Archive for the ‘Abraham Foxman’ Category

The Leo Frank Jewish Sex Murder Criminal Case and Post-Trial Lynching: The Rape and Strangulation of Mary Phagan and Meticulous Leo Frank Trial Analysis at the American Mercury.

These are the most hateful articles ever written about the Leo Frank case, how dare they say he was guilty. Please pressure their ISP to shut down The American Mercury, before these articles get copied to other websites and shared around the world. This hate must be stopped.

The Astounding Alonzo Mann Hoax and Jewish ADL of B’nai B’rith
http://theamericanmercury.org/2015/09/the-astounding-alonzo-mann-hoax

The Amazing Story of Mrs. Leo M. Frank: Lucille Selig Frank
http://theamericanmercury.org/2015/09/the-amazing-story-of-mrs-leo-frank

The Coroner’s Inquest of the Mary Phagan Murder Mystery
http://theamericanmercury.org/2015/08/leo-frank-the-coroners-inquest

100 Years Ago Today: The Trial of Leo Frank Begins

http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/07/100-years-ago-today-the-trial-of-leo-frank-begins/

Leo Frank Trial Week One
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-one/

Leo Frank Trial Week Two
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-two/

One Hundred Years Ago Leo Frank Mounts the Witness Stand
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/100-years-ago-today-leo-frank-takes-the-stand/

Leo Frank Trial Week Three
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-three/

Leo Frank Trial Week Four
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/09/the-leo-frank-trial-week-four/

Leo Frank Trial Closing Arguments
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/10/the-leo-frank-trial-closing-arguments-of-hooper-arnold-and-rosser/

One Hundred Reasons Leo Frank is Guilty
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/04/100-reasons-proving-leo-frank-is-guilty/

Anti-Defamation League: One Hundred Years of Jewish Hate, October 1913 – 2013
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/10/adl-100-years-of-hate/

Professor Emeritus of Judaic Studies: Leonard Dinnerstein’s Pseudo-history About the Leo Frank Case
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/10/the-leo-frank-case-a-pseudo-history/

Review of Tabloid Style Journalist Steve Oney’s the Dead Shall Rise: Who Really Solved the Mary Phagan Murder Case?
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/10/who-really-solved-the-mary-phagan-murder-case/

Did Leo Frank Confess to the Murder of Mary Phagan?
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/09/did-leo-frank-confess/

Atlanta Constitution Newspaper (1913 – 1915):
http://archive.org/details/LeoFrankCaseInTheAtlantaConstitutionNewspaper1913To1915

Atlanta Georgian Newspaper (April – August, 1913):
http://archive.org/details/AtlantaGeorgianNewspaperAprilToAugust1913

Atlanta Journal Newspaper (April – August, 1913):
http://archive.org/details/AtlantaJournalApril281913toAugust311913

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April 26, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, B'nai B'rith, Jews, John de Nugent, Ku Klux Klan, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

PBS Documentary Asks: Is It OK To Joke About The Holocaust? 04 … – MediaPost Communications

You can be excused if you have never pondered the question posed by this new PBS documentary titled The Last Laugh.

This documentary — premiering Monday night as part of the ongoing Independent Lens series of documentary films — explores whether or not it should be OK for comedians to joke about the Holocaust.

My first reaction to this concept as the underpinning of an entire 90-minute documentary was to wonder why this question is being asked in the first place.

With all of the subjects — touchy or otherwise — that people talk about today, the question of the Holocaust as stand-up comedy material is a subject that no one seems to be raising these days.

And yet, heres an entire documentary on this subject that seems to have left no comedy stone unturned in its pursuit of the answer to this question.

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Which is to say: If this question is meaningful or important for you, then you will likely never encounter a more thorough and comprehensive examination of this issue in your entire life.

The director, Ferne Pearlstein, has done a remarkable job wrangling interviews with comedians, Holocaust survivors and others who delve into every possible facet of this issue.

In addition, no TV show, movie or stand-up comedy routine in which Nazis and/or the Holocaust are mentioned seems to be omitted.

If you are expecting an examination such as this one to touch on everything from The Producers (the original movie from 1968) and Hogans Heroes (TVs most notorious sitcom about life in a Nazi prison camp — and the only such show that was ever made with this setting) to Life is Beautiful (the Italian Holocaust comedy from 1998), then you wont be disappointed.

Theyre all discussed here, along with just about every Holocaust joke that ever popped into the public consciousness.

There arent that many of these, but as this documentary points out, two female comedians — Sarah Silverman and Joan Rivers — were not shy about including comedic observations about the Holocaust in their routines.

Silverman is among those interviewed in the documentary. Joan Rivers is not, probably because this film was put together after her death in 2014.

The list of interviewees is long. From the world of comedy, they include Mel Brooks (pictured above), Carl Reiner, Rob Reiner, Jeffrey Ross, Gilbert Gottfried, Larry Charles (director pf many Seinfeld episodes and director of Borat and other movies), David Steinberg, Judy Gold, Lisa Lampanelli, Harry Shearer and others.

One entertainer who was interviewed stands out because he is a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp who later went on to star as a cast member on Hogans Heroes — the actor Robert Clary.

The filmmaker made a great effort to balance the various opinions with those of real Holocaust survivors, including Abraham Foxman, long-time national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

To fill its 90-minute length, the documentary devolves at times into a discussion of all comedy generally, with particular attention paid to Lenny Bruce and the controversial material he wrote and performed about ethnic groups that liberally used slang terms for various minority groups (as they were called in the 1060s).

In this documentary, various examples of profanity are bleeped out. But the n-word is not, particularly as it comes up in routines ranging from Bruces stand-up act to The Chappelle Show.

With the interviewees coming at the subject from a variety of angles, the documentarys central question is not answered definitively. Nor does it have to be.

For example, Abraham Foxman doesnt appreciate Holocaust jokes from the likes of Rivers, Silverman and Sasha Baron Cohen because he thinks the jokes help sustain anti-Semitic stereotypes. In the film, Foxman blames Jack Benny for propagating the myth of the cheap Jew.

Many of the comedians agree that jokes about Hitler and Nazis are OK, but jokes specifically about the Holocaust are not.

Anything I could do to deflate Germans, I did, says Mel Brooks.

The Holocaust itself is not funny, says Rob Reiner. Theres nothing funny about it. But survival and what it takes to survive — there can be humor in that.

Even Robert Clary, who was the only Holocaust survivor among the 13 members of his immediate family, understands the power of comedy, even in the most dire of circumstances. Says he: You have to have a sense of humor.

Independent Lens: The Last Laugh premieres Monday night (April 24) at 10 Eastern on PBS (airdate and airtime might vary; check local listings).

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PBS Documentary Asks: Is It OK To Joke About The Holocaust? 04 … – MediaPost Communications

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Top American Jewish Leader: US Military Strike Against Assad Regime Air Base ‘Both the Obvious and Necessary … – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Top American Jewish Leader: US Military Strike Against Assad Regime Air Base Both the Obvious and Necessary Thing to Do” to a friend

The USS Porter, from which Tomahawk missiles were launched into Syria on Thursday night. Photo: US Navy via Wikimedia Commons.

The US missile strike against a military air base in Syria on Thursday night was both the obvious and necessary thing to do following the suspected use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime earlier this week, a top American Jewish leader told The Algemeiner.

Its time that America starts standing up and giving expression to things that we say, Malcolm Hoenlein the executive vice chairman and CEO of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations said.I think that many countries in the Middle East will welcome the fact the United States is intervening. They wanted to see an active America back in the region.

The fact that we did not do it when we should have, when [former] President [Barack] Obama decided not act in 2013, sent a message that we had disengaged, Hoenlein continued. As one Arab leader said, You vanished without saying goodbye. So in that sense, I think what happened yesterday sent an important message. Its also an important message to Iran and Russia and their allies Hezbollah and other terrorist organizations in Syria.

April 9, 2017 11:53 pm

Now the question is is there a plan, something more comprehensive, that goes with this? Hoenlein asked.

In a statement published late Thursday night, Rabbis MarvinHierand AbrahamCooper the dean and associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said, We support the presidents action taken directly against the base that launched the poison gas attacks against innocent Syrian civilians including women and children. This sends a clear message that when crimes against humanity are committed, words alone are never sufficient.

On Friday, the Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) praised President Donald Trump for his decision to hit the Assad regime.

The RJC strongly supports last nights strikesagainst the Syrian military targets in response to the horrific chemical attacks by Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, RJC Executive DirectorMatt Brooks said in a statement. We want tothank the members and the families of the US Armed Forces who carried out last nights attack. This response has made it clear to the world that the United States will not sit by as Assad brutally slaughters innocent civilians. President Trump made the right, moral choice in responding to this reprehensible chemical attack, and he deserves our support.

American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris stated, The US action is a wake-up call to the international community that endless words of anguish and protest are not nearly enough in the face of an ongoing crisis of this magnitude. While it remains to be seen what the US strategy will be, it is heartening to witness President Trump show leadership, strength, and resolve, and, in doing so, gain the support of so many in the international community.

Former Anti-Defamation League (ADL) chief Abraham Foxman told Jewish Insiderthat Trump did the right thing.

It is finally a significant gesture on behalf of the innocent victims of hate, he was quoted as saying. If only it had happened against Auschwitz or Treblinka. This act will not put an end to all the hate and death. But it is a welcome message and hopefully a new beginning.

Read more here:

Top American Jewish Leader: US Military Strike Against Assad Regime Air Base ‘Both the Obvious and Necessary … – Algemeiner

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April 10, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – thejewishchronicle.net

The American-Israeli teenager arrested on suspicion of making over 100 bomb threats to American JCCs leaves court in Rishon Lezion, Israel. (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

It appears the groups were wrong.

The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right.

Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric.

The ADL has repeatedly charged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semites and far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals.

In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews.

But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager.

He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing.

Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and is being held.

The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Juan Thompson is a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convoluted vendetta against a former romantic partner.

ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said after the arrest that the organization stands by its prognosis of a surge in anti-Semitism and hatred in the U.S. since the campaign. Aside from the JCC bombings, Greenblatt pointed to a range of other hateful activities tied to white supremacists, from abuse of journalists on Twitter and harassment of Jews in Whitefish, Mont., to a South Carolina man who plotted a mass shooting at a synagogue.

The impact is still the same: Youve got children, families, the elderly, teens and others who have been terrorized by these attacks, Greenblatt said. Weve seen rising levels of bigotry in ways that are brand new. The emergence of the alt-right and the rising levels of abuse they perpetrated during the campaign against Jews and other minorities is despicable.

The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated.

The JCC Association of North America said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking.

Greenblatt and Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, both said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats.

What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, Goldenberg said. I do understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort.

For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions.

Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman said. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. … I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions.

Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus.

It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be.

Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America.

Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate.

Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism.

Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

Here is the original post:

Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – thejewishchronicle.net

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April 3, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Trump Ally Alex Jones Attacks "The Jewish Press" For Reporting On His "Jewish Mafia" Commentary – Media Matters for America (blog)


Media Matters for America (blog)
Trump Ally Alex Jones Attacks "The Jewish Press" For Reporting On His "Jewish Mafia" Commentary
Media Matters for America (blog)
Then-Anti-Defamation League Executive Director Abraham Foxman called those claims completely inappropriate, offensive, and horrific, explaining that to hold a young boy responsible for what was going on around him during the Holocaust as part of a …

and more »

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Trump Ally Alex Jones Attacks "The Jewish Press" For Reporting On His "Jewish Mafia" Commentary – Media Matters for America (blog)

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April 1, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Bomb threats arrest shows perils of assumptions – jewishpresspinellas

By BEN SALES JTA news service

NEW YORK Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year.

It appears the groups were wrong.

The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli-American, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right.

But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, the teen-age suspect suffers from mental illness.

He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing.

Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-yearold suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday, March 23. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30.

The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convoluted vendetta against a former romantic partner.

ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt told JTA that the organization stands by its prognosis of a surge in anti-Semitism and hatred in the U.S. since the campaign. Aside from the JCC bombings, Greenblatt pointed to a range of other hateful activities tied to white supremacists, from abuse of journalists on Twitter and harassment of Jews in Whitefish, MT, to a South Carolina man who plotted a mass shooting at a synagogue.

The impact is still the same: Youve got children, families, the elderly, teens and others who have been terrorized by these attacks, Greenblatt said. Weve seen rising levels of bigotry in ways that are brand new. The emergence of the alt-right and the rising levels of abuse they perpetrated during the campaign against Jews and other minorities is despicable.

Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated.

The JCC Association of North America said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking.

Greenblatt and Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, both said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats.

What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, Goldenberg said. I do understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort.

For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions.

Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. … I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions.

Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus.

It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be.

Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America.

Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate.

Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently – the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that the May 23 arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism.

Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

See the article here:

Bomb threats arrest shows perils of assumptions – jewishpresspinellas

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March 30, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Jewish bomb threatener undermines groups’ narrative on Trump-related anti-Semitism – The Jewish Standard

Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year.

It appears the groups were wrong.

The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right.

Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric.

The ADL has repeatedlycharged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semitesand far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals.

In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews.

But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager.

He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing.

Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30.

The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convolutedvendetta against a former romantic partner.

The ADL responded to the Israeli teens arrest with a mix of relief and caution along with a hint of defensiveness. The organization welcomed the news that JCC patrons among them preschoolers and senior citizens would no longer have to be evacuated and fear for their safety. But its statement said that despite the suspects profile, anti-Semitism in America is still a problem.

These were acts of anti-Semitism, the statement said, adding that anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a very serious concern. No arrests have been made in three cemetery desecrations or a series of other anti-Semitic incidents involving swastika graffiti and hate fliers. JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant.

The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated.

The JCCAssociationofNorthAmerica said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking.

Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats.

What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, he said. Ido understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort.

For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said Thursday that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions.

Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions.

Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus.

It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be.

Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America.

Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate.

Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism.

Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

See the original post here:

Jewish bomb threatener undermines groups’ narrative on Trump-related anti-Semitism – The Jewish Standard

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March 26, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – Cleveland Jewish News

NEW YORK Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year.

It appears the groups were wrong.

The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right.

Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric.

The ADL has repeatedlycharged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semitesand far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals.

In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews.

But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager.

He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing.

Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30.

The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convolutedvendetta against a former romantic partner.

The ADL responded to the Israeli teens arrest with a mix of relief and caution along with a hint of defensiveness. The organization welcomed the news that JCC patrons among them preschoolers and senior citizens would no longer have to be evacuated and fear for their safety. But its statement said that despite the suspects profile, anti-Semitism in America is still a problem.

These were acts of anti-Semitism, the statement said, adding that anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a very serious concern. No arrests have been made in three cemetery desecrations or a series of other anti-Semitic incidents involving swastika graffiti and hate fliers. JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant.

The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated.

The JCCAssociationofNorthAmerica said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking.

Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats.

What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, he said. Ido understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort.

For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said Thursday that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions.

Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions.

Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus.

It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be.

Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America.

Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate.

Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism.

Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

See the rest here:

Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – Cleveland Jewish News

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Movie review: Does humor have limits these days? – San Angelo Standard Times

Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times (TNS) 8:52 p.m. CT March 17, 2017

Mel Brooks interviewed in “The Last Laugh.”(Photo: PBS, TNS)

At times haphazard but always involving, The Last Laugh confronts a question that sounds anachronistic in todays anything-goes world: Are there any taboos remaining in humor, areas where making jokes is simply beyond the pale?

Though documentarian Ferne Pearlstein (who photographed and edited as well as directed) deals briefly with potentially forbidden areas like 9/11 and even child molestation (the subject of a Louis CK routine), most of the film focuses on jokes about Hitler and the Holocaust, a subject that elicits as many opinions and jokes as there are interview subjects.

Those speaking up include Larry Charles involved in everything from Seinfeld to the features of Sacha Baron Cohen and Israeli novelist Etgar Keret, the son a Holocaust survivor, who notes that humor is the weapon of the weak.

One of the most involving voices in the film turns out to be that of Mel Brooks, whose vision of Hitler on Ice from History of the World, Part I opens the film.

Though Brooks can be antic he drops quickly into a Hitler imitation and then notes he could do Stalin, but (Hiitler) is the guy who made me money, so I stay with him he also has some thoughtful things to say about why he can do Hitler jokes but not ones about the Holocaust.

Rob Reiner agrees. Survival can be funny, he says, but the Holocaust itself is not funny.

In one of the films funnier bits, Reiner and Gilbert Gottfried alternate lines in a joke about what happens when two Jews are sent to assassinate Hitler.

Most comics feel that the passage of time makes even the most tragic events, like the Spanish Inquisition, a Brooks target, acceptable for comedy.

Brooks relates that he had originally wanted to call The Producers Springtime for Hitler, but distributor Joseph E. Levine told him, I cant put that on a marquee. Though the title seems tame today, Harry Shearer says imagining Springtime for Saddam Hussein after 9/11 would give you an idea of its effect at the time.

The Last Laugh is at its best when its people are telling jokes, often ones in which the Holocaust is involved. Theres Baron Cohen in country-western mode singing throw the Jew down the well, Sarah Silverman ending a skit with Auschwitz? Youll say Wowschwitz and Larry David focusing a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode on a dinner-party battle between a Holocaust survivor and a contestant on the TV show Survivor.

Perhaps the most savage, and most unapologetic, comic in this area was Joan Rivers. Her take-no-prisoners humor included showing a picture of Heidi Klum and saying, The last time a German looked this hot was when they were pushing Jews into ovens and complaining about a botched Mercedes repair: The Germans killed 6 million Jews; you cant fix a carburetor.

Getting the most divided response was Roberto Benignis Oscar-winning Holocaust comedy Life Is Beautiful, with former director of the Anti-Defamation League Abraham Foxman calling it brilliant and Brooks unhesitatingly describing it as the worst movie ever made.

Less involving than this kind of spirited back-and-forth is time spent with Holocaust survivor Renee Firestone, whose ideas about and memories of humor in Auschwitz feel like they come from a different movie.

Given how much has happened since his heyday, its interesting that The Last Laugh puts in a plug for Lenny Bruce as the most shocking comedian ever. As David Steinberg points out, he was the only one who actually was put in prison for the jokes he told.

THE LAST LAUGH

Not rated

Running time: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Read or Share this story: http://www.gosanangelo.com/story/entertainment/movies/2017/03/17/movie-review-does-humor-have-limits-these-days/99336144/

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Movie review: Does humor have limits these days? – San Angelo Standard Times

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The Leo Frank Jewish Sex Murder Criminal Case and Post-Trial Lynching: The Rape and Strangulation of Mary Phagan and Meticulous Leo Frank Trial Analysis at the American Mercury.

These are the most hateful articles ever written about the Leo Frank case, how dare they say he was guilty. Please pressure their ISP to shut down The American Mercury, before these articles get copied to other websites and shared around the world. This hate must be stopped. The Astounding Alonzo Mann Hoax and Jewish […]

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April 26, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, B'nai B'rith, Jews, John de Nugent, Ku Klux Klan, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

PBS Documentary Asks: Is It OK To Joke About The Holocaust? 04 … – MediaPost Communications

You can be excused if you have never pondered the question posed by this new PBS documentary titled The Last Laugh. This documentary — premiering Monday night as part of the ongoing Independent Lens series of documentary films — explores whether or not it should be OK for comedians to joke about the Holocaust. My first reaction to this concept as the underpinning of an entire 90-minute documentary was to wonder why this question is being asked in the first place. With all of the subjects — touchy or otherwise — that people talk about today, the question of the Holocaust as stand-up comedy material is a subject that no one seems to be raising these days. And yet, heres an entire documentary on this subject that seems to have left no comedy stone unturned in its pursuit of the answer to this question. advertisement advertisement Which is to say: If this question is meaningful or important for you, then you will likely never encounter a more thorough and comprehensive examination of this issue in your entire life. The director, Ferne Pearlstein, has done a remarkable job wrangling interviews with comedians, Holocaust survivors and others who delve into every possible facet of this issue. In addition, no TV show, movie or stand-up comedy routine in which Nazis and/or the Holocaust are mentioned seems to be omitted. If you are expecting an examination such as this one to touch on everything from The Producers (the original movie from 1968) and Hogans Heroes (TVs most notorious sitcom about life in a Nazi prison camp — and the only such show that was ever made with this setting) to Life is Beautiful (the Italian Holocaust comedy from 1998), then you wont be disappointed. Theyre all discussed here, along with just about every Holocaust joke that ever popped into the public consciousness. There arent that many of these, but as this documentary points out, two female comedians — Sarah Silverman and Joan Rivers — were not shy about including comedic observations about the Holocaust in their routines. Silverman is among those interviewed in the documentary. Joan Rivers is not, probably because this film was put together after her death in 2014. The list of interviewees is long. From the world of comedy, they include Mel Brooks (pictured above), Carl Reiner, Rob Reiner, Jeffrey Ross, Gilbert Gottfried, Larry Charles (director pf many Seinfeld episodes and director of Borat and other movies), David Steinberg, Judy Gold, Lisa Lampanelli, Harry Shearer and others. One entertainer who was interviewed stands out because he is a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp who later went on to star as a cast member on Hogans Heroes — the actor Robert Clary. The filmmaker made a great effort to balance the various opinions with those of real Holocaust survivors, including Abraham Foxman, long-time national director of the Anti-Defamation League. To fill its 90-minute length, the documentary devolves at times into a discussion of all comedy generally, with particular attention paid to Lenny Bruce and the controversial material he wrote and performed about ethnic groups that liberally used slang terms for various minority groups (as they were called in the 1060s). In this documentary, various examples of profanity are bleeped out. But the n-word is not, particularly as it comes up in routines ranging from Bruces stand-up act to The Chappelle Show. With the interviewees coming at the subject from a variety of angles, the documentarys central question is not answered definitively. Nor does it have to be. For example, Abraham Foxman doesnt appreciate Holocaust jokes from the likes of Rivers, Silverman and Sasha Baron Cohen because he thinks the jokes help sustain anti-Semitic stereotypes. In the film, Foxman blames Jack Benny for propagating the myth of the cheap Jew. Many of the comedians agree that jokes about Hitler and Nazis are OK, but jokes specifically about the Holocaust are not. Anything I could do to deflate Germans, I did, says Mel Brooks. The Holocaust itself is not funny, says Rob Reiner. Theres nothing funny about it. But survival and what it takes to survive — there can be humor in that. Even Robert Clary, who was the only Holocaust survivor among the 13 members of his immediate family, understands the power of comedy, even in the most dire of circumstances. Says he: You have to have a sense of humor. Independent Lens: The Last Laugh premieres Monday night (April 24) at 10 Eastern on PBS (airdate and airtime might vary; check local listings).

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Top American Jewish Leader: US Military Strike Against Assad Regime Air Base ‘Both the Obvious and Necessary … – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Top American Jewish Leader: US Military Strike Against Assad Regime Air Base Both the Obvious and Necessary Thing to Do” to a friend The USS Porter, from which Tomahawk missiles were launched into Syria on Thursday night. Photo: US Navy via Wikimedia Commons. The US missile strike against a military air base in Syria on Thursday night was both the obvious and necessary thing to do following the suspected use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime earlier this week, a top American Jewish leader told The Algemeiner. Its time that America starts standing up and giving expression to things that we say, Malcolm Hoenlein the executive vice chairman and CEO of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations said.I think that many countries in the Middle East will welcome the fact the United States is intervening. They wanted to see an active America back in the region. The fact that we did not do it when we should have, when [former] President [Barack] Obama decided not act in 2013, sent a message that we had disengaged, Hoenlein continued. As one Arab leader said, You vanished without saying goodbye. So in that sense, I think what happened yesterday sent an important message. Its also an important message to Iran and Russia and their allies Hezbollah and other terrorist organizations in Syria. April 9, 2017 11:53 pm Now the question is is there a plan, something more comprehensive, that goes with this? Hoenlein asked. In a statement published late Thursday night, Rabbis MarvinHierand AbrahamCooper the dean and associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said, We support the presidents action taken directly against the base that launched the poison gas attacks against innocent Syrian civilians including women and children. This sends a clear message that when crimes against humanity are committed, words alone are never sufficient. On Friday, the Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) praised President Donald Trump for his decision to hit the Assad regime. The RJC strongly supports last nights strikesagainst the Syrian military targets in response to the horrific chemical attacks by Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, RJC Executive DirectorMatt Brooks said in a statement. We want tothank the members and the families of the US Armed Forces who carried out last nights attack. This response has made it clear to the world that the United States will not sit by as Assad brutally slaughters innocent civilians. President Trump made the right, moral choice in responding to this reprehensible chemical attack, and he deserves our support. American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris stated, The US action is a wake-up call to the international community that endless words of anguish and protest are not nearly enough in the face of an ongoing crisis of this magnitude. While it remains to be seen what the US strategy will be, it is heartening to witness President Trump show leadership, strength, and resolve, and, in doing so, gain the support of so many in the international community. Former Anti-Defamation League (ADL) chief Abraham Foxman told Jewish Insiderthat Trump did the right thing. It is finally a significant gesture on behalf of the innocent victims of hate, he was quoted as saying. If only it had happened against Auschwitz or Treblinka. This act will not put an end to all the hate and death. But it is a welcome message and hopefully a new beginning.

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Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – thejewishchronicle.net

The American-Israeli teenager arrested on suspicion of making over 100 bomb threats to American JCCs leaves court in Rishon Lezion, Israel. (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images) It appears the groups were wrong. The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right. Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric. The ADL has repeatedly charged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semites and far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals. In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews. But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager. He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing. Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and is being held. The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Juan Thompson is a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convoluted vendetta against a former romantic partner. ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said after the arrest that the organization stands by its prognosis of a surge in anti-Semitism and hatred in the U.S. since the campaign. Aside from the JCC bombings, Greenblatt pointed to a range of other hateful activities tied to white supremacists, from abuse of journalists on Twitter and harassment of Jews in Whitefish, Mont., to a South Carolina man who plotted a mass shooting at a synagogue. The impact is still the same: Youve got children, families, the elderly, teens and others who have been terrorized by these attacks, Greenblatt said. Weve seen rising levels of bigotry in ways that are brand new. The emergence of the alt-right and the rising levels of abuse they perpetrated during the campaign against Jews and other minorities is despicable. The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated. The JCC Association of North America said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking. Greenblatt and Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, both said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats. What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, Goldenberg said. I do understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort. For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions. Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman said. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. … I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions. Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus. It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be. Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America. Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate. Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism. Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

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Trump Ally Alex Jones Attacks "The Jewish Press" For Reporting On His "Jewish Mafia" Commentary – Media Matters for America (blog)

Media Matters for America (blog) Trump Ally Alex Jones Attacks "The Jewish Press" For Reporting On His "Jewish Mafia" Commentary Media Matters for America (blog) Then-Anti-Defamation League Executive Director Abraham Foxman called those claims completely inappropriate, offensive, and horrific, explaining that to hold a young boy responsible for what was going on around him during the Holocaust as part of a … and more »

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April 1, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Bomb threats arrest shows perils of assumptions – jewishpresspinellas

By BEN SALES JTA news service NEW YORK Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year. It appears the groups were wrong. The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli-American, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right. But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, the teen-age suspect suffers from mental illness. He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing. Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-yearold suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday, March 23. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30. The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convoluted vendetta against a former romantic partner. ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt told JTA that the organization stands by its prognosis of a surge in anti-Semitism and hatred in the U.S. since the campaign. Aside from the JCC bombings, Greenblatt pointed to a range of other hateful activities tied to white supremacists, from abuse of journalists on Twitter and harassment of Jews in Whitefish, MT, to a South Carolina man who plotted a mass shooting at a synagogue. The impact is still the same: Youve got children, families, the elderly, teens and others who have been terrorized by these attacks, Greenblatt said. Weve seen rising levels of bigotry in ways that are brand new. The emergence of the alt-right and the rising levels of abuse they perpetrated during the campaign against Jews and other minorities is despicable. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated. The JCC Association of North America said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking. Greenblatt and Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, both said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats. What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, Goldenberg said. I do understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort. For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions. Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. … I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions. Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus. It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be. Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America. Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate. Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently – the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that the May 23 arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism. Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

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March 30, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Jewish bomb threatener undermines groups’ narrative on Trump-related anti-Semitism – The Jewish Standard

Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year. It appears the groups were wrong. The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right. Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric. The ADL has repeatedlycharged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semitesand far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals. In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews. But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager. He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing. Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30. The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convolutedvendetta against a former romantic partner. The ADL responded to the Israeli teens arrest with a mix of relief and caution along with a hint of defensiveness. The organization welcomed the news that JCC patrons among them preschoolers and senior citizens would no longer have to be evacuated and fear for their safety. But its statement said that despite the suspects profile, anti-Semitism in America is still a problem. These were acts of anti-Semitism, the statement said, adding that anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a very serious concern. No arrests have been made in three cemetery desecrations or a series of other anti-Semitic incidents involving swastika graffiti and hate fliers. JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant. The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated. The JCCAssociationofNorthAmerica said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking. Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats. What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, he said. Ido understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort. For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said Thursday that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions. Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions. Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus. It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be. Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America. Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate. Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism. Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

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March 26, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman  Comments Closed

Jewish bomb threat suspect undermines groups’ narrative on anti-Semitism – Cleveland Jewish News

NEW YORK Many Jewish groups blamed white supremacists, emboldened by Donald Trumps campaign, for the bomb threats that have plagued Jewish institutions since the beginning of this year. It appears the groups were wrong. The news that one Jewish teen an Israeli, no less was behind most of the approximately 150 bomb threats that have hit Jewish community centers since the start of 2017 is a shocking twist in light of months in which the Anti-Defamation League and other groups pointed their collective finger at the far right. Were in unprecedented times, said Oren Segal, director of the ADLs Center on Extremism, at a March 10 news conference on the bomb threats. Weve never seen, ever, the volume of bomb threats that weve seen. White supremacists in this country feel more emboldened than they ever have before because of the public discourse and divisive rhetoric. The ADL has repeatedlycharged Trump with emboldening extremists, anti-Semitesand far-right groups in the U.S. Other groups were even more explicit in linking rising anti-Semitic acts this year to the new president. On Jan. 10, following the first wave of JCC bomb threats, Bend The Arc, a liberal Jewish group, said that Trump helped to create the atmosphere of bigotry and violence that has resulted in these dangerous threats against Jewish institutions and individuals. In February, the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said in a statement to Trump that Rightly or wrongly, the most vicious anti-Semites in America are looking at you and your Administration as a nationalistic movement granting them permission to attack Jews. But the perpetrator of the anti-Semitic acts, while his political opinions are not known, does not fit the profile of a white supremacist. According to Israeli reports, hes a mentally ill Israeli-American Jewish teenager. He worked from home, using a computer lab with sophisticated equipment, encryption and transmission systems, and a powerful antenna, according to reports. And his father may have known what he was doing. Israels anti-fraud squad arrested the 19-year-old suspect at his home in southern Israel and searched the premises on Thursday. He was brought to court and ordered held until March 30. The other suspect in the bomb threats, arrested earlier in March, also does not appear connected to the far right. Hes a left-wing African-American former journalist who apparently made the calls in a convolutedvendetta against a former romantic partner. The ADL responded to the Israeli teens arrest with a mix of relief and caution along with a hint of defensiveness. The organization welcomed the news that JCC patrons among them preschoolers and senior citizens would no longer have to be evacuated and fear for their safety. But its statement said that despite the suspects profile, anti-Semitism in America is still a problem. These were acts of anti-Semitism, the statement said, adding that anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a very serious concern. No arrests have been made in three cemetery desecrations or a series of other anti-Semitic incidents involving swastika graffiti and hate fliers. JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant. The Anne Frank Center, a small group whose profile has risen in part due to the attention around the JCC threats, said in a statement Thursday that it doesnt matter where any suspect is from or what his or her background is. Bend The Arc CEO Stosh Cotler said in a statement: Violence and threats of violence, whoever or wherever they come from, are unacceptable and cannot be tolerated. The JCCAssociationofNorthAmerica said it was troubled by the news that the suspect is Jewish, while the Jewish Federations of North America called the news heartbreaking. Paul Goldenberg, director of the Secure Community Network, which advises Jewish groups and institutions on security, said the suspects age and location were less relevant than the fact that someone has been caught for making the threats. What is relevant is that an individual or individuals were placed into custody who were engaged in or involved in criminal behavior, who were looking to terrorize our community, he said. Ido understand why people may have believed that this was part of a larger effort. For longtime observers of anti-Semitism, the news showed the need to be cautious when analyzing hateful acts. Former ADL National Director Abraham Foxman, who has previously called for cooler heads in responding to recent hateful acts, said Thursday that the arrest shows the pitfalls of making assumptions. Always take these things seriously, but dont jump to conclusions, Foxman told JTA. History has taught us the source of anti-Semitism does not come from one direction. Its universal in its nature. I think it is on the increase, but its not in epidemic proportions. Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, noted that this isnt the first time that Jews have committed anti-Semitic acts. In 1989, the former president of the Jewish Student Union at the State University of New York in Binghamton was charged with painting anti-Semitic slogans on campus. It is a reminder that we have to be very careful before we talk about a whole wave of anti-Semitism, Sarna said. Something like this will surely make everybody a little embarrassed as Jews, but also embarrassed in the sense that its not what people imagined it would turn out to be. Sarna added that this incident shows Jews may not be as hated in America as it may have seemed. He cited a recent study by the Pew Research Center showing Jews to be the most popular religious group in America. Its good to take a middle ground, he said. Yes, there are people who hate Jews, but were not seeing storm troopers at the gate. Still, Sarna and Foxman noted the string of other anti-Semitic acts recently the cemetery desecrations and swastika graffiti, as well as a deluge of anti-Semitic harassment on Twitter last year. Because anti-Semitic acts, beyond the JCC threats, remain frequent in the U.S., Foxman does not believe that Thursdays arrest will lead to anyone downplaying future acts of anti-Semitism. Its there, Foxman said of anti-Semitism. So theres one guy who, whatever his problem was, that doesnt change the fact that every day there are incidents of anti-Semitism in this country.

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Movie review: Does humor have limits these days? – San Angelo Standard Times

Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times (TNS) 8:52 p.m. CT March 17, 2017 Mel Brooks interviewed in “The Last Laugh.”(Photo: PBS, TNS) At times haphazard but always involving, The Last Laugh confronts a question that sounds anachronistic in todays anything-goes world: Are there any taboos remaining in humor, areas where making jokes is simply beyond the pale? Though documentarian Ferne Pearlstein (who photographed and edited as well as directed) deals briefly with potentially forbidden areas like 9/11 and even child molestation (the subject of a Louis CK routine), most of the film focuses on jokes about Hitler and the Holocaust, a subject that elicits as many opinions and jokes as there are interview subjects. Those speaking up include Larry Charles involved in everything from Seinfeld to the features of Sacha Baron Cohen and Israeli novelist Etgar Keret, the son a Holocaust survivor, who notes that humor is the weapon of the weak. One of the most involving voices in the film turns out to be that of Mel Brooks, whose vision of Hitler on Ice from History of the World, Part I opens the film. Though Brooks can be antic he drops quickly into a Hitler imitation and then notes he could do Stalin, but (Hiitler) is the guy who made me money, so I stay with him he also has some thoughtful things to say about why he can do Hitler jokes but not ones about the Holocaust. Rob Reiner agrees. Survival can be funny, he says, but the Holocaust itself is not funny. In one of the films funnier bits, Reiner and Gilbert Gottfried alternate lines in a joke about what happens when two Jews are sent to assassinate Hitler. Most comics feel that the passage of time makes even the most tragic events, like the Spanish Inquisition, a Brooks target, acceptable for comedy. Brooks relates that he had originally wanted to call The Producers Springtime for Hitler, but distributor Joseph E. Levine told him, I cant put that on a marquee. Though the title seems tame today, Harry Shearer says imagining Springtime for Saddam Hussein after 9/11 would give you an idea of its effect at the time. The Last Laugh is at its best when its people are telling jokes, often ones in which the Holocaust is involved. Theres Baron Cohen in country-western mode singing throw the Jew down the well, Sarah Silverman ending a skit with Auschwitz? Youll say Wowschwitz and Larry David focusing a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode on a dinner-party battle between a Holocaust survivor and a contestant on the TV show Survivor. Perhaps the most savage, and most unapologetic, comic in this area was Joan Rivers. Her take-no-prisoners humor included showing a picture of Heidi Klum and saying, The last time a German looked this hot was when they were pushing Jews into ovens and complaining about a botched Mercedes repair: The Germans killed 6 million Jews; you cant fix a carburetor. Getting the most divided response was Roberto Benignis Oscar-winning Holocaust comedy Life Is Beautiful, with former director of the Anti-Defamation League Abraham Foxman calling it brilliant and Brooks unhesitatingly describing it as the worst movie ever made. Less involving than this kind of spirited back-and-forth is time spent with Holocaust survivor Renee Firestone, whose ideas about and memories of humor in Auschwitz feel like they come from a different movie. Given how much has happened since his heyday, its interesting that The Last Laugh puts in a plug for Lenny Bruce as the most shocking comedian ever. As David Steinberg points out, he was the only one who actually was put in prison for the jokes he told. THE LAST LAUGH Not rated Running time: 1 hour, 25 minutes Read or Share this story: http://www.gosanangelo.com/story/entertainment/movies/2017/03/17/movie-review-does-humor-have-limits-these-days/99336144/

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