Archive for the ‘American Renaissance’ Category

Ian Jefferies: Revitalizing transportation systems starts with sensible … – Topeka Capital Journal

Leaders in Washington, D.C. are turning their attention toward revitalizing an American infrastructure system recently graded a D-plus by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The same group rated Kansas infrastructure a C-minus.

Privately owned freight railroads, which spend their own money so taxpayers do not including $635 billion since partial deregulation nearly 40 years ago believe progress will be made through public policy solutions that both enhance public spending and spur private infrastructure investment. Our industry perhaps understands best that optimum performance requires steady capital investment.

Therefore, as lawmakers turn their attention to actual legislation, our industry offers recommendations as a starting point in this sure-to-be lengthy process, simply for the transportation portion of Kansas and U.S. infrastructure:

Stop applying band aids to the insolvent Highway Trust Fund, the pool of money funded almost solely by the gas tax and which is used to fund federal and state transportation infrastructure projects. Because the gas tax does not cover operating expenses, and because commercial users such as trucks do not pay for their proportional use of roads, taxpayers have subsidized the fund to the tune of $143 billion since 2008. We need measures such as a weight distance fee that accounts more realistically for commercial road use.

Do not make things worse by pushing heavier trucks onto transportation networks. Any federal program that boosts truck weight limits at the federal level further subsidizes commercial highway users at the expense of taxpayers, exacerbates deterioration of crumbling infrastructure and tilts the policy scale against a critical freight rail industry. Trucks today dont cover their current impact and heavier trucks will only force taxpayers to further bankroll the underpayment of even heavier trucks, according to U.S. Department of Transportation data.

Enact tax reform to spur economic growth and generate revenues needed for sustainable funding. We need a simpler and fairer tax code, reducing the business rate to a globally-competitive level to broaden the tax base, enhance U.S. economic development and promote growth. Divisive items related to tax reform must not impede the larger goal to enhance competition, which for railroads and American industry in general, will lead to more domestic spending.

Streamline government processes that will similarly unshackle the business community and fuel an American renaissance not seen for decades. By generating policies that focus more on desired outcomes than prescriptive steps, cutting red tape in the permitting process and by actually communicating with the private sector, long-delayed infrastructure projects may finally come to fruition. Not by eradicating regulation, but by instilling good government principles transparency and complete and sound science railroads, trucks and other transportation stakeholders would gain efficiencies that make room for greater innovation and investment.

Ensure the vitality of private infrastructure, namely a freight rail network that serves nearly every industrial, wholesale, retail and resource-based sector of the economy, including energy and farm products, water treatment and fertilizer materials, and a host of goods used in manufacturing in Kansas. This means Washington regulators ditching numerous proceedings to re-regulate freight rail, most notably a proposed measure called forced access, which would allow the government to order one rail company to use its own privately owned facilities on behalf of a competitor. Unneeded government meddling in the operations of this 140,000 mile network that keeps trucks off the road, reduces emissions and employs nearly 5,500 Kansans, is in direct opposition to the larger goal at hand.

To be clear, raising the GPA of Kansas and U.S. infrastructure is no small task. Myriad stakeholders have varying views and solutions. But these principles embody a premise that should be followed in this process: avoid changes in public policy that make things more difficult and increase funding needs.

Ian Jefferies is senior vice president of government affairs at the Association of American Railroads.

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Ian Jefferies: Revitalizing transportation systems starts with sensible … – Topeka Capital Journal

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

White-supremacist fliers posted at UCSC – Santa Cruz Sentinel – Santa Cruz Sentinel

SANTA CRUZ >> UC Santa Cruz students encountered white-supremacist fliers some with feminist symbol Rosie the Riveter amid promotions of white heritage across campus Monday morning.

Its unclear how many fliers were posted to the trees and bulletin boards, but sophomore Andrew McGill, 20, did his best to take down the 25 posters he saw near Kresge College and Porter College.

They were spread out in a bunch of places on campus, McGill said. We cant have this on our campus. This kind of stuff cant happen here.

Most of the postings bore the name American Renaissance, a monthly online publication.

The fliers also decry so-called anti-white propaganda, among others that mention a notion of white guilt.

University spokesman Scott Hernandez-Jason confirmed the fliers had been posted on campus. He did not know the quantity of postings.

Student Maria Ruiz said there may be hundreds of fliers all across our campus.

While many people have reported this incident to UCSCs Hate and Bias Center, this isnt enough, Ruiz said. This sort of behavior directly threatens people of color in our community, which is unacceptable. There is no place for white supremacy on our campus, period.

For McGill, who is considering a major in sociology, such speech is a form of fascism.

It makes me feel angry and we need to rally the community to get together and fight this, McGill said. When Hitler rose to power, there was no one there to really stop him. People poked fun of him and had arguments, but that didnt seem to work.

He said such hate speech may need a more organized response.

They reminded me of the propaganda posters from WWII, McGill said.

UC Santa Cruz Police Chief Nader Oweis said he was looking into the matter.

It isnt the first hate speech posted in Santa Cruz County the last 12 months. In November, the Santa Cruz County Governmental Center was marked in black with phrases criticizing a religious faith and sexuality.

In September, university police released images of a man believed to have delivered packages promoting white supremacy. At that time, Oweis said the communication was a First Amendment issue.

In December, pro-white stickers and fliers were posted across UC Santa Cruz with similar messages as those on the fliers posted this week. Those posted in December also mentioned anti-white propaganda and called for viewers to join the alt-right.

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In November, The Associated Press reported Twitter had suspended accounts of several prominent members of the alt-right movement. The AP refers to the movement as a name currently embraced by some groups to refer to themselves and their ideology, which emphasizes preserving and protecting the white race in the U.S. in an addition to, or over, other traditional conservative positions such as limited government, low taxes and strict law-and-order.

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White-supremacist fliers posted at UCSC – Santa Cruz Sentinel – Santa Cruz Sentinel

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Saint-Gaudens: brilliant, prolific – Irish Echo

Augustus Saint-Gaudens was born in Dublin during the Famine to an Irish mother and French father.

By Geoffrey Cobb

Why do we Irish celebrate our writers, but often forget our painters and sculptors? One who certainly deserves a lot more attention is the Dublin-born Augustus Saint-Gaudens, considered the father of the American Renaissance. He is one of the greatest American sculptors, and one who also pioneered the integration of sculpture with architecture and landscape. His monumental sculptures still grace major parks in Boston, New York and Chicago and he is also one of only two American artists who was honored with a national historic site. However, few today know the artists amazing rise from poverty to become one Americas greatest sculptors.

Saint-Gaudens was born in 1848 during the Famine to an Irish mother and a French father who was a shoemaker. The family with the six month-old Gus, as he was known, left for New York where the father struggled to run a shoe store. Saint Gaudens grew up in the Bowery, attending Sunday school at Saint Patricks Cathedral on Mulberry Street. The French-Irish boy survived numerous fights with rock throwing nativist street gangs who targeted him and other Celtic immigrants.

At age 13 Gus, having to choose a profession, was apprenticed to an accomplished French cameo maker. The boy spent 10-hour days polishing the stone cameos, which were very much in demand as ladys scarf pins at the time. Soon, his boss, seeing his talent, allowed him to create his own cameos.

The art of cutting cameos was more closely related to sculpting than engraving and Saint-Gaudens labored at a workbench with many cutting tools and during his three-year apprenticeship he mastered the art of making remarkably detailed, exquisite cameos that surpassed what many journeymen adults could produce.

The downside to this apprenticeship was the French masters brutal and abusive ways. When he fired the boy for a minor infraction and then offered him his job back at a higher wage, the boy refused. He found employment with another cameo maker who encouraged him become a sculptor. So, Saint-Gaudens began to take evening drawing classes at Cooper Union and then at the National Academy of Design.

His years of apprenticeship occurred during the Civil War and two indelible memories were etched in his brain during this period when he saw General Grant and later President Lincoln in the streets of New York. He would later draw on these memories when creating sculptures of those two men.

Standing Lincoln, AKA Abraham Lincoln:

The Man, is in Lincoln Park, Chicago.

With his apprenticeship complete by 1867, the 19-year-old Saint-Gaudens made his way to Paris where he enrolledat the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and began mastering the art of sculpting the human form.

Back in New York, he had his first major success when he received a commission in 1876 for the bronzeDavid Farragut Memorial for Madison Square. Stanford White, a friend destined for fame as an architect and murder victim, designed its pedestal, and its 1881 unveiling to rave reviews immediately established Saint-Gaudenss reputation.

Saint-Gaudens continued to work relentlessly. In 1887 he completed one of the iconic sculptures in Chicago, the 12-foot foot high bronze Abraham Lincoln: The Man, which still graces the citys Lincoln Park. For 12 years, he labored on what many consider his masterwork, TheRobert Gould Shaw Memorial for the Boston Common, which shows African-American foot soldiers of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry with their commander Colonel Shaw on horseback with the angel of glory hovering above them.

Dublins Parnell Monument was Saint-Gaudenss only

Irish commission and one that was close to his heart.

In 1892, Saint-Gaudens began his most famous New York commission, which he would labor over for 11 years the equestrian statue of General Sherman, which is located in Grand Army Plaza, just across from the Plaza Hotel.

In 1900 the artist moved with his wife Augusta to an artist colony in Cornish, N.H. and his home there would later become a national historic site. While in Cornish he began work on his only Irish commission: the Parnell Monument in Dublins OConnell Street. Saint-Gaudens not only made a scale replica of the buildings and the square, but he even created a full-scale model of the monument in wood near his studio. However, in 1904 there was a disastrous fire in the studio and only Parnells head survived. Saint Gaudens commented, More than all the rest of my losses in the fire I regret, as an Irishman, the loss of the Parnell statue.

An Augustus Saint-Gaudens commemorative

stamp was issued in 1940.

Saint-Gaudens created his Parnell statue from photographs, cartoons and accounts of his habits and even his clothes. The artist felt that the entire monument should be as simple, impressive and austere as possible and the sculpture remains to this day one of Dublins most impressive monuments.

Saint Gaudens was asked by President Theodore Roosevelt, a fan of his work, to design an American coin and so he designed the $20 double eagle gold piece, for the U.S. Mint in 1907, which is considered one of the most beautiful American coins ever issued. By 1907 though Saint Gaudens was dying of cancer, and he died that year at his home in Cornish. His many monuments are an enduring legacy of this massively talented, but under appreciated Irishman.

Geoffrey Cobb, the author of the book The King of Greenpoint about the Brooklyn politician Pete McGuinness, will speak on the subject of the Irish of Williamsburg on Saturday afternoon, May 6, at 2 p.m., at the New York Irish History Roundtable, the Basilica of Old St. Patricks Cathedral, corner of Mott and Prince Streets, in Manhattan.

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Saint-Gaudens: brilliant, prolific – Irish Echo

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Generate – Axios – Axios

Good morning and welcome back to Generate! I hope you had a nice weekend. In case you missed it, the great Mary Keitany ran very, very, very fast yesterday and broke the women’s only marathon world record in the London Marathon. And…a bit of an awkward transition…energy news is happening fast, too! Let’s dive in . . .

Rebecca Zisser / Axios

Here’s a bit of my Axios colleague Amy Harder’s new “Harder Line” column….

After almost 40 years and billions of dollars, the American nuclear industry’s bid to revive itself is falling flat.

The latest: Self-inflicted problems on top of adverse market conditions and public fears about nuclear power has put Japanese conglomerate Toshiba on the brink of bankruptcy.

Why it matters: Toshiba is attempting to build the first new nuclear reactors in the U.S. in more than three decades. That’s now in doubt. The effort represents a big chance for the industry to follow through on oft-repeated calls for an American renaissance and, if it fails, it will exacerbate efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

Why it matters, part 2: Industry officials worry that if these reactors don’t come through, investments in advanced nuclear power technologies could dry up. Billionaires Bill Gates and Peter Thiel want to build futuristic reactors, but that effort would face big headwinds if the effort to build reactors using current technology falls apart. An industry that isn’t growing can’t innovate.

You can find the whole thing here. I recommend the read.

Let’s check out the energy policy stakes from my colleague Jonathan Swan’s scoop yesterday about President Trump’s upcoming flurry of executive orders.

What’s happening: We don’t have details yet on the offshore energy order, but look for the White House to seek to unravel two major Obama-era decisions aimed at protecting vast swaths of U.S. waters.

Why it matters: Obama’s moves keep most areas outside the Gulf of Mexico off-limits to development. Republicans and industry interests say this needlessly bottles up potentially huge U.S. energy resources. Green groups say development would disrupt and endanger sensitive ecosystems.

What’s next: A slog. A splashy executive order will eventually be followed by court battles and lengthy bureaucratic efforts to unwind Obama’s policies. Use of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to permanently withdraw massive areas, as Obama did, has never been tested in court, while rewriting Interior’s 2017-2022 plan requires a detailed, years-long administrative process.

Reality check: Oil-and-gas companies aren’t pushing to launch hugely expansive and complicated drilling projects in Arctic waters in the foreseeable future.

In case you missed it, I looked at Trump’s first Earth Day statement Saturday, which promotes his environmental approach and underscores his sharp break with Obama-era policies.

Why it matters: Trump’s statement arrived amid the March for Science in D.C., and cities worldwide, where demonstrators took to the streets to decry Trump’s moves to cut funding for science programs, and unwind various environmental and climate regulations.

What it doesn’t say: The statement breaks with many of Obama’s Earth Day messages by omitting any mention of climate change

Battle lines: The 188-word statement, which appears to respond to the March without mentioning it directly, seeks to parry arguments that Trump’s aggressive deregulatory push will hurt the planet, arguing that the administration is “reducing unnecessary burdens” while being mindful of the environment.

Quick take: The statement has language that’s consistent with the administration’s skepticism of the scientific consensus on human-induced global warming. “[R]igorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate,” it states, using the type of phrasing that’s common in climate-skeptic circles.

Apple: The Portland Business Journal reports on new developments in the tech giant’s renewable energy push.

Climate: My Axios colleague Alison Snyder’s sharp look at Saturday’s March for Science explores why divides over climate change are so tough to bridge.

Politics: Bloomberg looks at support for clean energy in Trump’s political base. From their piece:

Pipelines: Clip and save for 2020. The New York Post bashes Gov. Andrew Cuomo with a new U.S. Chamber of Commerce report on the costs to consumers of thwarting natural gas pipelines.

Fracking: The Alaska Dispatch reports on efforts to bring the lower-48 shale oil revolution up north.

Here’s a few things on our radar this week….

Earnings: First-quarter reports start rolling in this week from big energy companies. Look for reports from Exxon, Chevron, coal giant Cloud Peak Energy, renewables players including Iberdrola and First Solar, and more.

Rick Perry: The Energy secretary will speak Tuesday at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance summit in New York. So will a lot of clean energy industry players. Full agenda here.

Tax policy: The White House is slated to unveil a tax proposal this week. It won’t include the border adjustment tax (BAT).

Congress: A House Energy and Commerce subcommittee will hold a hearing Wednesday on new draft legislation aimed at reviving the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository.

Thanks for reading! That’s all for today. Please send tips, feedback, and any interesting London Marathon analyses I might have missed to ben@axios.com.

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

The Plot to Paper College Campuses with Racist Posters – Newsweek – Newsweek

Youve seen herthe woman in the red-and-white polka-dot bandana and rumpled blue shirt, flexing her bicep and clenching her fist beneath the slogan We Can Do It! Maybe it was Beyonc posing in that 2014 Instagram photo or Marge Simpson on the cover of Utne Reader in 2011. Or Pink in the music video for Raise Your Glass, her 2010 pop anthem. The origins of the We Can Do It!poster, however, go back to World War II, when it sold patriotism to American women taking up historically male factory jobs to support the war effort. Since then, the poster has become one of the most iconic feminist images in the world.

Rosie the Riveter, as shes also known (a nod to a 1943 Saturday Evening Post cover by Norman Rockwell of a burly redhead on her lunch break, a rivet gun in her lap and a crumpled copy of Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitlers manifesto, wedged under her feet), has graced Hillary Clinton campaign T-shirts, Sarah Palin posters and postage stamps. In early February, two weeks after 3 million to 4 million people joined Womens March events around the country, The New Yorker put a young, black Rosie on the cover, wearing a pink pussy hat instead of a bandana. Rosie has her own national park, a celebrity following and so many mugs, magnets and other doodads that a 2000 Washington Post article named her the most overexposed souvenir in the Washington, D.C., market.

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Rosies latest incarnation: alt-right poster girl. In late January, Americas greatest feminist icon was seen pumping her arm alongside a new rallying cry: Dont apologize for being white! The image was part of a white-consciousness campaign launched by alt-right impresario Jared Taylor on the eve of Black History Month. His mission was to inundate college and university campuses with pro-white propaganda. The election of Donald Trump is a sign of rising white consciousness, Taylor wrote on American Renaissance, his online magazine dedicated to white supremacy, adding later, Now is the time to press our advantage in every way possible.

Along with a 13-step video tutorial on how to hang racist propaganda without getting caught ( advice included wearing a hoodie and posting between midnight and 4 a.m. ), Taylor linked to 15 downloadable posters that co-opt some of the most powerful images of the 20th century, including James Montgomery Flaggs I Want You! poster from World War I, only here Uncle Sam has a new message: I want you to love who you are. Dont apologize for being white. And theres Thomas Jefferson in front of a tattered American flag, with the slogan Men of the West, dont give in to hate. Embrace white identity today!

Taylors posters drip with nostalgia for a whitewashed 1940s America and speak to those who believe they are losing control of their country. One poster looks like a Colliers or Saturday Evening Post cover, with a butler in a tux offering an attractive, diamond-clad woman a cup of tea as she coyly glances at her audience. Tagline: Women. They will try to shame you for being white. Dont let them. Another resembles a retro World War II poster, with two floating heads on a green background and a bubble that reads, Free your mind from hate and Dont be manipulated by professors! White guilt only hurts you!

The original Rosie the Riveter sold patriotism to American women taking up historically male factory jobs to support the war effort. Now, the iconic feminist image is part of a “white-consciousness campaign” launched by alt-right impresario Jared Taylor. American Renaissance

For much of the 20th century, racists have waged their wars in the shadows, spewing pro-white agendas quietly, often anonymously. But when Trump promised to make America great again, which some heard as make America white again, the sheets came off. Taylors schemeco-opting iconic liberal posters to convince bright, young minds that white Americans are under attackfeels more like a PR stunt than a legitimate attempt at recruitment. But as Ryan Lenz, senior investigative reporter for the Southern Poverty Law Center s Intelligence Project, points out, For Taylor to tap into cultural touchstones that have been unifying moments of American culture, and use them to divide groups of people, its quite a strategic move on his part.

Taylor may be depending on an analog form of communicationthe posterbut hes doing so at a time when memes have come to define movements and anything can go viral. So that pro-white poster tacked onto a bulletin board at some college may get ripped down immediately, but a photo of the poster can spread online instantaneously, worming its way into our Facebook and Twitter feeds, our news sources and our social media universes, proving that Taylors approach may not be so dated after all.

Scrolling through Taylors pro-white posters, graphic design authority Steven Heller ticks off their inspiration as if hes reciting the names of his children. Theres Alexander Rodchenkos famous pro-literacy ad from the Russian Revolution, and Dmitry Moors iconic Soviet propaganda poster, and another that combines Barbara Krugers typography with Stefan Sagmeisters face painting. This is a sophisticated way of propagandizing. The alt-right has not done this up until now, says Heller, who co-chairs the MFA Design program at Manhattans School of Visual Arts and spent 33 years as an art director at The New York Times. Ive collected white supremacist stuff for a long time, and its always pretty ugly. You know what youre getting into: white Aryan resistance, white supremacist magazines. But theyre limited to the audience theyre aiming at, he says. [Taylors posters] can mobilize people. Theyre ironic enough where people can think, OK, Im not gonna apologize for who I am. Thats scary shit.

Im certainly not a racist, Taylor tells me over the phone from Oakton, Virginia, where he runs the nonprofit New Century Foundation, a pro-white group that he dresses up as a high-brow think tanknot to be confused with the New America think tank and the Century Foundation, which are both politically progressive. I want my tribe, my people, to survive and flourish, whereas if the U.S. follows its current path, whiteshe pronounces it whhhhhhhites, as if hes breathing life into the wordwill become an ever-diminishing minority, and chances are, a despised minority.

His voice is a soft monotone, almost elegant. He is a trilingual (English, Japanese, French), Yale-educated white supremacist (he prefers racial realist) who believes that race is directly related to intelligence and that whites are superior to blacks. The New Century Foundation uses pseudoscience to promote the philosophy that whites ought to be the majority race. The organization has an annual budget of around $200,000, according to Taylor, and his American Renaissance website gets 400,000 unique visitors a month. He also hosts an annual conference that attracts everyone from white supremacists to former Klansmen and the suit-and-tie racist set. Asked why he launched his poster campaign, he replies, We just got inspired. The timing is good, given all of the controversy around the Trump presidency.

Taylors pro-white posters may be derivative, but experts agree that the person who designed them did some homework. (Taylor would not reveal the designers name but referred to him as a talented young person. Asked to relay an interview request, he reported back that the designer had declined to speak to Newsweek.) This is not a piece of junk, Heller says, referring to a poster that reads, We founded this nation, set over a large silhouette of Uncle Sam in profile. This is well-designed, seriously thought-out iconographyyou wouldnt mind putting up on your wall.

Taylors mission to inundate college campuses with pro-white propaganda includes a 13-step video tutorial on how to hang posters without getting caught or beaten up (wear a hoodie; post after midnight). Pete Marovich/Getty

Thats a very nice graphic, right out of an avant-garde design, says poster collector Merrill Berman, referring to a poster with a large white maze over an orange background, with a small figure running toward the words The only way out is within.

This one knows typographic hierarchy, says Elizabeth Resnick, a professor of graphic design at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design who curates sociopolitical poster exhibitions . Shes referring to Taylors Men of the West poster, which has three blocks of text in different sizes. What to see first, second and third, except that third line is kind of stupidthis is where they show you theyre stupid, because its centered.

But aesthetics only get you so far. A successful propaganda poster fires you up, whether you agree with its message or not. Legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser, who created the I NY logo and an iconic Bob Dylan psychedelic poster and co-founded New York magazine, calls Taylors posters ineffective, sloppy and anti-design. Gesturing toward the Colliers look-alike with the young woman and tuxedoed butler, he says, I cant imagine anybody being persuaded one way or another by this.

Nicholas Lowry, president of Swann Auction Galleries and the longtime poster specialist and appraiser for PBSs Antiques Roadshow, also thinks the posters are ineffective. They will not sway social discourse. Theyll go up on campus, maybe infuriate people and spark a discussion. But it wont be about the posters themselves; it will be about posting them.

Thats what happened on January 31, the night before alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos was scheduled to speak at the University of California, Berkeley. It was close to 8 p.m., and Andrew, 23, and Daniel, 26, were walking around campus with a binder full of Taylors posters, sticking them on trees, buildings and bulletin boards. (Both spoke on the condition of anonymity.) Theyd been hanging posters for 90 minutes when, they say, a white guy in his 20s walked up to them and asked for a flyer. They were suspicious but handed him one. Then, according to Daniel, the guy asked for a copy of each poster, promising to put [them] up around campus.

No, Daniel replied. We prefer to do that, if you dont mind.

Daniel says thats when the guy got noticeably aggressive. He started walking toward us at a very brisk pace, with a very stern look on his face, and started demanding that we give him everything.

When Andrew told the guy to back off, he charged toward him, saying, What the fuck are you gonna do about it? and grabbed the binder containing the posters. When Daniel snatched it back, the guy punched him in the face.

Taylors scheme is to co-opt iconic liberal posters to convince bright, young minds that white America is under attack. American Renaissance

He and Andrew say a second man in his 20s then jumped in and also smacked Daniel in the face. The four young men traded punches for nearly a minuteAndrew was slammed onto the ground, hard, his attacker falling on his left knee. When Daniels glasses flew off his face, one of the guys stomped on them. Daniel remembers one of his assailants shouting, Go back to the internet. If you ever do something like this again, the same sort of thing will happen.

By the time the two guys fled, Daniel had four or five small cuts on his face, and Andrew could barely walk because of his busted knee, so Daniel helped him hobble over to a campus phone, where they called Berkeley police. (The incident is listed as attempted robbery, and the crime report says both suspects wore plaid shirts and had beards.)

This is a violent way to censor someones political speech that we all have a right to, Andrew says. They told us to never do this again, but in no way do I plan on stopping. Once Im healed up, Ill be out there again.

When Trump became the 45th president of the United States in January and started making good on his campaign promises, like introducing a controversial immigration ban, rolling back bathroom protections for transgender students and attacking the liberal media, white nationalists celebrated. Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!shouted alt-right leader Richard Spencer in front of a room full of supporters at the annual conference of the National Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., last November. They replied with cheers and Nazi salutes.

White supremacists have long moved in the shadows, but many of them heard Trumps call to make America great again as a code for make America white again, and are stepping into the mainstream. Johnny Milano/Reuters

The day before, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke had praised Trump, saying, Hes appointed men who are going to start this process of taking our country back, and I tell you, for the first time in years, our side is empowered, our side is enthusiastic, our side is excited, our side is hopeful, but more than hopeful, we are becoming confident.

In mid-March, U.S. Representative Steve King, a Republican from Iowa, tweeted his support for Geert Wilders, a far-right Dutch politician who wants to ban the Koran in the Netherlands and end Muslim immigration. King said, Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We cant restore our civilization with somebody elses babies. Although he got hammered, he stood by his tweet. I meant exactly what I said,he told CNN. I’d like to see an America that is just so homogenous that we look a lot the same.

Trump has never formally embraced white nationalism, which the Anti-Defamation League calls a euphemism for white supremacy, yet his America first policy has emboldened leaders like Taylor to take their messages to the masses. Before Trump got elected, there was a sense that whites were losing their place in society, says Marilyn Mayo, a research fellow at the ADLs Center on Extremism. Ive been here 20 years, and Ive never seen white supremacists feel so optimistic and emboldened as they do right now, in terms of being able to reach the mainstream.

Since last fall, white supremacists have papered more th an 90 college campuses in 32 states with flyers, according to the ADL. Between September 2016 and April 6, the organization had tracked 126 incidents of white supremacist flyer campaigns, 86 of w hich occurred since January. This is unprecedented, Mayo says. Up until now, the internet has been the alt-rights playpenthats how Pepe the Frog morphed from a beloved cartoon meme into an unofficial symbol of white supremacy.

Two groups are behind most of the poster campaigns: Identity Evropa, which launched Project Siege to attract recruits on college campuses and favors posters of Greek and Roman statues, and Vanguard America, which produces monochrome, text-heavy flyers for its Northern Propaganda Campaign. Last March, a self-professed white nationalist hacktivist named Andrew Auernheimer, also known as Weev, used a line of code to send anti-Semitic, racist flyers to 20,000 publicly accessible printers around the U.S. The one-page flyers, which suddenly appeared in printer paper trays at Princeton, Brown University and Smith College, among other schools, mentioned the struggle for global white supremacy and bore two swastikas.

Collectors of poster art say that even the best alt-right stuff is derivative, replicating iconic imagery. They say the movement is still waiting for the infusion of artistic genius that fuels the most compelling graphics. American Renaissance

Images of Klanspeople burning crosses and committing lynchingsthose were the advertisements of white supremacy historically in the U.S., says Stuart Ewen, a distinguished professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center and at Hunter College, CUNY, and an expert on media, consumer culture and propaganda. White supremacy doesnt have a particularly rich aesthetic history that can be drawn upon today.

Perhaps thats why Taylors posters co-opt Rosie, Thomas Jefferson and 1940s Americana, all of which have been recycled with furious frequency for left-leaning causes. Its kind of brilliant to re-appropriate your enemy, says Lenz. These posters are part of a larger global movement to push traditionalism and white nationalism further into the mainstream.

Taylor may be trying to attract new supporters with his flyers, but historically, political posters did something much more nuanced: Through art and design, they validated and strengthened peoples feelings, uniting them around common causes. In 1754, Benjamin Franklin designed and published the first political cartoon in American history, depicting the early American Colonies as a snake chopped up into eight pieces. New England was the head, South Carolina the tail, and along the bottom read the phrase Join, or Die. The image, published in Franklins Pennsylvania Gazette, underscored the importance of the Colonies uniting against the French and their Indian allies.

During World War I, the Committee on Public Information hired artists and illustrators to create propaganda posters to mobilize support for the war. It was a pre-TV, pre-radio and pre-internet world, which meant designers had to create images so powerful they would convince Americans to enlist and turn the national conscience against the enemy. Good propaganda is heart-stoppingly fantastic, even if you disagree with the message, says Lowry.

H.R. Hoppss Destroy This Mad Brute portrayed Germans as animals, with a barbaric gorilla storming American shores as he clutched a half-naked woman in one hand and a bloody club in the other. Fred Spears haunting poster Enlist depicted a mother caressing her baby as they sank, dead, into the depths of the ocean. The poster followed the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915, which killed 1,198 people, including 128 Americans, and was so successful that people rioted in the streets and men lined up to enlist on that image alone, says Lowry.

During the Vietnam War, printmaker Lorraine Schneider scrawled the phrase War is unhealthy for children and other living things around a simple drawing of a sunflower, creating a timeless anti-war icon.

The market for political posters exploded in the 60s, taking on everything from the Vietnam War to womens rights to the use of recreational drugs. UNIVERSITY OF COLUMBIA, BERKELEY

Over the next decades, propaganda posters continued to combine emotional pleas with sociopolitical agendas, from AIDS epidemic posters that tackled fear and misinformation about the disease to the antiIraq War poster that replaced the dancing silhouettes in Apples iPod ads with a torture image from Abu Ghraib. Shepard Faireys iconic Hope portrait of then-presidential candidate Barack Obama, which New Yorker art critic Peter Schjeldahl called the most efficacious American political illustration since Uncle Sam Wants You, has become an enduring image of possibility. It also spawned a crop of parodies featuring various politicians paired with the words Nope, Dope and Grope.

In the wake of Trumps election, the leftlike the alt-righthas leveraged the power of poster-making and poster dissemination on social media. At those womens marches in January, propaganda posters got personal. More than 1 million people protested Trumps presidency and what they saw as his racist, sexist and anti-immigrant policies. Rather than carrying mass-produced posters designed by famous artists, as protesters had done decades before, most people hoisted up DIYers that looked more like fifth-grade art projects than branded content. I cant believe I still have to protest this fucking shit, read a sign held by an older woman. If you build a wall, my generation will knock it down! said a poster board held by a young boy. This is what a feminist looks like, read the posters hanging from the necks of two older men. A toddler sat on her fathers shoulders, holding a sign that said, I count.

Photographs of those signs and posters, put together on kitchen tables and living room floors in Washington, London, Paris and other cities around the world, flooded Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for days. This outpouring of political soul-baring not only boosted arts and crafts sales the week leading up to the marches (poster board sales increased 33 percent over last year in the U.S., and foam board signs were up 42 percent), but it also launched countless listicles of the best, funniest, nastiest and most badass signs. This clever but pointed visual shorthand is easy to share and spreads fast, says David Hajdu, an arts and culture critic and professor at the Columbia Journalism School. Its the lingua franca of 2017.

The alt-right, however, speaks another language. Taylors posters are masterful in their appropriation, piggybacking on powerful impressions made by proven iconography, and yet they show that, so far, white nationalists understand creativity and innovation as well as toddlers grasp aeronautical science. Taylors posters dont even make whiteness funny or something anyone would want to be! Ewen says. It took a left-leaning historian from New York City, who worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a 1960s civil rights group, to jokingly suggest what an effective pro-white slogan might say: Kiss my white ass.

As Ewen says, That would be funny.

Wars are often some of the most fruitful topics for poster art, pro and con; the U.S. government hired artists to stir up support on the home front during World War I and enflame anti-German sentiments. H. R. Hopps/Swann Auction Galleries

Craig Brumfield was freezing his tail off, sitting at a table near the entrance of the Mississippi Coast Coliseum and Convention Center, wearing khaki pants and a thick hunting jacket. It was January 2016, primary season, and Trump was in Biloxi for what was billed as the largest political event in Mississippi history. Brumfield, an artist from nearby Ocean Springs who makes pottery and paints ornate nature and marine scenes, had decided on a whim to create a pro-Trump poster. Thats why he was sitting there in the blowing cold, with a box of 150 posters for salenot the lifeless signs scattered around lawns and crowds, with Trumps name etched in rigid white-and-blue lettering, but enormous, vibrant works of art that look more like lowrider murals or rock concert posters.

In one, a cartoon Trump screams from the center of the poster, as if hes in mid-rant, his mouth wide open and one fist clenched. In his other hand, he holds a fishing rod that has hooked the coliseum as if its a largemouth bass. A gigantic blue crab sits on his head, topped with a red trucker hat and two eagles. Up top, boxy, bright red letters read, Donald Trump, and at the bottom, theres a bright-green 3-D drawing of the state of Mississippi. Scattered throughout are American flags and birds.

Brumfield sold 90 posters at the Biloxi rally. He designed six more for Trump rallies last winter, and now political poster expert Hal Wert and other poster freaks are tracking them down for their collections. For Trumps rally in Madison, Mississippi, Brumfield drew Hillary Clinton in black-and-white prison garb, her face wrinkled and skeletal as Trump dangles her upside down by her toes and brands her behind with an iron shaped like the state of Mississippi. In the New Orleans poster, Trump plays a shiny golden trumpet on a fast-moving speedboat while clutching a fishing net full of voodoo dolls that resemble Clinton, Obama and other political figures, all about to be eaten by an alligator.

Brumfield made a series of posters that tapped into the passion and fury of Trumps campaign rallies, mocking foes and their foibles. Craig Brumfield

Ive not seen anything on the right like that ever before, says Wert, a professor of history at the Kansas City Art Institute and author of Hope: A Collection of Obama Posters and Prints. Thomas Nast is alive and well! Brumfields posters play up everything the left dislikes about Trump: his brashness, his reality-TV showmanship, his utter disdain for Clinton and all other foes. And thats what makes them extremely effective pro-Trump propaganda. According to Brumfield, Trump fansas well as campaign staffers and Trump himselfate them up. (The president signed one of his Biloxi posters.) I could have sold a heck of a lot more if Id put them on my Facebook and website, but everyone has their own politics. I dont want people to get the wrong message and be hating on my artwork. (Brumfield adds that he voted for Trump.)

His posters are as raw and brazen as Trump and do exactly what propaganda should do: hit you in the gut. Yet some experts are skeptical about their impact. Heller likens Brumfields posters to nasty comic book art by an untutored yet heartfelt high-schooler. Resnick says that if they are the future of political art, we are all doomed to complete mediocrity!

But Brumfield isnt particularly concerned about creating capital A art. He set out to capture Trump, the man, in a language his fans could understandanother kind of lingua franca. Seems to me the left didn’t have much to offer in the art spectrum concerning politics this year, he says. This was a perfect time in American history to visually capture the momentum and power of the campaign with originality, not ripping old images off and putting new messages in them to fit the order, he says, referring to Taylors pro-white posters. I looked through those and rolled my eyes. Not that people should not be proud of their heritage or culture, but I frown on extreme measures to push anyones color. Colors only matter to me when I am doing artwork.

Taylor and his alt-right buddies agreeso long as the color is white. Unlike Brumfields posters, which captured the raucous rebellion of the voters who put Trump in the White House, Taylors work focuses on a marginalized belief in white supremacy. The success of his pro-white posters is not that they are artful, nor is it their ability to recruit new blood (at least not yet). Its that they exist at all. I do hope the alt-right doesnt figure it out, Lowry says. An image is worth a thousand words, and if they do figure out how to do PR, it wont bode well for the rest of us.

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The Plot to Paper College Campuses with Racist Posters – Newsweek – Newsweek

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As America ages, falls become costly – VVdailypress.com

By Sam Asano

Over the past few weeks, we have discussed a large-scale issue of creating an American renaissance by getting back to manufacturing, where we once excelled.

Today let us switch our subject to issues that we live constantly with. The following is a public presentation I did on March 22. The subject was Falling Down. No, it isnt the famous 1993 movie featuring Michael Douglas. It is about people falling. Yes, physically.

America is aging. Yes, aging fast. Our population of the 65-plus group now stands at 50 million, and the number will reach 90 million in 2050, a mere 33 years away. That sector of population, a nation within our nation, shall we call it, is larger than todays combined population of Germany and Austria together. In the year 2050, the aging 65-plus sector of population occupies fully 20 percent of America.

Are we ready to deal with this demographic sea change? No, not really. America has always striven to think young and act young. TV media always focuses on 18-to-40 market. Although that sector of the audience of TV networks has drastically declined in the recent two decades, the networks still focus on that same demographic sector as though nothing has happened.

This nationwide indifference toward the aged has caused a distinctly myopic view of not paying close attention to the issues and problems the aged face daily. So, today I will discuss one of the most prominent problems this nation is facing and will continue to face without developing an effective solution.

That is falling. For young people, falling doesnt constitute a serious health hazard most of the time. They feel pain and grimace, pick themselves up and dust off, and start walking. A few hours later the incident is all but forgotten. However, for those 65 and older, falling constitutes a very serious threat to their health from just a staggering pain but no damage, to a few hours in the emergency room to a few weeks in the hospital to finally a death.

About 1 million people fall in a month in America. Of the roughly 12 million falls per year, 700,000 people are hospitalized at an average cost to Medicare A of $37,000 per case. The total expense to Medicare A now stands at $26 billion per year. Not so fast. A hospitalized patient with some serious issues would require rehab and other specialized treatment after being discharged, and this is estimated as an additional $14 billion, making the current total hospitalization economic cost to $40 billion per year.

The people who fall but are not hospitalized would have some medical expenses, yet this figure has not been tabulated so far. Just consider the staggering loss of $40 billion per year. NASAs annual budget is $20 billion, and U.S. cancer research spending is a paltry $5 billion a year.

If we could 1) prevent people from falling, 2) report without fail any people falling instantly, and 3) train people to correctly walk with a certain walking method with a properly-designed slip-resistant footwear, I am convinced the loss could be cut by half easily. Thats what science and technology are for. And we know we are good at them.

So, lets think about proceeding to develop a system that saves this country some serious money.

First, before we embark on such an important project, lets us examine todays state of art. The generic name for systems that enable users to report personal emergencies is called PERS. It stands for Personal Emergency Reporting System. Most PERS are on a subscription basis, and it costs users anywhere between $25 to $40 a month with some going up as high as $60. Most systems provide users with a push button on a lanyard, and the users wear them on their necks. In case of emergency, the user presses the button, and this signals to the remote PERS station. Most systems allow users to speak to the customer service, and the desk person decides the degree of emergency as to if dispatching EMTs is necessary.

The main problem with this system is that about 45 percent of people who fall either pass out and are incapable of pressing the activation button, or are injured badly as well so they are not able to press the button.

Other systems use some accelerometers and a gyroscope built in a wristwatch case, and this system is supposed to detect a fall. This system is an indirect measurement method and is likely not 100 percent reliable.

Neither legacy systems are 100 percent reliable. A system that is 100 percent reliable must be developed to reduce this $40 billion waste.

To be continued.

Shintaro “Sam” Asano was named by MIT in 2011 as one of the top 10 most influential inventors of the 20th century. He lives on the seacoast of New Hampshire with his dog Sophie. You can write to Sam at sasano@americaninventioninstitute

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Californians for Population Stabilization Board Chair Ben … – Southern Poverty Law Center

Dear ****: whatever Michael Harts opinions regarding race might be, he is not an astronomer and has not been one for more than two decades, Zuckerman wrote in an email exchange with a postdoctoral researcher who quizzed him about Harts racist views. Zuckerman and Hart also organized a conference together titled Symposium on the Implications of Our Failure to Observe Extraterrestrials around the same time the book was released.

Hart, a Jewish astrophysicist, has attended pseudo-academic racist gatherings for decades. He is the author of the racist book Understanding Human History, which focuses on alleged differences in intelligence between various ethnic and racial groups. In the past, Hart was a regular at the biannual conferences put on by American Renaissance, a racist publication that wrote, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, that [w]hen blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilization any kind of civilization disappears.

Hart stopped attending AMREN conferences following a very public spat with former Klan boss and professional anti-Semite David Duke. The conflict was trigged at the 2006 conference by Duke, who attacked Jews, telling the crowd, There is a power in the world that dominates our media, influences our government and that has led to the internal destruction of our will and spirit. Though Duke didnt directly say Jews were that power, everyone in the crowdincluding several members of the neo-Nazi National Allianceknew exactly who he meant.

Hart couldnt take it. He stood up and yelled at Duke, You fucking Nazi, youve disgraced this meeting! and stormed out. As many as 50 people at the conference then began to jeer and point at the rapidly disappearing Hart.

Hart and other Jewish academic racists left American Renaissance shortly thereafter, when founder Jared Taylor declined to explicitly ban anti-Semites. Hart went on to host his own racist gathering, a Preserving Western Civilization, conference in response. At that conference, Hart compared the Koran to Mein Kampf and Islam to Nazism.

In recent years, Hart attended Richard Spencers 2013 National Policy Institute (NPI) conference in Washington, D.C. Also in 2013, Hart attended another racist gathering, a meeting of the H.L. Mencken Club in Baltimore.

So why would Zuckerman agree to co-edit a book with a white nationalist, and then choose to ignore his documented racist views 20 years later? Mainly because CAPS and Zuckerman are both comfortable working with white nationalists.

CAPS recently hired and fired a well-known neo-Nazi, Parker Wilson, who was arrested in 2011 after he admitted to fighting with brass knuckles. Police searched his residence and found numerous White Pride paraphernalia, firearms, ammunition and components to make a pipe bomb.

CAPS co-founder is white nationalist Garret Hardin, a visionary nativist who, along with white nationalist John Tanton, helped to build the well-established organized nativist movement in the U.S. that we see today. In a 1997 interview, Hardin stated, My position is that this idea of a multiethnic society is a disaster. That’s what we’ve got in Central Europe, and in Central Africa. A multiethnic society is insanity. I think we should restrict immigration for that reason. Like FAIR, CAPS received funding from the Pioneer Fund, a now defunct organization whose original mandate was to pursue “race betterment” by promoting the genetic stock of those “deemed to be descended predominantly from white persons who settled in the original 13 states prior to the adoption of the Constitution.” Before its insolvency, it funded studies of race and intelligence, as well as eugenics, the “science” of breeding superior human beings that was discredited by various Nazi atrocities and supported by many of the leading Anglo-American race scientists of the last several decades.

CAPS has also made more than a few questionable hires in recent memory. In 2013, the organization hired white nationalist John Vinson as a senior writing fellow. Vinson is a founding member of the openly racist neo-Confederate group League of the South, and the Anti-Defamation League credits with drafting the Kinism Statement, a set of guiding principles for a modern white supremacist interpretation of Christianity. Another white nationalist who writes frequently for CAPS is Frosty Wooldridge, aformer FAIR advisory board member whohas written countless anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant screeds including once writing In order to be faithful to the Islamic religion, Muslims ultimately must degrade and kill all other people who follow any other religions. He has granted interviews to anti-Semites and Holocaust deniers on multiple occasions. Both Wooldridge and Vinson no longer write for CAPS after SPLC pointed out their racist views in a previous blog post published in February of 2017.

Zuckerman is an ally of Tantons and once called him a great environmentalist. He was an integral part of the nativist push to take over the board of environmental group the Sierra Club, a major goal of Tantons, Zuckerman was elected to the Clubs board in 2002 where he then attempted to push the club to end its position of neutrality on American immigration policy to one that favors clamping down the borders. Sierra Club members rejected Zuckermans proposal along with similar ballot initiatives a few years later, dealing a major defeat to Tanton, Zuckerman and other nativists who were heavily invested in the hostile takeover attempt.

Zuckermans relationship with Hart and Tanton is not random. The nativist movement that Tanton started was founded on white supremacist principals and the groups making up that movement todayincluding Zuckermans CAPShave direct ties to white nationalism, despite their environmentalist veneer.

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History journal apologizes for assigning review of book on urban education and inequality to someone viewed as a … – Inside Higher Ed


Inside Higher Ed
History journal apologizes for assigning review of book on urban education and inequality to someone viewed as a …
Inside Higher Ed
Wolters has published a series of articles in American Renaissance, a publication that urges a focus on "white identity." One of his articles is "Why Have We Unlearned What We Knew in 1900?" In the article, Wolters laments that, after World War II, the

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History journal apologizes for assigning review of book on urban education and inequality to someone viewed as a … – Inside Higher Ed

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Strange New Respect: NYT Finds ‘Widely Respected Conservative Economist’ Who (Surprise) Wants More Immigration – NewsBusters (blog)


NewsBusters (blog)
Strange New Respect: NYT Finds 'Widely Respected Conservative Economist' Who (Surprise) Wants More Immigration
NewsBusters (blog)
This is yet another betrayal, just like breaking his promise to deport all illegal immigrants and to repeal President Obama's executive amnesties, said Jared Taylor, the editor of the online magazine American Renaissance, who spoke highly of Mr
Pro-Immigration Economic Adviser Has Trump's Base WorriedNewsmax
An Open Letter from 1,470 Economists on Immigration – New American EconomyNew American Economy

all 64 news articles »

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Strange New Respect: NYT Finds ‘Widely Respected Conservative Economist’ Who (Surprise) Wants More Immigration – NewsBusters (blog)

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Ian Jefferies: Revitalizing transportation systems starts with sensible … – Topeka Capital Journal

Leaders in Washington, D.C. are turning their attention toward revitalizing an American infrastructure system recently graded a D-plus by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The same group rated Kansas infrastructure a C-minus. Privately owned freight railroads, which spend their own money so taxpayers do not including $635 billion since partial deregulation nearly 40 years ago believe progress will be made through public policy solutions that both enhance public spending and spur private infrastructure investment. Our industry perhaps understands best that optimum performance requires steady capital investment. Therefore, as lawmakers turn their attention to actual legislation, our industry offers recommendations as a starting point in this sure-to-be lengthy process, simply for the transportation portion of Kansas and U.S. infrastructure: Stop applying band aids to the insolvent Highway Trust Fund, the pool of money funded almost solely by the gas tax and which is used to fund federal and state transportation infrastructure projects. Because the gas tax does not cover operating expenses, and because commercial users such as trucks do not pay for their proportional use of roads, taxpayers have subsidized the fund to the tune of $143 billion since 2008. We need measures such as a weight distance fee that accounts more realistically for commercial road use. Do not make things worse by pushing heavier trucks onto transportation networks. Any federal program that boosts truck weight limits at the federal level further subsidizes commercial highway users at the expense of taxpayers, exacerbates deterioration of crumbling infrastructure and tilts the policy scale against a critical freight rail industry. Trucks today dont cover their current impact and heavier trucks will only force taxpayers to further bankroll the underpayment of even heavier trucks, according to U.S. Department of Transportation data. Enact tax reform to spur economic growth and generate revenues needed for sustainable funding. We need a simpler and fairer tax code, reducing the business rate to a globally-competitive level to broaden the tax base, enhance U.S. economic development and promote growth. Divisive items related to tax reform must not impede the larger goal to enhance competition, which for railroads and American industry in general, will lead to more domestic spending. Streamline government processes that will similarly unshackle the business community and fuel an American renaissance not seen for decades. By generating policies that focus more on desired outcomes than prescriptive steps, cutting red tape in the permitting process and by actually communicating with the private sector, long-delayed infrastructure projects may finally come to fruition. Not by eradicating regulation, but by instilling good government principles transparency and complete and sound science railroads, trucks and other transportation stakeholders would gain efficiencies that make room for greater innovation and investment. Ensure the vitality of private infrastructure, namely a freight rail network that serves nearly every industrial, wholesale, retail and resource-based sector of the economy, including energy and farm products, water treatment and fertilizer materials, and a host of goods used in manufacturing in Kansas. This means Washington regulators ditching numerous proceedings to re-regulate freight rail, most notably a proposed measure called forced access, which would allow the government to order one rail company to use its own privately owned facilities on behalf of a competitor. Unneeded government meddling in the operations of this 140,000 mile network that keeps trucks off the road, reduces emissions and employs nearly 5,500 Kansans, is in direct opposition to the larger goal at hand. To be clear, raising the GPA of Kansas and U.S. infrastructure is no small task. Myriad stakeholders have varying views and solutions. But these principles embody a premise that should be followed in this process: avoid changes in public policy that make things more difficult and increase funding needs. Ian Jefferies is senior vice president of government affairs at the Association of American Railroads.

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White-supremacist fliers posted at UCSC – Santa Cruz Sentinel – Santa Cruz Sentinel

SANTA CRUZ > > UC Santa Cruz students encountered white-supremacist fliers some with feminist symbol Rosie the Riveter amid promotions of white heritage across campus Monday morning. Its unclear how many fliers were posted to the trees and bulletin boards, but sophomore Andrew McGill, 20, did his best to take down the 25 posters he saw near Kresge College and Porter College. They were spread out in a bunch of places on campus, McGill said. We cant have this on our campus. This kind of stuff cant happen here. Most of the postings bore the name American Renaissance, a monthly online publication. The fliers also decry so-called anti-white propaganda, among others that mention a notion of white guilt. University spokesman Scott Hernandez-Jason confirmed the fliers had been posted on campus. He did not know the quantity of postings. Student Maria Ruiz said there may be hundreds of fliers all across our campus. While many people have reported this incident to UCSCs Hate and Bias Center, this isnt enough, Ruiz said. This sort of behavior directly threatens people of color in our community, which is unacceptable. There is no place for white supremacy on our campus, period. For McGill, who is considering a major in sociology, such speech is a form of fascism. It makes me feel angry and we need to rally the community to get together and fight this, McGill said. When Hitler rose to power, there was no one there to really stop him. People poked fun of him and had arguments, but that didnt seem to work. He said such hate speech may need a more organized response. They reminded me of the propaganda posters from WWII, McGill said. UC Santa Cruz Police Chief Nader Oweis said he was looking into the matter. It isnt the first hate speech posted in Santa Cruz County the last 12 months. In November, the Santa Cruz County Governmental Center was marked in black with phrases criticizing a religious faith and sexuality. In September, university police released images of a man believed to have delivered packages promoting white supremacy. At that time, Oweis said the communication was a First Amendment issue. In December, pro-white stickers and fliers were posted across UC Santa Cruz with similar messages as those on the fliers posted this week. Those posted in December also mentioned anti-white propaganda and called for viewers to join the alt-right. Advertisement In November, The Associated Press reported Twitter had suspended accounts of several prominent members of the alt-right movement. The AP refers to the movement as a name currently embraced by some groups to refer to themselves and their ideology, which emphasizes preserving and protecting the white race in the U.S. in an addition to, or over, other traditional conservative positions such as limited government, low taxes and strict law-and-order.

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Saint-Gaudens: brilliant, prolific – Irish Echo

Augustus Saint-Gaudens was born in Dublin during the Famine to an Irish mother and French father. By Geoffrey Cobb Why do we Irish celebrate our writers, but often forget our painters and sculptors? One who certainly deserves a lot more attention is the Dublin-born Augustus Saint-Gaudens, considered the father of the American Renaissance. He is one of the greatest American sculptors, and one who also pioneered the integration of sculpture with architecture and landscape. His monumental sculptures still grace major parks in Boston, New York and Chicago and he is also one of only two American artists who was honored with a national historic site. However, few today know the artists amazing rise from poverty to become one Americas greatest sculptors. Saint-Gaudens was born in 1848 during the Famine to an Irish mother and a French father who was a shoemaker. The family with the six month-old Gus, as he was known, left for New York where the father struggled to run a shoe store. Saint Gaudens grew up in the Bowery, attending Sunday school at Saint Patricks Cathedral on Mulberry Street. The French-Irish boy survived numerous fights with rock throwing nativist street gangs who targeted him and other Celtic immigrants. At age 13 Gus, having to choose a profession, was apprenticed to an accomplished French cameo maker. The boy spent 10-hour days polishing the stone cameos, which were very much in demand as ladys scarf pins at the time. Soon, his boss, seeing his talent, allowed him to create his own cameos. The art of cutting cameos was more closely related to sculpting than engraving and Saint-Gaudens labored at a workbench with many cutting tools and during his three-year apprenticeship he mastered the art of making remarkably detailed, exquisite cameos that surpassed what many journeymen adults could produce. The downside to this apprenticeship was the French masters brutal and abusive ways. When he fired the boy for a minor infraction and then offered him his job back at a higher wage, the boy refused. He found employment with another cameo maker who encouraged him become a sculptor. So, Saint-Gaudens began to take evening drawing classes at Cooper Union and then at the National Academy of Design. His years of apprenticeship occurred during the Civil War and two indelible memories were etched in his brain during this period when he saw General Grant and later President Lincoln in the streets of New York. He would later draw on these memories when creating sculptures of those two men. Standing Lincoln, AKA Abraham Lincoln: The Man, is in Lincoln Park, Chicago. With his apprenticeship complete by 1867, the 19-year-old Saint-Gaudens made his way to Paris where he enrolledat the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and began mastering the art of sculpting the human form. Back in New York, he had his first major success when he received a commission in 1876 for the bronzeDavid Farragut Memorial for Madison Square. Stanford White, a friend destined for fame as an architect and murder victim, designed its pedestal, and its 1881 unveiling to rave reviews immediately established Saint-Gaudenss reputation. Saint-Gaudens continued to work relentlessly. In 1887 he completed one of the iconic sculptures in Chicago, the 12-foot foot high bronze Abraham Lincoln: The Man, which still graces the citys Lincoln Park. For 12 years, he labored on what many consider his masterwork, TheRobert Gould Shaw Memorial for the Boston Common, which shows African-American foot soldiers of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry with their commander Colonel Shaw on horseback with the angel of glory hovering above them. Dublins Parnell Monument was Saint-Gaudenss only Irish commission and one that was close to his heart. In 1892, Saint-Gaudens began his most famous New York commission, which he would labor over for 11 years the equestrian statue of General Sherman, which is located in Grand Army Plaza, just across from the Plaza Hotel. In 1900 the artist moved with his wife Augusta to an artist colony in Cornish, N.H. and his home there would later become a national historic site. While in Cornish he began work on his only Irish commission: the Parnell Monument in Dublins OConnell Street. Saint-Gaudens not only made a scale replica of the buildings and the square, but he even created a full-scale model of the monument in wood near his studio. However, in 1904 there was a disastrous fire in the studio and only Parnells head survived. Saint Gaudens commented, More than all the rest of my losses in the fire I regret, as an Irishman, the loss of the Parnell statue. An Augustus Saint-Gaudens commemorative stamp was issued in 1940. Saint-Gaudens created his Parnell statue from photographs, cartoons and accounts of his habits and even his clothes. The artist felt that the entire monument should be as simple, impressive and austere as possible and the sculpture remains to this day one of Dublins most impressive monuments. Saint Gaudens was asked by President Theodore Roosevelt, a fan of his work, to design an American coin and so he designed the $20 double eagle gold piece, for the U.S. Mint in 1907, which is considered one of the most beautiful American coins ever issued. By 1907 though Saint Gaudens was dying of cancer, and he died that year at his home in Cornish. His many monuments are an enduring legacy of this massively talented, but under appreciated Irishman. Geoffrey Cobb, the author of the book The King of Greenpoint about the Brooklyn politician Pete McGuinness, will speak on the subject of the Irish of Williamsburg on Saturday afternoon, May 6, at 2 p.m., at the New York Irish History Roundtable, the Basilica of Old St. Patricks Cathedral, corner of Mott and Prince Streets, in Manhattan.

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Generate – Axios – Axios

Good morning and welcome back to Generate! I hope you had a nice weekend. In case you missed it, the great Mary Keitany ran very, very, very fast yesterday and broke the women’s only marathon world record in the London Marathon. And…a bit of an awkward transition…energy news is happening fast, too! Let’s dive in . . . Rebecca Zisser / Axios Here’s a bit of my Axios colleague Amy Harder’s new “Harder Line” column…. After almost 40 years and billions of dollars, the American nuclear industry’s bid to revive itself is falling flat. The latest: Self-inflicted problems on top of adverse market conditions and public fears about nuclear power has put Japanese conglomerate Toshiba on the brink of bankruptcy. Why it matters: Toshiba is attempting to build the first new nuclear reactors in the U.S. in more than three decades. That’s now in doubt. The effort represents a big chance for the industry to follow through on oft-repeated calls for an American renaissance and, if it fails, it will exacerbate efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Why it matters, part 2: Industry officials worry that if these reactors don’t come through, investments in advanced nuclear power technologies could dry up. Billionaires Bill Gates and Peter Thiel want to build futuristic reactors, but that effort would face big headwinds if the effort to build reactors using current technology falls apart. An industry that isn’t growing can’t innovate. You can find the whole thing here. I recommend the read. Let’s check out the energy policy stakes from my colleague Jonathan Swan’s scoop yesterday about President Trump’s upcoming flurry of executive orders. What’s happening: We don’t have details yet on the offshore energy order, but look for the White House to seek to unravel two major Obama-era decisions aimed at protecting vast swaths of U.S. waters. Why it matters: Obama’s moves keep most areas outside the Gulf of Mexico off-limits to development. Republicans and industry interests say this needlessly bottles up potentially huge U.S. energy resources. Green groups say development would disrupt and endanger sensitive ecosystems. What’s next: A slog. A splashy executive order will eventually be followed by court battles and lengthy bureaucratic efforts to unwind Obama’s policies. Use of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to permanently withdraw massive areas, as Obama did, has never been tested in court, while rewriting Interior’s 2017-2022 plan requires a detailed, years-long administrative process. Reality check: Oil-and-gas companies aren’t pushing to launch hugely expansive and complicated drilling projects in Arctic waters in the foreseeable future. In case you missed it, I looked at Trump’s first Earth Day statement Saturday, which promotes his environmental approach and underscores his sharp break with Obama-era policies. Why it matters: Trump’s statement arrived amid the March for Science in D.C., and cities worldwide, where demonstrators took to the streets to decry Trump’s moves to cut funding for science programs, and unwind various environmental and climate regulations. What it doesn’t say: The statement breaks with many of Obama’s Earth Day messages by omitting any mention of climate change Battle lines: The 188-word statement, which appears to respond to the March without mentioning it directly, seeks to parry arguments that Trump’s aggressive deregulatory push will hurt the planet, arguing that the administration is “reducing unnecessary burdens” while being mindful of the environment. Quick take: The statement has language that’s consistent with the administration’s skepticism of the scientific consensus on human-induced global warming. “[R]igorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate,” it states, using the type of phrasing that’s common in climate-skeptic circles. Apple: The Portland Business Journal reports on new developments in the tech giant’s renewable energy push. Climate: My Axios colleague Alison Snyder’s sharp look at Saturday’s March for Science explores why divides over climate change are so tough to bridge. Politics: Bloomberg looks at support for clean energy in Trump’s political base. From their piece: Pipelines: Clip and save for 2020. The New York Post bashes Gov. Andrew Cuomo with a new U.S. Chamber of Commerce report on the costs to consumers of thwarting natural gas pipelines. Fracking: The Alaska Dispatch reports on efforts to bring the lower-48 shale oil revolution up north. Here’s a few things on our radar this week…. Earnings: First-quarter reports start rolling in this week from big energy companies. Look for reports from Exxon, Chevron, coal giant Cloud Peak Energy, renewables players including Iberdrola and First Solar, and more. Rick Perry: The Energy secretary will speak Tuesday at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance summit in New York. So will a lot of clean energy industry players. Full agenda here. Tax policy: The White House is slated to unveil a tax proposal this week. It won’t include the border adjustment tax (BAT). Congress: A House Energy and Commerce subcommittee will hold a hearing Wednesday on new draft legislation aimed at reviving the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Thanks for reading! That’s all for today. Please send tips, feedback, and any interesting London Marathon analyses I might have missed to ben@axios.com.

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

The Plot to Paper College Campuses with Racist Posters – Newsweek – Newsweek

Youve seen herthe woman in the red-and-white polka-dot bandana and rumpled blue shirt, flexing her bicep and clenching her fist beneath the slogan We Can Do It! Maybe it was Beyonc posing in that 2014 Instagram photo or Marge Simpson on the cover of Utne Reader in 2011. Or Pink in the music video for Raise Your Glass, her 2010 pop anthem. The origins of the We Can Do It!poster, however, go back to World War II, when it sold patriotism to American women taking up historically male factory jobs to support the war effort. Since then, the poster has become one of the most iconic feminist images in the world. Rosie the Riveter, as shes also known (a nod to a 1943 Saturday Evening Post cover by Norman Rockwell of a burly redhead on her lunch break, a rivet gun in her lap and a crumpled copy of Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitlers manifesto, wedged under her feet), has graced Hillary Clinton campaign T-shirts, Sarah Palin posters and postage stamps. In early February, two weeks after 3 million to 4 million people joined Womens March events around the country, The New Yorker put a young, black Rosie on the cover, wearing a pink pussy hat instead of a bandana. Rosie has her own national park, a celebrity following and so many mugs, magnets and other doodads that a 2000 Washington Post article named her the most overexposed souvenir in the Washington, D.C., market. Try Newsweek from $3.25 per week Rosies latest incarnation: alt-right poster girl. In late January, Americas greatest feminist icon was seen pumping her arm alongside a new rallying cry: Dont apologize for being white! The image was part of a white-consciousness campaign launched by alt-right impresario Jared Taylor on the eve of Black History Month. His mission was to inundate college and university campuses with pro-white propaganda. The election of Donald Trump is a sign of rising white consciousness, Taylor wrote on American Renaissance, his online magazine dedicated to white supremacy, adding later, Now is the time to press our advantage in every way possible. Along with a 13-step video tutorial on how to hang racist propaganda without getting caught ( advice included wearing a hoodie and posting between midnight and 4 a.m. ), Taylor linked to 15 downloadable posters that co-opt some of the most powerful images of the 20th century, including James Montgomery Flaggs I Want You! poster from World War I, only here Uncle Sam has a new message: I want you to love who you are. Dont apologize for being white. And theres Thomas Jefferson in front of a tattered American flag, with the slogan Men of the West, dont give in to hate. Embrace white identity today! Taylors posters drip with nostalgia for a whitewashed 1940s America and speak to those who believe they are losing control of their country. One poster looks like a Colliers or Saturday Evening Post cover, with a butler in a tux offering an attractive, diamond-clad woman a cup of tea as she coyly glances at her audience. Tagline: Women. They will try to shame you for being white. Dont let them. Another resembles a retro World War II poster, with two floating heads on a green background and a bubble that reads, Free your mind from hate and Dont be manipulated by professors! White guilt only hurts you! The original Rosie the Riveter sold patriotism to American women taking up historically male factory jobs to support the war effort. Now, the iconic feminist image is part of a “white-consciousness campaign” launched by alt-right impresario Jared Taylor. American Renaissance For much of the 20th century, racists have waged their wars in the shadows, spewing pro-white agendas quietly, often anonymously. But when Trump promised to make America great again, which some heard as make America white again, the sheets came off. Taylors schemeco-opting iconic liberal posters to convince bright, young minds that white Americans are under attackfeels more like a PR stunt than a legitimate attempt at recruitment. But as Ryan Lenz, senior investigative reporter for the Southern Poverty Law Center s Intelligence Project, points out, For Taylor to tap into cultural touchstones that have been unifying moments of American culture, and use them to divide groups of people, its quite a strategic move on his part. Taylor may be depending on an analog form of communicationthe posterbut hes doing so at a time when memes have come to define movements and anything can go viral. So that pro-white poster tacked onto a bulletin board at some college may get ripped down immediately, but a photo of the poster can spread online instantaneously, worming its way into our Facebook and Twitter feeds, our news sources and our social media universes, proving that Taylors approach may not be so dated after all. Scrolling through Taylors pro-white posters, graphic design authority Steven Heller ticks off their inspiration as if hes reciting the names of his children. Theres Alexander Rodchenkos famous pro-literacy ad from the Russian Revolution, and Dmitry Moors iconic Soviet propaganda poster, and another that combines Barbara Krugers typography with Stefan Sagmeisters face painting. This is a sophisticated way of propagandizing. The alt-right has not done this up until now, says Heller, who co-chairs the MFA Design program at Manhattans School of Visual Arts and spent 33 years as an art director at The New York Times. Ive collected white supremacist stuff for a long time, and its always pretty ugly. You know what youre getting into: white Aryan resistance, white supremacist magazines. But theyre limited to the audience theyre aiming at, he says. [Taylors posters] can mobilize people. Theyre ironic enough where people can think, OK, Im not gonna apologize for who I am. Thats scary shit. Im certainly not a racist, Taylor tells me over the phone from Oakton, Virginia, where he runs the nonprofit New Century Foundation, a pro-white group that he dresses up as a high-brow think tanknot to be confused with the New America think tank and the Century Foundation, which are both politically progressive. I want my tribe, my people, to survive and flourish, whereas if the U.S. follows its current path, whiteshe pronounces it whhhhhhhites, as if hes breathing life into the wordwill become an ever-diminishing minority, and chances are, a despised minority. His voice is a soft monotone, almost elegant. He is a trilingual (English, Japanese, French), Yale-educated white supremacist (he prefers racial realist) who believes that race is directly related to intelligence and that whites are superior to blacks. The New Century Foundation uses pseudoscience to promote the philosophy that whites ought to be the majority race. The organization has an annual budget of around $200,000, according to Taylor, and his American Renaissance website gets 400,000 unique visitors a month. He also hosts an annual conference that attracts everyone from white supremacists to former Klansmen and the suit-and-tie racist set. Asked why he launched his poster campaign, he replies, We just got inspired. The timing is good, given all of the controversy around the Trump presidency. Taylors pro-white posters may be derivative, but experts agree that the person who designed them did some homework. (Taylor would not reveal the designers name but referred to him as a talented young person. Asked to relay an interview request, he reported back that the designer had declined to speak to Newsweek.) This is not a piece of junk, Heller says, referring to a poster that reads, We founded this nation, set over a large silhouette of Uncle Sam in profile. This is well-designed, seriously thought-out iconographyyou wouldnt mind putting up on your wall. Taylors mission to inundate college campuses with pro-white propaganda includes a 13-step video tutorial on how to hang posters without getting caught or beaten up (wear a hoodie; post after midnight). Pete Marovich/Getty Thats a very nice graphic, right out of an avant-garde design, says poster collector Merrill Berman, referring to a poster with a large white maze over an orange background, with a small figure running toward the words The only way out is within. This one knows typographic hierarchy, says Elizabeth Resnick, a professor of graphic design at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design who curates sociopolitical poster exhibitions . Shes referring to Taylors Men of the West poster, which has three blocks of text in different sizes. What to see first, second and third, except that third line is kind of stupidthis is where they show you theyre stupid, because its centered. But aesthetics only get you so far. A successful propaganda poster fires you up, whether you agree with its message or not. Legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser, who created the I NY logo and an iconic Bob Dylan psychedelic poster and co-founded New York magazine, calls Taylors posters ineffective, sloppy and anti-design. Gesturing toward the Colliers look-alike with the young woman and tuxedoed butler, he says, I cant imagine anybody being persuaded one way or another by this. Nicholas Lowry, president of Swann Auction Galleries and the longtime poster specialist and appraiser for PBSs Antiques Roadshow, also thinks the posters are ineffective. They will not sway social discourse. Theyll go up on campus, maybe infuriate people and spark a discussion. But it wont be about the posters themselves; it will be about posting them. Thats what happened on January 31, the night before alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos was scheduled to speak at the University of California, Berkeley. It was close to 8 p.m., and Andrew, 23, and Daniel, 26, were walking around campus with a binder full of Taylors posters, sticking them on trees, buildings and bulletin boards. (Both spoke on the condition of anonymity.) Theyd been hanging posters for 90 minutes when, they say, a white guy in his 20s walked up to them and asked for a flyer. They were suspicious but handed him one. Then, according to Daniel, the guy asked for a copy of each poster, promising to put [them] up around campus. No, Daniel replied. We prefer to do that, if you dont mind. Daniel says thats when the guy got noticeably aggressive. He started walking toward us at a very brisk pace, with a very stern look on his face, and started demanding that we give him everything. When Andrew told the guy to back off, he charged toward him, saying, What the fuck are you gonna do about it? and grabbed the binder containing the posters. When Daniel snatched it back, the guy punched him in the face. Taylors scheme is to co-opt iconic liberal posters to convince bright, young minds that white America is under attack. American Renaissance He and Andrew say a second man in his 20s then jumped in and also smacked Daniel in the face. The four young men traded punches for nearly a minuteAndrew was slammed onto the ground, hard, his attacker falling on his left knee. When Daniels glasses flew off his face, one of the guys stomped on them. Daniel remembers one of his assailants shouting, Go back to the internet. If you ever do something like this again, the same sort of thing will happen. By the time the two guys fled, Daniel had four or five small cuts on his face, and Andrew could barely walk because of his busted knee, so Daniel helped him hobble over to a campus phone, where they called Berkeley police. (The incident is listed as attempted robbery, and the crime report says both suspects wore plaid shirts and had beards.) This is a violent way to censor someones political speech that we all have a right to, Andrew says. They told us to never do this again, but in no way do I plan on stopping. Once Im healed up, Ill be out there again. When Trump became the 45th president of the United States in January and started making good on his campaign promises, like introducing a controversial immigration ban, rolling back bathroom protections for transgender students and attacking the liberal media, white nationalists celebrated. Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!shouted alt-right leader Richard Spencer in front of a room full of supporters at the annual conference of the National Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., last November. They replied with cheers and Nazi salutes. White supremacists have long moved in the shadows, but many of them heard Trumps call to make America great again as a code for make America white again, and are stepping into the mainstream. Johnny Milano/Reuters The day before, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke had praised Trump, saying, Hes appointed men who are going to start this process of taking our country back, and I tell you, for the first time in years, our side is empowered, our side is enthusiastic, our side is excited, our side is hopeful, but more than hopeful, we are becoming confident. In mid-March, U.S. Representative Steve King, a Republican from Iowa, tweeted his support for Geert Wilders, a far-right Dutch politician who wants to ban the Koran in the Netherlands and end Muslim immigration. King said, Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We cant restore our civilization with somebody elses babies. Although he got hammered, he stood by his tweet. I meant exactly what I said,he told CNN. I’d like to see an America that is just so homogenous that we look a lot the same. Trump has never formally embraced white nationalism, which the Anti-Defamation League calls a euphemism for white supremacy, yet his America first policy has emboldened leaders like Taylor to take their messages to the masses. Before Trump got elected, there was a sense that whites were losing their place in society, says Marilyn Mayo, a research fellow at the ADLs Center on Extremism. Ive been here 20 years, and Ive never seen white supremacists feel so optimistic and emboldened as they do right now, in terms of being able to reach the mainstream. Since last fall, white supremacists have papered more th an 90 college campuses in 32 states with flyers, according to the ADL. Between September 2016 and April 6, the organization had tracked 126 incidents of white supremacist flyer campaigns, 86 of w hich occurred since January. This is unprecedented, Mayo says. Up until now, the internet has been the alt-rights playpenthats how Pepe the Frog morphed from a beloved cartoon meme into an unofficial symbol of white supremacy. Two groups are behind most of the poster campaigns: Identity Evropa, which launched Project Siege to attract recruits on college campuses and favors posters of Greek and Roman statues, and Vanguard America, which produces monochrome, text-heavy flyers for its Northern Propaganda Campaign. Last March, a self-professed white nationalist hacktivist named Andrew Auernheimer, also known as Weev, used a line of code to send anti-Semitic, racist flyers to 20,000 publicly accessible printers around the U.S. The one-page flyers, which suddenly appeared in printer paper trays at Princeton, Brown University and Smith College, among other schools, mentioned the struggle for global white supremacy and bore two swastikas. Collectors of poster art say that even the best alt-right stuff is derivative, replicating iconic imagery. They say the movement is still waiting for the infusion of artistic genius that fuels the most compelling graphics. American Renaissance Images of Klanspeople burning crosses and committing lynchingsthose were the advertisements of white supremacy historically in the U.S., says Stuart Ewen, a distinguished professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center and at Hunter College, CUNY, and an expert on media, consumer culture and propaganda. White supremacy doesnt have a particularly rich aesthetic history that can be drawn upon today. Perhaps thats why Taylors posters co-opt Rosie, Thomas Jefferson and 1940s Americana, all of which have been recycled with furious frequency for left-leaning causes. Its kind of brilliant to re-appropriate your enemy, says Lenz. These posters are part of a larger global movement to push traditionalism and white nationalism further into the mainstream. Taylor may be trying to attract new supporters with his flyers, but historically, political posters did something much more nuanced: Through art and design, they validated and strengthened peoples feelings, uniting them around common causes. In 1754, Benjamin Franklin designed and published the first political cartoon in American history, depicting the early American Colonies as a snake chopped up into eight pieces. New England was the head, South Carolina the tail, and along the bottom read the phrase Join, or Die. The image, published in Franklins Pennsylvania Gazette, underscored the importance of the Colonies uniting against the French and their Indian allies. During World War I, the Committee on Public Information hired artists and illustrators to create propaganda posters to mobilize support for the war. It was a pre-TV, pre-radio and pre-internet world, which meant designers had to create images so powerful they would convince Americans to enlist and turn the national conscience against the enemy. Good propaganda is heart-stoppingly fantastic, even if you disagree with the message, says Lowry. H.R. Hoppss Destroy This Mad Brute portrayed Germans as animals, with a barbaric gorilla storming American shores as he clutched a half-naked woman in one hand and a bloody club in the other. Fred Spears haunting poster Enlist depicted a mother caressing her baby as they sank, dead, into the depths of the ocean. The poster followed the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915, which killed 1,198 people, including 128 Americans, and was so successful that people rioted in the streets and men lined up to enlist on that image alone, says Lowry. During the Vietnam War, printmaker Lorraine Schneider scrawled the phrase War is unhealthy for children and other living things around a simple drawing of a sunflower, creating a timeless anti-war icon. The market for political posters exploded in the 60s, taking on everything from the Vietnam War to womens rights to the use of recreational drugs. UNIVERSITY OF COLUMBIA, BERKELEY Over the next decades, propaganda posters continued to combine emotional pleas with sociopolitical agendas, from AIDS epidemic posters that tackled fear and misinformation about the disease to the antiIraq War poster that replaced the dancing silhouettes in Apples iPod ads with a torture image from Abu Ghraib. Shepard Faireys iconic Hope portrait of then-presidential candidate Barack Obama, which New Yorker art critic Peter Schjeldahl called the most efficacious American political illustration since Uncle Sam Wants You, has become an enduring image of possibility. It also spawned a crop of parodies featuring various politicians paired with the words Nope, Dope and Grope. In the wake of Trumps election, the leftlike the alt-righthas leveraged the power of poster-making and poster dissemination on social media. At those womens marches in January, propaganda posters got personal. More than 1 million people protested Trumps presidency and what they saw as his racist, sexist and anti-immigrant policies. Rather than carrying mass-produced posters designed by famous artists, as protesters had done decades before, most people hoisted up DIYers that looked more like fifth-grade art projects than branded content. I cant believe I still have to protest this fucking shit, read a sign held by an older woman. If you build a wall, my generation will knock it down! said a poster board held by a young boy. This is what a feminist looks like, read the posters hanging from the necks of two older men. A toddler sat on her fathers shoulders, holding a sign that said, I count. Photographs of those signs and posters, put together on kitchen tables and living room floors in Washington, London, Paris and other cities around the world, flooded Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for days. This outpouring of political soul-baring not only boosted arts and crafts sales the week leading up to the marches (poster board sales increased 33 percent over last year in the U.S., and foam board signs were up 42 percent), but it also launched countless listicles of the best, funniest, nastiest and most badass signs. This clever but pointed visual shorthand is easy to share and spreads fast, says David Hajdu, an arts and culture critic and professor at the Columbia Journalism School. Its the lingua franca of 2017. The alt-right, however, speaks another language. Taylors posters are masterful in their appropriation, piggybacking on powerful impressions made by proven iconography, and yet they show that, so far, white nationalists understand creativity and innovation as well as toddlers grasp aeronautical science. Taylors posters dont even make whiteness funny or something anyone would want to be! Ewen says. It took a left-leaning historian from New York City, who worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a 1960s civil rights group, to jokingly suggest what an effective pro-white slogan might say: Kiss my white ass. As Ewen says, That would be funny. Wars are often some of the most fruitful topics for poster art, pro and con; the U.S. government hired artists to stir up support on the home front during World War I and enflame anti-German sentiments. H. R. Hopps/Swann Auction Galleries Craig Brumfield was freezing his tail off, sitting at a table near the entrance of the Mississippi Coast Coliseum and Convention Center, wearing khaki pants and a thick hunting jacket. It was January 2016, primary season, and Trump was in Biloxi for what was billed as the largest political event in Mississippi history. Brumfield, an artist from nearby Ocean Springs who makes pottery and paints ornate nature and marine scenes, had decided on a whim to create a pro-Trump poster. Thats why he was sitting there in the blowing cold, with a box of 150 posters for salenot the lifeless signs scattered around lawns and crowds, with Trumps name etched in rigid white-and-blue lettering, but enormous, vibrant works of art that look more like lowrider murals or rock concert posters. In one, a cartoon Trump screams from the center of the poster, as if hes in mid-rant, his mouth wide open and one fist clenched. In his other hand, he holds a fishing rod that has hooked the coliseum as if its a largemouth bass. A gigantic blue crab sits on his head, topped with a red trucker hat and two eagles. Up top, boxy, bright red letters read, Donald Trump, and at the bottom, theres a bright-green 3-D drawing of the state of Mississippi. Scattered throughout are American flags and birds. Brumfield sold 90 posters at the Biloxi rally. He designed six more for Trump rallies last winter, and now political poster expert Hal Wert and other poster freaks are tracking them down for their collections. For Trumps rally in Madison, Mississippi, Brumfield drew Hillary Clinton in black-and-white prison garb, her face wrinkled and skeletal as Trump dangles her upside down by her toes and brands her behind with an iron shaped like the state of Mississippi. In the New Orleans poster, Trump plays a shiny golden trumpet on a fast-moving speedboat while clutching a fishing net full of voodoo dolls that resemble Clinton, Obama and other political figures, all about to be eaten by an alligator. Brumfield made a series of posters that tapped into the passion and fury of Trumps campaign rallies, mocking foes and their foibles. Craig Brumfield Ive not seen anything on the right like that ever before, says Wert, a professor of history at the Kansas City Art Institute and author of Hope: A Collection of Obama Posters and Prints. Thomas Nast is alive and well! Brumfields posters play up everything the left dislikes about Trump: his brashness, his reality-TV showmanship, his utter disdain for Clinton and all other foes. And thats what makes them extremely effective pro-Trump propaganda. According to Brumfield, Trump fansas well as campaign staffers and Trump himselfate them up. (The president signed one of his Biloxi posters.) I could have sold a heck of a lot more if Id put them on my Facebook and website, but everyone has their own politics. I dont want people to get the wrong message and be hating on my artwork. (Brumfield adds that he voted for Trump.) His posters are as raw and brazen as Trump and do exactly what propaganda should do: hit you in the gut. Yet some experts are skeptical about their impact. Heller likens Brumfields posters to nasty comic book art by an untutored yet heartfelt high-schooler. Resnick says that if they are the future of political art, we are all doomed to complete mediocrity! But Brumfield isnt particularly concerned about creating capital A art. He set out to capture Trump, the man, in a language his fans could understandanother kind of lingua franca. Seems to me the left didn’t have much to offer in the art spectrum concerning politics this year, he says. This was a perfect time in American history to visually capture the momentum and power of the campaign with originality, not ripping old images off and putting new messages in them to fit the order, he says, referring to Taylors pro-white posters. I looked through those and rolled my eyes. Not that people should not be proud of their heritage or culture, but I frown on extreme measures to push anyones color. Colors only matter to me when I am doing artwork. Taylor and his alt-right buddies agreeso long as the color is white. Unlike Brumfields posters, which captured the raucous rebellion of the voters who put Trump in the White House, Taylors work focuses on a marginalized belief in white supremacy. The success of his pro-white posters is not that they are artful, nor is it their ability to recruit new blood (at least not yet). Its that they exist at all. I do hope the alt-right doesnt figure it out, Lowry says. An image is worth a thousand words, and if they do figure out how to do PR, it wont bode well for the rest of us.

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

As America ages, falls become costly – VVdailypress.com

By Sam Asano Over the past few weeks, we have discussed a large-scale issue of creating an American renaissance by getting back to manufacturing, where we once excelled. Today let us switch our subject to issues that we live constantly with. The following is a public presentation I did on March 22. The subject was Falling Down. No, it isnt the famous 1993 movie featuring Michael Douglas. It is about people falling. Yes, physically. America is aging. Yes, aging fast. Our population of the 65-plus group now stands at 50 million, and the number will reach 90 million in 2050, a mere 33 years away. That sector of population, a nation within our nation, shall we call it, is larger than todays combined population of Germany and Austria together. In the year 2050, the aging 65-plus sector of population occupies fully 20 percent of America. Are we ready to deal with this demographic sea change? No, not really. America has always striven to think young and act young. TV media always focuses on 18-to-40 market. Although that sector of the audience of TV networks has drastically declined in the recent two decades, the networks still focus on that same demographic sector as though nothing has happened. This nationwide indifference toward the aged has caused a distinctly myopic view of not paying close attention to the issues and problems the aged face daily. So, today I will discuss one of the most prominent problems this nation is facing and will continue to face without developing an effective solution. That is falling. For young people, falling doesnt constitute a serious health hazard most of the time. They feel pain and grimace, pick themselves up and dust off, and start walking. A few hours later the incident is all but forgotten. However, for those 65 and older, falling constitutes a very serious threat to their health from just a staggering pain but no damage, to a few hours in the emergency room to a few weeks in the hospital to finally a death. About 1 million people fall in a month in America. Of the roughly 12 million falls per year, 700,000 people are hospitalized at an average cost to Medicare A of $37,000 per case. The total expense to Medicare A now stands at $26 billion per year. Not so fast. A hospitalized patient with some serious issues would require rehab and other specialized treatment after being discharged, and this is estimated as an additional $14 billion, making the current total hospitalization economic cost to $40 billion per year. The people who fall but are not hospitalized would have some medical expenses, yet this figure has not been tabulated so far. Just consider the staggering loss of $40 billion per year. NASAs annual budget is $20 billion, and U.S. cancer research spending is a paltry $5 billion a year. If we could 1) prevent people from falling, 2) report without fail any people falling instantly, and 3) train people to correctly walk with a certain walking method with a properly-designed slip-resistant footwear, I am convinced the loss could be cut by half easily. Thats what science and technology are for. And we know we are good at them. So, lets think about proceeding to develop a system that saves this country some serious money. First, before we embark on such an important project, lets us examine todays state of art. The generic name for systems that enable users to report personal emergencies is called PERS. It stands for Personal Emergency Reporting System. Most PERS are on a subscription basis, and it costs users anywhere between $25 to $40 a month with some going up as high as $60. Most systems provide users with a push button on a lanyard, and the users wear them on their necks. In case of emergency, the user presses the button, and this signals to the remote PERS station. Most systems allow users to speak to the customer service, and the desk person decides the degree of emergency as to if dispatching EMTs is necessary. The main problem with this system is that about 45 percent of people who fall either pass out and are incapable of pressing the activation button, or are injured badly as well so they are not able to press the button. Other systems use some accelerometers and a gyroscope built in a wristwatch case, and this system is supposed to detect a fall. This system is an indirect measurement method and is likely not 100 percent reliable. Neither legacy systems are 100 percent reliable. A system that is 100 percent reliable must be developed to reduce this $40 billion waste. To be continued. Shintaro “Sam” Asano was named by MIT in 2011 as one of the top 10 most influential inventors of the 20th century. He lives on the seacoast of New Hampshire with his dog Sophie. You can write to Sam at sasano@americaninventioninstitute

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Californians for Population Stabilization Board Chair Ben … – Southern Poverty Law Center

Dear ****: whatever Michael Harts opinions regarding race might be, he is not an astronomer and has not been one for more than two decades, Zuckerman wrote in an email exchange with a postdoctoral researcher who quizzed him about Harts racist views. Zuckerman and Hart also organized a conference together titled Symposium on the Implications of Our Failure to Observe Extraterrestrials around the same time the book was released. Hart, a Jewish astrophysicist, has attended pseudo-academic racist gatherings for decades. He is the author of the racist book Understanding Human History, which focuses on alleged differences in intelligence between various ethnic and racial groups. In the past, Hart was a regular at the biannual conferences put on by American Renaissance, a racist publication that wrote, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, that [w]hen blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilization any kind of civilization disappears. Hart stopped attending AMREN conferences following a very public spat with former Klan boss and professional anti-Semite David Duke. The conflict was trigged at the 2006 conference by Duke, who attacked Jews, telling the crowd, There is a power in the world that dominates our media, influences our government and that has led to the internal destruction of our will and spirit. Though Duke didnt directly say Jews were that power, everyone in the crowdincluding several members of the neo-Nazi National Allianceknew exactly who he meant. Hart couldnt take it. He stood up and yelled at Duke, You fucking Nazi, youve disgraced this meeting! and stormed out. As many as 50 people at the conference then began to jeer and point at the rapidly disappearing Hart. Hart and other Jewish academic racists left American Renaissance shortly thereafter, when founder Jared Taylor declined to explicitly ban anti-Semites. Hart went on to host his own racist gathering, a Preserving Western Civilization, conference in response. At that conference, Hart compared the Koran to Mein Kampf and Islam to Nazism. In recent years, Hart attended Richard Spencers 2013 National Policy Institute (NPI) conference in Washington, D.C. Also in 2013, Hart attended another racist gathering, a meeting of the H.L. Mencken Club in Baltimore. So why would Zuckerman agree to co-edit a book with a white nationalist, and then choose to ignore his documented racist views 20 years later? Mainly because CAPS and Zuckerman are both comfortable working with white nationalists. CAPS recently hired and fired a well-known neo-Nazi, Parker Wilson, who was arrested in 2011 after he admitted to fighting with brass knuckles. Police searched his residence and found numerous White Pride paraphernalia, firearms, ammunition and components to make a pipe bomb. CAPS co-founder is white nationalist Garret Hardin, a visionary nativist who, along with white nationalist John Tanton, helped to build the well-established organized nativist movement in the U.S. that we see today. In a 1997 interview, Hardin stated, My position is that this idea of a multiethnic society is a disaster. That’s what we’ve got in Central Europe, and in Central Africa. A multiethnic society is insanity. I think we should restrict immigration for that reason. Like FAIR, CAPS received funding from the Pioneer Fund, a now defunct organization whose original mandate was to pursue “race betterment” by promoting the genetic stock of those “deemed to be descended predominantly from white persons who settled in the original 13 states prior to the adoption of the Constitution.” Before its insolvency, it funded studies of race and intelligence, as well as eugenics, the “science” of breeding superior human beings that was discredited by various Nazi atrocities and supported by many of the leading Anglo-American race scientists of the last several decades. CAPS has also made more than a few questionable hires in recent memory. In 2013, the organization hired white nationalist John Vinson as a senior writing fellow. Vinson is a founding member of the openly racist neo-Confederate group League of the South, and the Anti-Defamation League credits with drafting the Kinism Statement, a set of guiding principles for a modern white supremacist interpretation of Christianity. Another white nationalist who writes frequently for CAPS is Frosty Wooldridge, aformer FAIR advisory board member whohas written countless anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant screeds including once writing In order to be faithful to the Islamic religion, Muslims ultimately must degrade and kill all other people who follow any other religions. He has granted interviews to anti-Semites and Holocaust deniers on multiple occasions. Both Wooldridge and Vinson no longer write for CAPS after SPLC pointed out their racist views in a previous blog post published in February of 2017. Zuckerman is an ally of Tantons and once called him a great environmentalist. He was an integral part of the nativist push to take over the board of environmental group the Sierra Club, a major goal of Tantons, Zuckerman was elected to the Clubs board in 2002 where he then attempted to push the club to end its position of neutrality on American immigration policy to one that favors clamping down the borders. Sierra Club members rejected Zuckermans proposal along with similar ballot initiatives a few years later, dealing a major defeat to Tanton, Zuckerman and other nativists who were heavily invested in the hostile takeover attempt. Zuckermans relationship with Hart and Tanton is not random. The nativist movement that Tanton started was founded on white supremacist principals and the groups making up that movement todayincluding Zuckermans CAPShave direct ties to white nationalism, despite their environmentalist veneer.

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

History journal apologizes for assigning review of book on urban education and inequality to someone viewed as a … – Inside Higher Ed

Inside Higher Ed History journal apologizes for assigning review of book on urban education and inequality to someone viewed as a … Inside Higher Ed Wolters has published a series of articles in American Renaissance , a publication that urges a focus on "white identity." One of his articles is "Why Have We Unlearned What We Knew in 1900?" In the article, Wolters laments that, after World War II, the …

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Strange New Respect: NYT Finds ‘Widely Respected Conservative Economist’ Who (Surprise) Wants More Immigration – NewsBusters (blog)

NewsBusters (blog) Strange New Respect: NYT Finds 'Widely Respected Conservative Economist' Who (Surprise) Wants More Immigration NewsBusters (blog) This is yet another betrayal, just like breaking his promise to deport all illegal immigrants and to repeal President Obama's executive amnesties, said Jared Taylor, the editor of the online magazine American Renaissance , who spoke highly of Mr … Pro-Immigration Economic Adviser Has Trump's Base Worried Newsmax An Open Letter from 1,470 Economists on Immigration – New American Economy New American Economy all 64 news articles »

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April 15, 2017   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed


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