Archive for the ‘American Renaissance’ Category

"American Renaissance" Matt Bevin – US Senate – KY – Video



“American Renaissance” Matt Bevin – US Senate – KY
An ad we did for FreedomWorks For America in the US Senate GOP primary race in support of Matt Bevin of Kentucky.

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American Renaissance Essay – Critical Essays – eNotes.com

American Renaissance

Also known as the New England Renaissance, the American Renaissance refers to a period of American literature from the 1830s to the end of the Civil War. The movement developed out of efforts by various American writers to formulate a distinctly American literature influenced by great works of European literature. Yet these novels, poems, and short stories utilized native dialect, history, landscape, and characters in order to explore uniquely American issues of the time, such as abolitionism, temperance, religious tolerance, scientific progress, the expanding western frontier, and the Native American situation.

Short fiction of the American Renaissance encompassed a broad range of subjects, settings, and stylesincluding Gothic romance, detective and horror stories, sea tales, historical fiction of colonial America, and progressive social problem tales, among othersall of which contributed to the first generation of great American literature. Critics consider the shorter work of Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, and Lydia Maria Child, as well as the posthumously published sensational thrillers of Louisa May Alcott, as representative of American Renaissance short fiction. These authors viewed the short story or novella as a viable form in which to produce parables that explored literary and political concerns. Critics regard some of the short fiction produced during the American Renaissance as some of the best American fiction ever written.

The American Renaissance was closely associated with an intellectual movement known as Transcendentalism, which is a philosophy or system of thought based on the idea that humans are essentially good, that humanity’s deepest truths may be formulated through insight rather than logic, and that there is an essential unity to all of creation. Transcendentalism in the United States became popular among scholars, ministers, and intellectuals in and around Concord, Massachusetts. The American Transcendentalists advocated the development of a national culture and efforts at humanitarian social reform, as well as debate on such issues as the abolition of slavery, women’s suffrage, workers rights, educational innovation, and freedom of religion. The magazine The Dial, founded in 1840 by Margaret Fuller and Ralph Waldo Emerson, served as a forum for the publication of fiction, poetry, and essays by leading American Transcendentalists and writers of the American Renaissance, such as the poet Walt Whitman and the essayists Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, Fuller, and Emerson.

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The American Renaissance – Video



The American Renaissance

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American Renaissance Vlog – Video



American Renaissance Vlog
I talk about the American Renaissance and some authors and their.

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Income Inequality: The Debate Ignores Race – Video



Income Inequality: The Debate Ignores Race
Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, on the phony debate about income inequality.

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Amerimerch.com – Bringing America Back Together

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) January 30, 2014

Amerimerch.com, today announced they will be officially launching their American Made E-commerce platform live to the public on February 17th or Presidents Day. A unique shopping experience full of innovative products; Amerimerch.com is a Global E-commerce platform solely dedicated to American made products and manufacturers.

Their mission has been to construct an online platform in which anyone can easily discover, inspect, purchase, and enjoy American made goods and products. Co-Founder Kellen Kania had this to say on current E-commerce platforms. Global resource providers exist in many forms online for millions of niche markets and products, but none that purely promote U.S. manufactured products and companies; until now. Amerimerch.com was created to fill the void by providing the most convenient, one stop, global access to high quality American made products for consumers worldwide.

2014 is the rise of a new kind of American revolution, one that has been long awaited by businesses and consumers alike, said Amerimerch.com Co-Founder Gordon Allen. An evolution in commerce; Amerimerch not only creates a channel to bring more revenue to American companies and the U.S. economy, but also empowers consumer choice for Made in USA products that hasnt been seen in over 50 years.

The growing need for more consumer products and goods coming from the U.S. has been abundantly clear for many years. In the most recent State of the Union Address, President Obama stated, …We need to work together on tools like bipartisan trade promotion authority to protect our workers, protect our environment and open new markets to new goods stamped “Made in the USA. The Amerimerch.com HUB provides a channel and voice for companies ranging from humble artisans like California North to large-scale manufacturers such as Dean Guitar and Okabashi Shoes. These American companies and businesses contribute not only to the U.S., but the world. Providing products with such unbelievable craftsmanship, innovation, and creativeness it can be best described as a contemporary American renaissance.

Amerimerch.com will now enable online shoppers to find products and companies that may have been overlooked otherwise or products they need or want, but made in the USA. We proudly work with companies that have a long history in American made products, some over 100 years, but somehow have gone relatively unnoticed, says Allen. The Amerimerch E-commerce platform dramatically increases the web presence of each company by unifying, creating and strengthening a community of American companies and consumers. We are honored and appreciative to be working with so many amazing companies, but it is going to take more than Amerimerch and U.S. manufacturers, says Kania. Its going to take the support of the American public, ultimately the decision is theirs to make and with their help, the possibilities are endless for U.S. companies and products.

Founders Allen and Kania are implementing new ways for the online community to participate and act as a voice for companies they believe in, whether they are a prototype on Kickstarter or a 150 year old company, the consumers will effectively be contributing to the product thats released on the site. The objective of Amerimerch.com is to grow companies, marketplaces, jobs and create a new industry standard for quality products. The success of American craftsmanship and manufacturing is left in the hands of the people; Amerimerch.com proudly provides the gateway to bring America back together.

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American Renaissance Essay – American Renaissance – eNotes.com

SOURCE: Reynolds, David S. Black Cats and Delirium Tremens: Temperance and the American Renaissance. In The Serpent in the Cup: Temperance in American Literature, edited by David S. Reynolds and Debra J. Rosenthal, pp. 22-59. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997.

[In the following essay, Reynolds asserts that the writers of American Renaissance literature presented a reconceptualization of the temperance movement in the antebellum era.]

America’s literary flowering between 1835 and 1860, commonly known as the American Renaissance, owed much to the temperance movement that burgeoned in several forms during these years. No other single reform had so widespread an impact upon American literature as temperance, largely because of its extraordinary cultural prominence. In particular, the Washingtonian movement, which during the 1840s infiltrated nearly every area of working-class life, made temperance an inescapable phenomenon. As one popular writer noted in 1846, the typical American town had not only frequent temperance lectures but also temperance negro operas; temperance theaters; temperance eating houses, and temperance every thing, and our whole population, in places, is soused head-over-heels in temperance.1 Although the campaign against drink did affect alcohol consumption, which dropped from the equivalent of around ten gallons of absolute alcohol per American yearly in 1830 to just over one gallon by 1855, the temperance movement became riddled with contradictions and ambiguities that made it a fertile source of literary themes and images. Temperance produced two best-selling novels, George B. Cheever’s Deacon Giles’ Distillery and Timothy Shay Arthur’s Ten Nights in a Bar-room, and provided a rich fund of images and character types that were adopted by all of the major authors.

Four main types of temperance-related discourse developed during this period: what may be called conventional, dark temperance, ironic, and transcendental.

Conventional temperance literature featured straightforward, didactic expositions or exempla against drinking, with emphasis on the benign rewards of virtue rather than the brutal results of vice. Rooted in the relatively restrained evangelical tracts, novels, and newspapers of the 1820s, the conventional mode, which determinedly avoided excessive sensationalism, waned during the 1830s and especially after 1840, the year that witnessed the arrival of Washingtonianism. Initiated by a group of reformed drunkards from Baltimore whose repentance led to nationwide appeals for total abstinence, the Washingtonian movement spread with incredible rapidity, largely because its antialcohol message was typically delivered in diverting, often highly sensational stories about the horrors of drink, stories that had high entertainment value for an American working-class that feasted on crime-filled penny papers and P. T. Barnum’s gallery of freaks. Canny publishers, grasping the opportunity to peddle blood and violence under the guise of morality, issued a series of temperance novels and story collections in which didacticism was muted and sensationalism was exaggerated. This dark-temperance mode placed new emphasis on the pathological behavior and diseased psychology associated with alcoholism. It is against this ambiguous background of dark temperance that several works by major authorsWhitman’s Franklin Evans, Poe’s The Black Cat and The Cask of Amontillado, and some of Hawthorne’s and Melville’s fictioncan be profitably viewed.

A corollary of dark temperance was the ironic mode, which refers to the widely noted irony of supposedly virtuous temperance reformers who were involved in dissipation or debauchery on the sly. The intemperate temperance reformer became a common character type in popular fiction and contributed to the paradoxes of familiar works by Hawthorne and Melville.

The indulgent sensationalism of dark temperance and crippling paradoxes of the ironic mode contributed, on the popular level, to the replacement of moral suasion by legalistic temperance reform and, in the major literature, to transcendentalist reconstructions of temperance by Thoreau, Whitman, and Dickinson. The transcendentalist response consisted of affirmative, individualistic versions of alcohol-related images by those who perceived the flaws or ironies of temperance reform and who wished to redirect temperance, usually by associating it with such positive things as deliberate living and reveling in nature’s beauty.

THE POPULAR SCENE

Early in this period, popular temperance reformers made a deliberate effort to communicate their animus against spirits without overstepping the bounds of what they perceived as propriety. The language and style of what I call conventional temperance is epitomized by the influential New York newspaper Genius of Temperance. Founded in Boston in 1826 as the National Philanthropist, this evangelical organ moved to Providence in 1829 and the next year to Manhattan, where it ran until 1833. Establishing the conventional approach to temperance, it repeatedly warned against tippling but avoided graphic descriptions of drunkenness and inveighed against novels and the sensational press. Alarmed by the rising popularity of the latter, the editors asked in exasperation, Is it because men are so superficial, volatile, and vicious, that they can neither understand nor relish a sober solid essay on morals?2 In opposition to what they termed licentious literature, they filled their paper with sober solid essays denouncing drinking, gambling, and other social vices. In the many issues of the newspaper I surveyed, I found only one piece of fiction, a short story entitled Henry Wallace; or, The Victim of Lottery Gambling. This deemphasis of fiction was reflected in several articles attacking novels and the reportage of crimes in the popular press. Lamenting that crimes formed the great burden of the Domestic News of almost every journal, the editors believed that vivid depictions of evil, even if motivated by reform, tended to make evil attractive.3 In an age when vice is popular, they argued, and men hasten to sin as with a cart-ropedrinking in iniquity like waterthere is sometimes a danger of making bad men and bad measures and systems popular, by merely demonstrating their iniquity.

Such cautious avoidance of descriptions of vice was shared by temperance novelists of the 1820s. Edmund and Margaret; or Sobriety and Faithfulness Rewarded (1822) established a basic situation often used in later temperance fictiona marriage threatened by the husband’s drinking habitand handled the theme with explicit didacticism reinforced by many quotations from the Bible. The novel ends with a moralistic affirmation of social reintegration, as the married pair, having learned to eschew alcohol, become useful members of society, and, by honesty and sobriety in their callings, and a desire to do the will of their Maker, deservedly have the respect of the wise and good, and may look forward with cheering hope in the mercy of God, unto everlasting life, by his beloved son, Jesus Christ.4

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American Renaissance Essay – American Renaissance – eNotes.com

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What was the American Renaissance? – Video



What was the American Renaissance?
English 491, Week 4, Webcast.

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American Renaissance (American literature) — Encyclopedia …

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American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit.

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"American Renaissance" Matt Bevin – US Senate – KY – Video




“American Renaissance” Matt Bevin – US Senate – KY An ad we did for FreedomWorks For America in the US Senate GOP primary race in support of Matt Bevin of Kentucky. By: Odd Lamps Productions

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American Renaissance Essay – Critical Essays – eNotes.com

American Renaissance Also known as the New England Renaissance, the American Renaissance refers to a period of American literature from the 1830s to the end of the Civil War. The movement developed out of efforts by various American writers to formulate a distinctly American literature influenced by great works of European literature. Yet these novels, poems, and short stories utilized native dialect, history, landscape, and characters in order to explore uniquely American issues of the time, such as abolitionism, temperance, religious tolerance, scientific progress, the expanding western frontier, and the Native American situation. Short fiction of the American Renaissance encompassed a broad range of subjects, settings, and stylesincluding Gothic romance, detective and horror stories, sea tales, historical fiction of colonial America, and progressive social problem tales, among othersall of which contributed to the first generation of great American literature. Critics consider the shorter work of Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, and Lydia Maria Child, as well as the posthumously published sensational thrillers of Louisa May Alcott, as representative of American Renaissance short fiction. These authors viewed the short story or novella as a viable form in which to produce parables that explored literary and political concerns. Critics regard some of the short fiction produced during the American Renaissance as some of the best American fiction ever written. The American Renaissance was closely associated with an intellectual movement known as Transcendentalism, which is a philosophy or system of thought based on the idea that humans are essentially good, that humanity’s deepest truths may be formulated through insight rather than logic, and that there is an essential unity to all of creation. Transcendentalism in the United States became popular among scholars, ministers, and intellectuals in and around Concord, Massachusetts. The American Transcendentalists advocated the development of a national culture and efforts at humanitarian social reform, as well as debate on such issues as the abolition of slavery, women’s suffrage, workers rights, educational innovation, and freedom of religion. The magazine The Dial, founded in 1840 by Margaret Fuller and Ralph Waldo Emerson, served as a forum for the publication of fiction, poetry, and essays by leading American Transcendentalists and writers of the American Renaissance, such as the poet Walt Whitman and the essayists Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, Fuller, and Emerson.

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The American Renaissance – Video




The American Renaissance By: Jessica Hixson

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American Renaissance Vlog – Video




American Renaissance Vlog I talk about the American Renaissance and some authors and their. By: Trashcan2351

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Income Inequality: The Debate Ignores Race – Video




Income Inequality: The Debate Ignores Race Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance, on the phony debate about income inequality. By: American Renaissance

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Amerimerch.com – Bringing America Back Together

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) January 30, 2014 Amerimerch.com, today announced they will be officially launching their American Made E-commerce platform live to the public on February 17th or Presidents Day. A unique shopping experience full of innovative products; Amerimerch.com is a Global E-commerce platform solely dedicated to American made products and manufacturers. Their mission has been to construct an online platform in which anyone can easily discover, inspect, purchase, and enjoy American made goods and products. Co-Founder Kellen Kania had this to say on current E-commerce platforms. Global resource providers exist in many forms online for millions of niche markets and products, but none that purely promote U.S. manufactured products and companies; until now. Amerimerch.com was created to fill the void by providing the most convenient, one stop, global access to high quality American made products for consumers worldwide. 2014 is the rise of a new kind of American revolution, one that has been long awaited by businesses and consumers alike, said Amerimerch.com Co-Founder Gordon Allen. An evolution in commerce; Amerimerch not only creates a channel to bring more revenue to American companies and the U.S. economy, but also empowers consumer choice for Made in USA products that hasnt been seen in over 50 years. The growing need for more consumer products and goods coming from the U.S. has been abundantly clear for many years. In the most recent State of the Union Address, President Obama stated, …We need to work together on tools like bipartisan trade promotion authority to protect our workers, protect our environment and open new markets to new goods stamped “Made in the USA. The Amerimerch.com HUB provides a channel and voice for companies ranging from humble artisans like California North to large-scale manufacturers such as Dean Guitar and Okabashi Shoes. These American companies and businesses contribute not only to the U.S., but the world. Providing products with such unbelievable craftsmanship, innovation, and creativeness it can be best described as a contemporary American renaissance. Amerimerch.com will now enable online shoppers to find products and companies that may have been overlooked otherwise or products they need or want, but made in the USA. We proudly work with companies that have a long history in American made products, some over 100 years, but somehow have gone relatively unnoticed, says Allen. The Amerimerch E-commerce platform dramatically increases the web presence of each company by unifying, creating and strengthening a community of American companies and consumers. We are honored and appreciative to be working with so many amazing companies, but it is going to take more than Amerimerch and U.S. manufacturers, says Kania. Its going to take the support of the American public, ultimately the decision is theirs to make and with their help, the possibilities are endless for U.S. companies and products. Founders Allen and Kania are implementing new ways for the online community to participate and act as a voice for companies they believe in, whether they are a prototype on Kickstarter or a 150 year old company, the consumers will effectively be contributing to the product thats released on the site. The objective of Amerimerch.com is to grow companies, marketplaces, jobs and create a new industry standard for quality products. The success of American craftsmanship and manufacturing is left in the hands of the people; Amerimerch.com proudly provides the gateway to bring America back together.

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American Renaissance Essay – American Renaissance – eNotes.com

SOURCE: Reynolds, David S. Black Cats and Delirium Tremens: Temperance and the American Renaissance. In The Serpent in the Cup: Temperance in American Literature, edited by David S. Reynolds and Debra J. Rosenthal, pp. 22-59. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997. [In the following essay, Reynolds asserts that the writers of American Renaissance literature presented a reconceptualization of the temperance movement in the antebellum era.] America’s literary flowering between 1835 and 1860, commonly known as the American Renaissance, owed much to the temperance movement that burgeoned in several forms during these years. No other single reform had so widespread an impact upon American literature as temperance, largely because of its extraordinary cultural prominence. In particular, the Washingtonian movement, which during the 1840s infiltrated nearly every area of working-class life, made temperance an inescapable phenomenon. As one popular writer noted in 1846, the typical American town had not only frequent temperance lectures but also temperance negro operas; temperance theaters; temperance eating houses, and temperance every thing, and our whole population, in places, is soused head-over-heels in temperance.1 Although the campaign against drink did affect alcohol consumption, which dropped from the equivalent of around ten gallons of absolute alcohol per American yearly in 1830 to just over one gallon by 1855, the temperance movement became riddled with contradictions and ambiguities that made it a fertile source of literary themes and images. Temperance produced two best-selling novels, George B. Cheever’s Deacon Giles’ Distillery and Timothy Shay Arthur’s Ten Nights in a Bar-room, and provided a rich fund of images and character types that were adopted by all of the major authors. Four main types of temperance-related discourse developed during this period: what may be called conventional, dark temperance, ironic, and transcendental. Conventional temperance literature featured straightforward, didactic expositions or exempla against drinking, with emphasis on the benign rewards of virtue rather than the brutal results of vice. Rooted in the relatively restrained evangelical tracts, novels, and newspapers of the 1820s, the conventional mode, which determinedly avoided excessive sensationalism, waned during the 1830s and especially after 1840, the year that witnessed the arrival of Washingtonianism. Initiated by a group of reformed drunkards from Baltimore whose repentance led to nationwide appeals for total abstinence, the Washingtonian movement spread with incredible rapidity, largely because its antialcohol message was typically delivered in diverting, often highly sensational stories about the horrors of drink, stories that had high entertainment value for an American working-class that feasted on crime-filled penny papers and P. T. Barnum’s gallery of freaks. Canny publishers, grasping the opportunity to peddle blood and violence under the guise of morality, issued a series of temperance novels and story collections in which didacticism was muted and sensationalism was exaggerated. This dark-temperance mode placed new emphasis on the pathological behavior and diseased psychology associated with alcoholism. It is against this ambiguous background of dark temperance that several works by major authorsWhitman’s Franklin Evans, Poe’s The Black Cat and The Cask of Amontillado, and some of Hawthorne’s and Melville’s fictioncan be profitably viewed. A corollary of dark temperance was the ironic mode, which refers to the widely noted irony of supposedly virtuous temperance reformers who were involved in dissipation or debauchery on the sly. The intemperate temperance reformer became a common character type in popular fiction and contributed to the paradoxes of familiar works by Hawthorne and Melville. The indulgent sensationalism of dark temperance and crippling paradoxes of the ironic mode contributed, on the popular level, to the replacement of moral suasion by legalistic temperance reform and, in the major literature, to transcendentalist reconstructions of temperance by Thoreau, Whitman, and Dickinson. The transcendentalist response consisted of affirmative, individualistic versions of alcohol-related images by those who perceived the flaws or ironies of temperance reform and who wished to redirect temperance, usually by associating it with such positive things as deliberate living and reveling in nature’s beauty. THE POPULAR SCENE Early in this period, popular temperance reformers made a deliberate effort to communicate their animus against spirits without overstepping the bounds of what they perceived as propriety. The language and style of what I call conventional temperance is epitomized by the influential New York newspaper Genius of Temperance. Founded in Boston in 1826 as the National Philanthropist, this evangelical organ moved to Providence in 1829 and the next year to Manhattan, where it ran until 1833. Establishing the conventional approach to temperance, it repeatedly warned against tippling but avoided graphic descriptions of drunkenness and inveighed against novels and the sensational press. Alarmed by the rising popularity of the latter, the editors asked in exasperation, Is it because men are so superficial, volatile, and vicious, that they can neither understand nor relish a sober solid essay on morals?2 In opposition to what they termed licentious literature, they filled their paper with sober solid essays denouncing drinking, gambling, and other social vices. In the many issues of the newspaper I surveyed, I found only one piece of fiction, a short story entitled Henry Wallace; or, The Victim of Lottery Gambling. This deemphasis of fiction was reflected in several articles attacking novels and the reportage of crimes in the popular press. Lamenting that crimes formed the great burden of the Domestic News of almost every journal, the editors believed that vivid depictions of evil, even if motivated by reform, tended to make evil attractive.3 In an age when vice is popular, they argued, and men hasten to sin as with a cart-ropedrinking in iniquity like waterthere is sometimes a danger of making bad men and bad measures and systems popular, by merely demonstrating their iniquity. Such cautious avoidance of descriptions of vice was shared by temperance novelists of the 1820s. Edmund and Margaret; or Sobriety and Faithfulness Rewarded (1822) established a basic situation often used in later temperance fictiona marriage threatened by the husband’s drinking habitand handled the theme with explicit didacticism reinforced by many quotations from the Bible. The novel ends with a moralistic affirmation of social reintegration, as the married pair, having learned to eschew alcohol, become useful members of society, and, by honesty and sobriety in their callings, and a desire to do the will of their Maker, deservedly have the respect of the wise and good, and may look forward with cheering hope in the mercy of God, unto everlasting life, by his beloved son, Jesus Christ.4

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What was the American Renaissance? – Video




What was the American Renaissance? English 491, Week 4, Webcast. By: sixtiesgal

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American Renaissance (American literature) — Encyclopedia …

Update or expand this article! In Edit mode, you will be able to click anywhere in the article to modify text, insert images, or add new information. Once you are finished, your modifications will be sent to our editors for review. You will be notified if your changes are approved and become part of the published article! Go to Edit Mode In Edit mode, you will be able to click anywhere in the article to modify text, insert images, or add new information. Once you are finished, your modifications will be sent to our editors for review. You will be notified if your changes are approved and become part of the published article! Go to Edit Mode American Renaissance,also called New England Renaissance , period from the 1830s roughly until the end of the American Civil War in which American literature, in the wake of the Romantic movement, came of age as an expression of a national spirit.

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