Archive for the ‘American Renaissance’ Category

What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

In the late 1980s, I was in my early 20s just finishing my bachelors degree in education at Emory University. At that time, I discovered a book called All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, a series of tongue-in-cheek lessons on living by Robert Fulghum.

He begins the book with an explanation of his worldview:

All I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sand pile at school.

These are the things I learned:

He goes on to imagine how great, how wonderful and peaceful and utopian the world would be if everyone lived by his philosophy. I dont disagree.

Coming right out of collegeespecially one as left-leaning as EmoryI was enamored of the book. I hadnt had sufficient life experience to gain a healthy, realistic cynicism. That was soon to change.

In the Atlanta area in the late 80s, there was an oversupply of teachers competing for positions in the metro area, especially in the better school systems. People with advanced degrees were competing with tenured teachers for the best positions available, which left me to choose from whatever was available.

I finally got an interview with Atlanta Public Schools, which had its headquarters downtown. The interviewer seemed very pleased to have a young, white Emory applicant in her office, so the interview was just a formality. She explained apologetically that there were currently no positions in the posh Buckhead schools (the only schools with any measurable white population), but she assured me she would place me in a good school.

In the end, I taught a total of two-and-a-half years in two different schools before I walked out in the middle of my third year, giving up on the tenure that would have been mine had I finished the year.

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What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

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Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video



Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox
THE SYNOPSIS OF YOUR FAVORITE BOOK =— Where to buy this book? ISBN: 9780873385176 Book Synopsis of An Artist of the American Renaissance by Kenyon Cox If you want to add…

By: Gene Walter's Marketplace

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Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video

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January 25, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video



Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam?
The Charlie Hebdo attacks and their support in Muslim countries prove once again that Islam is a threat to the West.

By: American Renaissance

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Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video

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January 18, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

. The period is generally defined as the mid-19th century but especially the years roughly from 1850 to 1855. Major works from those years include Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Representative Men (1850, though most of Emerson’s best-known texts were published earlier), Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851), Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Henry David Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Walt Whitman’s first edition of Leaves of Grass (1855).

Scholar F. O. Matthiessen originated the phrase “American Renaissance” in his 1941 book American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman. Although Mathiessen limited his definition to the period between 1850 and 1855, the term has since expanded to a broader range of time. In The American Renaissance Reconsidered, for example, Eric Sundquist expands the years covered by the American Renaissance to “the 1830s through the Civil War.”[1]

The notion of an American Renaissance has been criticized for overemphasizing a small number of white male writers and artifacts of high culture.[2] William E. Cain noted the “extreme white male formation” of Mathiessen’s list of authors and stated that by “devoting hundreds of pages of analysis and celebration to five white male authors, Mathiessen unwittingly prefigured in his book what later readers would dispute and labor to correct.”[3] The demographic exclusivity of the American Renaissance began eroding toward the end of the twentieth century. Emily Dickinson, who began her poetry in the late 1850s, made her way into the canon. Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) rose to prominence in the late 1970s. African American literature gained increasing recognition.[4]

The American Renaissance continues as a central term in American studies. The American Renaissance was for long considered synonymous with American Romanticism[5] and was closely associated with Transcendentalism.[6]

Often considered a movement centered in New England, the American Renaissance was inspired in part by a new focus on humanism as a way to move from Calvinism.[7]

The thematic center of the American Renaissance was what Matthiessen called the “devotion” of all five of his writers to “the possibilities of democracy.” He presented the American Renaissance texts as “literature for our democracy and challenged the nation to repossess them.[8]

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American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

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January 15, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video



Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police
Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen…

By: American Renaissance

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Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video

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January 8, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend.

John Derbyshire

The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras.

A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down.

Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year.

John Derbyshire

The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants.

Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day.

Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

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2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

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January 1, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video



LSU, Building an American Renaissance
Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond.

By: LSU

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LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video

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December 20, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video



Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain
Written for the American Renaissance Theatre in Portland, Maine, the brief from the director was “Star Wars meets the Princess Bride”. Battles and perfect br…

By: James Alberty

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Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video

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American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit.

The literary scene of the period was dominated by a group of New England writers, the Brahmins, notably Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. They were aristocrats, steeped in foreign culture, active as professors at Harvard College, and interested in creating a genteel American literature based on foreign models. Longfellow adapted European methods of storytelling and versifying to narrative poems dealing with American history. Holmes, in his occasional poems and his Breakfast-Table series (185891), brought touches of urbanity and jocosity to polite literature. Lowell put much of his homelands outlook and values into verse, especially in his satirical Biglow Papers (184867).

One of the most important influences in the period was that of the Transcendentalists (see Transcendentalism), centred in the village of Concord, Massachusetts, and including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, and Margaret Fuller. The Transcendentalists contributed to the founding of a new national culture based on native elements. They advocated reforms in church, state, and society, contributing to the rise of free religion and the abolition movement and to the formation of various utopian communities, such as Brook Farm. The abolition movement was also bolstered by other New England writers, including the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier and the novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) dramatized the plight of the black slave.

Apart from the Transcendentalists, there emerged during this period great imaginative writersNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitmanwhose novels and poetry left a permanent imprint on American literature. Contemporary with these writers but outside the New England circle was the Southern genius Edgar Allan Poe, who later in the century had a strong impact on European literature.

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American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

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December 15, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

In the late 1980s, I was in my early 20s just finishing my bachelors degree in education at Emory University. At that time, I discovered a book called All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, a series of tongue-in-cheek lessons on living by Robert Fulghum. He begins the book with an explanation of his worldview: All I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sand pile at school. These are the things I learned: He goes on to imagine how great, how wonderful and peaceful and utopian the world would be if everyone lived by his philosophy. I dont disagree. Coming right out of collegeespecially one as left-leaning as EmoryI was enamored of the book. I hadnt had sufficient life experience to gain a healthy, realistic cynicism. That was soon to change. In the Atlanta area in the late 80s, there was an oversupply of teachers competing for positions in the metro area, especially in the better school systems. People with advanced degrees were competing with tenured teachers for the best positions available, which left me to choose from whatever was available. I finally got an interview with Atlanta Public Schools, which had its headquarters downtown. The interviewer seemed very pleased to have a young, white Emory applicant in her office, so the interview was just a formality. She explained apologetically that there were currently no positions in the posh Buckhead schools (the only schools with any measurable white population), but she assured me she would place me in a good school. In the end, I taught a total of two-and-a-half years in two different schools before I walked out in the middle of my third year, giving up on the tenure that would have been mine had I finished the year.

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video




Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox THE SYNOPSIS OF YOUR FAVORITE BOOK =— Where to buy this book? ISBN: 9780873385176 Book Synopsis of An Artist of the American Renaissance by Kenyon Cox If you want to add… By: Gene Walter's Marketplace

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January 25, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video




Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? The Charlie Hebdo attacks and their support in Muslim countries prove once again that Islam is a threat to the West. By: American Renaissance

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January 18, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

. The period is generally defined as the mid-19th century but especially the years roughly from 1850 to 1855. Major works from those years include Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Representative Men (1850, though most of Emerson’s best-known texts were published earlier), Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851), Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Henry David Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Walt Whitman’s first edition of Leaves of Grass (1855). Scholar F. O. Matthiessen originated the phrase “American Renaissance” in his 1941 book American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman. Although Mathiessen limited his definition to the period between 1850 and 1855, the term has since expanded to a broader range of time. In The American Renaissance Reconsidered, for example, Eric Sundquist expands the years covered by the American Renaissance to “the 1830s through the Civil War.”[1] The notion of an American Renaissance has been criticized for overemphasizing a small number of white male writers and artifacts of high culture.[2] William E. Cain noted the “extreme white male formation” of Mathiessen’s list of authors and stated that by “devoting hundreds of pages of analysis and celebration to five white male authors, Mathiessen unwittingly prefigured in his book what later readers would dispute and labor to correct.”[3] The demographic exclusivity of the American Renaissance began eroding toward the end of the twentieth century. Emily Dickinson, who began her poetry in the late 1850s, made her way into the canon. Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) rose to prominence in the late 1970s. African American literature gained increasing recognition.[4] The American Renaissance continues as a central term in American studies. The American Renaissance was for long considered synonymous with American Romanticism[5] and was closely associated with Transcendentalism.[6] Often considered a movement centered in New England, the American Renaissance was inspired in part by a new focus on humanism as a way to move from Calvinism.[7] The thematic center of the American Renaissance was what Matthiessen called the “devotion” of all five of his writers to “the possibilities of democracy.” He presented the American Renaissance texts as “literature for our democracy and challenged the nation to repossess them.[8]

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January 15, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video




Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen… By: American Renaissance

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January 8, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend. John Derbyshire The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras. A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down. Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year. John Derbyshire The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants. Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day. Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

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January 1, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video




LSU, Building an American Renaissance Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond. By: LSU

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December 20, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video




Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain Written for the American Renaissance Theatre in Portland, Maine, the brief from the director was “Star Wars meets the Princess Bride”. Battles and perfect br… By: James Alberty

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December 20, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit. The literary scene of the period was dominated by a group of New England writers, the Brahmins, notably Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. They were aristocrats, steeped in foreign culture, active as professors at Harvard College, and interested in creating a genteel American literature based on foreign models. Longfellow adapted European methods of storytelling and versifying to narrative poems dealing with American history. Holmes, in his occasional poems and his Breakfast-Table series (185891), brought touches of urbanity and jocosity to polite literature. Lowell put much of his homelands outlook and values into verse, especially in his satirical Biglow Papers (184867). One of the most important influences in the period was that of the Transcendentalists (see Transcendentalism), centred in the village of Concord, Massachusetts, and including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, and Margaret Fuller. The Transcendentalists contributed to the founding of a new national culture based on native elements. They advocated reforms in church, state, and society, contributing to the rise of free religion and the abolition movement and to the formation of various utopian communities, such as Brook Farm. The abolition movement was also bolstered by other New England writers, including the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier and the novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) dramatized the plight of the black slave. Apart from the Transcendentalists, there emerged during this period great imaginative writersNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitmanwhose novels and poetry left a permanent imprint on American literature. Contemporary with these writers but outside the New England circle was the Southern genius Edgar Allan Poe, who later in the century had a strong impact on European literature.

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December 15, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed


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