Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

Catholic priest presents inspiring lessons from Anne Frank’s diary 70 years after US publication – The Desert Sun

By Bill Marchese, Special to The Desert Sun 12:56 p.m. PT May 26, 2017

The Rev. John Neiman holds a copy of LIFE magazine from 1958 with a cover story about Anne Frank, the subject of his recent talk to students visiting the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage.(Photo: Bill Marchese / Special to The Desert Sun)

When John Neiman of Indian Wells was 10 years old, he read The Diary of Anne Frank, and didnt really understand much of it, he said. He had no idea the book would later affect his life and career forever.

Intrigued by her tragic story, he re-read the book several times as he matured and saw a film about the young Jewish girl who hid with her family for two years in cramped attic room during World War II. She later died in a Nazi prison camp at age 15.

Today, Neiman, a Catholic priest and authority on the life and times, the Holocaust and death of Anne Frank, offers free lectures to students and other visitors at the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage.

Franks famous diary is celebrating its 70th anniversary of publication in America this year. The book is still in print and one of the most read nonfiction books after the Bible, according to Neiman. It has been published in 60 languages.

The diary describes her life while in hiding with her family during the German occupation of the Netherlands from 1942 to 1944 during World War II. I was so impressed with her courage and her optimism and her faith, Neiman said.

Students from Palm Desert High School listen to the Rev. John Neiman describe the life and times of Anne Frank during a visit to the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage. The Diary of Ann Frank was published 70 years ago in the United States and is still in print.(Photo: Bill Marchese / Special to The Desert Sun)

In 1974, Neiman, a college student, wrote a letter to Anne Franks father, Otto Frank, the only Holocaust survivor in the family, saying how much the diary had inspired him. Frank wrote back, and the two struck up a correspondence that turned into a friendship. Neiman went to visit Frank at his home in Switzerland in 1976.

Mr. Frank said to me, Its wonderful that you remember my family. But if you really want to honor Annes memory and all the people who died in the Holocaust, you need to do what Anne wanted to do: Live your life doing good for other people, Neiman said.

Those words resonated with Neiman and bolstered his decision to become a priest.

Neiman, speaking recently to a group of Palm Desert High School students, peppered his talk with facts and figures, vivid anecdotes and stories about Anne Frank and the Holocaust. He has collected photos and family memorabilia in scrapbooks, which he shared with his audience.

Anne Frank wrote about her dreams for the future, which included a chance to move to Hollywood and become an actress or a writer, Neiman said. But her family was betrayed by a neighbor who turned them in to the Nazi for a financial reward, a bounty. Family members were separated, with Frank and her sister sent to Bergen-Belsen prison camp for two years in Germany where they died of Typhus, a disease carried by lice, in 1945, a month before the camp was liberated by allied forces.

Father John is one of our most popular speakers about Anne Frank and the Holocaust, said Talia Lizemer-Hawley, education director at the Tolerance Education Center. The center, which opened in 2009 to promote tolerance and understanding among people, also presents talks by Holocaust survivors and programs relating to black history, transgender and Hispanic issues, and a variety of films and discussions. All events are free and open to the public.

IF YOU GO:

What: Tolerance Education Center

Where: 35147 Landy Lane, Rancho Mirage

When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday

Info: (760) 328-8252, ToleranceEducationCenter.org

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Catholic priest presents inspiring lessons from Anne Frank’s diary 70 years after US publication – The Desert Sun

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May 26, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Windham Theatre Guild to Present THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

The Windham Theatre Guild presents an extraordinary theatrical event as its final Main Stage production of the season…The Diary of Anne Frank, by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, based upon “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl”, and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman.

In 1942, thirteen-year-old Anne Frank and her family-German-born Jews-were driven into hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The Frank family spent two years living in a cramped annex with several other Jews before they were arrested by the Gestapo in 1944. All except Anne’s father, Otto, perished in Nazi concentration camps. However, during those two years in hiding, Anne Frank kept a remarkably witty, insightful, and moving diary about her life and the world around her. From that journal comes the play, The Diary of Anne Frank, winner of the 1956 Pulitzer Prize in Drama. Above all, the play is a celebration of the lively mind of Anne Frank and the complex human spirits of those with whom she shared the annex.

David Smith returns to direct his second show for the Guild. As a UConn graduate, he brings his theatrical skills of acting and Directing to the Guild stage.

The Diary of Anne Frank runs June 2, 3, 9 & 10 at 8:00pm, Sunday Matinees on June 4th & 11th at 2:00pm and Thursday, June 8th at 7:30pm at the Burton Leavitt Theatre, 779 Main Street, Willimantic. Ticket prices are $19 for Adults, $16 for Students/Seniors, and $12 for children under 12. All UCONN, ECSU & QVCC students (with ID) pay the discounted price of $14. Group discounts are also available. Walmart of North Windham sponsors a Thursday night special. Anyone who buys a ticket at the door on Thursday, June 8th will pay the children’s price of just $12 a ticket. This special offer does NOT apply to tickets reserved in advance.

For reservations and information, call the Windham Theatre Guild at 860-423-2245 or buy your tickets online at windhamtheatreguild.org.

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The Windham Theatre Guild to Present THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

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Anne Frank Center has dropped off media radar since expos one month ago – legal Insurrection (blog)

The rise and fall of an anti-Trump attack dog.

There was a time during the first quarter of 2017, when the Anne Frank Center (US) aka Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, was all over the news for the bashing and thrashing its Executive Director, Steven Goldstein, gave Donald Trump.

A time limited Google Search reveals dozens of articles in which Goldstein was quoted as an authority on anti-Semitism and bashing Trump. Here is a small sample:

Goldstein was a frequent guest on CNN, where he launched tirades against the Trump administration:

Goldsteins attacks even elicited a response from Sean Spicer:

There were a small number of conservative websites, including the Daily Caller andLegal Insurrection, warning that this group was not what it purported to be, that it had been hijacked into a social justice activist group with Goldsteins appointment in mid-2016. IsraellyCool questioned whether the group really was founded by Otto Frank, Annes father, as was claimed.

Conservative website criticism had little impact in the mainstream media, which continued itslove affair with a Trump-bashing group bearing Anne Franks name.

And then on April 24, 2017, The Atlantic dropped the big one, a lengthyexpos about how the Anne Frank Center not only turned political, but also likely wasnt even founded by Anne Franks father Otto,Who Does the Anne Frank Center Represent?(emphasis added):

In other words, it is a tiny organization in the process of reinventing itself. The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect and Understanding may not be a Holocaust organization, a Jewish organization, or one founded by Anne Franks father. Its may not have leaders with a scholarly background, a mass membership, or institutional standing among Jewish groups and Holocaust museums. But because it talks a big game and wields the name of Anne Frank, the media has awarded it authority it never earned.

That Atlantic article reverberatedacross the media.

Goldstein was interviewed shortly after that by The Washington Post to explain why the Anne Frank Center attacked Trump so vociferously. Basically, he blamed Trump for making him attack:

In the month since The Atlantic article there have been almost no media mentions of Goldstein or the Anne Frank Center.

A Google search reveals the Anne Frank Center being mentioned in mid May when a memorial for Anne Frank was vandalized in Idaho. Goldstein was quoted by the Southern Poverty Law Center in connection with that incident, but other than that, his media mentions have been almost non-existent.

Id send a screen shot, but theres almost nothing there to screenshot.

The Anne Frank Center gained a big following based on bashing Trump, and it Facebook page posts still regularly receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of shares.

But in terms of being a media attack dog, the Anne Frank Center no longer has any teeth. Which probably is a good thing, maybe theyll go back to, you know, being known for teaching people about Anne Frank, instead of exploiting her name and memory for political purposes.

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Anne Frank Center has dropped off media radar since expos one month ago – legal Insurrection (blog)

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May 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond school – Your Local Guardian

Anne Franks stepsister – a Holocaust survivor – is visiting a Richmond school this week to talk about her horrific experience during the Nazis invasion.

Eva Schloss MBE, 89, from Maida Vale, will attend Radnor House in Twickenham on Friday (May 25) to discuss her time spent in hiding and imprisonment at Auschwitz Concentration Camps.

Eva’s mother, Fritzi, married to Anne Franks father, Otto, in 1953 after both lost their spouse and families in the Holocaust.

Julie Foulkes-Hannam, learning resources manager of the school, said: This is an incredible honour for our school and an amazing opportunity for our students to learn first-hand of the horrors of the Holocaust and ask questions about this time in our history.

The world today is a fairly turbulent place and, in light of Monday’s terrorist attack in Manchester, it is important that we study events like the Holocaust in order to understand how to deal with such outpourings of hate.

Radnor has been preparing for Ms Schloss visit and been using Anne Franks diary and Ms Schlosss story in their English lesson, ethical discussions in religious studies and history lessons to learn more on the subject.

The children are very excited to learn from one of the few remaining survivors what it was like to be in hiding, life in the concentration camp and Russian army rescue.

Henry, a Year 10 student, said: ” I think I will gain so much knowledge about the impact of the events in history and be able to understand so much more having the emotional angle that Ms Schloss will provide us with.

“This is a once in a lifetime experience that very few people of my age will have and I feel so lucky to be able to be involved in meeting someone that survived the Holocaust and to understand what it meant to them, added Jack, another Year 10 student.

One of the founding members of the Anne Frank Memorial Trust and a trustee of the Anne Frank Educational Trust UK, the Austrian was awarded an MBE in 2012 for her work in schools and prisons – educating people on the dangers of intolerance.

Emily, a Year 10 student said: “To appreciate what it was actually like to be shaved, tattooed and dehumanised and to talk to someone who went through it, will help us understand how wrong that was and is to treat anyone that way.

“The opportunity to know and understand what happened and ask questions so that we get a personal perspective, rather than just facts and figures from a teacher will deepen my knowledge of this historical time,” added James, a Year 10 student.

Ms Schloss has written a biography outlining her life story and to help raise awareness of the holocaust and current genocide atrocities and more information can be found at http://www.evaschloss.com/.

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Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond school – Your Local Guardian

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Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond … – Your Local Guardian

Anne Franks stepsister – a Holocaust survivor – is visiting a Richmond school this week to talk about her horrific experience during the Nazis invasion.

Eva Schloss MBE, 89, from Maida Vale, will attend Radnor House in Twickenham on Friday (May 25) to discuss her time spent in hiding and imprisonment at Auschwitz Concentration Camps.

Eva’s mother, Fritzi, married to Anne Franks father, Otto, in 1953 after both lost their spouse and families in the Holocaust.

Julie Foulkes-Hannam, learning resources manager of the school, said: This is an incredible honour for our school and an amazing opportunity for our students to learn first-hand of the horrors of the Holocaust and ask questions about this time in our history.

The world today is a fairly turbulent place and, in light of Monday’s terrorist attack in Manchester, it is important that we study events like the Holocaust in order to understand how to deal with such outpourings of hate.

Radnor has been preparing for Ms Schloss visit and been using Anne Franks diary and Ms Schlosss story in their English lesson, ethical discussions in religious studies and history lessons to learn more on the subject.

The children are very excited to learn from one of the few remaining survivors what it was like to be in hiding, life in the concentration camp and Russian army rescue.

Henry, a Year 10 student, said: ” I think I will gain so much knowledge about the impact of the events in history and be able to understand so much more having the emotional angle that Ms Schloss will provide us with.

“This is a once in a lifetime experience that very few people of my age will have and I feel so lucky to be able to be involved in meeting someone that survived the Holocaust and to understand what it meant to them, added Jack, another Year 10 student.

One of the founding members of the Anne Frank Memorial Trust and a trustee of the Anne Frank Educational Trust UK, the Austrian was awarded an MBE in 2012 for her work in schools and prisons – educating people on the dangers of intolerance.

Emily, a Year 10 student said: “To appreciate what it was actually like to be shaved, tattooed and dehumanised and to talk to someone who went through it, will help us understand how wrong that was and is to treat anyone that way.

“The opportunity to know and understand what happened and ask questions so that we get a personal perspective, rather than just facts and figures from a teacher will deepen my knowledge of this historical time,” added James, a Year 10 student.

Ms Schloss has written a biography outlining her life story and to help raise awareness of the holocaust and current genocide atrocities and more information can be found at http://www.evaschloss.com/.

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Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond … – Your Local Guardian

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J.D. Salinger’s WWII Story Eerily Echoes Anne Frank – Forward

J. D. Salinger is not a writer we associate with the Holocaust, but this June 25, on the 70th anniversary of The Diary of Anne Frank, theres a neglected Salinger short story, A Girl I Knew, worth recalling as a companion piece to Franks recollections.

A Girl I Knew first appeared in the February 1948 issue of Good Housekeeping at a time when no English translation of The Diary of Anne Frank existed. In Salingers story, Leah, the girl referred to in his title, is 16, a year older than Anne Frank at the time of her death, but Leahs doomed life in pre-World War II Vienna carries with it the same poignancy as Annes will a few years later.

Salinger did not include A Girl I Knew in the Nine Stories collection he published in 1953, two years after The Catcher in the Rye, and so A Girl I Knew is not well known, even among Salinger admirers. But the story is one that closely follows events in Salingers life. It parallels both his time as a college dropout in Europe in the late 1930s and his military service during and after World War II.

After flunking out of New York University in 1936, Salingers father sent his son to Europe in 1937 and 1938, ostensibly to learn French and German, but as Salingers chief biographer Kenneth Slawenski points out, in hopes that Salinger would interest himself in the family import business.

Most of Salingers time in Europe was spent in Vienna with a Jewish family whose daughter he fondly recalled years later. In a 1945 letter to Ernest Hemingway, Salinger wrote of a girl in Vienna whose ice skates he would like to go back and tie on.

There is no record of how Salingers romance with his Viennese familys daughter went. In A Girl I Knew, what makes the romance so touching is that it exists largely in the head of John, Salingers narrator, who is telling Leahs story in the wake of World War II when he is a member of the U.S. Army while in Europe.

In A Girl I Knew, John makes friends with Leah, whose family has an apartment in the same building in which he is living, after he hears her singing tunes from a record he has been playing. He invites Leah to visit him on the grounds that he will help her with her English and she will help him with his German. They meet over the course of four months several times a week in Johns sitting room.

Their knowledge of one anothers language is so minimal that they can never get past formalities, and to make matter worse for John, Leah has a fianc. She has been promised by her father to a Polish suitor, whom she is expected to marry when she turns 17. When John leaves Vienna for Paris, all that has changed in his chaste relationship with Leah is that his longing for her has increased. The following year when she writes him (without providing a return address), he learns that she is living in Vienna with her husband.

A Girl I Knew then shifts to the end of World War II, when John is stationed in Nuremberg doing intelligence work, as Salinger did in 1945-46. John is given the opportunity to take some military papers to Vienna, and he leaps at the chance, hoping to find Leah. He never does. Instead, he discovers that Leah was killed by the Nazis. Neighbors and a doctor who was in Buchenwald all tell him the same sad news.

But Salingers story does not end at this obvious stopping point. It concludes on Johns return to his old apartment. The apartment has been taken over by the Army, and only after great effort does John persuade the sergeant in charge of who goes in and out of the apartment to let him have a look around.

The exchange John and the sergeant have marks the true end to A Girl I Knew. After John tells the sergeant he wants to go back to his old apartment because that is where before the war he met with a girl, the sergeant asks what happened to the girl.

She and her family were burned to death in an incinerator, Im told, John answers.

Yeah? What was she, a Jew or something? the sergeant replies, and when John says yes, their conversation ends. Very visibly, the sergeants interest in the affair waned, John observes.

The sergeants response, devoid of sympathy and shock, is the key to A Girl I Knew. The sergeant thrusts us into a world where, with the war barely over, the Holocaust is already a matter of indifference to the average G.I.

For Salinger, by contrast, the horror of the Holocaust stayed. Years later, his daughter would recall him telling her in an unguarded moment, You never really get the smell of burning flesh out of your nose entirely, no matter how long you live.

Nicolaus Mills chairs the literature department at Sarah Lawrence College. He is currently at work on a book about Ernest Hemingway and his World War II circle.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are the authors own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

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Auction of Anne Frank poem will finance Holocaust memorial – The Times of Israel

AMSTERDAM A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust memorial for Dutch Jews.

Jacqueline van Maarsen, who was a childhood friend of Anne Frank, received the poem in the 1970s from her sister, Christiane, who gave her the poem because Jacqueline was closer to Anne, the NOS public broadcaster reported Thursday. The sisters are not Jewish.

In November, van Maarsen auctioned off the poem, which is dated March 28, 1942. She told NOS that she will donate a little over $50,000 from the proceeds for the building of a commemorative wall featuring the names of more than 102,000 Dutch Jews who were killed in the Holocaust.

Addressed to Cri-Cri, Christiane van Maarsen, the poem was signed by Anne Frank. While the first four lines of the text are well known among such poems written by girls, for girls, the Bubb Kuyper auction house that sold the poem has so far not traced the origins of the final four lines.

A man shows a handwritten poem by Anne Frank, written shortly before she went into hiding from the Nazis, at the auction Bubb Kuyper in Haarlem on November 22, 2016. (AFP PHOTO / ANP / Koen Suyk / Netherlands)

The second half might possibly even be composed by Anne Frank, Bubb Kuyper co-director Thys Blankevoort acknowledged. It follows the vein of such poems which often contained a moral about love and friendship, calling on girls to work hard and be diligent.

A series of letters between Anne and her sister Margot with American penpals sold for $165,000 in 1988. And a 1925 edition of Grimms fairy tales, with both girls names written on the title page, went for $62,500 in May in a New York auction fetching twice the estimated price.

The text, written in Dutch and translated by the Daily Mail, reads in full:

If you did not finish your work properly, And lost precious time, Then once again take up your task And try harder than before. If others have reproached you For what you have done wrong, Then be sure to amend your mistake. That is the best memory one can make.

A memorial stone for Anne Frank and her sister Margot on the grounds of the former Prisoner of War (POW) and concentration camps Bergen-Belsen in Bergen, north of Hanover, central Germany, on June 21, 2015. (AFP / NIGEL TREBLIN)

The Frank family went into hiding in Amsterdam three months after the poem was penned. They were discovered, arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps in 1944. Anne Frank died at the Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany in 1945.

Anne wrote in hiding about her life under Nazi occupation. Her diaries were edited and then published by her father, Otto, who was the only member of the family to survive the Holocaust. The book, The Diary of a Young Girl, has been translated into dozens of languages and sold millions of copies.

Times of Israel staff and AFP contributed to this report.

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$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Holocaust … – Jerusalem Post Israel News


Jerusalem Post Israel News
$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Holocaust …
Jerusalem Post Israel News
A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust …

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$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Holocaust … – Jerusalem Post Israel News

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$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Amsterdam … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

AMSTERDAM (JTA) A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust memorial for Dutch Jews.

Jacqueline van Maarsen, who was a childhood friend of Anne Frank, received the poem in the 1970s from her sister, Christiane, who gave her the poem because Jacqueline was closer to Anne, the NOS public broadcaster reported Thursday. The sisters are not Jewish.

In November, van Maarsen auctioned off the poem, which is dated March 28, 1942. She told NOS that she will donate a little over $50,000 from the proceeds for the building of a commemorative wall featuring the names of more than 102,000 Dutch Jews who were killed in the Holocaust.

Addressed to Cri-Cri, Christiane van Maarsen, the poem was signed by Anne Frank. While the first four lines of the text are well known among such poems written by girls, for girls, the origins of the final four lines are not known and may have been composed by her.

It follows the vein of such poems that often contained a moral about love and friendship, calling on girls to work hard and be diligent.

The Frank family went into hiding in Amsterdam three months after the poem was penned. They were discovered, arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps in 1944. Anne Frank died at the Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany in 1945.

Anne wrote in hiding about her life under Nazi occupation. Her diaries were edited and then published by her father, Otto, who was the only member of the family to survive the Holocaust. The book, The Diary of a Young Girl, has been translated into dozens of languages and sold millions of copies.

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$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Amsterdam … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

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Catholic priest presents inspiring lessons from Anne Frank’s diary 70 years after US publication – The Desert Sun

By Bill Marchese, Special to The Desert Sun 12:56 p.m. PT May 26, 2017 The Rev. John Neiman holds a copy of LIFE magazine from 1958 with a cover story about Anne Frank, the subject of his recent talk to students visiting the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage.(Photo: Bill Marchese / Special to The Desert Sun) When John Neiman of Indian Wells was 10 years old, he read The Diary of Anne Frank, and didnt really understand much of it, he said. He had no idea the book would later affect his life and career forever. Intrigued by her tragic story, he re-read the book several times as he matured and saw a film about the young Jewish girl who hid with her family for two years in cramped attic room during World War II. She later died in a Nazi prison camp at age 15. Today, Neiman, a Catholic priest and authority on the life and times, the Holocaust and death of Anne Frank, offers free lectures to students and other visitors at the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage. Franks famous diary is celebrating its 70th anniversary of publication in America this year. The book is still in print and one of the most read nonfiction books after the Bible, according to Neiman. It has been published in 60 languages. The diary describes her life while in hiding with her family during the German occupation of the Netherlands from 1942 to 1944 during World War II. I was so impressed with her courage and her optimism and her faith, Neiman said. Students from Palm Desert High School listen to the Rev. John Neiman describe the life and times of Anne Frank during a visit to the Tolerance Education Center in Rancho Mirage. The Diary of Ann Frank was published 70 years ago in the United States and is still in print.(Photo: Bill Marchese / Special to The Desert Sun) In 1974, Neiman, a college student, wrote a letter to Anne Franks father, Otto Frank, the only Holocaust survivor in the family, saying how much the diary had inspired him. Frank wrote back, and the two struck up a correspondence that turned into a friendship. Neiman went to visit Frank at his home in Switzerland in 1976. Mr. Frank said to me, Its wonderful that you remember my family. But if you really want to honor Annes memory and all the people who died in the Holocaust, you need to do what Anne wanted to do: Live your life doing good for other people, Neiman said. Those words resonated with Neiman and bolstered his decision to become a priest. Neiman, speaking recently to a group of Palm Desert High School students, peppered his talk with facts and figures, vivid anecdotes and stories about Anne Frank and the Holocaust. He has collected photos and family memorabilia in scrapbooks, which he shared with his audience. Anne Frank wrote about her dreams for the future, which included a chance to move to Hollywood and become an actress or a writer, Neiman said. But her family was betrayed by a neighbor who turned them in to the Nazi for a financial reward, a bounty. Family members were separated, with Frank and her sister sent to Bergen-Belsen prison camp for two years in Germany where they died of Typhus, a disease carried by lice, in 1945, a month before the camp was liberated by allied forces. Father John is one of our most popular speakers about Anne Frank and the Holocaust, said Talia Lizemer-Hawley, education director at the Tolerance Education Center. The center, which opened in 2009 to promote tolerance and understanding among people, also presents talks by Holocaust survivors and programs relating to black history, transgender and Hispanic issues, and a variety of films and discussions. All events are free and open to the public. IF YOU GO: What: Tolerance Education Center Where: 35147 Landy Lane, Rancho Mirage When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Info: (760) 328-8252, ToleranceEducationCenter.org Read or Share this story: http://desert.sn/2rq1YQe

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The Windham Theatre Guild to Present THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

The Windham Theatre Guild presents an extraordinary theatrical event as its final Main Stage production of the season…The Diary of Anne Frank, by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, based upon “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl”, and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman. In 1942, thirteen-year-old Anne Frank and her family-German-born Jews-were driven into hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The Frank family spent two years living in a cramped annex with several other Jews before they were arrested by the Gestapo in 1944. All except Anne’s father, Otto, perished in Nazi concentration camps. However, during those two years in hiding, Anne Frank kept a remarkably witty, insightful, and moving diary about her life and the world around her. From that journal comes the play, The Diary of Anne Frank, winner of the 1956 Pulitzer Prize in Drama. Above all, the play is a celebration of the lively mind of Anne Frank and the complex human spirits of those with whom she shared the annex. David Smith returns to direct his second show for the Guild. As a UConn graduate, he brings his theatrical skills of acting and Directing to the Guild stage. The Diary of Anne Frank runs June 2, 3, 9 & 10 at 8:00pm, Sunday Matinees on June 4th & 11th at 2:00pm and Thursday, June 8th at 7:30pm at the Burton Leavitt Theatre, 779 Main Street, Willimantic. Ticket prices are $19 for Adults, $16 for Students/Seniors, and $12 for children under 12. All UCONN, ECSU & QVCC students (with ID) pay the discounted price of $14. Group discounts are also available. Walmart of North Windham sponsors a Thursday night special. Anyone who buys a ticket at the door on Thursday, June 8th will pay the children’s price of just $12 a ticket. This special offer does NOT apply to tickets reserved in advance. For reservations and information, call the Windham Theatre Guild at 860-423-2245 or buy your tickets online at windhamtheatreguild.org.

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center has dropped off media radar since expos one month ago – legal Insurrection (blog)

The rise and fall of an anti-Trump attack dog. There was a time during the first quarter of 2017, when the Anne Frank Center (US) aka Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, was all over the news for the bashing and thrashing its Executive Director, Steven Goldstein, gave Donald Trump. A time limited Google Search reveals dozens of articles in which Goldstein was quoted as an authority on anti-Semitism and bashing Trump. Here is a small sample: Goldstein was a frequent guest on CNN, where he launched tirades against the Trump administration: Goldsteins attacks even elicited a response from Sean Spicer: There were a small number of conservative websites, including the Daily Caller andLegal Insurrection, warning that this group was not what it purported to be, that it had been hijacked into a social justice activist group with Goldsteins appointment in mid-2016. IsraellyCool questioned whether the group really was founded by Otto Frank, Annes father, as was claimed. Conservative website criticism had little impact in the mainstream media, which continued itslove affair with a Trump-bashing group bearing Anne Franks name. And then on April 24, 2017, The Atlantic dropped the big one, a lengthyexpos about how the Anne Frank Center not only turned political, but also likely wasnt even founded by Anne Franks father Otto,Who Does the Anne Frank Center Represent?(emphasis added): In other words, it is a tiny organization in the process of reinventing itself. The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect and Understanding may not be a Holocaust organization, a Jewish organization, or one founded by Anne Franks father. Its may not have leaders with a scholarly background, a mass membership, or institutional standing among Jewish groups and Holocaust museums. But because it talks a big game and wields the name of Anne Frank, the media has awarded it authority it never earned. That Atlantic article reverberatedacross the media. Goldstein was interviewed shortly after that by The Washington Post to explain why the Anne Frank Center attacked Trump so vociferously. Basically, he blamed Trump for making him attack: In the month since The Atlantic article there have been almost no media mentions of Goldstein or the Anne Frank Center. A Google search reveals the Anne Frank Center being mentioned in mid May when a memorial for Anne Frank was vandalized in Idaho. Goldstein was quoted by the Southern Poverty Law Center in connection with that incident, but other than that, his media mentions have been almost non-existent. Id send a screen shot, but theres almost nothing there to screenshot. The Anne Frank Center gained a big following based on bashing Trump, and it Facebook page posts still regularly receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of shares. But in terms of being a media attack dog, the Anne Frank Center no longer has any teeth. Which probably is a good thing, maybe theyll go back to, you know, being known for teaching people about Anne Frank, instead of exploiting her name and memory for political purposes.

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May 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond school – Your Local Guardian

Anne Franks stepsister – a Holocaust survivor – is visiting a Richmond school this week to talk about her horrific experience during the Nazis invasion. Eva Schloss MBE, 89, from Maida Vale, will attend Radnor House in Twickenham on Friday (May 25) to discuss her time spent in hiding and imprisonment at Auschwitz Concentration Camps. Eva’s mother, Fritzi, married to Anne Franks father, Otto, in 1953 after both lost their spouse and families in the Holocaust. Julie Foulkes-Hannam, learning resources manager of the school, said: This is an incredible honour for our school and an amazing opportunity for our students to learn first-hand of the horrors of the Holocaust and ask questions about this time in our history. The world today is a fairly turbulent place and, in light of Monday’s terrorist attack in Manchester, it is important that we study events like the Holocaust in order to understand how to deal with such outpourings of hate. Radnor has been preparing for Ms Schloss visit and been using Anne Franks diary and Ms Schlosss story in their English lesson, ethical discussions in religious studies and history lessons to learn more on the subject. The children are very excited to learn from one of the few remaining survivors what it was like to be in hiding, life in the concentration camp and Russian army rescue. Henry, a Year 10 student, said: ” I think I will gain so much knowledge about the impact of the events in history and be able to understand so much more having the emotional angle that Ms Schloss will provide us with. “This is a once in a lifetime experience that very few people of my age will have and I feel so lucky to be able to be involved in meeting someone that survived the Holocaust and to understand what it meant to them, added Jack, another Year 10 student. One of the founding members of the Anne Frank Memorial Trust and a trustee of the Anne Frank Educational Trust UK, the Austrian was awarded an MBE in 2012 for her work in schools and prisons – educating people on the dangers of intolerance. Emily, a Year 10 student said: “To appreciate what it was actually like to be shaved, tattooed and dehumanised and to talk to someone who went through it, will help us understand how wrong that was and is to treat anyone that way. “The opportunity to know and understand what happened and ask questions so that we get a personal perspective, rather than just facts and figures from a teacher will deepen my knowledge of this historical time,” added James, a Year 10 student. Ms Schloss has written a biography outlining her life story and to help raise awareness of the holocaust and current genocide atrocities and more information can be found at http://www.evaschloss.com/.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Stepsister to Anne Frank and Holocaust survivor visits Richmond … – Your Local Guardian

Anne Franks stepsister – a Holocaust survivor – is visiting a Richmond school this week to talk about her horrific experience during the Nazis invasion. Eva Schloss MBE, 89, from Maida Vale, will attend Radnor House in Twickenham on Friday (May 25) to discuss her time spent in hiding and imprisonment at Auschwitz Concentration Camps. Eva’s mother, Fritzi, married to Anne Franks father, Otto, in 1953 after both lost their spouse and families in the Holocaust. Julie Foulkes-Hannam, learning resources manager of the school, said: This is an incredible honour for our school and an amazing opportunity for our students to learn first-hand of the horrors of the Holocaust and ask questions about this time in our history. The world today is a fairly turbulent place and, in light of Monday’s terrorist attack in Manchester, it is important that we study events like the Holocaust in order to understand how to deal with such outpourings of hate. Radnor has been preparing for Ms Schloss visit and been using Anne Franks diary and Ms Schlosss story in their English lesson, ethical discussions in religious studies and history lessons to learn more on the subject. The children are very excited to learn from one of the few remaining survivors what it was like to be in hiding, life in the concentration camp and Russian army rescue. Henry, a Year 10 student, said: ” I think I will gain so much knowledge about the impact of the events in history and be able to understand so much more having the emotional angle that Ms Schloss will provide us with. “This is a once in a lifetime experience that very few people of my age will have and I feel so lucky to be able to be involved in meeting someone that survived the Holocaust and to understand what it meant to them, added Jack, another Year 10 student. One of the founding members of the Anne Frank Memorial Trust and a trustee of the Anne Frank Educational Trust UK, the Austrian was awarded an MBE in 2012 for her work in schools and prisons – educating people on the dangers of intolerance. Emily, a Year 10 student said: “To appreciate what it was actually like to be shaved, tattooed and dehumanised and to talk to someone who went through it, will help us understand how wrong that was and is to treat anyone that way. “The opportunity to know and understand what happened and ask questions so that we get a personal perspective, rather than just facts and figures from a teacher will deepen my knowledge of this historical time,” added James, a Year 10 student. Ms Schloss has written a biography outlining her life story and to help raise awareness of the holocaust and current genocide atrocities and more information can be found at http://www.evaschloss.com/.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

J.D. Salinger’s WWII Story Eerily Echoes Anne Frank – Forward

J. D. Salinger is not a writer we associate with the Holocaust, but this June 25, on the 70th anniversary of The Diary of Anne Frank, theres a neglected Salinger short story, A Girl I Knew, worth recalling as a companion piece to Franks recollections. A Girl I Knew first appeared in the February 1948 issue of Good Housekeeping at a time when no English translation of The Diary of Anne Frank existed. In Salingers story, Leah, the girl referred to in his title, is 16, a year older than Anne Frank at the time of her death, but Leahs doomed life in pre-World War II Vienna carries with it the same poignancy as Annes will a few years later. Salinger did not include A Girl I Knew in the Nine Stories collection he published in 1953, two years after The Catcher in the Rye, and so A Girl I Knew is not well known, even among Salinger admirers. But the story is one that closely follows events in Salingers life. It parallels both his time as a college dropout in Europe in the late 1930s and his military service during and after World War II. After flunking out of New York University in 1936, Salingers father sent his son to Europe in 1937 and 1938, ostensibly to learn French and German, but as Salingers chief biographer Kenneth Slawenski points out, in hopes that Salinger would interest himself in the family import business. Most of Salingers time in Europe was spent in Vienna with a Jewish family whose daughter he fondly recalled years later. In a 1945 letter to Ernest Hemingway, Salinger wrote of a girl in Vienna whose ice skates he would like to go back and tie on. There is no record of how Salingers romance with his Viennese familys daughter went. In A Girl I Knew, what makes the romance so touching is that it exists largely in the head of John, Salingers narrator, who is telling Leahs story in the wake of World War II when he is a member of the U.S. Army while in Europe. In A Girl I Knew, John makes friends with Leah, whose family has an apartment in the same building in which he is living, after he hears her singing tunes from a record he has been playing. He invites Leah to visit him on the grounds that he will help her with her English and she will help him with his German. They meet over the course of four months several times a week in Johns sitting room. Their knowledge of one anothers language is so minimal that they can never get past formalities, and to make matter worse for John, Leah has a fianc. She has been promised by her father to a Polish suitor, whom she is expected to marry when she turns 17. When John leaves Vienna for Paris, all that has changed in his chaste relationship with Leah is that his longing for her has increased. The following year when she writes him (without providing a return address), he learns that she is living in Vienna with her husband. A Girl I Knew then shifts to the end of World War II, when John is stationed in Nuremberg doing intelligence work, as Salinger did in 1945-46. John is given the opportunity to take some military papers to Vienna, and he leaps at the chance, hoping to find Leah. He never does. Instead, he discovers that Leah was killed by the Nazis. Neighbors and a doctor who was in Buchenwald all tell him the same sad news. But Salingers story does not end at this obvious stopping point. It concludes on Johns return to his old apartment. The apartment has been taken over by the Army, and only after great effort does John persuade the sergeant in charge of who goes in and out of the apartment to let him have a look around. The exchange John and the sergeant have marks the true end to A Girl I Knew. After John tells the sergeant he wants to go back to his old apartment because that is where before the war he met with a girl, the sergeant asks what happened to the girl. She and her family were burned to death in an incinerator, Im told, John answers. Yeah? What was she, a Jew or something? the sergeant replies, and when John says yes, their conversation ends. Very visibly, the sergeants interest in the affair waned, John observes. The sergeants response, devoid of sympathy and shock, is the key to A Girl I Knew. The sergeant thrusts us into a world where, with the war barely over, the Holocaust is already a matter of indifference to the average G.I. For Salinger, by contrast, the horror of the Holocaust stayed. Years later, his daughter would recall him telling her in an unguarded moment, You never really get the smell of burning flesh out of your nose entirely, no matter how long you live. Nicolaus Mills chairs the literature department at Sarah Lawrence College. He is currently at work on a book about Ernest Hemingway and his World War II circle. The views and opinions expressed in this article are the authors own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

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May 22, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Auction of Anne Frank poem will finance Holocaust memorial – The Times of Israel

AMSTERDAM A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust memorial for Dutch Jews. Jacqueline van Maarsen, who was a childhood friend of Anne Frank, received the poem in the 1970s from her sister, Christiane, who gave her the poem because Jacqueline was closer to Anne, the NOS public broadcaster reported Thursday. The sisters are not Jewish. In November, van Maarsen auctioned off the poem, which is dated March 28, 1942. She told NOS that she will donate a little over $50,000 from the proceeds for the building of a commemorative wall featuring the names of more than 102,000 Dutch Jews who were killed in the Holocaust. Addressed to Cri-Cri, Christiane van Maarsen, the poem was signed by Anne Frank. While the first four lines of the text are well known among such poems written by girls, for girls, the Bubb Kuyper auction house that sold the poem has so far not traced the origins of the final four lines. A man shows a handwritten poem by Anne Frank, written shortly before she went into hiding from the Nazis, at the auction Bubb Kuyper in Haarlem on November 22, 2016. (AFP PHOTO / ANP / Koen Suyk / Netherlands) The second half might possibly even be composed by Anne Frank, Bubb Kuyper co-director Thys Blankevoort acknowledged. It follows the vein of such poems which often contained a moral about love and friendship, calling on girls to work hard and be diligent. A series of letters between Anne and her sister Margot with American penpals sold for $165,000 in 1988. And a 1925 edition of Grimms fairy tales, with both girls names written on the title page, went for $62,500 in May in a New York auction fetching twice the estimated price. The text, written in Dutch and translated by the Daily Mail, reads in full: If you did not finish your work properly, And lost precious time, Then once again take up your task And try harder than before. If others have reproached you For what you have done wrong, Then be sure to amend your mistake. That is the best memory one can make. A memorial stone for Anne Frank and her sister Margot on the grounds of the former Prisoner of War (POW) and concentration camps Bergen-Belsen in Bergen, north of Hanover, central Germany, on June 21, 2015. (AFP / NIGEL TREBLIN) The Frank family went into hiding in Amsterdam three months after the poem was penned. They were discovered, arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps in 1944. Anne Frank died at the Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany in 1945. Anne wrote in hiding about her life under Nazi occupation. Her diaries were edited and then published by her father, Otto, who was the only member of the family to survive the Holocaust. The book, The Diary of a Young Girl, has been translated into dozens of languages and sold millions of copies. Times of Israel staff and AFP contributed to this report.

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May 20, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Holocaust … – Jerusalem Post Israel News

Jerusalem Post Israel News $50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Holocaust … Jerusalem Post Israel News A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust … and more »

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May 20, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

$50,000 from auction of Anne Frank poem to finance Amsterdam … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

AMSTERDAM (JTA) A friend of Anne Frank who recently sold a poem handwritten by the teenage diarist for $155,000 has donated a third of the money to the building of a Holocaust memorial for Dutch Jews. Jacqueline van Maarsen, who was a childhood friend of Anne Frank, received the poem in the 1970s from her sister, Christiane, who gave her the poem because Jacqueline was closer to Anne, the NOS public broadcaster reported Thursday. The sisters are not Jewish. In November, van Maarsen auctioned off the poem, which is dated March 28, 1942. She told NOS that she will donate a little over $50,000 from the proceeds for the building of a commemorative wall featuring the names of more than 102,000 Dutch Jews who were killed in the Holocaust. Addressed to Cri-Cri, Christiane van Maarsen, the poem was signed by Anne Frank. While the first four lines of the text are well known among such poems written by girls, for girls, the origins of the final four lines are not known and may have been composed by her. It follows the vein of such poems that often contained a moral about love and friendship, calling on girls to work hard and be diligent. The Frank family went into hiding in Amsterdam three months after the poem was penned. They were discovered, arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps in 1944. Anne Frank died at the Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany in 1945. Anne wrote in hiding about her life under Nazi occupation. Her diaries were edited and then published by her father, Otto, who was the only member of the family to survive the Holocaust. The book, The Diary of a Young Girl, has been translated into dozens of languages and sold millions of copies.

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May 19, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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