Archive for the ‘American Renaissance’ Category

Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video



Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police
Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen…

By: American Renaissance

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Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video

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2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend.

John Derbyshire

The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras.

A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down.

Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year.

John Derbyshire

The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants.

Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day.

Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

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2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

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LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video



LSU, Building an American Renaissance
Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond.

By: LSU

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LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video

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Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video



Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain
Written for the American Renaissance Theatre in Portland, Maine, the brief from the director was “Star Wars meets the Princess Bride”. Battles and perfect br…

By: James Alberty

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Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video

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American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit.

The literary scene of the period was dominated by a group of New England writers, the Brahmins, notably Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. They were aristocrats, steeped in foreign culture, active as professors at Harvard College, and interested in creating a genteel American literature based on foreign models. Longfellow adapted European methods of storytelling and versifying to narrative poems dealing with American history. Holmes, in his occasional poems and his Breakfast-Table series (185891), brought touches of urbanity and jocosity to polite literature. Lowell put much of his homelands outlook and values into verse, especially in his satirical Biglow Papers (184867).

One of the most important influences in the period was that of the Transcendentalists (see Transcendentalism), centred in the village of Concord, Massachusetts, and including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, and Margaret Fuller. The Transcendentalists contributed to the founding of a new national culture based on native elements. They advocated reforms in church, state, and society, contributing to the rise of free religion and the abolition movement and to the formation of various utopian communities, such as Brook Farm. The abolition movement was also bolstered by other New England writers, including the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier and the novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) dramatized the plight of the black slave.

Apart from the Transcendentalists, there emerged during this period great imaginative writersNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitmanwhose novels and poetry left a permanent imprint on American literature. Contemporary with these writers but outside the New England circle was the Southern genius Edgar Allan Poe, who later in the century had a strong impact on European literature.

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American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

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THE AMERICAN TERRORIST – Video



THE AMERICAN TERRORIST
The American Terrorist – Book One: Vengeance Rising Available Here: http://amzn.to/1vKeSPf A successful U.S. tech visionary, Thom Spencer, Founder CEO of Nanoexology Corp, wages war on …

By: The American Renaissance Publishing Company

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THE AMERICAN TERRORIST – Video

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About Us | American Renaissance – Business-Class Web …

What We Believe

Race is an important aspect of individual and group identity. Of all the fault lines that divide societylanguage, religion, class, ideologyit is the most prominent and divisive. Race and racial conflict are at the heart of some of the most serious challenges the Western World faces in the 21st century.

The problems of race cannot be solved without adequate understanding. Attempts to gloss over the significance of race or even to deny its reality only make problems worse. Progress requires the study of all aspects of race, whether historical, cultural, or biological. This approach is known as race realism.

American Renaissancewas published as a monthly print magazine from October 1990 through January 2012. All back issues are available here. AR has had a web presence since 1994, and we consider AmRen.com to be the Internets premier race-realist site. Every weekday we publish articles and news items from a world-wide race-realist perspective.

American Renaissance and its website are run by Jared TaylorandHenry Wolff. Our mailing address is Box 527, Oakton, VA 22124 and our telephone number is (703) 716-0900.

American Renaissance cannot continue without help from people like you.There are no monies from corporations, charities, or governmentto support us. If you believe that a realistic understanding of race is essential to thesurvival of the West, please make a donationhere. Donations aretax deductible.

American Renaissance will not sell, transfer or otherwise voluntarily disclose personal informationsuch as names, postal addresses, or e-mail addressessubmitted by purchasers of American Renaissance products or other users of this site. American Renaissance will disclose such personal information only ifrequired by law and in response to proper legal process.

Credit card data submitted in connection with donations and purchases of products offered by American Renaissance are submitted to an online merchant that protects them from interception by Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption. American Renaissance will not sell or voluntarily disclose such data to any third party.

Like all websites, American Renaissance is vulnerable to hacking, viruses, denial-of-service attacks and other incidents that can result in corruption or compromise of user-submitted data, though we have made every effort to makeour site secure. American Renaissance cannot be held responsible for loss caused by breach of the security of its services or that of any of its contractors.

Articles and essays original to American Renaissance may be used on the Internet free of charge, with proper attribution (author, title, date, American Renaissance, web address). For print reproduction rights, please contact ushere. We cannot offer rights to any articles that may appear on this site but that were originally published elsewhere.

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About Us | American Renaissance – Business-Class Web …

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The American Renaissance 1876-1917 – University of Virginia

The Brooklyn Museum * Distributed by Pantheon Books, New York 1979 * Part I by Richard Guy Wilson

(left) FIG. 3: Infant Bacchus, circa 1880. John La Farge (1835-1910). Stained glass window; 226.5 x 114.0 cm. (89 1/8 x 44 7/8 in.). From the Kidder house, Beverly, Massachusetts. COLLECTION: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Gift of W.B. Thomas.

(above) FIG. 4 Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Arch, Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, New York, 1889-1892. John H. Duncan (1855-1929), and McKim, Mead and White, architects. Sculpture: (top) Quadriga, 1898,(south pedestals) Army and Navy, 1901, by Frederick MacMonnies (1863-1937); Bas-reliefs: (inside arch) Lincoln,1895, by Thomas Eakins (1844-1916); Grant, 1895, by William O’Donovan. COLLECTION/PHOTO: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

How men perceive themselves influences what they see and how they create their surroundings. A people or a nation may identify or locate themselves in a variety of conceptual molds: particular religious or philosophical dogmas, the natural landscape, the existential here and now, or an epoch of the historic past. For Americans, the preoccupation with national identity has produced a varied body of commentary, literature, and art containing both superficial and profound statements on the nature of American culture. Typically, periods of intense physical and social change have led to alternating visions of the American experience. And while many periods can be pointed to, the era of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has produced some of the more diverse expressions of American art. Here, within the same space-time continuum, exist the low-slung Prairie houses of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Renaissance palazzos of McKim, Mead and White; the futuristic compositions of Joseph Stella and the tradition-laden paintings of Kenyon Cox; the simplified oak furniture of Gustav Stickley and the Colonial Revival highbacks of A. H. Davenport. The visual and philosophical differences in these works have been viewed as representing on one side a nativistic, modern-oriented spirit, and on the other side, a conservative-academic viewpoint tied to stultified Old World traditions. Later generations have easily grasped the modern work, while the conservative work has been viewed as an anachronism caught in the web of the past and having little if any relation to American civilization and identity.

Yet the conservative, largely European-oriented art had an impact in its time; overwhelmingly popular, the art projected an image of culture and civilization that many people approved of. Partaking of the air of genteel idealism and higher service, the art also gave a sense of release from the stuffy confines of Victorianism. An art and architecture of superb craftsman- ship was produced, one of wealth with tinges of exoticism that delighted in ornamental richness for its own sake. Investigation of the art and the surrounding corpus of literature and activity indicates that many people felt it implied a special connection with the grand traditions of history representing what they identified as the “American Renaissance.”1

The term “American Renaissance” concerns the identification by many Americans-painters, sculptors, architects, craftsmen, scholars, collectors, politicians, financeers, and industrialists-with the period of the European Renaissance and the feeling that the Renaissance spirit had been captured again in the United States. Concurrently, the Italian Renaissance (1420-1580) came into focus through the work of scholars and provided initial identification for many Americans. This was the Renaissance with a capital R. In time, other Renaissance manifestations were admired and seen as providing important models: France and England of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, America in the formative years of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and other countries, including the original sources for the Renaissance, Greece and Rome.

Analogies with the Renaissance were obvious. The American robber baron had been preceded by the Italian and French merchant princes.2Artists found an affinity with the Renaissance, identifying each other in terms such as “Old Master” or with personalities such as Bramante and Benvenuto Cellini.3Many aspired to the Renaissance example: Stanford White designed buildings, magazine covers, jewelry, furniture, and picture frames; John La Farge painted, wrote art criticism and history, and designed stained-glass windows (Fig. 3) and interiors; Charles Adams Platt was an architect, landscape architect, painter, and etcher. The collaboration between architects, painters, sculptors, decorators, and landscape architects in world’s fairs, public buildings, and city plans received confirmation by the example of the artistic unity in High Renaissance Rome. To some, the periods were comparable. Augustus Saint-Gaudens exclaimed after the initial planning session of the World’s Columbian Exposition: “This is the greatest meeting of artists since the fifteenth century!”4The painter Theodore Robinson claimed that many of his comrades “persuaded themselves for a year or so that the days of the Italian Renaissance were revived on Manhattan Island.”5The past spoke to today claimed Bernard Berenson, a Boston-educated boy soon to become the world authority on Renaissance art, who wrote in his first book: “We ourselves, because of our faith in science and the power of work, are instinctively in sympathy with the Renaissance…. the spirit which animates us was anticipated by the spirit of the Renaissance, and more than anticipated. That spirit seems like the small rough model after which ours is being fashioned.”6

According to the ideas of the American Renaissance, the art of the past could provide useful sources for the development of a national American art. While the reliance on sources or authority would be important, what would be produced would be a unique American art; it would be tied together not only by styles, but also by a unity of tradition and approach. Senator James McMillan, the “father” of the 1901-1902 Senate Parks Commission Plan for Washington, D.C., predicted the future of governmental architecture: “It is the general opinion that for monumental work, Greece and Rome furnish the styles of architecture best adapted to serve the manifold wants of today, not only as to beauty and dignity, but as to utility.”7To this end the American Academy in Rome was founded. Charles F. McKim, one of the prime leaders of the school, felt that just as other countries had gone to Rome to learn “the splendid standards of Classic and Renaissance art,” so must Americans, and he added, “I pity the artist who does not feel humbled before its splendid examples of art.”8But ultimately a new art resulted, for, as John La Farge claimed in speaking about the Academy: “We are going to be established in Rome…. This is in itself a statement that we too are rivals of all that has been done, and intend to rival all that shall be done, and we can then feel that the old cycle is closed and that a new one has begun.”9

The American Renaissance, by both definition and action, was intensely nationalistic. It appropriated images and symbols of past civilizations and used them to create a magnificent American pageant. America became the culmination of history for an age that believed in progress. Prime Minister William Gladstone of England noted: “Europe may already see in North America an immediate successor in the march of civilization.”10The civilization envisaged for America was a public life, one of the street, the park, the square, or the mall, of large monuments, memorials, and public buildings in the eternal style, adorned with murals and sculptures personifying heroes and symbolizing virtue and enterprise. Several commentators of the period claimed the United States needed a national Valhalla, and in a sense this was attempted with the great arch in Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn (Fig. 4), the projected “Pantheon” of national heroes in Washington, D.C., or the Hall of Fame at New York University.11The projected vision could be caught in a variety of places-ascending the stairs at the new Library of Congress, strolling on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, or visiting any of the dream cities of the great expositions that dotted the American land- scape in these years: Buffalo, Saint Louis, San Francisco (Fig. 5), and others. Walking among the lagoons of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, one could find a Viking ship (Fig. 6) lying next to backdrops of Imperial Rome, Renaissance Florence, Bourbon Paris, and the Far East. Literally all the history of mankind lay at the fingertips of Americans.

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The American Renaissance 1876-1917 – University of Virginia

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The American Renaissance and Transcendentalsim – Video



The American Renaissance and Transcendentalsim
Short documentary for 4th period US history Ms, Carey's class.

By: AJ Spurr

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The American Renaissance and Transcendentalsim – Video

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Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video




Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen… By: American Renaissance

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January 8, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend. John Derbyshire The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras. A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down. Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year. John Derbyshire The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants. Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day. Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

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January 1, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video




LSU, Building an American Renaissance Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond. By: LSU

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Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain – Video




Finale – Cymbeline, King of Britain Written for the American Renaissance Theatre in Portland, Maine, the brief from the director was “Star Wars meets the Princess Bride”. Battles and perfect br… By: James Alberty

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American Renaissance (American literature) | Encyclopedia …

American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit. The literary scene of the period was dominated by a group of New England writers, the Brahmins, notably Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. They were aristocrats, steeped in foreign culture, active as professors at Harvard College, and interested in creating a genteel American literature based on foreign models. Longfellow adapted European methods of storytelling and versifying to narrative poems dealing with American history. Holmes, in his occasional poems and his Breakfast-Table series (185891), brought touches of urbanity and jocosity to polite literature. Lowell put much of his homelands outlook and values into verse, especially in his satirical Biglow Papers (184867). One of the most important influences in the period was that of the Transcendentalists (see Transcendentalism), centred in the village of Concord, Massachusetts, and including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, and Margaret Fuller. The Transcendentalists contributed to the founding of a new national culture based on native elements. They advocated reforms in church, state, and society, contributing to the rise of free religion and the abolition movement and to the formation of various utopian communities, such as Brook Farm. The abolition movement was also bolstered by other New England writers, including the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier and the novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) dramatized the plight of the black slave. Apart from the Transcendentalists, there emerged during this period great imaginative writersNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitmanwhose novels and poetry left a permanent imprint on American literature. Contemporary with these writers but outside the New England circle was the Southern genius Edgar Allan Poe, who later in the century had a strong impact on European literature.

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December 15, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

THE AMERICAN TERRORIST – Video




THE AMERICAN TERRORIST The American Terrorist – Book One: Vengeance Rising Available Here: http://amzn.to/1vKeSPf A successful U.S. tech visionary, Thom Spencer, Founder CEO of Nanoexology Corp, wages war on … By: The American Renaissance Publishing Company

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December 14, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

About Us | American Renaissance – Business-Class Web …

What We Believe Race is an important aspect of individual and group identity. Of all the fault lines that divide societylanguage, religion, class, ideologyit is the most prominent and divisive. Race and racial conflict are at the heart of some of the most serious challenges the Western World faces in the 21st century. The problems of race cannot be solved without adequate understanding. Attempts to gloss over the significance of race or even to deny its reality only make problems worse. Progress requires the study of all aspects of race, whether historical, cultural, or biological. This approach is known as race realism. American Renaissancewas published as a monthly print magazine from October 1990 through January 2012. All back issues are available here. AR has had a web presence since 1994, and we consider AmRen.com to be the Internets premier race-realist site. Every weekday we publish articles and news items from a world-wide race-realist perspective. American Renaissance and its website are run by Jared TaylorandHenry Wolff. Our mailing address is Box 527, Oakton, VA 22124 and our telephone number is (703) 716-0900. American Renaissance cannot continue without help from people like you.There are no monies from corporations, charities, or governmentto support us. If you believe that a realistic understanding of race is essential to thesurvival of the West, please make a donationhere. Donations aretax deductible. American Renaissance will not sell, transfer or otherwise voluntarily disclose personal informationsuch as names, postal addresses, or e-mail addressessubmitted by purchasers of American Renaissance products or other users of this site. American Renaissance will disclose such personal information only ifrequired by law and in response to proper legal process. Credit card data submitted in connection with donations and purchases of products offered by American Renaissance are submitted to an online merchant that protects them from interception by Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption. American Renaissance will not sell or voluntarily disclose such data to any third party. Like all websites, American Renaissance is vulnerable to hacking, viruses, denial-of-service attacks and other incidents that can result in corruption or compromise of user-submitted data, though we have made every effort to makeour site secure. American Renaissance cannot be held responsible for loss caused by breach of the security of its services or that of any of its contractors. Articles and essays original to American Renaissance may be used on the Internet free of charge, with proper attribution (author, title, date, American Renaissance, web address). For print reproduction rights, please contact ushere. We cannot offer rights to any articles that may appear on this site but that were originally published elsewhere.

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December 5, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

The American Renaissance 1876-1917 – University of Virginia

The Brooklyn Museum * Distributed by Pantheon Books, New York 1979 * Part I by Richard Guy Wilson (left) FIG. 3: Infant Bacchus, circa 1880. John La Farge (1835-1910). Stained glass window; 226.5 x 114.0 cm. (89 1/8 x 44 7/8 in.). From the Kidder house, Beverly, Massachusetts. COLLECTION: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Gift of W.B. Thomas. (above) FIG. 4 Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Arch, Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, New York, 1889-1892. John H. Duncan (1855-1929), and McKim, Mead and White, architects. Sculpture: (top) Quadriga, 1898,(south pedestals) Army and Navy, 1901, by Frederick MacMonnies (1863-1937); Bas-reliefs: (inside arch) Lincoln,1895, by Thomas Eakins (1844-1916); Grant, 1895, by William O’Donovan. COLLECTION/PHOTO: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. How men perceive themselves influences what they see and how they create their surroundings. A people or a nation may identify or locate themselves in a variety of conceptual molds: particular religious or philosophical dogmas, the natural landscape, the existential here and now, or an epoch of the historic past. For Americans, the preoccupation with national identity has produced a varied body of commentary, literature, and art containing both superficial and profound statements on the nature of American culture. Typically, periods of intense physical and social change have led to alternating visions of the American experience. And while many periods can be pointed to, the era of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has produced some of the more diverse expressions of American art. Here, within the same space-time continuum, exist the low-slung Prairie houses of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Renaissance palazzos of McKim, Mead and White; the futuristic compositions of Joseph Stella and the tradition-laden paintings of Kenyon Cox; the simplified oak furniture of Gustav Stickley and the Colonial Revival highbacks of A. H. Davenport. The visual and philosophical differences in these works have been viewed as representing on one side a nativistic, modern-oriented spirit, and on the other side, a conservative-academic viewpoint tied to stultified Old World traditions. Later generations have easily grasped the modern work, while the conservative work has been viewed as an anachronism caught in the web of the past and having little if any relation to American civilization and identity. Yet the conservative, largely European-oriented art had an impact in its time; overwhelmingly popular, the art projected an image of culture and civilization that many people approved of. Partaking of the air of genteel idealism and higher service, the art also gave a sense of release from the stuffy confines of Victorianism. An art and architecture of superb craftsman- ship was produced, one of wealth with tinges of exoticism that delighted in ornamental richness for its own sake. Investigation of the art and the surrounding corpus of literature and activity indicates that many people felt it implied a special connection with the grand traditions of history representing what they identified as the “American Renaissance.”1 The term “American Renaissance” concerns the identification by many Americans-painters, sculptors, architects, craftsmen, scholars, collectors, politicians, financeers, and industrialists-with the period of the European Renaissance and the feeling that the Renaissance spirit had been captured again in the United States. Concurrently, the Italian Renaissance (1420-1580) came into focus through the work of scholars and provided initial identification for many Americans. This was the Renaissance with a capital R. In time, other Renaissance manifestations were admired and seen as providing important models: France and England of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, America in the formative years of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and other countries, including the original sources for the Renaissance, Greece and Rome. Analogies with the Renaissance were obvious. The American robber baron had been preceded by the Italian and French merchant princes.2Artists found an affinity with the Renaissance, identifying each other in terms such as “Old Master” or with personalities such as Bramante and Benvenuto Cellini.3Many aspired to the Renaissance example: Stanford White designed buildings, magazine covers, jewelry, furniture, and picture frames; John La Farge painted, wrote art criticism and history, and designed stained-glass windows (Fig. 3) and interiors; Charles Adams Platt was an architect, landscape architect, painter, and etcher. The collaboration between architects, painters, sculptors, decorators, and landscape architects in world’s fairs, public buildings, and city plans received confirmation by the example of the artistic unity in High Renaissance Rome. To some, the periods were comparable. Augustus Saint-Gaudens exclaimed after the initial planning session of the World’s Columbian Exposition: “This is the greatest meeting of artists since the fifteenth century!”4The painter Theodore Robinson claimed that many of his comrades “persuaded themselves for a year or so that the days of the Italian Renaissance were revived on Manhattan Island.”5The past spoke to today claimed Bernard Berenson, a Boston-educated boy soon to become the world authority on Renaissance art, who wrote in his first book: “We ourselves, because of our faith in science and the power of work, are instinctively in sympathy with the Renaissance…. the spirit which animates us was anticipated by the spirit of the Renaissance, and more than anticipated. That spirit seems like the small rough model after which ours is being fashioned.”6 According to the ideas of the American Renaissance, the art of the past could provide useful sources for the development of a national American art. While the reliance on sources or authority would be important, what would be produced would be a unique American art; it would be tied together not only by styles, but also by a unity of tradition and approach. Senator James McMillan, the “father” of the 1901-1902 Senate Parks Commission Plan for Washington, D.C., predicted the future of governmental architecture: “It is the general opinion that for monumental work, Greece and Rome furnish the styles of architecture best adapted to serve the manifold wants of today, not only as to beauty and dignity, but as to utility.”7To this end the American Academy in Rome was founded. Charles F. McKim, one of the prime leaders of the school, felt that just as other countries had gone to Rome to learn “the splendid standards of Classic and Renaissance art,” so must Americans, and he added, “I pity the artist who does not feel humbled before its splendid examples of art.”8But ultimately a new art resulted, for, as John La Farge claimed in speaking about the Academy: “We are going to be established in Rome…. This is in itself a statement that we too are rivals of all that has been done, and intend to rival all that shall be done, and we can then feel that the old cycle is closed and that a new one has begun.”9 The American Renaissance, by both definition and action, was intensely nationalistic. It appropriated images and symbols of past civilizations and used them to create a magnificent American pageant. America became the culmination of history for an age that believed in progress. Prime Minister William Gladstone of England noted: “Europe may already see in North America an immediate successor in the march of civilization.”10The civilization envisaged for America was a public life, one of the street, the park, the square, or the mall, of large monuments, memorials, and public buildings in the eternal style, adorned with murals and sculptures personifying heroes and symbolizing virtue and enterprise. Several commentators of the period claimed the United States needed a national Valhalla, and in a sense this was attempted with the great arch in Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn (Fig. 4), the projected “Pantheon” of national heroes in Washington, D.C., or the Hall of Fame at New York University.11The projected vision could be caught in a variety of places-ascending the stairs at the new Library of Congress, strolling on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, or visiting any of the dream cities of the great expositions that dotted the American land- scape in these years: Buffalo, Saint Louis, San Francisco (Fig. 5), and others. Walking among the lagoons of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, one could find a Viking ship (Fig. 6) lying next to backdrops of Imperial Rome, Renaissance Florence, Bourbon Paris, and the Far East. Literally all the history of mankind lay at the fingertips of Americans.

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December 2, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

The American Renaissance and Transcendentalsim – Video




The American Renaissance and Transcendentalsim Short documentary for 4th period US history Ms, Carey's class. By: AJ Spurr

Fair Usage Law

November 22, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

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