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Al Sharpton; You are the problem! – Video



Al Sharpton; You are the problem!
Black people aren't victims. Stop treating them that way!

By: CJ Pearson

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Al Sharpton; You are the problem! – Video

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Rev. Al Sharpton Expected to Visit North Charleston

During a sermon at a North Charleston church, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday that swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

“It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.”

The tone of the local community’s response to the shooting death of Walter Scott, 50, has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri after Michael Brown’s death.

Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at a later vigil at the grassy vacant lot where Scott was shot to death.

The shooting was captured on dramatic video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

Some North Charleston community members said they suspect abuse of power and the abuse of public trust played more of a role than race in the shooting.

“It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice, we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.”

The chants, hymns and calls for more police accountability during small rallies in North Charleston have echoed those in Ferguson, Missouri.

However, many in the North Charleston area have said they don’t want to see the burned-out buildings, broken windows and social tension that characterized Ferguson after Brown’s shooting and the announcement that a grand jury wouldn’t indict the officer who shot him.

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Rev. Al Sharpton Expected to Visit North Charleston

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Rev. Al Sharpton expected to make visit to North …

April 12, 2015: The Rev. Al Sharpton, right, speaks during a service at Charity Missionary Baptist Church in the wake of the death of Walter Scott, the black driver who was fatally shot by a white police officer after he fled a traffic stop, in North Charleston, S.C.(AP)

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. The Rev. Al Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston on Sunday for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott.

Sharpton gave the sermon at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation. Later, he led a vigil for a small crowd in the grassy, fenced-in area where Scott, 50, was fatally shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4.

Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but witness video later surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scott’s death was criticized as another police shooting of an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. In Sharpton’s commendation of the city’s response, he said the mayor and police chief’s swift action could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

Despite the city’s response and Sharpton’s praise, there’s still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scott’s death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video.

“The mayor and the chief, they did what they had to do because none of us are blind,” Keith White, 60, of North Charleston, said before the church service. “Everyone saw the video and they did what they were forced to do once that video became public.”

The response by city officials and the local community hasn’t been similar to that of Ferguson, Missouri, where protests after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and a grand jury’s decision not to indict the officer who shot him turned violent and exposed striking social rifts between black and white residents in the area.

Some North Charleston residents have said they suspect abuse of power and public trust among law enforcement as issues that may have played a more pivotal role than race in Scott’s death.

“It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach Sunday. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.”

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Rev. Al Sharpton expected to make visit to North …

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Sharpton urges unity, praises S.C. mayor

Rev. Al Sharpton speaking at Charity Baptist Church. WCSC

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity during a vigil at the site where 50-year-old Walter Scott was fatally shot by a North Charleston police officer.

A small crowd assembled Sunday afternoon under cloudy skies in the grassy, fenced-in area to pray for Scott, his family and for justice.

Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4. Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his stun gun, but witness video surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Other speakers at the vigil urged the crowd to attend an upcoming meeting at the South Carolina Capitol about a bill proposing body cameras for officers in the state.

Earlier, Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston, South Carolina for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott during his sermon at a local church on Sunday morning.

Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Sharpton appeared at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation.

“What this mayor did is what we’ve asked mayors to do all over the country. Not ‘do us a favor,’ just enforce the law,” Sharpton said, CBS affiliate WCSC reported.

Despite the city’s response and Sharpton’s praise, there’s still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scott’s death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video.

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Sharpton urges unity, praises S.C. mayor

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Al Sharpton on Walter Scott shooting: 'It's not about black and white, it's about right and wrong'

NORTH CHARLESTON (WCSC) – Civil Rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton said the fatal officer-involved shooting of Walter Scott was “not about black and white, it’s about right and wrong.”

The National Action Network president spoke on Sunday morning at the Charity Baptist Church in North Charleston where he commended North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers, who were both in attendance, for the arrest of former police officer Michael Slager in Scott’s death.

“What this mayor did is what we’ve asked mayors to do all over the country. Not ‘do us a favor,’ just enforce the law,” Sharpton said.

Sharpton called for more black officers in the North Charleston Police Department and told church members to not let presidential candidates come to South Carolina without talking about police accountability.

“I didn’t come to start trouble, I came to stop trouble,” Sharpton said.

Sharpton told the congregation that he was not anti-police, but “anti-police brutality” and referenced not only the video which captured Scott’s shooting but other videos involving police that have made national news.

“There’s been videos in other places, and they would not arrest them and charge them,” Sharpton said.”At least in the deep south, now you’ve got a bar that you’ve got to reach all over this country…to quit playing with the law. Either enforce the law or get out of law enforcement.”

Sharpton also addressed the National Bar Association’s announcement that they were seeking the immediate arrest of North Charleston police officer Clarence Habersham who responded to the shooting on the cause that he “left material facts out of his report to police.”

“A man writing false reports, handing it to his superiors should not expect his superiors to cover up for him including a black cop,” Sharpton said.”If they’re lying, you go where the liars go. It’s not about white cop, black cop. It’s not about black and white, it’s about right and wrong.”

According to Sharpton, he was with the family of Michael Brown and Eric Garner when he learned about Walter Scott’s shooting.

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Al Sharpton on Walter Scott shooting: 'It's not about black and white, it's about right and wrong'

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Sharpton leads memorial for shooting victim Walter Scott

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. The Rev. Al Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston on Sunday for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott.

Sharpton gave the sermon at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation. Later, he led a vigil for a small crowd in the grassy, fenced-in area where Scott, 50, was fatally shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4.

Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but witness video later surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scotts death was criticized as another police shooting of an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. In Sharptons commendation of the citys response, he said the mayor and police chiefs swift action could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

Despite the citys response and Sharptons praise, theres still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scotts death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video.

The mayor and the chief, they did what they had to do because none of us are blind, Keith White, 60, of North Charleston said before the church service. Everyone saw the video and they did what they were forced to do once that video became public.

The response by city officials and the local community hasnt been similar to that in Ferguson, Missouri, where protests after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and a grand jurys decision not to indict the officer who shot him turned violent and exposed striking social rifts between black and white residents in the area.

Photo: AP

Its not about the color of your skin, its about social justice. When we all practice social justice, were all free, said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach Sunday. Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and thats whats happening now.

Before concluding his sermon, Sharpton mentioned that South Carolina is an important state in the upcoming presidential race. He charged the congregation with pressing candidates about their stances on community policing.

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Sharpton leads memorial for shooting victim Walter Scott

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Al Sharpton praises response to fatal S.C. police shooting

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) Demonstrators in the North Charleston area say they will press local officials for broader civilian oversight of the citys police force after the shooting death of Walter Scott.

The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity Sunday at a vigil on the grassy vacant lot where Scott, 50, was killed. Other speakers invited people to the state Capitol this week for discussions on proposed legislation on body cameras for officers in the state.

Black Lives Matter leaders said in an open letter that they want people to begin recording police officers as part of a project titled #WeAreWatchingYou.

PHOTOS: Sharpton praises response to fatal SC police shooting

During a sermon at a North Charleston church Sunday morning, Sharpton said swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

Its not about black and white. Its about right and wrong, Sharpton said. What this mayor did is what weve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.

The tone of the local communitys response has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri, after Michael Browns death.

Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers – both of whom were in the congregation and at the vigil.

The shooting was captured on video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scotts death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

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Al Sharpton praises response to fatal S.C. police shooting

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Sharpton praises response to fatal SC police shooting

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C.

Demonstrators in the North Charleston area say they will press local officials for broader civilian oversight of the city’s police force after the shooting death of Walter Scott.

The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity Sunday at a vigil on the grassy vacant lot where Scott, 50, was killed. Other speakers invited people to the state Capitol this week for discussions on proposed legislation on body cameras for officers in the state.

Black Lives Matter leaders said in an open letter that they want people to begin recording police officers as part of a project titled #WeAreWatchingYou.

During a sermon at a North Charleston church Sunday morning, Sharpton said swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

“It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.”

The tone of the local community’s response has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri, after Michael Brown’s death.

Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at the vigil.

The shooting was captured on video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

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Sharpton praises response to fatal SC police shooting

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Sharpton leads service to remember SC police shooting victim

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. During a sermon at a North Charleston church, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday that swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country.

“It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.”

The tone of the local community’s response to the shooting death of Walter Scott, 50, has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri after Michael Brown’s death.

Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at a later vigil at the grassy vacant lot where Scott was shot to death.

The shooting was captured on dramatic video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder.

Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

Some North Charleston community members said they suspect abuse of power and the abuse of public trust played more of a role than race in the shooting.

“It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice, we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.”

The chants, hymns and calls for more police accountability during small rallies in North Charleston have echoed those in Ferguson, Missouri.

However, many in the North Charleston area have said they don’t want to see the burned-out buildings, broken windows and social tension that characterized Ferguson after Brown’s shooting and the announcement that a grand jury wouldn’t indict the officer who shot him.

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Sharpton leads service to remember SC police shooting victim

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Al Sharpton; You are the problem! – Video




Al Sharpton; You are the problem! Black people aren't victims. Stop treating them that way! By: CJ Pearson

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Rev. Al Sharpton Expected to Visit North Charleston

During a sermon at a North Charleston church, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday that swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. “It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.” The tone of the local community’s response to the shooting death of Walter Scott, 50, has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri after Michael Brown’s death. Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at a later vigil at the grassy vacant lot where Scott was shot to death. The shooting was captured on dramatic video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. Some North Charleston community members said they suspect abuse of power and the abuse of public trust played more of a role than race in the shooting. “It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice, we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.” The chants, hymns and calls for more police accountability during small rallies in North Charleston have echoed those in Ferguson, Missouri. However, many in the North Charleston area have said they don’t want to see the burned-out buildings, broken windows and social tension that characterized Ferguson after Brown’s shooting and the announcement that a grand jury wouldn’t indict the officer who shot him.

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Rev. Al Sharpton expected to make visit to North …

April 12, 2015: The Rev. Al Sharpton, right, speaks during a service at Charity Missionary Baptist Church in the wake of the death of Walter Scott, the black driver who was fatally shot by a white police officer after he fled a traffic stop, in North Charleston, S.C.(AP) NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. The Rev. Al Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston on Sunday for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott. Sharpton gave the sermon at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation. Later, he led a vigil for a small crowd in the grassy, fenced-in area where Scott, 50, was fatally shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4. Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but witness video later surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scott’s death was criticized as another police shooting of an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. In Sharpton’s commendation of the city’s response, he said the mayor and police chief’s swift action could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. Despite the city’s response and Sharpton’s praise, there’s still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scott’s death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video. “The mayor and the chief, they did what they had to do because none of us are blind,” Keith White, 60, of North Charleston, said before the church service. “Everyone saw the video and they did what they were forced to do once that video became public.” The response by city officials and the local community hasn’t been similar to that of Ferguson, Missouri, where protests after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and a grand jury’s decision not to indict the officer who shot him turned violent and exposed striking social rifts between black and white residents in the area. Some North Charleston residents have said they suspect abuse of power and public trust among law enforcement as issues that may have played a more pivotal role than race in Scott’s death. “It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach Sunday. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.”

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Sharpton urges unity, praises S.C. mayor

Rev. Al Sharpton speaking at Charity Baptist Church. WCSC NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity during a vigil at the site where 50-year-old Walter Scott was fatally shot by a North Charleston police officer. A small crowd assembled Sunday afternoon under cloudy skies in the grassy, fenced-in area to pray for Scott, his family and for justice. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4. Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his stun gun, but witness video surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Other speakers at the vigil urged the crowd to attend an upcoming meeting at the South Carolina Capitol about a bill proposing body cameras for officers in the state. Earlier, Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston, South Carolina for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott during his sermon at a local church on Sunday morning. Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports Sharpton appeared at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation. “What this mayor did is what we’ve asked mayors to do all over the country. Not ‘do us a favor,’ just enforce the law,” Sharpton said, CBS affiliate WCSC reported. Despite the city’s response and Sharpton’s praise, there’s still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scott’s death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video.

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Al Sharpton on Walter Scott shooting: 'It's not about black and white, it's about right and wrong'

NORTH CHARLESTON (WCSC) – Civil Rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton said the fatal officer-involved shooting of Walter Scott was “not about black and white, it’s about right and wrong.” The National Action Network president spoke on Sunday morning at the Charity Baptist Church in North Charleston where he commended North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers, who were both in attendance, for the arrest of former police officer Michael Slager in Scott’s death. “What this mayor did is what we’ve asked mayors to do all over the country. Not ‘do us a favor,’ just enforce the law,” Sharpton said. Sharpton called for more black officers in the North Charleston Police Department and told church members to not let presidential candidates come to South Carolina without talking about police accountability. “I didn’t come to start trouble, I came to stop trouble,” Sharpton said. Sharpton told the congregation that he was not anti-police, but “anti-police brutality” and referenced not only the video which captured Scott’s shooting but other videos involving police that have made national news. “There’s been videos in other places, and they would not arrest them and charge them,” Sharpton said.”At least in the deep south, now you’ve got a bar that you’ve got to reach all over this country…to quit playing with the law. Either enforce the law or get out of law enforcement.” Sharpton also addressed the National Bar Association’s announcement that they were seeking the immediate arrest of North Charleston police officer Clarence Habersham who responded to the shooting on the cause that he “left material facts out of his report to police.” “A man writing false reports, handing it to his superiors should not expect his superiors to cover up for him including a black cop,” Sharpton said.”If they’re lying, you go where the liars go. It’s not about white cop, black cop. It’s not about black and white, it’s about right and wrong.” According to Sharpton, he was with the family of Michael Brown and Eric Garner when he learned about Walter Scott’s shooting.

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Sharpton leads memorial for shooting victim Walter Scott

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. The Rev. Al Sharpton thanked the mayor and police chief in North Charleston on Sunday for their response to the fatal shooting of Walter Scott. Sharpton gave the sermon at Charity Missionary Baptist Church, where Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers were among those in the congregation. Later, he led a vigil for a small crowd in the grassy, fenced-in area where Scott, 50, was fatally shot after fleeing a traffic stop April 4. Then-officer Michael Slager initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but witness video later surfaced showing Scott being shot as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scotts death was criticized as another police shooting of an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. In Sharptons commendation of the citys response, he said the mayor and police chiefs swift action could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. Despite the citys response and Sharptons praise, theres still a lingering sense of skepticism about whether Scotts death would have been thoroughly investigated without the witness video. The mayor and the chief, they did what they had to do because none of us are blind, Keith White, 60, of North Charleston said before the church service. Everyone saw the video and they did what they were forced to do once that video became public. The response by city officials and the local community hasnt been similar to that in Ferguson, Missouri, where protests after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and a grand jurys decision not to indict the officer who shot him turned violent and exposed striking social rifts between black and white residents in the area. Photo: AP Its not about the color of your skin, its about social justice. When we all practice social justice, were all free, said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach Sunday. Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and thats whats happening now. Before concluding his sermon, Sharpton mentioned that South Carolina is an important state in the upcoming presidential race. He charged the congregation with pressing candidates about their stances on community policing.

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Al Sharpton praises response to fatal S.C. police shooting

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) Demonstrators in the North Charleston area say they will press local officials for broader civilian oversight of the citys police force after the shooting death of Walter Scott. The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity Sunday at a vigil on the grassy vacant lot where Scott, 50, was killed. Other speakers invited people to the state Capitol this week for discussions on proposed legislation on body cameras for officers in the state. Black Lives Matter leaders said in an open letter that they want people to begin recording police officers as part of a project titled #WeAreWatchingYou. PHOTOS: Sharpton praises response to fatal SC police shooting During a sermon at a North Charleston church Sunday morning, Sharpton said swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. Its not about black and white. Its about right and wrong, Sharpton said. What this mayor did is what weve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law. The tone of the local communitys response has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri, after Michael Browns death. Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers – both of whom were in the congregation and at the vigil. The shooting was captured on video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scotts death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

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Sharpton praises response to fatal SC police shooting

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. Demonstrators in the North Charleston area say they will press local officials for broader civilian oversight of the city’s police force after the shooting death of Walter Scott. The Rev. Al Sharpton called for unity Sunday at a vigil on the grassy vacant lot where Scott, 50, was killed. Other speakers invited people to the state Capitol this week for discussions on proposed legislation on body cameras for officers in the state. Black Lives Matter leaders said in an open letter that they want people to begin recording police officers as part of a project titled #WeAreWatchingYou. During a sermon at a North Charleston church Sunday morning, Sharpton said swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. “It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.” The tone of the local community’s response has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri, after Michael Brown’s death. Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at the vigil. The shooting was captured on video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances.

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April 13, 2015   Posted in: Al Sharpton  Comments Closed

Sharpton leads service to remember SC police shooting victim

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. During a sermon at a North Charleston church, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday that swift action taken by a white mayor and police chief in the South could set the tone for handling future questions of police misconduct across the country. “It’s not about black and white. It’s about right and wrong,” Sharpton said. “What this mayor did is what we’ve been asking mayors to do all over the country: Not do us a favor, just enforce the law.” The tone of the local community’s response to the shooting death of Walter Scott, 50, has been different than other instances of unarmed black men being fatally shot by white police officers, including the violent demonstrations from people in Ferguson, Missouri after Michael Brown’s death. Sharpton preached at the Charity Missionary Baptist Church and commended Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers both of whom were in the congregation and at a later vigil at the grassy vacant lot where Scott was shot to death. The shooting was captured on dramatic video that was taken by a witness. Scott was shot after fleeing a traffic stop by then-officer Michael Slager. The officer initially said Scott was shot after a tussle over his Taser, but the witness video that later surfaced showed Scott being shot at eight times as he ran away. Slager was fired and has been charged with murder. Scott’s death was criticized as yet another fatal shooting involving an unarmed black man by a white officer under questionable circumstances. Some North Charleston community members said they suspect abuse of power and the abuse of public trust played more of a role than race in the shooting. “It’s not about the color of your skin, it’s about social justice. When we all practice social justice, we’re all free,” said Mattese Lecque, a North Charleston resident who heard Sharpton preach. “Sometimes it takes disaster to bring about change, and that’s what’s happening now.” The chants, hymns and calls for more police accountability during small rallies in North Charleston have echoed those in Ferguson, Missouri. However, many in the North Charleston area have said they don’t want to see the burned-out buildings, broken windows and social tension that characterized Ferguson after Brown’s shooting and the announcement that a grand jury wouldn’t indict the officer who shot him.

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April 13, 2015   Posted in: Al Sharpton  Comments Closed


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