Halloween store removes Anne Frank costume after complaints …

At least one online retailer has pulled a costume from its website that depicted the teenage diarist and Holocaust victim Anne Frank, but an identical costume is still available at several online retailers.

Screenshots of the costume for sale at HalloweenCostumes.com posted to social media show a smiling girl wearing World War II-era clothing and a beret.

The costume quickly received criticism. Carlos Galindo-Elvira, who leads the Anti-Defamation League’s Arizona office, said on Twitter that it trivializes Frank’s memory. “There [are] better ways [to] commemorate Anne Frank. This is not one,” he tweeted.

Fun.com, based in North Mankato, Minnesota, runs the website where the costume was featured. Spokesman Ross Walker SmithtweetedSunday that the costume had been pulled.

He explained that the company sells costumes for activities other than Halloween, like “school projects and plays.” He apologized for any offense caused by the costume.

Anne Frank is known for the diary she wrote while in hiding from the Nazis in an attic in Amsterdam during the war. Her family was discovered in 1944 and sent to a concentration camp, where Anne died at the age of 15.

Google search results for “Anne Frank kids costume” still show an identical costume being sold on Walmart.com, TheHalloweenSpot.com, ziggosparty.com and several other online retailers. It’s labeled as a “WWII girl costume” or “WWII evacuee costume.”

2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Excerpt from:
Halloween store removes Anne Frank costume after complaints …

Related Post

October 16, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank |

Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."