees Story. In addition to his autobiography, Dees has written Hate on Trial: The Case Against America’s Most Dangerous Neo-Nazi (1993) and Gathering Storm: America’s Militia Threat (1996). He was also the subject of a made-for-television movie, Line of Fire: The Morris Dees Story (1991). During his senior year of high school, Dees married Beverly Crum. The couple had two sons together before divorcing in the late 1960s. Dees next married Maureene Buck, a former employee. Dees and Buck had one daughter together. After they divorced, Dees married his third wife, Mary Farmer, the director of an abortion clinic. Following the end of his marriage to Farmer, he wed Elizabeth Breen. Dees’s fifth wife is Susan Star.

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November 11, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

STEALING THE ELECTION: Broward County elections supervisor mixed invalid provisional ballots into valid batch

Senior Democrat leadership, all the way up to President Obama, spied on Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump and then tried to cover it up with some bogus Russia story. Put nothing past these usurpers. Evil. How is a clown with a history of illegal vote tampering in charge of this circus? Broward County elections supervisor mixed invalid provisional ballots into valid batch by Caitlin Yilek  | November 10, 2018: B roward County’s elections supervisor mixed 20 invalid ballots with a pile of 205 valid ballots, giving more fuel to Republicans who have alleged Democrats are trying to steal the U.S. Senate election from Gov. Rick Scott, R-Fla., who faces incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson. The mistake was discovered after Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes agreed to turn over 205 provisional ballots to the county’s canvassing board for inspection, according to the Miami Herald . County officials collected more than 600 provisional ballots on Election Day, a majority of which were deemed invalid for reasons such as registering to vote too late or voting at the wrong precinct. However, a couple hundred provisional ballots were set aside because of a connectivity issue with the system used to look up voter registrations. Precinct workers had 205 voters fill out provisional ballots when the system at the precincts showed they weren’t registered voters, which differed from information at Broward election headquarters. Upon reviewing those provisional ballots, the canvassing board found 20 of those 205 votes had mismatched signatures and said they were illegal. Those votes have already been counted in a voting machine, but have not been added to the final vote count. “The ballots cannot be identified,” Snipes confirmed when a lawyer for the Republican Party asked, according to the Miami Herald. It’s unclear what happens next, but both parties cried foul upon hearing the news. “This process doesn’t exist. The process is that the ballots aren’t opened. I would suggest to the board that this process would stop,” said Leonard Collins, a lawyer for the Florida Republican Party. Want more lawlessness? #BrowardCounty elections opened 208 provisional ballots without canvassing boards approval as required by law After admitting error submitted them to board which found at least 12 are invalid Guess what? They are going to count all 208 of them anyway — Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) November 10, 2018 Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio called the matter “lawlessness.” Democratic lawyer Marc Elias said he expected some of the voters affected to “fight for their votes.” MEDIA ALERT: The GOP is trying to throw out 205 valid ballots in Broward County due to alleged signature mismatch on 22 of them. The County Board will decide tomorrow am. We expect some of affected voters there in person to fight for their votes. #CountTheVotes — Marc E. Elias (@marceelias) November 10, 2018

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November 11, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Pamella Geller  Comments Closed

Where are the West’s solidarity marches for Asia Bibi? Where are the t-shirts?

If there were a more powerful example of left-wing hypocrisy, I can’t think of one. Is there a more powerful example of the islamization of the West than Asia Bibi, the harsh recriminations of Charlie Hebdo or our AFDI free speech event in Garland, Texas? It’s all of a piece. After 9/11, ignorance of Islam and sharia law was understandable. Seventeen years later and tens of thousands of jihad attacks later, it is not. People have a choice and they will have to live with their lily-livered cowardice. It won’t be pretty, The abandonment of Asia Bibi Why Western progressives are not fighting for this persecuted Pakistani woman. By Brendan O’Neill, Editor, Spiked, November 2018: Where are the West’s solidarity marches for  Asia Bibi ? Where are the t-shirts? Why aren’t ‘Free Asia Bibi’ flags flying on campuses? Why haven’t student progressives elected Asia as the symbolic head of their unions, as they did with persecuted Eastern European writers in the 1970s or African liberation leaders in the 1980s . Bibi, after all, comes across as an ideal person for those of a genuinely liberal or leftist persuasion to get behind. She’s a woman. She’s a farm labourer. She is part of a persecuted minority (Christians in Pakistan). And she has been subjected to awful punishments and deprivations merely for saying something. In a different era, Asia would have been a  cause célèbre  in certain Western circles. But not today. Why? Because many in the West now agree that the thing Bibi is alleged to have done, and for which she has been so severely punished, is indeed immoral – that is, mocking Muhammad. Bibi is a Roman Catholic and a former farm worker from the Sheikhupura district of Punjab. In June 2009 she was harvesting berries with other women in Sheikhupura when she picked up a cup to take a drink of water. Some of the other women, Muslims, accused her of polluting the cup, given she is a Christian and therefore unclean, or ‘filthy’, as they branded her. And they allege that Bibi fired back with some swipes at Muhammad. Bibi has always denied this. Nonetheless, a mob visited her house and beat her up. She was then arrested, charged with blasphemy, and, in November 2010, sentenced to death by hanging. She was sent to death row. She was attacked in prison. Other prisoners were arrested for conspiring to kill her. There were regular anti-Bibi protests by hardline Islamists waving placards saying, ‘HANG ASIA’. They wanted her execution hurried along so that the world might be rid of this poor, filthy Catholic woman who allegedly disrespected the Prophet. Last week, however, Pakistan’s Supreme Court overturned Bibi’s sentence. It accused the women who made the accusations against her of lying – their story was ‘concoction incarnate’, it said – and it decreed that Bibi was ‘free to go’. Only Bibi has not been free to go. In response to the Supreme Court’s acquittal there have been massive and violent Islamist protests across Pakistan. ‘Kill Asia’, they have demanded in their thousands. They have burned rickshaws, cars and lorries. The protests are thought to have caused damage in the region of £900million. And in response to this intolerant mob uprising, Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan has agreed to refuse Bibi’s right to leave the country. In the words of Wilson Chowdhry of the British Pakistani Christian Association, this is akin to ‘signing her death warrant’. Indeed, Bibi’s lawyer has already had to flee Pakistan, though he intends to continue fighting for Bibi’s full freedom once he has established asylum somewhere. Forcing Bibi to stay in a country in which many thousands of people want to kill her is cruel and inhuman treatment. Of course there has been much disquiet in the West over the past eight years, from human-rights outfits and most notably from Christian groups. The Vatican called for clemency. Pope Francis said he felt a ‘spiritual closeness’ with Bibi. Groups such as Voices of the Martyrs, which campaigns on behalf of persecuted Christians, organised petitions for Bibi’s freedom that got up to 400,000 signatures. In Pakistan itself, brave Christians protested in Lahore and elsewhere, calling for Bibi’s release and for the abolition of Pakistan’s blasphemy laws. First introduced by the British Raj in 1860, and then severely strengthened under the military rule of General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in the 1980s, these laws forbid the insulting of religious beliefs, the desecration of a Koran (life imprisonment), and the mocking of the Prophet (death). Yet something has been notable by its absence amid the admirable pro-Bibi efforts of Pakistani and Western Christians: the full and loud raising of the Western liberal voice.  

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November 11, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Pamella Geller  Comments Closed


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