Archive for the ‘American Renaissance’ Category

Quite Possibly the Most Racist Article You Will Ever Read …

Every now and then you come across an article that folks just need to read. This one written by Michael Smith entitled, Confessions of a Public Defender and originally posted at American Renaissance on May 9, 2014 is one of those articles.

It is a profound and deeply disturbing piece, which, as we end 2014, we all need to comprehend as we move towards the 50th anniversary of the Great Society initiatives of President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

Smith articulates that which ails the black communitythe real discussion we should be having on race, not that of victimhood and the further expansion of the welfare nanny-state.

He begins by saying, I am a public defender in a large southern metropolitan area. Fewer than ten percent of the people in the area I serve are black but over 90 per cent of my clients are black. The remaining ten percent are mainly Hispanics but there are a few whites.

I have no explanation for why this is, but crime has racial patterns. Hispanics usually commit two kinds of crime: sexual assault on children and driving under the influence. Blacks commit many violent crimes but very few sex crimes. The handful of whites I see commit all kinds of crimes. In my many years as a public defender I have represented only three Asians, and one was half black.

He presents his observations based on his personal experience with black defendants, and his words will no doubt inflame many:

My experience has also taught me that blacks are different by almost any measure to all other people. They cannot reason as well. They cannot communicate as well. They cannot control their impulses as well. They are a threat to all who cross their paths, black and non-black alike.

It will take you only 5 minutes to read this articleand I would bet youll read it again. Then ask yourself, is this something you hear Al Sharpton addressing? Or President Obama, Eric Holder, Jeh Johnson or Jesse Jackson?

Im quite sure the progressive socialist left will criticize me for sharing this articlethats just who they arethey hate the truth. But if there is a war to be fought, it is for the soul of the inner city and the black community. The facts and observations in this are not shocking to me. They are quite well known, but the manner in which the writer so eloquently presents them is quite commendable.

We cannot begin to have a conversation about race until we are willing to honestly address the facts.

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Quite Possibly the Most Racist Article You Will Ever Read …

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February 9, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Confessions of a Public Defender | American Renaissance

[Editors Note: This is just one of thirteen essays in our newly-released collection of first-hand reports about the reality of race,Face to Face with Race.]

I am a public defender in a large southern metropolitan area. Fewer than ten percent of the people in the area I serve are black but over 90 per cent of my clients are black. The remaining ten percent are mainly Hispanics but there are a few whites.

I have no explanation for why this is, but crime has racial patterns. Hispanics usually commit two kinds of crime: sexual assault on children and driving under the influence. Blacks commit many violent crimes but very few sex crimes. The handful of whites I see commit all kinds of crimes. In my many years as a public defender I have represented only three Asians, and one was half black.

As a young lawyer, I believed the official story that blacks are law abiding, intelligent, family-oriented people, but are so poor they must turn to crime to survive. Actual black behavior was a shock to me.

The media invariably sugarcoat black behavior. Even the news reports of the very crimes I dealt with in court were slanted. Television news intentionally leaves out unflattering facts about the accused, and sometimes omits names that are obviously black. All this rocked my liberal, tolerant beliefs, but it took me years to set aside my illusions and accept the reality of what I see every day. I have now served thousands of blacks and their families, protecting their rights and defending them in court. What follow are my observations.

Although blacks are only a small percentage of our community, the courthouse is filled with them: the halls and gallery benches are overflowing with black defendants, families, and crime victims. Most whites with business in court arrive quietly, dress appropriately, and keep their heads down. They get in and get outif they canas fast as they can. For blacks, the courthouse is like a carnival. They all seem to know each other: hundreds and hundreds each day, gossiping, laughing loudly, waving, and crowding the halls.

When I am appointed to represent a client I introduce myself and explain that I am his lawyer. I explain the court process and my role in it, and I ask the client some basic questions about himself. At this stage, I can tell with great accuracy how people will react. Hispanics are extremely polite and deferential. An Hispanic will never call me by my first name and will answer my questions directly and with appropriate respect for my position. Whites are similarly respectful.

A black man will never call me Mr. Smith; I am always Mike. It is not unusual for a 19-year-old black to refer to me as dog. A black may mumble complaints about everything I say, and roll his eyes when I politely interrupt so I can continue with my explanation. Also, everything I say to blacks must be at about the third-grade level. If I slip and use adult language, they get angry because they think I am flaunting my superiority.

At the early stages of a case, I explain the process to my clients. I often do not yet have the information in the police reports. Blacks are unable to understand that I do not yet have answers to all of their questions, but that I will by a certain date. They live in the here and the now and are unable to wait for anything. Usually, by the second meeting with the client I have most of the police reports and understand their case.

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Confessions of a Public Defender | American Renaissance

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

In the late 1980s, I was in my early 20s just finishing my bachelors degree in education at Emory University. At that time, I discovered a book called All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, a series of tongue-in-cheek lessons on living by Robert Fulghum.

He begins the book with an explanation of his worldview:

All I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sand pile at school.

These are the things I learned:

He goes on to imagine how great, how wonderful and peaceful and utopian the world would be if everyone lived by his philosophy. I dont disagree.

Coming right out of collegeespecially one as left-leaning as EmoryI was enamored of the book. I hadnt had sufficient life experience to gain a healthy, realistic cynicism. That was soon to change.

In the Atlanta area in the late 80s, there was an oversupply of teachers competing for positions in the metro area, especially in the better school systems. People with advanced degrees were competing with tenured teachers for the best positions available, which left me to choose from whatever was available.

I finally got an interview with Atlanta Public Schools, which had its headquarters downtown. The interviewer seemed very pleased to have a young, white Emory applicant in her office, so the interview was just a formality. She explained apologetically that there were currently no positions in the posh Buckhead schools (the only schools with any measurable white population), but she assured me she would place me in a good school.

In the end, I taught a total of two-and-a-half years in two different schools before I walked out in the middle of my third year, giving up on the tenure that would have been mine had I finished the year.

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What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

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Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video



Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox
THE SYNOPSIS OF YOUR FAVORITE BOOK =— Where to buy this book? ISBN: 9780873385176 Book Synopsis of An Artist of the American Renaissance by Kenyon Cox If you want to add…

By: Gene Walter's Marketplace

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Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video

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January 25, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video



Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam?
The Charlie Hebdo attacks and their support in Muslim countries prove once again that Islam is a threat to the West.

By: American Renaissance

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Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video

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January 18, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

. The period is generally defined as the mid-19th century but especially the years roughly from 1850 to 1855. Major works from those years include Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Representative Men (1850, though most of Emerson’s best-known texts were published earlier), Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851), Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Henry David Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Walt Whitman’s first edition of Leaves of Grass (1855).

Scholar F. O. Matthiessen originated the phrase “American Renaissance” in his 1941 book American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman. Although Mathiessen limited his definition to the period between 1850 and 1855, the term has since expanded to a broader range of time. In The American Renaissance Reconsidered, for example, Eric Sundquist expands the years covered by the American Renaissance to “the 1830s through the Civil War.”[1]

The notion of an American Renaissance has been criticized for overemphasizing a small number of white male writers and artifacts of high culture.[2] William E. Cain noted the “extreme white male formation” of Mathiessen’s list of authors and stated that by “devoting hundreds of pages of analysis and celebration to five white male authors, Mathiessen unwittingly prefigured in his book what later readers would dispute and labor to correct.”[3] The demographic exclusivity of the American Renaissance began eroding toward the end of the twentieth century. Emily Dickinson, who began her poetry in the late 1850s, made her way into the canon. Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) rose to prominence in the late 1970s. African American literature gained increasing recognition.[4]

The American Renaissance continues as a central term in American studies. The American Renaissance was for long considered synonymous with American Romanticism[5] and was closely associated with Transcendentalism.[6]

Often considered a movement centered in New England, the American Renaissance was inspired in part by a new focus on humanism as a way to move from Calvinism.[7]

The thematic center of the American Renaissance was what Matthiessen called the “devotion” of all five of his writers to “the possibilities of democracy.” He presented the American Renaissance texts as “literature for our democracy and challenged the nation to repossess them.[8]

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American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

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January 15, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video



Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police
Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen…

By: American Renaissance

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Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video

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2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend.

John Derbyshire

The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras.

A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down.

Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year.

John Derbyshire

The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants.

Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day.

Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

Originally posted here:

2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

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January 1, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video



LSU, Building an American Renaissance
Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond.

By: LSU

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LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video

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December 20, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Quite Possibly the Most Racist Article You Will Ever Read …

Every now and then you come across an article that folks just need to read. This one written by Michael Smith entitled, Confessions of a Public Defender and originally posted at American Renaissance on May 9, 2014 is one of those articles. It is a profound and deeply disturbing piece, which, as we end 2014, we all need to comprehend as we move towards the 50th anniversary of the Great Society initiatives of President Lyndon Baines Johnson. Smith articulates that which ails the black communitythe real discussion we should be having on race, not that of victimhood and the further expansion of the welfare nanny-state. He begins by saying, I am a public defender in a large southern metropolitan area. Fewer than ten percent of the people in the area I serve are black but over 90 per cent of my clients are black. The remaining ten percent are mainly Hispanics but there are a few whites. I have no explanation for why this is, but crime has racial patterns. Hispanics usually commit two kinds of crime: sexual assault on children and driving under the influence. Blacks commit many violent crimes but very few sex crimes. The handful of whites I see commit all kinds of crimes. In my many years as a public defender I have represented only three Asians, and one was half black. He presents his observations based on his personal experience with black defendants, and his words will no doubt inflame many: My experience has also taught me that blacks are different by almost any measure to all other people. They cannot reason as well. They cannot communicate as well. They cannot control their impulses as well. They are a threat to all who cross their paths, black and non-black alike. It will take you only 5 minutes to read this articleand I would bet youll read it again. Then ask yourself, is this something you hear Al Sharpton addressing? Or President Obama, Eric Holder, Jeh Johnson or Jesse Jackson? Im quite sure the progressive socialist left will criticize me for sharing this articlethats just who they arethey hate the truth. But if there is a war to be fought, it is for the soul of the inner city and the black community. The facts and observations in this are not shocking to me. They are quite well known, but the manner in which the writer so eloquently presents them is quite commendable. We cannot begin to have a conversation about race until we are willing to honestly address the facts.

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February 9, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Confessions of a Public Defender | American Renaissance

[Editors Note: This is just one of thirteen essays in our newly-released collection of first-hand reports about the reality of race,Face to Face with Race.] I am a public defender in a large southern metropolitan area. Fewer than ten percent of the people in the area I serve are black but over 90 per cent of my clients are black. The remaining ten percent are mainly Hispanics but there are a few whites. I have no explanation for why this is, but crime has racial patterns. Hispanics usually commit two kinds of crime: sexual assault on children and driving under the influence. Blacks commit many violent crimes but very few sex crimes. The handful of whites I see commit all kinds of crimes. In my many years as a public defender I have represented only three Asians, and one was half black. As a young lawyer, I believed the official story that blacks are law abiding, intelligent, family-oriented people, but are so poor they must turn to crime to survive. Actual black behavior was a shock to me. The media invariably sugarcoat black behavior. Even the news reports of the very crimes I dealt with in court were slanted. Television news intentionally leaves out unflattering facts about the accused, and sometimes omits names that are obviously black. All this rocked my liberal, tolerant beliefs, but it took me years to set aside my illusions and accept the reality of what I see every day. I have now served thousands of blacks and their families, protecting their rights and defending them in court. What follow are my observations. Although blacks are only a small percentage of our community, the courthouse is filled with them: the halls and gallery benches are overflowing with black defendants, families, and crime victims. Most whites with business in court arrive quietly, dress appropriately, and keep their heads down. They get in and get outif they canas fast as they can. For blacks, the courthouse is like a carnival. They all seem to know each other: hundreds and hundreds each day, gossiping, laughing loudly, waving, and crowding the halls. When I am appointed to represent a client I introduce myself and explain that I am his lawyer. I explain the court process and my role in it, and I ask the client some basic questions about himself. At this stage, I can tell with great accuracy how people will react. Hispanics are extremely polite and deferential. An Hispanic will never call me by my first name and will answer my questions directly and with appropriate respect for my position. Whites are similarly respectful. A black man will never call me Mr. Smith; I am always Mike. It is not unusual for a 19-year-old black to refer to me as dog. A black may mumble complaints about everything I say, and roll his eyes when I politely interrupt so I can continue with my explanation. Also, everything I say to blacks must be at about the third-grade level. If I slip and use adult language, they get angry because they think I am flaunting my superiority. At the early stages of a case, I explain the process to my clients. I often do not yet have the information in the police reports. Blacks are unable to understand that I do not yet have answers to all of their questions, but that I will by a certain date. They live in the here and the now and are unable to wait for anything. Usually, by the second meeting with the client I have most of the police reports and understand their case.

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

What I Learned in Kindergarten | American Renaissance

In the late 1980s, I was in my early 20s just finishing my bachelors degree in education at Emory University. At that time, I discovered a book called All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, a series of tongue-in-cheek lessons on living by Robert Fulghum. He begins the book with an explanation of his worldview: All I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be I learned in kindergarten. Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sand pile at school. These are the things I learned: He goes on to imagine how great, how wonderful and peaceful and utopian the world would be if everyone lived by his philosophy. I dont disagree. Coming right out of collegeespecially one as left-leaning as EmoryI was enamored of the book. I hadnt had sufficient life experience to gain a healthy, realistic cynicism. That was soon to change. In the Atlanta area in the late 80s, there was an oversupply of teachers competing for positions in the metro area, especially in the better school systems. People with advanced degrees were competing with tenured teachers for the best positions available, which left me to choose from whatever was available. I finally got an interview with Atlanta Public Schools, which had its headquarters downtown. The interviewer seemed very pleased to have a young, white Emory applicant in her office, so the interview was just a formality. She explained apologetically that there were currently no positions in the posh Buckhead schools (the only schools with any measurable white population), but she assured me she would place me in a good school. In the end, I taught a total of two-and-a-half years in two different schools before I walked out in the middle of my third year, giving up on the tenure that would have been mine had I finished the year.

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox – Video




Synopsis | An Artist Of The American Renaissance By Kenyon Cox THE SYNOPSIS OF YOUR FAVORITE BOOK =— Where to buy this book? ISBN: 9780873385176 Book Synopsis of An Artist of the American Renaissance by Kenyon Cox If you want to add… By: Gene Walter's Marketplace

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January 25, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? – Video




Charlie Hebdo: What Use Is Islam? The Charlie Hebdo attacks and their support in Muslim countries prove once again that Islam is a threat to the West. By: American Renaissance

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January 18, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

American Renaissance (literature) – Wikipedia, the free …

. The period is generally defined as the mid-19th century but especially the years roughly from 1850 to 1855. Major works from those years include Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Representative Men (1850, though most of Emerson’s best-known texts were published earlier), Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851), Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Henry David Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Walt Whitman’s first edition of Leaves of Grass (1855). Scholar F. O. Matthiessen originated the phrase “American Renaissance” in his 1941 book American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman. Although Mathiessen limited his definition to the period between 1850 and 1855, the term has since expanded to a broader range of time. In The American Renaissance Reconsidered, for example, Eric Sundquist expands the years covered by the American Renaissance to “the 1830s through the Civil War.”[1] The notion of an American Renaissance has been criticized for overemphasizing a small number of white male writers and artifacts of high culture.[2] William E. Cain noted the “extreme white male formation” of Mathiessen’s list of authors and stated that by “devoting hundreds of pages of analysis and celebration to five white male authors, Mathiessen unwittingly prefigured in his book what later readers would dispute and labor to correct.”[3] The demographic exclusivity of the American Renaissance began eroding toward the end of the twentieth century. Emily Dickinson, who began her poetry in the late 1850s, made her way into the canon. Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) rose to prominence in the late 1970s. African American literature gained increasing recognition.[4] The American Renaissance continues as a central term in American studies. The American Renaissance was for long considered synonymous with American Romanticism[5] and was closely associated with Transcendentalism.[6] Often considered a movement centered in New England, the American Renaissance was inspired in part by a new focus on humanism as a way to move from Calvinism.[7] The thematic center of the American Renaissance was what Matthiessen called the “devotion” of all five of his writers to “the possibilities of democracy.” He presented the American Renaissance texts as “literature for our democracy and challenged the nation to repossess them.[8]

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January 15, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police – Video




Mass Delusion: The 2014 War Against the Police Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, discusses the big lie of 2014–that white police are targeting black men–and the protest movement that's risen… By: American Renaissance

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January 8, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

2014 American Renaissance Conference | American Renaissance

April 26 dawned as a brilliant spring day in Montgomery Bell State Park just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. It was a perfect beginning for the more than 150 people who enjoyed the inspiring talks, fellowship, and conviviality of the 12th American Renaissance Conference. A band of scruffy anti-racist protesters wasjust the seasoning to make it a recipe for a perfect weekend. John Derbyshire The first speaker was columnist, author, and noted China expert, John Derbyshire. His talk was a fascinating introduction to China and its relations with the United States. He first pointed out the remarkable cultural stability China has enjoyed over a history that may be as long as 5,000 yearsif one accepts accounts of semi-mythical early eras. A striking aspect of Chinas national character is conformity, which may be a naturally evolved trait or could have been the result of generations of Chinese rulers systematically killing off anyone with a rebellious streak. Mr. Derbyshire explained that many Chinese proverbs praise conformity and fitting in, as in The tallest tree in the forest is the first to be cut down. Mr. Derbyshire described the early period of Chinese immigration to the United States, which brought mostly manual laborers. Their alienness and their willingness to work for low wages led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This essentially put a halt to Chinese immigration until 1943, when the United States found itself allied with China in the Second World War, and a policy of exclusion was an embarrassment. Even then, quota restrictions limited Chinese immigration to just a few hundred people per year. John Derbyshire The new immigration law of 1965 that abolished nation origins quotas did not immediately lead to a large Chinese influx since the Mao regime let no one out. Immigration began to rise in 1979 with the establishment of relations between the US and China, and picked up greatly after the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 led to a relaxation of visa requirements. Nearly four million Chinese now live in the United States, of whom more than half are immigrants. Curiously, a large majority of immigrants come from just one part of the country. In 1970, more than 60 percent of Chinese immigrants were from a single countyTaishanin a single province: Guangdong. This highly localized immigration continues to this day. Mr. Derbyshire noted that China has unabashed ambitions to be a superpower, and that it acquires our technology by every possible means. It is fashionable among wealthy Chinese to send children to American universities, where many are deliberately absorbing scientific information that will be useful back home. The Chinese government also runs a huge intelligence-gathering effort in the United States that encourages immigrant and naturalized US citizens alike to pass along classified and corporate-confidential information. This human espionage is now heavily supplemented by computer espionage.

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January 1, 2015   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed

LSU, Building an American Renaissance – Video




LSU, Building an American Renaissance Ribbon cutting for exhibit featuring the design and history of LSU's campus as told by Professor Michael Desmond. By: LSU

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December 20, 2014   Posted in: American Renaissance  Comments Closed


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