Archive for the ‘Alt-right’ Category

Does the First Amendment Protect Alt-Right Parades in Portland? – NBCNews.com

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler speaks during a press conference on January 17, 2017 in Portland. Don Ryan / AP

“It may be tempting to shut down speech we disagree with, but once we allow the government to decide what we can say, see, or hear, or who we can gather with, history shows us that the most marginalized will be disproportionately censored and punished for unpopular speech,” said the organization in a statement immediately following Wheeler’s call to block the parades.

“The mayor is not just anyone on the street, he’s a government official who has to uphold the Constitution,” said Mathew dos Santos, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon. “And he’s not doing that,” he said.

“Portland has a proud history of protest. I am a firm supporter of the First Amendment, no matter the views expressed. I believe we had a case to make about the threats to public safety posed by this rally at this place and at this time. My job is to protect the safety of everyone… protesters, counter-protesters, and bystanders alike,” said Wheeler in a

Alt-right groups have scheduled a “Trump Free Speech Rally,” on June 4. A “March against Sharia” event was scheduled for June 10 but organizers decided to cancel the rally in Portland and move it to Seattle instead.

Organizers felt the city was no longer safe for them.

“Due to Mayor Wheeler’s inflammatory comments and what we feel is an incitement of violence, he has shamefully endangered every scheduled participant. Consequently, in order to ensure the safety of those who had planned on attending, we have taken the decision to cancel the Portland March Against Sharia,” wrote the organization planning the march in a

June 4th parade organizer Joey Gibson said the mayor “needs to sit down and take a minute and listen,” and feels that he is trying to “pin” Jeremy Christian on his movement.

Christian, who was arraigned on

The City of Portland has already

Wheeler also urged the federal government to follow in his footsteps and revoke federal permits issued to the group.

But the U.S. General Services Administration, charged with issuing permits, announced on Wednesday that it would allow the parades.

“All rules and regulations were followed by the applicant for the permit, including the timeframe for review. Since the permit was lawfully obtained to assemble at this federal location, GSA has no basis to revoke the permit,” the agency said in a statement.

Revoking permits amounts to government suppression of speech, which has always been illegal, dos Santos said. You cannot withhold permits based on people’s viewpoints, he said.

The case is a mirror image of another First Amendment battle out near Chicago 40 years ago.

In 1977, a neo-Nazi organization chose to stage their parade in the suburban Chicago town of Skokie, which at the time was home to thousands of Holocaust survivors.

Parade goers were slated to wear Nazi uniforms and emulate salutes and anti-Jewish chants from Nazi Germany.

Outraged community members tried to put a stop to the parade by using the same arguments set forth by Wheeler. The group said the parade promotes hate speech that would inflict emotional distress upon survivors of the Holocaust.

A girl leaves a message at a makeshift memorial for two men on May 29, 2017 in Portland. The men were killed on a commuter train while trying to stop another man from harassing two young women who appeared to be Muslim. Terray Sylvester / Reuters

Ultimately the Nazi group, represented by the ACLU, won at the Supreme Court level and was legally allowed to march under the first amendment. The group ended up holding a rally downtown instead.

“Part of the problem with hate speech is that it’s in the eye of the beholder,” said Geoffrey Stone, a professor at the University of Chicago Law School. “There is no neutral way to decide what hate speech is and courts will not even attempt it,” he said.

The alt-right group has not made any indication that they are planning to incite imminent danger or violence during the parade, which may be questionable under the law, he said. “The idea that you can ban speech because it’s offensive or may cause anxiety is not consistent with the first amendment.”

Thus far, the alt-right group has not brought suit against the city for revoking their permits, but if the situation does arise, it’s an open and shut case, Stone said.

“It’s inconceivable to me that a court would uphold the mayor’s argument,” he said. “This is long standing, well-settled law, and the mayor has it completely wrong,” he said.

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Alt-right troll files civil rights complaint after the Today show mocks him – Media Matters for America (blog)


Media Matters for America (blog)
Alt-right troll files civil rights complaint after the Today show mocks him
Media Matters for America (blog)
Alt-right personality Jack Posobiec has taken his trolling to the New York City human rights commission by filing a complaint against a movie theater and NBC Today show host Carson Daly. In his complaint, Posobiec — formerly employed by The Rebel …

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Alt-right troll files civil rights complaint after the Today show mocks him – Media Matters for America (blog)

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Who Radicalized Jeremy Christian? Alt-Right Extremists Rush to Distance Themselves From MAX Slaying Suspect – Willamette Week

Even among right-wing protesters who aimed to upset people, Jeremy Joseph Christian was disturbing.

He arrived at an April 29 “free speech” march in Southeast Portland wearing a Revolutionary War flag as a cape. He carried a baseball bat. He threw Nazi salutes and shouted racial slurs in a Burger King parking lot. Twice, left-wing demonstrators grew so infuriated with his antics that Portland police officers formed a barrier to shield him.

The “alt-right” marchers even debated what to do about him. Some of them, leather-clad bikers, told him to shut up and tried to kick him out of the rally. Others seemed fine with him expressing himself: Unpopular speech was the point of the event.

On May 26, nearly a month later, Christian’s hateful words allegedly turned into action.

He stands accused of murdering two men and wounding another who intervened as he harassed two teenage girls with an anti-Muslim screed on a Portland MAX train. Multiple witness accounts say he cut the throats of three men who confronted him.

Mayor Ted Wheeler has since asked for federal assistance to keep right-wing agitators from holding events scheduled in Portland. The leaders of local and national extremist groups known as the “alt-right” spent the weekend frantically trying to distance themselves from Christian, even as they refused to cancel a June 4 rally set for Terry Schrunk Plaza downtown.

Wheeler says Portland is still too raw and angry to fully process the events of last week. But it’s already clear that in the days to come, this city will want answers to some uncomfortable questions about Christian.

What turned a low-level stickup man into a monster? Should his actions reflect on the people who marched alongside him? What responsibility do they bear for the way Christian developed his hateful behavior?

U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley speaks at the May 27 vigil. (Emily Joan Greene)

At a May 27 memorial for the men killed in the MAX stabbing, U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) described Christian’s alleged actions as the logical end point of vicious rhetoric on the far right. “A message of hate leads to violence,” he said, “and violence leads to tragedy.”

Christian, 35, who previously lived with his parents in the Piedmont neighborhood of North Portland, spent most of his adult life either behind bars or under post-conviction supervision, the result of state felony convictions for robbing a convenience store in 2002 and a federal gun conviction in 2011. He was released from federal custody May 14, 2014. He told booking authorities May 27 he’s now homeless and without any income.

His parents and four siblings could not be reached for comment. Several people who knew him described him as disturbed, but he told booking authorities he’d never been diagnosed with a mental health issue.

His Facebook page was full of racist rants, and a simple introduction. “I’m an ex-con,” he wrote. “I like comix, cannabis and metalin any combination.”

His forearm was covered in Nordic rune tattoos, and the “Misanthropic Nihilist” philosophy he outlined online suggests he was among those radical white supremacists who call themselves “Odinists”they celebrate pagan Norse gods as part of their race hatred.

Jeremy Christian at a free speech rally in Portland last month. (Joe Riedl)

Christian’s social-media posts also make clear he saw himself as the street-level enforcer for a neo-Nazi movement larger than himself.

“Brown shirts are rank and file,” he wrote on Facebook on Jan. 23. “Nihilist Criminals like me facilitate and run the show if we are talking about recreating the third Reich. You need unhindered and unhinged thugs for dirty work. A Good thing we have the largest collection of them in the entire world!!!”

An affidavit of probable cause says that minutes after he was arrested for the May 26 killings, Christian was recorded in a squad car describing his standoff with one of the men who confronted him.

“I told him, ‘You ain’t gonna heal, punk,'” Christian allegedly said. “And he still wants to put his hands on me. Stupid motherfucker. That’s what liberalism gets you.

“I hope they all die,” Christian continued. “I’m gonna say that on the stand. I’m a patriot, and I hope everyone I stabbed died.”

The question of whether Christian was a product of political fringe groups, or merely a disturbed man who was attracted to extremist rhetoric, is more than a matter of assessing blame. It may determine how much leeway such movements are given in future.

Christian distinguished himself among the disparate attendees of events organized by the alt-right, a collection of online agitators, militia groups and white supremacists who for months have engaged in street confrontations with antifascist groups, or antifa.

Joey Gibson, a Vancouver, Wash., organizer of the April 29 Portland march and other alt-right events, has since May 26 repeatedly attempted to distance his movement from Christian.

“Jeremy Christian has nothing to do with us,” Gibson tells WW. “He showed up [to our march] with violent intentions. We asked him to leave several times. We did what we could. You can’t make too much sense of a lot of things he said.”

On May 29, Mayor Wheeler announced he would try to block further activity by those groups, asking the federal government to revoke permits for the June 4 “free speech” rally Gibson wants to hold in Terry Schrunk Plaza.

“Our city is in mourning, our community’s anger is real, and the timing and subject of these events can only exacerbate an already difficult situation,” Wheeler said in a statement. “I am calling on every elected leader in Oregon, every legal agency, every level of law enforcement to stand with me in preventing another tragedy.”

Mayor Ted Wheeler at the May 27 vigil. (Emily Joan Greene)

Civil liberties groups blasted Wheeler’s actions as a violation of the First Amendment. Other activists celebrated a crackdown on a right-wing movement they described as racists emboldened by the election of President Donald Trump.

Gibson says despite Wheeler’s concerns, his associates still plan to gather in Portland on June 4.

“Unfortunately, there’s going to be hundreds of people in that park, no matter what,” he tells WW. “There’s going to be a huge police presence. Violence will not be tolerated on either side. Do our march. Go home.”

Randy Blazak, chairman of the Oregon Coalition Against Hate Crime, says the city should err on the side of allowing people to gather, including extremists.

“It’s better to see them in the daylight than suppress them into the shadows,” Blazak says. “I’d rather them march in the streets so we can take their pictures, and when they get on the bus with us, we know who they are.”

A May 27 vigil to honor the victims of the Portland MAX stabbings. (Emily Joan Greene)

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Who Radicalized Jeremy Christian? Alt-Right Extremists Rush to Distance Themselves From MAX Slaying Suspect – Willamette Week

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Comment: Israel’s alt-right ramps up the pressure on Trump – Arab … – The Jerusalem Post


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Failure to move US embassy to Jerusalem may put loyalties to the test.

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Richard Spencer’s ‘Alt-Right’ Podcasts Booted From Site The … – Forward

YouTube

New Face: White nationalist and leading alt-right figure Richard Spencer addresses a crowd at Texas A&M University in December.

White nationalist Richard Spencers alt-right podcast was booted from SoundCloud for violating the sites terms of service last week.

The move came in response to a Twitter query from the freelance journalist Alex Kotch, who wrote about the incident in a post for Alternet.org. I got the notorious white nationalist Richard Spencer kicked off of his podcast platform, Kotch wrote.

Kotch discovered that Spencers podcasts violated SoundClouds terms of service, which forbid content that promotes or encourages hatred, discrimination or violence against others based on things like race, cultural identity or ethnic background, religious beliefs, disability, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

Spencer popularized the term alt-right. He advocates for peaceful ethnic cleansing and the creation of a white ethno-state. He is among the countrys most recognizable white nationalists and has collaborated with people like the neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin and former Ku Klux Klan head David Duke.

Kotch wrote that he had been attacked online by alt-right accounts since Spencers removal. Kotch defended his move.

Good people should, any chance they get, no-platform cowardly alt-right provocateurs, neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates and other detestable groups of insecure, angry people, Kotch wrote.

Email Sam Kestenbaum at kestenbaum@forward.com and follow him on Twitter at @skestenbaum

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Muslim vlogger harassed by alt-right fights hate with positivity – WFAA

Irving vlogger fights hate with positivity

Hannah Davis , WFAA 7:15 PM. CDT May 31, 2017

Hours after the initial onslaught of hateful and anti-Islam messages flooded her account, Nye Armstrong posted a video response telling the critics she refuses to let them dictate how she feels about herself. (Photo: WFAA)

IRVING, Texas — Nye Armstrong loves to talk. It doesn’t matter what about, she’s ready to gab about fashion, recipes, books and religion on her Youtube channel.

“I’m not shy,” Armstrong joked.

The Irving woman regularly posts to her video blog and often discusses her Muslim religion. Last week, she says one of her posts made it to an “alt-right” site and she was inundated with hateful messages.

“Go throw yourself in an oven,” Armstrong quoted, “That hurt the most.”

Dozens of comments tore into Armstrong’s weight, religion and apparent “betrayal” of her race. Armstrong is Caucasian and became Muslim in her twenties after connecting with the religion’s scripture and teachings.

“I think it was even more upsetting for them that I’m a white woman,” Armstrong said.

While the comments calling for violence or containing propane language are disturbing, the rhetoric is not unique for Muslim women who wear hijabs in the United States.

Zeena Alkurdi is a graphic designer and mother of two in the Dallas area. She wears a hijab and says verbal harassment and stares have become a part of daily life.

“There are all kinds of people in downtown Dallas and you hear a lot of stuff. There has been more since we elected Donald Trump,” Alkurdi said.

Zakurdi and Armstrong say the harassment will not force them to stop wearing the religious head coverings, although Alkurdi’s family had encouraged her to consider it after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

“I was young and they said, ‘Just think about stopping for a while.’ I thought,’I don’t want to change because of other people,'” Zakurdi said.

For both women, wearing hijab is a decision they call empowering, a right to express their identity and their religion they way they see fit.

“I consider myself a feminist and for me, this is about choice,” Zakurdi said.

Armstrong puts on a brave face and brushes the hateful comments aside, but while talking to her, there are moments when the hurt shows.

“I don’t get emotional for myself. It’s when I think about other people that wouldn’t be able to get through comments with people telling them to kill themselves,” Armstrong said.

Like her hijab, Armstrong says her Youtube channel is about self-expression and bridging the divide between people of different backgrounds.

“I’m normal some, just talking is normalizing what and who I am,” Armstrong said.

Hours after the initial onslaught of hateful and anti-Islam messages flooded her account, Armstrong posted a video response telling the critics she refuses to let them dictate how she feels about herself.

Armstrong says the comments are proof her videos and expression are needed more than ever and that’s what she has no plans on keeping quiet anytime soon.

2017 WFAA-TV

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After Portland Killings, Mayor Wants to Cancel ‘Alt Right’ Rallies – NBCNews.com

A heart-shaped wreath covered with positive messages hangs on a traffic light pole at a memorial for two bystanders who were stabbed to death in Portland, Ore, Saturday, May 27, 2017. Gillian Flaccus / AP

An image posted on Chapman’s Facebook page last month showed what appeared to be a crude painting featuring the Muslim Prophet Muhammad and activist Linda Sarsour, who helped organize the National Women’s March on Washington and has received repeated death threats over a planned commencement speech at the City University of New York,

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“We took our Mohamed/Sarsour meme to Times Square and turned it into an art exhibit,” Chapman wrote. “The local Muslims were beside themselves hah hah!”

A “march against Sharia” is scheduled for the same plaza on June 10. The event’s organizer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon actually criticized the mayor on Monday, saying in a

A group behind a planned counter-demonstration on June 4, called “Rose City Antifa,” also said it had no plans to cancel.

“As a group focused on the community, our efforts are centered in the community, not the mayor’s office,” the Rose City group said in a statement to NBC News. “The Portland community is clearly opposed to this rally occurring, and on June 4th, we will stand against it.”

During the news conference, Wheeler also said he hoped to memorialize the attack’s three victims. The transit center where the crime occurred was already replete with dozens of bouquets of flowers and moving tributes written in chalk,

“This is a seminal moment in this state’s history and certainly in this community’s history,” he said. “The names of those three men, Rick and Taliesin and Micah, they’ll be up there with the greats. I don’t want future generations to forget that.”

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Portland mayor call on feds to cancel permit for ‘alt-right’ pro-Trump rally next weekend – Q13 FOX


Q13 FOX
Portland mayor call on feds to cancel permit for 'alt-right' pro-Trump rally next weekend
Q13 FOX
PORTLAND The mayor of Portland is calling on the federal government and organizers to cancel a Trump Free Speech Rally and other alt-right events next weekend. Mayor Ted Wheeler said Monday that the community is sad and angry after the fatal …
Ted Wheeler to federal government: revoke permit for Portland alt-right eventOregonLive.com
Mayor Ted Wheeler Says Feds Should Pull Permit For an Upcoming Alt-Right RallyThe Portland Mercury (blog)
Man Arrested for Oregon Stabbings was 'Known White Supremacist'Newsweek
New York Times –Irish Times –OregonLive.com –The Portland Mercury
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How I Got ‘Alt-Right’ White Nationalist Leader Richard Spencer Booted from His Podcast Platform – AlterNet

I got the notoriouswhite nationalistRichard Spencer kicked off of his podcast platform.

Spencer, the leader of the white nationalist so-called “alt-right who has made it clear he believes people of color are inferior to whites, is a lightning rod for controversy. He advocate what he calls peaceful ethnic cleansing and claims thatLatinos and AfricanAmericans havelower average IQs than whites. Auburn University initially canceled a speech he was set to give in April, but a court ruled that he must be allowed to speak. Hundreds of peopleprotestedoutside the event. In January, he took aflying punchin the neck from a masked person in the middle of an interview, immediately falling out of the view of the camera.

Recently, the Virginia gym Spencer belonged torevoked his membershipafter a university professor confronted him in the weight room and outed him as a vocal white nationalist. This is our December 1932. We have a choice,wrotethe Georgetown professor, Christine Fair, in a column for the Washington Post explaining her actions. We can refuse to treat this hateful, dangerous ideology as just another way of being, and fight it in every space we occupy.”

Last Monday, Inoticed that the podcast Spencerproduces with his alt-right website had a paid account at SoundCloud, the popular streaming website. TheAltRightRadio accountdidnt have many followers, but some of the podcasts themselves, which one can embed on most websites, had been listened to roughly 12,000 times.

I wondered whether Spencers hate-filled podcasts were violatingSoundCloudsterms of service. Sure enough,SoundCloudscommunity guidelineswere clear:The companyforbids content that promotes or encourages hatred, discrimination or violence against others based on things like race, cultural identity or ethnic background, religious beliefs, disability, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

Heres just one exchange on oneAltRightRadioepisode called You Say You Want a Revolution,in which Paul Kersey, founder of the racistStuff Black People Dont Like website, makes it clear that hes a racist white supremacist. And Spencer agrees withhis bigoted assertions.

KERSEY: Make America Great AgainThats a synonym for Make America White Again.

SPENCER: Mm-hmm.

KERSEY: Because wherever America isn’t white, it’s not great. Wherever America is great, it’s white.

SPENCER: Yeah.

KERSEY: And wherever Americais not safe, its not white. Wherever America is safe, its white.

There are morechoice quotesfrom white nationalist Jared Taylor, whose Beyond Conservatism speech was uploaded toSoundCloudbyAltRightRadio,and anti-Semite Kevin MacDonald, aguest onapodcast episode.

Per its terms ofuse,SoundCloudcan suspend or terminate an account if it violates its community guidelines. I did atweetstormabout theAltRightRadio account and the racist, anti-Semitic ideologies of its creator, urgingSoundCloudtoterminatethe account. The next morning, the company did just that.

All weve heard from Spencer on the matter was this tweet from last Tuesday

An associated account, Radix Radio, from the journal published by Spencers racist National Policy Institute appears to be terminated as well, although it’s unclearwhen itwas taken down.Several podcasts thatAltRightRadio promotes,includingThis is Europa,KulturkampfandRed Ice Radioare still online.

Embedded links to podcast episodes from the AltRightRadio and Radix Radioaccountsno longer work, and as of Friday, the white nationalist sites hadnt replaced them with an alternative.The latest Alt-Right Politics episode hosted by Spencer was uploaded directly to the Alt-Right website.

I got plenty of support for what I did,although as expected, the neo-Nazi trolls came out infull force. Overwhelmingly, themostfrequentresponses from these almost unanimously anonymous users came in three categories: 1) assumptions that I was Jewish, with mentions of yellow stars, gas chambers and the size of my nose; 2) assertions that Im gay or a faggot; and 3) revelations that Im a cuck and a very skinny, slight andgenerallyweak person.

But many of the replies alsoprotestedthat no-platformingSpencer was a free speech issuean allegation that is false.

The First Amendmentprotects againstgovernment-imposed restrictions on speech.(There areexceptionsincluding advocacy of illegal action and fighting words.) ButSoundCloudis not the government; its a private companythat has every right to a terms-of-use document that its users, including Spencer,agree towhen creating aSoundCloudaccount.And the terms of use does not discriminate against any group of people; in fact, it prohibits such discrimination.

For some people, freedom of speech has come to mean freedom to discriminate.The campus free speech movement is ledprimarilyby far-right conservatives whofeel that their voices are underrepresented on college campuses, when the more likely scenario is that their ideas just arent very popular, andmanyof those ideas are both hateful andextremely poor scholarship. Charles Murrays failed argument that black people are inherently less intelligentthat whites has been panned in the academic community, yet he continues to make college tours, funded by the far-right, Koch-backed American Enterprise Institute. I have written extensively aboutright-wing fundingfor hate speechon campus, much of the money coming from the Koch andDeVosfamilies and distributedbyAEI and the Young Americas Foundation.

Many of the same wealthy figures arealso bankrolling an assaulton dissent, with a Goldwater Institute-written bill making its way through state legislatures around the country, imposing harsh penalties, including expulsion,on students who disrupt campus speakers. For some, freedom of speech applies only to guest speakers, nottothe hundreds of others in the audience.

Actualhate speech, which Richard Spencer actively engages in and promotes as both a career andapersonal ideology, has no place inmainstream society, nor does it deserve the servicesofany company that rejectsracism, sexism, homophobia,transphobia,Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and other forms of hatein its terms of use or community guidelines.Revived Nazi terms, blatant racism against black and Latinopeople and calls for ethnic cleansing should not be tolerated.This type of speech is not an argument or an opinion; it is hate, plain and simple.

Fighting against hate isnt discrimination, as the alt-right will feebly argue; its social justice.Good people should, any chance theyget, no-platform cowardly alt-right provocateurs, neo-Nazis, neo-Confederatesand other detestable groups of insecure, angrypeople.

Someone who cries, Hail Trump! ata white nationalist conference or organizes atiki-torch-lit nighttime rally defending Confederate monuments reminiscent of KKK rallies,deserves no platform. Let white nationalists build their own servers, their own infrastructure, so they can yell white genocide from the rooftops.But no honorable company should acceptwhite nationalistscause, ortheir money.

Alex Kotch is an independent investigative journalist based in Brooklyn, NY. Follow him on Twitter at @alexkotch.

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Does the First Amendment Protect Alt-Right Parades in Portland? – NBCNews.com

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler speaks during a press conference on January 17, 2017 in Portland. Don Ryan / AP “It may be tempting to shut down speech we disagree with, but once we allow the government to decide what we can say, see, or hear, or who we can gather with, history shows us that the most marginalized will be disproportionately censored and punished for unpopular speech,” said the organization in a statement immediately following Wheeler’s call to block the parades. “The mayor is not just anyone on the street, he’s a government official who has to uphold the Constitution,” said Mathew dos Santos, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon. “And he’s not doing that,” he said. “Portland has a proud history of protest. I am a firm supporter of the First Amendment, no matter the views expressed. I believe we had a case to make about the threats to public safety posed by this rally at this place and at this time. My job is to protect the safety of everyone… protesters, counter-protesters, and bystanders alike,” said Wheeler in a Alt-right groups have scheduled a “Trump Free Speech Rally,” on June 4. A “March against Sharia” event was scheduled for June 10 but organizers decided to cancel the rally in Portland and move it to Seattle instead. Organizers felt the city was no longer safe for them. “Due to Mayor Wheeler’s inflammatory comments and what we feel is an incitement of violence, he has shamefully endangered every scheduled participant. Consequently, in order to ensure the safety of those who had planned on attending, we have taken the decision to cancel the Portland March Against Sharia,” wrote the organization planning the march in a June 4th parade organizer Joey Gibson said the mayor “needs to sit down and take a minute and listen,” and feels that he is trying to “pin” Jeremy Christian on his movement. Christian, who was arraigned on The City of Portland has already Wheeler also urged the federal government to follow in his footsteps and revoke federal permits issued to the group. But the U.S. General Services Administration, charged with issuing permits, announced on Wednesday that it would allow the parades. “All rules and regulations were followed by the applicant for the permit, including the timeframe for review. Since the permit was lawfully obtained to assemble at this federal location, GSA has no basis to revoke the permit,” the agency said in a statement. Revoking permits amounts to government suppression of speech, which has always been illegal, dos Santos said. You cannot withhold permits based on people’s viewpoints, he said. The case is a mirror image of another First Amendment battle out near Chicago 40 years ago. In 1977, a neo-Nazi organization chose to stage their parade in the suburban Chicago town of Skokie, which at the time was home to thousands of Holocaust survivors. Parade goers were slated to wear Nazi uniforms and emulate salutes and anti-Jewish chants from Nazi Germany. Outraged community members tried to put a stop to the parade by using the same arguments set forth by Wheeler. The group said the parade promotes hate speech that would inflict emotional distress upon survivors of the Holocaust. A girl leaves a message at a makeshift memorial for two men on May 29, 2017 in Portland. The men were killed on a commuter train while trying to stop another man from harassing two young women who appeared to be Muslim. Terray Sylvester / Reuters Ultimately the Nazi group, represented by the ACLU, won at the Supreme Court level and was legally allowed to march under the first amendment. The group ended up holding a rally downtown instead. “Part of the problem with hate speech is that it’s in the eye of the beholder,” said Geoffrey Stone, a professor at the University of Chicago Law School. “There is no neutral way to decide what hate speech is and courts will not even attempt it,” he said. The alt-right group has not made any indication that they are planning to incite imminent danger or violence during the parade, which may be questionable under the law, he said. “The idea that you can ban speech because it’s offensive or may cause anxiety is not consistent with the first amendment.” Thus far, the alt-right group has not brought suit against the city for revoking their permits, but if the situation does arise, it’s an open and shut case, Stone said. “It’s inconceivable to me that a court would uphold the mayor’s argument,” he said. “This is long standing, well-settled law, and the mayor has it completely wrong,” he said.

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Alt-right troll files civil rights complaint after the Today show mocks him – Media Matters for America (blog)

Media Matters for America (blog) Alt-right troll files civil rights complaint after the Today show mocks him Media Matters for America (blog) Alt-right personality Jack Posobiec has taken his trolling to the New York City human rights commission by filing a complaint against a movie theater and NBC Today show host Carson Daly. In his complaint, Posobiec — formerly employed by The Rebel … and more »

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Who Radicalized Jeremy Christian? Alt-Right Extremists Rush to Distance Themselves From MAX Slaying Suspect – Willamette Week

Even among right-wing protesters who aimed to upset people, Jeremy Joseph Christian was disturbing. He arrived at an April 29 “free speech” march in Southeast Portland wearing a Revolutionary War flag as a cape. He carried a baseball bat. He threw Nazi salutes and shouted racial slurs in a Burger King parking lot. Twice, left-wing demonstrators grew so infuriated with his antics that Portland police officers formed a barrier to shield him. The “alt-right” marchers even debated what to do about him. Some of them, leather-clad bikers, told him to shut up and tried to kick him out of the rally. Others seemed fine with him expressing himself: Unpopular speech was the point of the event. On May 26, nearly a month later, Christian’s hateful words allegedly turned into action. He stands accused of murdering two men and wounding another who intervened as he harassed two teenage girls with an anti-Muslim screed on a Portland MAX train. Multiple witness accounts say he cut the throats of three men who confronted him. Mayor Ted Wheeler has since asked for federal assistance to keep right-wing agitators from holding events scheduled in Portland. The leaders of local and national extremist groups known as the “alt-right” spent the weekend frantically trying to distance themselves from Christian, even as they refused to cancel a June 4 rally set for Terry Schrunk Plaza downtown. Wheeler says Portland is still too raw and angry to fully process the events of last week. But it’s already clear that in the days to come, this city will want answers to some uncomfortable questions about Christian. What turned a low-level stickup man into a monster? Should his actions reflect on the people who marched alongside him? What responsibility do they bear for the way Christian developed his hateful behavior? U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley speaks at the May 27 vigil. (Emily Joan Greene) At a May 27 memorial for the men killed in the MAX stabbing, U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) described Christian’s alleged actions as the logical end point of vicious rhetoric on the far right. “A message of hate leads to violence,” he said, “and violence leads to tragedy.” Christian, 35, who previously lived with his parents in the Piedmont neighborhood of North Portland, spent most of his adult life either behind bars or under post-conviction supervision, the result of state felony convictions for robbing a convenience store in 2002 and a federal gun conviction in 2011. He was released from federal custody May 14, 2014. He told booking authorities May 27 he’s now homeless and without any income. His parents and four siblings could not be reached for comment. Several people who knew him described him as disturbed, but he told booking authorities he’d never been diagnosed with a mental health issue. His Facebook page was full of racist rants, and a simple introduction. “I’m an ex-con,” he wrote. “I like comix, cannabis and metalin any combination.” His forearm was covered in Nordic rune tattoos, and the “Misanthropic Nihilist” philosophy he outlined online suggests he was among those radical white supremacists who call themselves “Odinists”they celebrate pagan Norse gods as part of their race hatred. Jeremy Christian at a free speech rally in Portland last month. (Joe Riedl) Christian’s social-media posts also make clear he saw himself as the street-level enforcer for a neo-Nazi movement larger than himself. “Brown shirts are rank and file,” he wrote on Facebook on Jan. 23. “Nihilist Criminals like me facilitate and run the show if we are talking about recreating the third Reich. You need unhindered and unhinged thugs for dirty work. A Good thing we have the largest collection of them in the entire world!!!” An affidavit of probable cause says that minutes after he was arrested for the May 26 killings, Christian was recorded in a squad car describing his standoff with one of the men who confronted him. “I told him, ‘You ain’t gonna heal, punk,'” Christian allegedly said. “And he still wants to put his hands on me. Stupid motherfucker. That’s what liberalism gets you. “I hope they all die,” Christian continued. “I’m gonna say that on the stand. I’m a patriot, and I hope everyone I stabbed died.” The question of whether Christian was a product of political fringe groups, or merely a disturbed man who was attracted to extremist rhetoric, is more than a matter of assessing blame. It may determine how much leeway such movements are given in future. Christian distinguished himself among the disparate attendees of events organized by the alt-right, a collection of online agitators, militia groups and white supremacists who for months have engaged in street confrontations with antifascist groups, or antifa. Joey Gibson, a Vancouver, Wash., organizer of the April 29 Portland march and other alt-right events, has since May 26 repeatedly attempted to distance his movement from Christian. “Jeremy Christian has nothing to do with us,” Gibson tells WW. “He showed up [to our march] with violent intentions. We asked him to leave several times. We did what we could. You can’t make too much sense of a lot of things he said.” On May 29, Mayor Wheeler announced he would try to block further activity by those groups, asking the federal government to revoke permits for the June 4 “free speech” rally Gibson wants to hold in Terry Schrunk Plaza. “Our city is in mourning, our community’s anger is real, and the timing and subject of these events can only exacerbate an already difficult situation,” Wheeler said in a statement. “I am calling on every elected leader in Oregon, every legal agency, every level of law enforcement to stand with me in preventing another tragedy.” Mayor Ted Wheeler at the May 27 vigil. (Emily Joan Greene) Civil liberties groups blasted Wheeler’s actions as a violation of the First Amendment. Other activists celebrated a crackdown on a right-wing movement they described as racists emboldened by the election of President Donald Trump. Gibson says despite Wheeler’s concerns, his associates still plan to gather in Portland on June 4. “Unfortunately, there’s going to be hundreds of people in that park, no matter what,” he tells WW. “There’s going to be a huge police presence. Violence will not be tolerated on either side. Do our march. Go home.” Randy Blazak, chairman of the Oregon Coalition Against Hate Crime, says the city should err on the side of allowing people to gather, including extremists. “It’s better to see them in the daylight than suppress them into the shadows,” Blazak says. “I’d rather them march in the streets so we can take their pictures, and when they get on the bus with us, we know who they are.” A May 27 vigil to honor the victims of the Portland MAX stabbings. (Emily Joan Greene)

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Comment: Israel’s alt-right ramps up the pressure on Trump – Arab … – The Jerusalem Post

The Jerusalem Post Comment: Israel's alt-right ramps up the pressure on Trump – Arab … The Jerusalem Post Failure to move US embassy to Jerusalem may put loyalties to the test. and more »

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Richard Spencer’s ‘Alt-Right’ Podcasts Booted From Site The … – Forward

YouTube New Face: White nationalist and leading alt-right figure Richard Spencer addresses a crowd at Texas A&M University in December. White nationalist Richard Spencers alt-right podcast was booted from SoundCloud for violating the sites terms of service last week. The move came in response to a Twitter query from the freelance journalist Alex Kotch, who wrote about the incident in a post for Alternet.org. I got the notorious white nationalist Richard Spencer kicked off of his podcast platform, Kotch wrote. Kotch discovered that Spencers podcasts violated SoundClouds terms of service, which forbid content that promotes or encourages hatred, discrimination or violence against others based on things like race, cultural identity or ethnic background, religious beliefs, disability, gender identity, or sexual orientation. Spencer popularized the term alt-right. He advocates for peaceful ethnic cleansing and the creation of a white ethno-state. He is among the countrys most recognizable white nationalists and has collaborated with people like the neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin and former Ku Klux Klan head David Duke. Kotch wrote that he had been attacked online by alt-right accounts since Spencers removal. Kotch defended his move. Good people should, any chance they get, no-platform cowardly alt-right provocateurs, neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates and other detestable groups of insecure, angry people, Kotch wrote. Email Sam Kestenbaum at kestenbaum@forward.com and follow him on Twitter at @skestenbaum

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Muslim vlogger harassed by alt-right fights hate with positivity – WFAA

Irving vlogger fights hate with positivity Hannah Davis , WFAA 7:15 PM. CDT May 31, 2017 Hours after the initial onslaught of hateful and anti-Islam messages flooded her account, Nye Armstrong posted a video response telling the critics she refuses to let them dictate how she feels about herself. (Photo: WFAA) IRVING, Texas — Nye Armstrong loves to talk. It doesn’t matter what about, she’s ready to gab about fashion, recipes, books and religion on her Youtube channel. “I’m not shy,” Armstrong joked. The Irving woman regularly posts to her video blog and often discusses her Muslim religion. Last week, she says one of her posts made it to an “alt-right” site and she was inundated with hateful messages. “Go throw yourself in an oven,” Armstrong quoted, “That hurt the most.” Dozens of comments tore into Armstrong’s weight, religion and apparent “betrayal” of her race. Armstrong is Caucasian and became Muslim in her twenties after connecting with the religion’s scripture and teachings. “I think it was even more upsetting for them that I’m a white woman,” Armstrong said. While the comments calling for violence or containing propane language are disturbing, the rhetoric is not unique for Muslim women who wear hijabs in the United States. Zeena Alkurdi is a graphic designer and mother of two in the Dallas area. She wears a hijab and says verbal harassment and stares have become a part of daily life. “There are all kinds of people in downtown Dallas and you hear a lot of stuff. There has been more since we elected Donald Trump,” Alkurdi said. Zakurdi and Armstrong say the harassment will not force them to stop wearing the religious head coverings, although Alkurdi’s family had encouraged her to consider it after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. “I was young and they said, ‘Just think about stopping for a while.’ I thought,’I don’t want to change because of other people,'” Zakurdi said. For both women, wearing hijab is a decision they call empowering, a right to express their identity and their religion they way they see fit. “I consider myself a feminist and for me, this is about choice,” Zakurdi said. Armstrong puts on a brave face and brushes the hateful comments aside, but while talking to her, there are moments when the hurt shows. “I don’t get emotional for myself. It’s when I think about other people that wouldn’t be able to get through comments with people telling them to kill themselves,” Armstrong said. Like her hijab, Armstrong says her Youtube channel is about self-expression and bridging the divide between people of different backgrounds. “I’m normal some, just talking is normalizing what and who I am,” Armstrong said. Hours after the initial onslaught of hateful and anti-Islam messages flooded her account, Armstrong posted a video response telling the critics she refuses to let them dictate how she feels about herself. Armstrong says the comments are proof her videos and expression are needed more than ever and that’s what she has no plans on keeping quiet anytime soon. 2017 WFAA-TV

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After Portland Killings, Mayor Wants to Cancel ‘Alt Right’ Rallies – NBCNews.com

A heart-shaped wreath covered with positive messages hangs on a traffic light pole at a memorial for two bystanders who were stabbed to death in Portland, Ore, Saturday, May 27, 2017. Gillian Flaccus / AP An image posted on Chapman’s Facebook page last month showed what appeared to be a crude painting featuring the Muslim Prophet Muhammad and activist Linda Sarsour, who helped organize the National Women’s March on Washington and has received repeated death threats over a planned commencement speech at the City University of New York, Related: “We took our Mohamed/Sarsour meme to Times Square and turned it into an art exhibit,” Chapman wrote. “The local Muslims were beside themselves hah hah!” A “march against Sharia” is scheduled for the same plaza on June 10. The event’s organizer did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon actually criticized the mayor on Monday, saying in a A group behind a planned counter-demonstration on June 4, called “Rose City Antifa,” also said it had no plans to cancel. “As a group focused on the community, our efforts are centered in the community, not the mayor’s office,” the Rose City group said in a statement to NBC News. “The Portland community is clearly opposed to this rally occurring, and on June 4th, we will stand against it.” During the news conference, Wheeler also said he hoped to memorialize the attack’s three victims. The transit center where the crime occurred was already replete with dozens of bouquets of flowers and moving tributes written in chalk, “This is a seminal moment in this state’s history and certainly in this community’s history,” he said. “The names of those three men, Rick and Taliesin and Micah, they’ll be up there with the greats. I don’t want future generations to forget that.”

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Portland mayor call on feds to cancel permit for ‘alt-right’ pro-Trump rally next weekend – Q13 FOX

Q13 FOX Portland mayor call on feds to cancel permit for ' alt-right ' pro-Trump rally next weekend Q13 FOX PORTLAND The mayor of Portland is calling on the federal government and organizers to cancel a Trump Free Speech Rally and other alt-right events next weekend. Mayor Ted Wheeler said Monday that the community is sad and angry after the fatal … Ted Wheeler to federal government: revoke permit for Portland alt-right event OregonLive.com Mayor Ted Wheeler Says Feds Should Pull Permit For an Upcoming Alt-Right Rally The Portland Mercury (blog) Man Arrested for Oregon Stabbings was 'Known White Supremacist' Newsweek New York Times  – Irish Times  – OregonLive.com  – The Portland Mercury all 1,285 news articles »

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How I Got ‘Alt-Right’ White Nationalist Leader Richard Spencer Booted from His Podcast Platform – AlterNet

I got the notoriouswhite nationalistRichard Spencer kicked off of his podcast platform. Spencer, the leader of the white nationalist so-called “alt-right who has made it clear he believes people of color are inferior to whites, is a lightning rod for controversy. He advocate what he calls peaceful ethnic cleansing and claims thatLatinos and AfricanAmericans havelower average IQs than whites. Auburn University initially canceled a speech he was set to give in April, but a court ruled that he must be allowed to speak. Hundreds of peopleprotestedoutside the event. In January, he took aflying punchin the neck from a masked person in the middle of an interview, immediately falling out of the view of the camera. Recently, the Virginia gym Spencer belonged torevoked his membershipafter a university professor confronted him in the weight room and outed him as a vocal white nationalist. This is our December 1932. We have a choice,wrotethe Georgetown professor, Christine Fair, in a column for the Washington Post explaining her actions. We can refuse to treat this hateful, dangerous ideology as just another way of being, and fight it in every space we occupy.” Last Monday, Inoticed that the podcast Spencerproduces with his alt-right website had a paid account at SoundCloud, the popular streaming website. TheAltRightRadio accountdidnt have many followers, but some of the podcasts themselves, which one can embed on most websites, had been listened to roughly 12,000 times. I wondered whether Spencers hate-filled podcasts were violatingSoundCloudsterms of service. Sure enough,SoundCloudscommunity guidelineswere clear:The companyforbids content that promotes or encourages hatred, discrimination or violence against others based on things like race, cultural identity or ethnic background, religious beliefs, disability, gender identity, or sexual orientation. Heres just one exchange on oneAltRightRadioepisode called You Say You Want a Revolution,in which Paul Kersey, founder of the racistStuff Black People Dont Like website, makes it clear that hes a racist white supremacist. And Spencer agrees withhis bigoted assertions. KERSEY: Make America Great AgainThats a synonym for Make America White Again. SPENCER: Mm-hmm. KERSEY: Because wherever America isn’t white, it’s not great. Wherever America is great, it’s white. SPENCER: Yeah. KERSEY: And wherever Americais not safe, its not white. Wherever America is safe, its white. There are morechoice quotesfrom white nationalist Jared Taylor, whose Beyond Conservatism speech was uploaded toSoundCloudbyAltRightRadio,and anti-Semite Kevin MacDonald, aguest onapodcast episode. Per its terms ofuse,SoundCloudcan suspend or terminate an account if it violates its community guidelines. I did atweetstormabout theAltRightRadio account and the racist, anti-Semitic ideologies of its creator, urgingSoundCloudtoterminatethe account. The next morning, the company did just that. All weve heard from Spencer on the matter was this tweet from last Tuesday An associated account, Radix Radio, from the journal published by Spencers racist National Policy Institute appears to be terminated as well, although it’s unclearwhen itwas taken down.Several podcasts thatAltRightRadio promotes,includingThis is Europa,KulturkampfandRed Ice Radioare still online. Embedded links to podcast episodes from the AltRightRadio and Radix Radioaccountsno longer work, and as of Friday, the white nationalist sites hadnt replaced them with an alternative.The latest Alt-Right Politics episode hosted by Spencer was uploaded directly to the Alt-Right website. I got plenty of support for what I did,although as expected, the neo-Nazi trolls came out infull force. Overwhelmingly, themostfrequentresponses from these almost unanimously anonymous users came in three categories: 1) assumptions that I was Jewish, with mentions of yellow stars, gas chambers and the size of my nose; 2) assertions that Im gay or a faggot; and 3) revelations that Im a cuck and a very skinny, slight andgenerallyweak person. But many of the replies alsoprotestedthat no-platformingSpencer was a free speech issuean allegation that is false. The First Amendmentprotects againstgovernment-imposed restrictions on speech.(There areexceptionsincluding advocacy of illegal action and fighting words.) ButSoundCloudis not the government; its a private companythat has every right to a terms-of-use document that its users, including Spencer,agree towhen creating aSoundCloudaccount.And the terms of use does not discriminate against any group of people; in fact, it prohibits such discrimination. For some people, freedom of speech has come to mean freedom to discriminate.The campus free speech movement is ledprimarilyby far-right conservatives whofeel that their voices are underrepresented on college campuses, when the more likely scenario is that their ideas just arent very popular, andmanyof those ideas are both hateful andextremely poor scholarship. Charles Murrays failed argument that black people are inherently less intelligentthat whites has been panned in the academic community, yet he continues to make college tours, funded by the far-right, Koch-backed American Enterprise Institute. I have written extensively aboutright-wing fundingfor hate speechon campus, much of the money coming from the Koch andDeVosfamilies and distributedbyAEI and the Young Americas Foundation. Many of the same wealthy figures arealso bankrolling an assaulton dissent, with a Goldwater Institute-written bill making its way through state legislatures around the country, imposing harsh penalties, including expulsion,on students who disrupt campus speakers. For some, freedom of speech applies only to guest speakers, nottothe hundreds of others in the audience. Actualhate speech, which Richard Spencer actively engages in and promotes as both a career andapersonal ideology, has no place inmainstream society, nor does it deserve the servicesofany company that rejectsracism, sexism, homophobia,transphobia,Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and other forms of hatein its terms of use or community guidelines.Revived Nazi terms, blatant racism against black and Latinopeople and calls for ethnic cleansing should not be tolerated.This type of speech is not an argument or an opinion; it is hate, plain and simple. Fighting against hate isnt discrimination, as the alt-right will feebly argue; its social justice.Good people should, any chance theyget, no-platform cowardly alt-right provocateurs, neo-Nazis, neo-Confederatesand other detestable groups of insecure, angrypeople. Someone who cries, Hail Trump! ata white nationalist conference or organizes atiki-torch-lit nighttime rally defending Confederate monuments reminiscent of KKK rallies,deserves no platform. Let white nationalists build their own servers, their own infrastructure, so they can yell white genocide from the rooftops.But no honorable company should acceptwhite nationalistscause, ortheir money. Alex Kotch is an independent investigative journalist based in Brooklyn, NY. Follow him on Twitter at @alexkotch.

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