Voluntary use of Race to Achieve Diversity in Postsecondary Education

The New York Times, and several other Associated Press publications, recently wrote about the Obama administration’s 10-page guideline that essentially “throws out” the Bush-era interpretation of a supreme court ruling that limited affirmative action in admissions. The new guideline provide Postsecondary Education with practical remedies to achieving diversity among their student population. To read the full New York Times article, click on the link below.


By SAM DILLON

Published: December 2, 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/03/education/us-urges-campus-creativity-to-gain-diversity.html


“The new guidelines issued by the Departments of Justice and Education replaced a 2008 document that essentially warned colleges and universities against considering race at all. Instead, the guidelines focus on the wiggle room in the court decisions involving the University of Michigan, suggesting that institutions use other criteria — students’ socioeconomic profiles, residential instability, the hardships they have overcome — that are often proxies for race. Schools could even grant preferences to students from certain schools selected for, among other things, their racial composition, the new document says.”


To read the 10-page Guidance on the Voluntary use of Race to Achieve Diversity in Postsecondary Education, please click here.

http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/edu/documents/guidancepost.pdf\

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