Archive for the ‘Alt-right’ Category

Alternative Right | The Founding Site of the Alt-Right.

If we look deeply into the Western spirit, we see that it is not of this material world, but a desire for greatness and beauty which denies the lazy impulse of the human heart to lounge in the comfortable, familiar and unchallenging. This spirit demands conquest, but first of the self, and only then through the ways of the world.

Well, Charles Manson, the well-known celebrity psycho-killer has finally passed away. Actually, he never actually killed anyone himself, always getting his followers to do the dirty work. In many ways he was a brilliant and talented man. He certainly had plenty of charisma, and could probably have taught us all a great deal about group dynamics and PUA.

Alt-Right News There are signs that China could be behind the military coup that is underway in Zimbabwe, the African state, once known as Rhodesia, that has been under the rule of President Robert Mugabe since 1980. Thepresent situationappears to be that the army, under the command of General Constantino Chiwenga and Major General Moyo, have imposed military control and

Why does the Church obscure the Bibles message that celibacy is the highest state?

This latest example of internet censorship in Britain cannot fail to bring to mind another pioneer of anti-Semitic comedy on these shores, the Jewish comedian Sacha Baron-Cohen, whose Borat character sang Throw the Jew Down the Well and threw money at a pair of insects representing a Jewish couple. Instead of a hate crime trial and a disqualification from earning a living, Baron-Cohen got a Golden Globe and over $261 million at the box office

Let me be very clear here:I like the Jews and I like Israel. I especially like the fact that the state of Israel was essentially a colonial state founded at the very time (1948-1967) when the tide of history was flowing most strongly against colonialism. That almost puts it next to Rhodesia in my holy pantheon of based, un-PC states. But unfortunately, like Rhodesia, there has always been a sense that Israel is ultimately doomed.

When you overuse a favourite weapon, expect the blade to become blunt beyond repair.

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Alt-Right, White Nationalist, Free Speech: The Far Right’s …

Jeremy Christian (right), seen during a Patriot Prayer, allegedly stabbed three men, two fatally, in Portland earlier this year. During a subsequent courtroom appearance, he exclaimed: “Free speech or die, Portland. You call it terrorism I call it patriotism.” John Rudoff/AP hide caption

Jeremy Christian (right), seen during a Patriot Prayer, allegedly stabbed three men, two fatally, in Portland earlier this year. During a subsequent courtroom appearance, he exclaimed: “Free speech or die, Portland. You call it terrorism I call it patriotism.”

Updated 9:26 a.m. ET on Aug. 14

Alt-right. White nationalist. Free speech. Hate speech.

A number of labels involving the far right have been tossed about once again after a weekend white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., turned deadly.

Here’s a look at some of the phrases being used to describe the people involved and what’s behind them:

Alt-right/white nationalist

There’s plenty of disagreement and debate about what language to use to describe far right politics and the groups that operate there.

These days, the labels white nationalist and alt-right have become ubiquitous. Radical right and ultra-right are older terms from the 1950s and ’60s, and other terms include paleo-conservative, the militia movement, identity movement, American fascists, national socialists, neo-Nazis. But according to Mark Potok, a leader at the Southern Poverty Law Center for the last two decades, essentially these groups can be broken down into two main categories those who focus primarily on issues of race and those who focus primarily on conspiracy theories. One idea that courses through nearly all of them is the belief that healthy societies are dependent on racial, ethnic and cultural purity that for the white race, diversity is the path to political and cultural extinction.

The thinking is that each racial/ethnic group should get their own country, but the USA (and Europe) is for white, European, Christian culture.

It’s why language like that of Jeremy Christian who allegedly stabbed three people on the Portland Metro then shouted “get the f*** out of my country” in court is prevalent among the far right.

In the “Unite the Right” rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia last week, white nationalists and neo-Nazis chanted the phrase “blood and soil” and “Jews will not replace us.”

“Blood and soil” began as a political and cultural idea in Germany that predated and then was taken up in earnest by the Nazi regime.

There are several romanticized conceptions in the Blood and Soil ideology race and ethnic purity combined with a belief that a rural, agrarian lifestyle is the healthiest, most sincere, conservative and (during the first half of the last century at least) Germanic way of life. In 1930, Richard Walther Darre wrote a book Neuadel aus Blut und Boden A New Nobility Based On Blood And Soil which glorified “peasant virtues” and aggressively promoted eugenics. It was a powerful influence on Reichsfuhrer Heinrich Himmler. A virulent anti-Semite, Darre became Reich Minister for Food and Agriculture in 1933 and authored the idea of “Rasse und Raum” Race and Space which was intended to provide political and intellectual cover for Nazi aggression and expansion.

This supremacist vision is what separates alternative right/white nationalists from others on the political spectrum. It’s an enormous leap ideologically from mainstream conservatism and the main reason why alt-right membership remains relatively low. Where does the term alt-right come from? Paleo-conservative philosopher Paul Grottfried first used the phrase in 2008 but white nationalist Richard Spencer ran with it and helped make alt-right ubiquitous.

Spencer is a new face of the extreme right movement. Well-educated at the Universities of Virginia, Chicago and Duke, he is a world away from old images of the Ku Klux Klan. According to Pete Simi, professor of Sociology at Chapman University and the co-author of the book American Swastika: Inside the White Power Movement’s Hidden Spaces of Hate, the term alt-right was a successful attempt by Spencer to rebrand himself and his followers as something fresh, young and smart for a new generation.

Among its allies, the alt-right embraces President Trump adviser and former Breitbart editor Steve Bannon. Bannon has called the site a “platform for the alt-right.”

Free speech or hate speech?

Free speech has grown into a major issue for both mainstream conservatives and the alt-right. For mainstream conservatives, the belief that the left is more intolerant of dissent than the right is evidenced by the protests against right-wing speakers on college campuses.

White nationalists believe their First Amendment rights go further: that they should have the freedom to say whatever they like and not suffer consequences for example, getting fired from their job for posting something hateful on Facebook.

The alt-right has developed its own language and symbols on the Internet. Parentheses around a person’s name means they are Jewish. “Cuckservative” is a particularly ugly racist and derogatory term describing establishment Republicans who aren’t considered conservative enough.

Professor Simi says a key feature of white nationalist belief is seeing themselves as victims. “We’re not the haters, we’re the victims of white genocide,” Simi says, describing the alt-right mindset. Marginalized, oppressed and fighting an uphill battle against the powers that be, they view themselves as noble, courageous, even heroic warriors.

“Patriot” or terrorist?

A second category of the extreme right is the American militia movement, which can be characterized by its belief in conspiracy theories. On his Facebook page, Christian praised Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, “May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh a TRUE PATRIOT!!!”

Former SPLC director Potok said the movement’s fundamental idea is that the federal government is involved in a conspiracy against its people’s liberties. The imposition of martial law will be followed by the forced confiscation of guns, and Potok explains that in the end, the U.S. government will be forced into a one world government, the so-called “New World Order” that will be run to serve the global elite. Elements of these conspiracy theories recently made a prominent appearance in Texas in 2015 during an armed forces military exercise, which stoked fear among some worried Texans that President Barack Obama was about to use Special Forces soldiers to confiscate guns and round up resisters. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott responded by ordering the Texas State Guard to monitor the Special Forces soldiers while they trained in Texas.

Martin Kaste contributed to this story. It was originally published on June 4.

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Alt-Right, White Nationalist, Free Speech: The Far Right’s …

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ALTERNATIVE RIGHT

Next time you encounter a so-called conservative, you might ask them what goal conservatives aim to achieve. You will usually either get an answer about traditional values, or a short discourse on the Constitution (if in Europe, they will talk about social benefits instead).

Very few of them will point out that the word conservative comes from the Latin word for to preserve, and that this means they are preserving something. If you bring this up, they will probably answer something about the founding of the nation, or maybe a favorite decade like the 1980s or 1950s. Anything farther back is a mystery, except the founding, which since no one remembers it, is handy like a movie screen for projecting upon.

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ALTERNATIVE RIGHT

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Alt-Right | Southern Poverty Law Center

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Are ‘Antifa’ and the ‘Alt-Right’ Equally Violent? – snopes.com

In the hours and days following the deadly Unite the Right rally on 12 August 2017, President Donald Trump laid the blame for the violence that took the lives of three people in Charlottesville, Virginia on many sides.

The claim that white supremacists and counter-demonstrators carry equal responsibility for the weekend melee in Charlottesville has been widely rejected both Democrat and Republican lawmakers have repudiated the views espoused by rally attendees who were seen using racist and anti-Semitic epithets and carrying Nazi symbols. But the presidents comments have drawn attention to far left demonstrators known as antifa (short for anti-fascist), who have been showing up to counter white supremacist rallies, sometimes violently).

However, videos of a car ramming into a group of pedestrians protesting the rally doesnt show any antifa in the crowd that was hit. Instead, Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman who was killed, was a Charlottesville local and many of the people in the area appeared to be regular demonstrators. Nevertheless on the day she was killed, President Trump said:

We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides.

Two days later, under pressure to condemn white supremacist violence, President Trump revisited the issue, but blamed the alt-left, a made-up term probably meant to refer to antifa. He said:

Okay, what about the alt-left that came charging at [indiscernible] excuse me what about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right? Do they have any semblance of guilt?

Even though the people who died amid the unrest have not been linked to antifa (the other two victims were police officers), questions have since been raised about the violence at the weekend rally and further potential for violence at upcomingevents by both the alt-right (a term that encompasses different strands of white supremacist factions) and the antifa activists who come out to meet them. Experts tell us that statistically, historically, and in terms of philosophy the alt-right poses a bigger threat and greater evil, but the violence at political demonstrations has been ratcheting up in recent months.

Brian Levin, criminal justice professor at California State University at San Bernardino who is an expert on hate groups, said ideology aside, street violence is generally increasing at political demonstrations, as extremist groups are egged on by each others words and actions:

To be sure, there is a violent subsection of antifa which is getting much publicity and much more prominent to say theyre not is just false. By the same token there isnt a moral equivalency in philosophy, but there is an escalating arms race with regard to extremists on different sides, of which I think alt-right are now at the forefront.

But, he pointed out, antifa isnt as organized as the alt-right, and doesnt have the access to the channels of publicity and governmental influence that the alt-right does:

The alt-right is far more organized and has greater access to the political mainstream than their less-organized cohorts on the hard left who do not enjoy or do not have the same structure or access into the political mainstream. Both are anti-establishments and socio-political entities that can radicalize constituents to violence but the alt-right just as an organism is far larger, more sophisticated and more able to participate in the political mainstream, particularly through messaging.

Marilyn Mayo, senior research fellow for the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, said that statistics show that radical leftists have been dramatically less likely to kill people than their counterparts on the opposite side of the political spectrum.Over the past decade, extremists of every stripe have killed 372 Americans. 74 percent of those killings were committed by right wing extremists. Only 2 percent of those deaths were at the hands of left wing extremists. Mayo told us:

I dont want to give moral equivalence to the two sides because one side is fighting against white supremacy. On the Antifa side, theyve never murdered anyone but there have been many murders done by white supremacists, so we have to be concerned about that movement.

But, she said:

You have an escalation of rhetoric and you have people who are willing to fight it out in the streets. With this political polarization in the country right now, you have people who come dressed for battle, and when they confront each other it can lead to violence.

This is kind of a watershed moments because we saw one of the largest and most violent white supremacist rallies in over a decade. It brought together a lot of strains under one umbrella and the fact these groups were able to unite shows they feel the moment is very ripe to get their message out and be in the streets. Theyre not afraid to be out and open in their views. When you have people who have so much hate and bigotry, shouting things like Jews will not replace us, it shows that they are rearing for action. And theres always the potential for violence when you have hate groups going out into the streets.

John Sepulvado, a reporter who has been covering far-right groups for Bay Area public radio station KQED, told us the violence at recent alt-right demonstrations has been used to recruit, and when antifa shows up to fight them it can play into their game plan. Theyre turning the traditional desire for objectivity by the media on its head, he told us.

Citing a lyric from rapper Jay Zs song Takeover that says, A wise man told me dont argue with fools, cause people from a distance cant tell who is who, Sepulvado told us the pattern of inciting violence at rallies from the alt-right has gone this way:

Announce an event thats going to piss everyone who has common sense off, something so outrageous its going to piss 99 percent of the population off, then when someone gets on Twitter [and threatens them], send out a press release saying, we cant practice our free speech rights because of leftist violence. Then show up anyway. They have canceled so many rallies that they showed up at anyway and still rallied. The threat of leftist violence means they need to wear body armor and bring weapons. If its an open carry state theyll have [firearms]. If its not an open carry state theyll bring firecrackers and sticks.

And then when someone pushes them or spits on them, theyll use that as an excuse to strike out. Then the leftists will strike out, and the media wont know whos who.

The important distinction, he said, is that the leftists arent organizing the protests. Theyre just responding to them. Sepulvado added:

You know [the alt-right] is guiltiest when they say, look at them, were not the only ones. Theyre not arguing whether the [car attack] was actually committed, theyre just trying to bring everyone down in the muck with them. This is like a bottom feeding monster trying to convince the world that dolphins are ugly creatures.

Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here.

Sepulvado, John, and Johnson, Bert.Californian Who Helped Lead Charlottesville Protests Used Berkeley as a Test Run.KQED.14 August 2017.

Beinart, Peter. What Trump Gets Wrong About Antifa. The Atlantic. 16 August 2017.

White House Press Office. Remarks by President Trump at Signing of the VA Choice and Quality Employment Act. 12 August 2017.

Politico Staff. Full Text: Trumps Comments on White Supremacists, Alt-Left in Charlottesville. Politico. 15 August 2017.

Ingraham, Christopher. The Alt-Right Is Just Another Word for White Supremacy, Study Finds. The Washington Post. 16 August 2017.

Anti-Defamation League. Murder and Extremism in the United States in 2016.

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Are ‘Antifa’ and the ‘Alt-Right’ Equally Violent? – snopes.com

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Alt-Right Demonstrations Scheduled for 9 Cities Next Weekend

****Update: Alt-Right Organizers Cancel the March on Google, Citing Terrorist Threats****

We, the organizers of the March on Google, join the President in condemning the actions in Charlottesville on August 12th. Despite many false rumors from those seeking to discredit us we are in no way associated with any group who organized there.

We condemn in the strongest possible terms any display of hatred and bigotry from any side. It has no place in America. No citizen should ever fear for their safety and security in our society.

But inevitably, given the timing, what looks and feels like a proliferation of far-right public events is going to attract attention, and probably counter-demonstrators. The march will be directed at Google facilities in Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Los Angeles, New York, Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., in addition to the companys headquarters, GooglePlex, in Mountain View, California.

The protests, of course, were spurred by the now-infamous memo on Googles hiring practices that made its author, Google engineer James Damore, a conservative hero, particularly after he was fired over it. As Madison Malone Kircher notes, Damore chose to show some solidarity with the alt-right.

Since confirming his firing, Damore has done very little press, but his first public interview, posted online Tuesday evening, is with alt-right YouTuber Stefan Molyneux.

Damore doesnt express any beyond-the-pale views in the interview, but Molyneux a mens-rights blogger and accused cult leader with, uh, unorthodox views on race is, well, a pointed choice for a first-interview host.

The alt-right not those prone to cavorting in sheets or goose-stepping, but the kind of people who view Breitbart News as their daily bread and mobilized for Trumps presidential candidacy has reciprocated this embrace avidly. And that has led to next weekends march, as the San Jose Mercury News reports:

We are going to raise awareness about Googles one-sided bias and campaign against dissenting opinions and voices, activist and protest march organizer Jack Posobiec, a self-identified member of the new right that seeks to distance itself from the white-power politics of the alt-right, told this news organization via Twitter.

Googles firing of James Damore is the flashpoint here, said the pro-Trump Posobiec, known for peddling conspiracy theories such as Pizzagate.

Posobiec was also special projects director for Citizens for Trump, a leading outside pro-Trump group during the 2016 presidential campaign. One problem for him in distinguishing the March on Google from Unite the Right is that he was accused by his own former employer, The Rebel, earlier this year of plagiarizing a video script from Jason Kessler, the white supremacist who organized Unite the Right. Oops.

Its likely next weekends protests will mark a point either of convergence or divergence for the alt-right and white-supremacist groups.

As J.M. Berger observes at The Atlantic, the events in Charlottesville represent an existential challenge to the idea of the alt-right as a playful and essentially harmless online phenomenon:

Charlottesville put to rest the idea that the alt-right can be primarily defined as fun-loving transgressive hipsters or an elaborate practical joke (if anyone still really believed that). Even before the culminating act of terrorism, the rally in Charlottesville illustrated that the umbrella of the alt-right is an effective means to mobilize a highly visible mix of old-school white supremacists and neo-Nazis. Offline, at least, this isnt the new white nationalism; its the old white nationalism as the primary beneficiary of the activity generated by a looser collection of people online.

How the March on Google turns out could have significant implications for the alt-right and for their daddy Donald Trump. Charlottesville was a turning point.

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Alt-Right Demonstrations Scheduled for 9 Cities Next Weekend

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Tesla Recalls 11,000 Model X SUVs over Seat Issue

Tesla offered SolarCity between $26.50 and $28.50 a share, depending on a volume-weighted five-day average price of Tesla shares
Car manufacturer Tesla is reportedly recalling 11,000 of their Model X SUVs due to a malfunctioning seat issue.

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Tesla Recalls 11,000 Model X SUVs over Seat Issue

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Hillary Clinton Compares Russia ‘Election Hacking’ Conspiracy to 9/11 Terrorism

hillary
Failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has compared alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election to 9/11.

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Report: ‘Every Wi-Fi Connection’ Vulnerable to Newly Discovered ‘Krack’ Security Flaw


“Every Wi-Fi connection” is reportedly vulnerable to a security flaw that allows hackers to snoop on your internet traffic.

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Report: ‘Every Wi-Fi Connection’ Vulnerable to Newly Discovered ‘Krack’ Security Flaw

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Alternative Right | The Founding Site of the Alt-Right.

If we look deeply into the Western spirit, we see that it is not of this material world, but a desire for greatness and beauty which denies the lazy impulse of the human heart to lounge in the comfortable, familiar and unchallenging. This spirit demands conquest, but first of the self, and only then through the ways of the world. Well, Charles Manson, the well-known celebrity psycho-killer has finally passed away. Actually, he never actually killed anyone himself, always getting his followers to do the dirty work. In many ways he was a brilliant and talented man. He certainly had plenty of charisma, and could probably have taught us all a great deal about group dynamics and PUA. Alt-Right News There are signs that China could be behind the military coup that is underway in Zimbabwe, the African state, once known as Rhodesia, that has been under the rule of President Robert Mugabe since 1980. Thepresent situationappears to be that the army, under the command of General Constantino Chiwenga and Major General Moyo, have imposed military control and Why does the Church obscure the Bibles message that celibacy is the highest state? This latest example of internet censorship in Britain cannot fail to bring to mind another pioneer of anti-Semitic comedy on these shores, the Jewish comedian Sacha Baron-Cohen, whose Borat character sang Throw the Jew Down the Well and threw money at a pair of insects representing a Jewish couple. Instead of a hate crime trial and a disqualification from earning a living, Baron-Cohen got a Golden Globe and over $261 million at the box office Let me be very clear here:I like the Jews and I like Israel. I especially like the fact that the state of Israel was essentially a colonial state founded at the very time (1948-1967) when the tide of history was flowing most strongly against colonialism. That almost puts it next to Rhodesia in my holy pantheon of based, un-PC states. But unfortunately, like Rhodesia, there has always been a sense that Israel is ultimately doomed. When you overuse a favourite weapon, expect the blade to become blunt beyond repair.

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Alt-Right, White Nationalist, Free Speech: The Far Right’s …

Jeremy Christian (right), seen during a Patriot Prayer, allegedly stabbed three men, two fatally, in Portland earlier this year. During a subsequent courtroom appearance, he exclaimed: “Free speech or die, Portland. You call it terrorism I call it patriotism.” John Rudoff/AP hide caption Jeremy Christian (right), seen during a Patriot Prayer, allegedly stabbed three men, two fatally, in Portland earlier this year. During a subsequent courtroom appearance, he exclaimed: “Free speech or die, Portland. You call it terrorism I call it patriotism.” Updated 9:26 a.m. ET on Aug. 14 Alt-right. White nationalist. Free speech. Hate speech. A number of labels involving the far right have been tossed about once again after a weekend white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., turned deadly. Here’s a look at some of the phrases being used to describe the people involved and what’s behind them: Alt-right/white nationalist There’s plenty of disagreement and debate about what language to use to describe far right politics and the groups that operate there. These days, the labels white nationalist and alt-right have become ubiquitous. Radical right and ultra-right are older terms from the 1950s and ’60s, and other terms include paleo-conservative, the militia movement, identity movement, American fascists, national socialists, neo-Nazis. But according to Mark Potok, a leader at the Southern Poverty Law Center for the last two decades, essentially these groups can be broken down into two main categories those who focus primarily on issues of race and those who focus primarily on conspiracy theories. One idea that courses through nearly all of them is the belief that healthy societies are dependent on racial, ethnic and cultural purity that for the white race, diversity is the path to political and cultural extinction. The thinking is that each racial/ethnic group should get their own country, but the USA (and Europe) is for white, European, Christian culture. It’s why language like that of Jeremy Christian who allegedly stabbed three people on the Portland Metro then shouted “get the f*** out of my country” in court is prevalent among the far right. In the “Unite the Right” rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia last week, white nationalists and neo-Nazis chanted the phrase “blood and soil” and “Jews will not replace us.” “Blood and soil” began as a political and cultural idea in Germany that predated and then was taken up in earnest by the Nazi regime. There are several romanticized conceptions in the Blood and Soil ideology race and ethnic purity combined with a belief that a rural, agrarian lifestyle is the healthiest, most sincere, conservative and (during the first half of the last century at least) Germanic way of life. In 1930, Richard Walther Darre wrote a book Neuadel aus Blut und Boden A New Nobility Based On Blood And Soil which glorified “peasant virtues” and aggressively promoted eugenics. It was a powerful influence on Reichsfuhrer Heinrich Himmler. A virulent anti-Semite, Darre became Reich Minister for Food and Agriculture in 1933 and authored the idea of “Rasse und Raum” Race and Space which was intended to provide political and intellectual cover for Nazi aggression and expansion. This supremacist vision is what separates alternative right/white nationalists from others on the political spectrum. It’s an enormous leap ideologically from mainstream conservatism and the main reason why alt-right membership remains relatively low. Where does the term alt-right come from? Paleo-conservative philosopher Paul Grottfried first used the phrase in 2008 but white nationalist Richard Spencer ran with it and helped make alt-right ubiquitous. Spencer is a new face of the extreme right movement. Well-educated at the Universities of Virginia, Chicago and Duke, he is a world away from old images of the Ku Klux Klan. According to Pete Simi, professor of Sociology at Chapman University and the co-author of the book American Swastika: Inside the White Power Movement’s Hidden Spaces of Hate, the term alt-right was a successful attempt by Spencer to rebrand himself and his followers as something fresh, young and smart for a new generation. Among its allies, the alt-right embraces President Trump adviser and former Breitbart editor Steve Bannon. Bannon has called the site a “platform for the alt-right.” Free speech or hate speech? Free speech has grown into a major issue for both mainstream conservatives and the alt-right. For mainstream conservatives, the belief that the left is more intolerant of dissent than the right is evidenced by the protests against right-wing speakers on college campuses. White nationalists believe their First Amendment rights go further: that they should have the freedom to say whatever they like and not suffer consequences for example, getting fired from their job for posting something hateful on Facebook. The alt-right has developed its own language and symbols on the Internet. Parentheses around a person’s name means they are Jewish. “Cuckservative” is a particularly ugly racist and derogatory term describing establishment Republicans who aren’t considered conservative enough. Professor Simi says a key feature of white nationalist belief is seeing themselves as victims. “We’re not the haters, we’re the victims of white genocide,” Simi says, describing the alt-right mindset. Marginalized, oppressed and fighting an uphill battle against the powers that be, they view themselves as noble, courageous, even heroic warriors. “Patriot” or terrorist? A second category of the extreme right is the American militia movement, which can be characterized by its belief in conspiracy theories. On his Facebook page, Christian praised Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, “May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh a TRUE PATRIOT!!!” Former SPLC director Potok said the movement’s fundamental idea is that the federal government is involved in a conspiracy against its people’s liberties. The imposition of martial law will be followed by the forced confiscation of guns, and Potok explains that in the end, the U.S. government will be forced into a one world government, the so-called “New World Order” that will be run to serve the global elite. Elements of these conspiracy theories recently made a prominent appearance in Texas in 2015 during an armed forces military exercise, which stoked fear among some worried Texans that President Barack Obama was about to use Special Forces soldiers to confiscate guns and round up resisters. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott responded by ordering the Texas State Guard to monitor the Special Forces soldiers while they trained in Texas. Martin Kaste contributed to this story. It was originally published on June 4.

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ALTERNATIVE RIGHT

Next time you encounter a so-called conservative, you might ask them what goal conservatives aim to achieve. You will usually either get an answer about traditional values, or a short discourse on the Constitution (if in Europe, they will talk about social benefits instead). Very few of them will point out that the word conservative comes from the Latin word for to preserve, and that this means they are preserving something. If you bring this up, they will probably answer something about the founding of the nation, or maybe a favorite decade like the 1980s or 1950s. Anything farther back is a mystery, except the founding, which since no one remembers it, is handy like a movie screen for projecting upon.

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Alt-Right | Southern Poverty Law Center

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Are ‘Antifa’ and the ‘Alt-Right’ Equally Violent? – snopes.com

In the hours and days following the deadly Unite the Right rally on 12 August 2017, President Donald Trump laid the blame for the violence that took the lives of three people in Charlottesville, Virginia on many sides. The claim that white supremacists and counter-demonstrators carry equal responsibility for the weekend melee in Charlottesville has been widely rejected both Democrat and Republican lawmakers have repudiated the views espoused by rally attendees who were seen using racist and anti-Semitic epithets and carrying Nazi symbols. But the presidents comments have drawn attention to far left demonstrators known as antifa (short for anti-fascist), who have been showing up to counter white supremacist rallies, sometimes violently). However, videos of a car ramming into a group of pedestrians protesting the rally doesnt show any antifa in the crowd that was hit. Instead, Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman who was killed, was a Charlottesville local and many of the people in the area appeared to be regular demonstrators. Nevertheless on the day she was killed, President Trump said: We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides. Two days later, under pressure to condemn white supremacist violence, President Trump revisited the issue, but blamed the alt-left, a made-up term probably meant to refer to antifa. He said: Okay, what about the alt-left that came charging at [indiscernible] excuse me what about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right? Do they have any semblance of guilt? Even though the people who died amid the unrest have not been linked to antifa (the other two victims were police officers), questions have since been raised about the violence at the weekend rally and further potential for violence at upcomingevents by both the alt-right (a term that encompasses different strands of white supremacist factions) and the antifa activists who come out to meet them. Experts tell us that statistically, historically, and in terms of philosophy the alt-right poses a bigger threat and greater evil, but the violence at political demonstrations has been ratcheting up in recent months. Brian Levin, criminal justice professor at California State University at San Bernardino who is an expert on hate groups, said ideology aside, street violence is generally increasing at political demonstrations, as extremist groups are egged on by each others words and actions: To be sure, there is a violent subsection of antifa which is getting much publicity and much more prominent to say theyre not is just false. By the same token there isnt a moral equivalency in philosophy, but there is an escalating arms race with regard to extremists on different sides, of which I think alt-right are now at the forefront. But, he pointed out, antifa isnt as organized as the alt-right, and doesnt have the access to the channels of publicity and governmental influence that the alt-right does: The alt-right is far more organized and has greater access to the political mainstream than their less-organized cohorts on the hard left who do not enjoy or do not have the same structure or access into the political mainstream. Both are anti-establishments and socio-political entities that can radicalize constituents to violence but the alt-right just as an organism is far larger, more sophisticated and more able to participate in the political mainstream, particularly through messaging. Marilyn Mayo, senior research fellow for the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, said that statistics show that radical leftists have been dramatically less likely to kill people than their counterparts on the opposite side of the political spectrum.Over the past decade, extremists of every stripe have killed 372 Americans. 74 percent of those killings were committed by right wing extremists. Only 2 percent of those deaths were at the hands of left wing extremists. Mayo told us: I dont want to give moral equivalence to the two sides because one side is fighting against white supremacy. On the Antifa side, theyve never murdered anyone but there have been many murders done by white supremacists, so we have to be concerned about that movement. But, she said: You have an escalation of rhetoric and you have people who are willing to fight it out in the streets. With this political polarization in the country right now, you have people who come dressed for battle, and when they confront each other it can lead to violence. This is kind of a watershed moments because we saw one of the largest and most violent white supremacist rallies in over a decade. It brought together a lot of strains under one umbrella and the fact these groups were able to unite shows they feel the moment is very ripe to get their message out and be in the streets. Theyre not afraid to be out and open in their views. When you have people who have so much hate and bigotry, shouting things like Jews will not replace us, it shows that they are rearing for action. And theres always the potential for violence when you have hate groups going out into the streets. John Sepulvado, a reporter who has been covering far-right groups for Bay Area public radio station KQED, told us the violence at recent alt-right demonstrations has been used to recruit, and when antifa shows up to fight them it can play into their game plan. Theyre turning the traditional desire for objectivity by the media on its head, he told us. Citing a lyric from rapper Jay Zs song Takeover that says, A wise man told me dont argue with fools, cause people from a distance cant tell who is who, Sepulvado told us the pattern of inciting violence at rallies from the alt-right has gone this way: Announce an event thats going to piss everyone who has common sense off, something so outrageous its going to piss 99 percent of the population off, then when someone gets on Twitter [and threatens them], send out a press release saying, we cant practice our free speech rights because of leftist violence. Then show up anyway. They have canceled so many rallies that they showed up at anyway and still rallied. The threat of leftist violence means they need to wear body armor and bring weapons. If its an open carry state theyll have [firearms]. If its not an open carry state theyll bring firecrackers and sticks. And then when someone pushes them or spits on them, theyll use that as an excuse to strike out. Then the leftists will strike out, and the media wont know whos who. The important distinction, he said, is that the leftists arent organizing the protests. Theyre just responding to them. Sepulvado added: You know [the alt-right] is guiltiest when they say, look at them, were not the only ones. Theyre not arguing whether the [car attack] was actually committed, theyre just trying to bring everyone down in the muck with them. This is like a bottom feeding monster trying to convince the world that dolphins are ugly creatures. Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here. Sepulvado, John, and Johnson, Bert.Californian Who Helped Lead Charlottesville Protests Used Berkeley as a Test Run.KQED.14 August 2017. Beinart, Peter. What Trump Gets Wrong About Antifa. The Atlantic. 16 August 2017. White House Press Office. Remarks by President Trump at Signing of the VA Choice and Quality Employment Act. 12 August 2017. Politico Staff. Full Text: Trumps Comments on White Supremacists, Alt-Left in Charlottesville. Politico. 15 August 2017. Ingraham, Christopher. The Alt-Right Is Just Another Word for White Supremacy, Study Finds. The Washington Post. 16 August 2017. Anti-Defamation League. Murder and Extremism in the United States in 2016.

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Alt-Right Demonstrations Scheduled for 9 Cities Next Weekend

****Update: Alt-Right Organizers Cancel the March on Google, Citing Terrorist Threats**** We, the organizers of the March on Google, join the President in condemning the actions in Charlottesville on August 12th. Despite many false rumors from those seeking to discredit us we are in no way associated with any group who organized there. We condemn in the strongest possible terms any display of hatred and bigotry from any side. It has no place in America. No citizen should ever fear for their safety and security in our society. But inevitably, given the timing, what looks and feels like a proliferation of far-right public events is going to attract attention, and probably counter-demonstrators. The march will be directed at Google facilities in Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Los Angeles, New York, Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., in addition to the companys headquarters, GooglePlex, in Mountain View, California. The protests, of course, were spurred by the now-infamous memo on Googles hiring practices that made its author, Google engineer James Damore, a conservative hero, particularly after he was fired over it. As Madison Malone Kircher notes, Damore chose to show some solidarity with the alt-right. Since confirming his firing, Damore has done very little press, but his first public interview, posted online Tuesday evening, is with alt-right YouTuber Stefan Molyneux. Damore doesnt express any beyond-the-pale views in the interview, but Molyneux a mens-rights blogger and accused cult leader with, uh, unorthodox views on race is, well, a pointed choice for a first-interview host. The alt-right not those prone to cavorting in sheets or goose-stepping, but the kind of people who view Breitbart News as their daily bread and mobilized for Trumps presidential candidacy has reciprocated this embrace avidly. And that has led to next weekends march, as the San Jose Mercury News reports: We are going to raise awareness about Googles one-sided bias and campaign against dissenting opinions and voices, activist and protest march organizer Jack Posobiec, a self-identified member of the new right that seeks to distance itself from the white-power politics of the alt-right, told this news organization via Twitter. Googles firing of James Damore is the flashpoint here, said the pro-Trump Posobiec, known for peddling conspiracy theories such as Pizzagate. Posobiec was also special projects director for Citizens for Trump, a leading outside pro-Trump group during the 2016 presidential campaign. One problem for him in distinguishing the March on Google from Unite the Right is that he was accused by his own former employer, The Rebel, earlier this year of plagiarizing a video script from Jason Kessler, the white supremacist who organized Unite the Right. Oops. Its likely next weekends protests will mark a point either of convergence or divergence for the alt-right and white-supremacist groups. As J.M. Berger observes at The Atlantic, the events in Charlottesville represent an existential challenge to the idea of the alt-right as a playful and essentially harmless online phenomenon: Charlottesville put to rest the idea that the alt-right can be primarily defined as fun-loving transgressive hipsters or an elaborate practical joke (if anyone still really believed that). Even before the culminating act of terrorism, the rally in Charlottesville illustrated that the umbrella of the alt-right is an effective means to mobilize a highly visible mix of old-school white supremacists and neo-Nazis. Offline, at least, this isnt the new white nationalism; its the old white nationalism as the primary beneficiary of the activity generated by a looser collection of people online. How the March on Google turns out could have significant implications for the alt-right and for their daddy Donald Trump. Charlottesville was a turning point.

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Tesla Recalls 11,000 Model X SUVs over Seat Issue

Car manufacturer Tesla is reportedly recalling 11,000 of their Model X SUVs due to a malfunctioning seat issue.

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Hillary Clinton Compares Russia ‘Election Hacking’ Conspiracy to 9/11 Terrorism

Failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has compared alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election to 9/11.

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Report: ‘Every Wi-Fi Connection’ Vulnerable to Newly Discovered ‘Krack’ Security Flaw

“Every Wi-Fi connection” is reportedly vulnerable to a security flaw that allows hackers to snoop on your internet traffic.

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed


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