Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young …

If the success of female-centric biopics like Hidden Figures has taught Hollywood anything, it’s that there are riches to be found in the lives of history-making women. Well, as lovers of a good true story, we’ve got a slew of suggestions for heroines who deserve their own big biopics.

How has there not been a prestige pic about the life and times of Harriet Tubman? After nearly 30 years of abuse and subjugation, Tubman followed the North Star to escape slavery. Such a trek might, on its own, be worthy of a movie. But Tubman, of course, did so much more. A year after she fled north, she risked her freedom and her life to return and try to rescue her sisters. Then again to save her brother. And again for her husband, who in the meantime took a new wife.

By 1856, she was a notorious outlaw with a bounty of $40,000 on her head. To evade capture, she stole masters’ buggies, perfected escape strategies, and effected clever disguises. Over 10 years, she made 19 trips back into the South, freeing an estimated 300 people.

Sure, she’s nowhere near as well known as Anne Bonny or Grace O’Malley, but Sadie’s pirate story would make for a thrilling action-comedy. This petite thief was a tiny terror of 1860s New York, earning her nickname by head-butting those she mugged. But when a brutal brawl with a female bouncer named Gallus Mag ended with Sadie’s ear being bitten off, she fled to the Hudson River with a makeshift crew. Sadie’s summer was made up of swashbuckling, pillaging waterside mansions, and an eventual reunion with her ear. (Mag had preserved it in a pickling jar for her trophy collection.) What more could you ask for?

The Oscars love a good tale of overcoming adversity, so how about the story of this German Jewish mathematician? Today she is celebrated for her contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics, but in 20th-century Bavaria, Amalie Noether had to fight for every bit of education and academic achievement. Women were not allowed to enroll at the University of Erlangen, so Noether had to petition each professor to attend classes. She later found academic employment similarly unwelcoming.

Noether secured work as a teacher, but on the condition that she wouldn’t be paida condition that lasted for 15 years! Still, she dedicated herself tirelessly to mathematics. She also fled the Nazis, and befriended Albert Einstein, whose eulogy for Noether would make for a marvelous introductory monologue: “In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fraulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began.

For a stirring drama about the tenacity of the human spirit, consider the story of this sideshow performer. Smith rose to fame for her abilities to write, paint, sew, play piano, and even do woodworkall with her feet. But aside from being beloved, she was inspiring. Smith’s lack of arms came at the hands of her abusive father, who basically burned them beyond repair when she was just nine years old. However, Smith persevered, focused on her education and rehabilitation, and made a life for herself as a performer and author, penning a memoir in which she forgave her deeply flawed dad.

The life of the “Joan of Arc of the Arabs” would make for a thrilling political drama. Abid was born into the lap of luxury, the educated daughter of an affluent Damascene aristocrat at the turn of the 20th century. But rather than spend her days reveling in wealth and its privileges, Abid became an outspoken and frequently exiled advocate, most notably for fighting for national independence and women’s rights. But her biggest battle was a literal one: She fought against the French invaders in the the bloody Battle of Maysaloun, of which she was said to be the only Syrian survivor. In honor of her service, King Faisal made her an honorary general. But the French ultimately overthrew Faisal, forcing Abid into exile. She would return to Syria to help advance feminist causes. When she died in 1959, it was within the bounds of her homeland, which was now free as well as a place where women were thriving under the social changes Abid helped enact.

Show biz comedy-meets-discovery drama in the life of Hedy Lamarr, Hollywood glamour girl by day, world-changing inventor by night. Her tale not only includes fame, but also an escape from a brutish, arms-dealing husband, and her quest to defeat the Nazis through applied science.

With the help of her friend, avant-garde composer George Antheil, Lamarr developed “frequency hopping,” an advancement in torpedo systems that aimed to make them jam-proof. Though the Navy didn’t take advantage of this tech until the 1960s, Lamarr’s contributions to spread spectrum technology later won recognition from the science community as her discoveries preceded the widespread adoption of wireless communications, like cell phones and Wi-Fi. At 83, Lamarr was honored with the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award as well as the BULBIE Gnass Spirit of Achievement Award, also regarded as “the Oscar of Inventing.” A celebratory biopic is long overdue.

Want a good gangster tale? After emigrating to the U.S. in 1912, this woman of French and African descent made her home in Harlem. By the 1930s, “Queenie” St. Clair was not to be trifled with, running a crew that fiercely protected their neighbors. St. Clair got corrupt cops booted from the police force. And when Bronx crime boss Dutch Schultz tried to push in on her turf, she made alliances that helped lead to his assassination.

Memorably, she sent a letter to his deathbed that read, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” And yet St. Clair has only been a supporting character in films like Hoodlum and The Cotton Club.

Numerous works of this 19th century American author have earned screen adaptations, but Chopin’s life is the stuff of compelling and heartwarming drama. In the 1880s, she was a happily married mother of six, living on a plantation in Louisiana. But when both her husband and mother died within the same year, Chopin fell into a deep depression. A doctor advised her to use writing as a tool to work through her grief. Chopin’s short stories and essays proved not only to be a saving passion for her, but also a career that saved her family from financial ruin. Though her novel The Awakening was scorned when first published in 1899, it’s now highly regarded as a masterpiece, and a landmark in early feminist literature.

Looking for a fanciful ghost story about the girl whose charm and fashion sense helped popularize the word flapper? This all-American ingnue made the leap from Ziegfeld Follies showgirl to Hollywood starlet, even marrying the brother of America’s Sweetheart Mary Pickford. At 25, Thomas was gone too soon. Yet her story lived on, as rumors spread that her sassy ghost took up residence in her old haunt, the New Amsterdam Theater. To this day, stagehands keep this party girl happy by wishing her goodnight before they leave the theater.

Hollywood loves a tale of a self-made mogul, so why not tackle that of the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire? Walker came from humble beginnings, born to recently freed slaves on a cotton plantation in 1867. By 14, she was married. By 20, she was a widow and single mother. Yet Walker overcame, finding work in her brothers’ barbershop as a washerwoman, where she noticed that her hair was falling out. She developed a tonic that helped re-grow her hair, and began marketing it across the country, and even into Latin America.

Rebranded as Madam C.J. Walker, she’d tour the U.S. selling her products and growing her empire. As her company expanded to factories and beauty schools, so did her philanthropic efforts toward the advancement of African Americans. Her story is not just one of personal success, but of drive, community, and advocacy.

They called her “The Confidence Queen,” and what better name for a crime-drama about this Prussian immigrant with a twisted take on the American Dream. In 1880s New York, Heyman repeatedly exploited people’s thirst for wealth to line her own pockets. Not even arrest could cage her. She continued to scam from her prison cell, and repeatedly convinced the cops to let her leave for outings to the theater and carriage rides around Central Park.

Perhaps you’d prefer an incredible epic about an unparalleled warrior? Well, this Vietnamese heroine’s legend is overflowing with flashy details. It’s said the 20-year-old was 9 feet tall with a voice that sounded loud as a temple bell. Dressed in vibrant yellow and wielding two swords, she rode into battle on a war elephant as she fended off the relentless Chinese forces.

But best of all, Trinh delivered the kind of speeches made for big movie moments, like: “I only want to ride the wind and walk the waves, slay the big whales of the Eastern sea, clean up our frontiers, and save the people from drowning. Why should I imitate others, bow my head, stoop over and be a slave? Why resign myself to menial housework?” And the music soars!

You might know this Creole triple threat for her saucy dance routines and dazzling persona. But a biopic about Baker would be incomplete without an espionage angle. During World War II, Josephine Baker was recruited by the French Resistance to be a spy. Her acceptance is the stuff of great screenplays:

“France made me what I am. I will be grateful forever. The people of Paris have given me everything. They have given me their hearts, and I have given them mine. I am ready, Captain, to give my life. You can use me as you wish.”

Baker’s beauty and fame served as a great cover for her covert ops. Her international acclaim gave her access to high-ranking Axis officials, allowing her to secure information. In secret, she trained in karate, and supposedly became such a skilled marksman with a pistol that she could shoot out the flame on a candle. She hid her notes in her unmentionables, and delivered messages on music sheets using invisible ink. There was also a narrow escape from Nazi forces, a torrid romance with her intelligence contact, Jacques Abtey, a false report of her demise, and being decorated for valor by General Charles de Gaulle. And all the while, Baker kept her career as a performer. Not even James Bond could pull all that off!

For a World War II adventure complete with edge-of-your-seat action sequences, turn to the tale of the all-female Night Bomber Regiment of the Soviet Air Forces. Over the course of three years, these young women (ages 17 to 26) flew 30,000 missions and dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on the invading Nazi forces. Even more remarkable, these fighter pilots favored the cover of night for their attacks, and flew planes made of plywood and canvasall the better to silently sneak up on German bombers. It’s for the soft whooshing of their planes and their nightly assaults that these patriots won their fantastic name.

It took two women, a pilot and a navigator, to man each of the Night Witches’ planesmaking for the perfect setting not only to explore the adventure of these fearless flyers, but also the sisterhood that helped the Soviet Union resist Nazi invasion.

A gifted painter with a vibrant imagination and influential use of color, Mary Blair was a concept artist whose works defined a generation of Disney animation, from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad and Peter Pan to Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella. As a young woman she dreamed of going into the fine arts, but the Depression pushed her into animation. There, she ultimately channeled her passion for color and distinctive aesthetic into groundbreaking designs.

It’s Blair who is credited with introducing Walt Disney to modern art, inciting a shift in his studio’s aesthetic. Disney himself called her in to design the look of his iconic It’s A Small World ride. Her rise through the Disney ranks to one of their official “legends” could be beautifully illustrated with the same kind of whimsy and color that her works were.

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10 Things to Know About Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young …

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February 27, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Maybe the first thing that most people would get shocked is that I rate with only 3 stars one of the best selling books of the 20th century (and now 21st century too) and even more, a book about the Holocaust.

First thing that I learned about this book is honesty.

Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same.

For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybod

First thing that I learned about this book is honesty.

Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same.

For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybody tells you that it’s a book that all people should read, and then they got in this commnunity for readers and maybe they feel the compromise to make the rest to think that you really read the book.

If not the case, hey, I don’t see why anyone can be offended by this comment, and it’s true, I don’t see either anyone who will complain, since to me it would be only a defense mechanism behind their own guilt of really not reading the book but making the rest that they did.

I didn’t think about this scenario but commenting about other thing with a reader friend, that thought stuck in my mind.

I invested so much time in that because, one has to be honest, the book is tedious since it’s not really a novel, it’s a collection of diary writings without a coherent line of constructing a story, even you need editors’ further notes to know what happened to the people in the Secret Annex since obviously, Anne was unable to tell the final events.

So, since it’s so tedious, I wouldn’t be surprised that some reader tried to read it but at the end they just rated with 5 stars to denote that they are “cultured” readers that they appreciate the book as one of the most important books of the 20th century.

Between the passages, you learn a lot of things. The first thing that surprised me it’s how this diary collection that it was written in the 40’s, in Holland, by a teenage girl, almost anybody can relate to the comments and you don’t feel them as outdated.

Sometimes if you read an “old” book, you sensed the outdated of the prose, selection of words, etc… but here I didn’t feel it. This diary could be easily being written in present time and I don’t think that it would change at all. I think that it was one of its strengths since I am sure that it will be as relevant for many more time.

Other thing that surprised me a lot was how much Anne Frank (and by association, the rest of the group in the Secret Annex) were informed about the events in the war, I know, they had a radio, but from stuff that I had read about WWII, there were certain elements of the information that people weren’t aware.

I mean, at many moments, they denote a certainty that Jewish people were murdered in the extermination camps, of course if you call them “extermination camps”, of course you know that people got killed there, but that’s a term used by me, now, they called them labor camps, and so far I read, Jewish people really thought that they will receive “baths” when they were really gassed or burned to death, and it’s kinda logical thing since if they were so certained about their deaths, there would be riots on the ghettos to flee in mass and they wouldn’t march without protest to the gas chambers and the ovens. Even, Allied forces used espionage methods to know from Nazi prisoners what was happening to the Jewish people on the camps.

Anyway, also, there are elements like the assasination attempt to Hitler that they were aware that it was made by their own generals. I don’t think that kind of stuff would be informed so easily since it was a clear fact of how divided was the opinions of the high ranking staff of the Third Reich.

I am not saying that the diary is not authentic as some dumb people commented that the Holocaust didn’t happen.

The Holocaust happened.

It was real and we never forget that to avoid that it would happen again. I am just commenting that surprised me how well they were informed about key sensitive info of war events taking in account that they were a bunch of people living hidden for like 3 years in an isolated annex of a building.

I know, they got visits by the people that helped them but even so. I am not questioning its authenticity, just expressing my surprise when I read it. There were other things here and there that I was surprised by the use of terms like “diet: low fat”, geez! I didn’t know that in the 1940’s they used terms like that in the 1980’s were like the rush of “healthy food”, but again, I supposed it’s the effect that stuff that we think are new, they are just recycled and labeled as “new”.

I am amazed that this book is banned in some schools, okay, there are comments relating to sex and sexual preferences, but so what? If a teenage girl from the 1940’s can think about stuff like that while she was isolated with a war outside, don’t you think that teenagers of today can think just the same?

I think that books like this one can help them to know that they are not alone, that they are not weird for thinking things like that, that was normal in the 1940s and it’s normal now too.

I was amazed that the group tried to “live normal”, I mean, kids making school work and so. I think that in such extraordinary circumstances, they needed to do extraordinary things like to make circles and to talk in group and hearing all about topics. I mean, they were like trapped and living together, really too close in the sense of physical space and yet, nobody cares about what Anne thinks or what she has to offer? Geez! Sure, they need to be really still and in silence, usually at day, but they should like making a “tribe”, I don’t know, I am babbling, but to try to live like regular families was evidently wrong for the sanity of their interrelationships.

What didn’t surprised me were behaviors like trying to hide food or keeping money from the group. In times where the group work were essential to survive, the human selfishness risen as a second nature.

Resumming, I just want to explain that my rating is based on my “entertaining” experience while reading the book and the format of the book itself.

And this didn’t have to do with my respect for the subject of the Holocaust and its terrible events.

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Was Anne Frank Denied Refugee Status by the U.S.?

CLAIM

The family of Anne Frank sought (and was denied) refugee status in the United States.

In November 2015, debate raged on social media networks regarding the escalating plight of Syrian refugees; during that time, a circulating rumor claimed Anne Frank was denied entry to the United States before her death in the Holocaust.

While most Americans were familiar with Anne Frank (and many read her diary in school), the claim labeling her a prospective refugee seemed novel. Its appearance during an ongoing debate about Syrian refugees similarly prompted some skepticism among those who hadnt before heard it, as Franks ordeal and death are a story with which so many are familiar.

On 14 February 2007The New York Timespublished an article titled Letters reveal desperate plight of Anne Franks family, reporting that documents newly uncovered by an accident of circumstance revealed the Frank familys failed attempts at entry to the U.S.:

After lying undisturbed in a New Jersey warehouse for nearly 30 years, documents revealing the desperate efforts of Anne Franks family to escape to the United States and Cuba from Nazi-occupied Holland in 1941 have been discovered thanks to a clerical error.

I am forced to look out for emigration and as far as I can see U.S.A. is the only country we could go to, Annes father, Otto, wrote to his college friend, Nathan Straus Jr., the head of the federal Housing Authority, a friend of Eleanor Roosevelts and the son of a Macys co-owner, asking him to put up a $5,000 bond. It is for the sake of the children mainly that we have to care for. Our own fate is of less importance, Otto Frank wrote.

Page by page, the papers illustrate the tortuous process for gaining entry to the United States in those days. Even with powerful connections and money, European Jews could not overcome the State Departments restrictions against refugees, said two Holocaust scholars who examined the documents.

As the war in Europe intensified, so too did Otto Franks efforts to transport his family to safety. He ultimately settled on an attempt to enter through Cuba, a plan which never reached fruition:

By June 1941, no one with close relatives still in Germany was allowed into the United States because of suspicions that the Nazis could use them to blackmail refugees into clandestine cooperation. That development ended the possibility of getting the Frank girls out through a childrens rescue agency.

Because of the uncertainty, Otto Frank decided to try for a single visa for himself. It was granted and forwarded to him on Dec. 1. No one knows if it arrived. Ten days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States and Havana canceled the visa.

Reuters covered the discovery on 14 February 2007, including commentary from Holocaust scholars who lamented the familys failed attempt at passage:

If her father had sought help sooner, Anne Frank could be a 77-year-old woman living in Boston today, a writer. That is what the YIVOs documents suggest, said Richard Breitman, a professor at American University.

However, Otto Frank decided to try to escape just as the Nazis were making it more difficult to leave and the United States was making it more difficult to enter, Breitman said.

Cuba issued Otto Frank a visa on December 1, 1941, according to the documents, but it was canceled 10 days later when Germany declared war on the United States.

A 2007TIMEarticle provided further details of Otto Franks increasingly desperate efforts:

For nine months, they tried to secure visas first to the U.S. and then to Cuba until that window shut. Just three letters of the file were written by Otto Frank, all addressed to university friend Nathan Straus Jr., son of a co-owner of Macys department store and head of the U.S. Housing Authority. Straus and Franks brother-in-law, Julius Hollander, regularly corresponded with two private Jewish agencies, the National Refugee Service in New York and the Boston Committee for Refugees. Straus also contacted the State Department on Franks behalf. Hollander and his brother arranged affidavits from their employers, Jacob Hiatt of E.F. Dodge Paper Box Co. and Harry Levine of the New England Novelty Co., both of Leominster, Mass.

An April 2015 articletitled Op-Ed: Getting Anne Frank All Wrong published toArutz Shevaaddressed the plight of Anne Frank and other Jewish refugee children who perished:

Otto Frank, Annes father, dutifully filled out the small mountain of required application formsand obtained supporting affidavits from the familys relatives in Massachusetts.

But that was not enough for those who zealously guarded Americas gates against refugees. In fact, in 1941, the Roosevelt administration even added a new restriction: no refugee with close relatives in Europe could come to the U.S., on the grounds that the Nazis might hold their relatives hostage in order to force the refugee to undertake espionage for Hitler.

Thats right: Anne Frank, Nazi spy.

Annes mother, Edith, wrote to a friend in 1939: I believe that all Germanys Jews are looking around the world, but can find nowhere to go.

On 4 September 2015, Anne Franks step-sister Eva Schloss drew direct parallels between the Syrian refugee crisis and the Jewish refugee crisis of World War II:

You must not be selfish and you must share whatever you have and help in a desperate situation. They need help from you.

These people have had the courage to do a very difficult thing- to take your family and your whole life to another country requires bravery and strength. This is history repeating itself.

These Syrians are valuable, educated people. These are doctors and nurses who are only too willing to help our society and they will become leaders in the community if you let them.

The claim that Anne Frank was a refugee confused some readers, as they hadnt heard it prior to the Syrian refugee crisis. But the extent to which Otto Frank tried (and failed) to save his family from death during World War II was only first reported in 2007, and thus didnt appear in many history lessons before that. Ultimately Frank perished (likely of typhus) at Bergen-Belsen in 1945, shortly after the deaths of her mother and sister Margot.

Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here.

Fact Checker:Kim LaCapria

Published:19 November 2015

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January 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The story of Anne Frank: The story in brief

Anne Frank is a Jewish girl who has to go into hiding during World War Two to escape from the Nazis. Together with seven others she hides in the secret annex at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam. After more thantwo years in hiding they are discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people to survive. After her death Anne becomes world famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding.

Discover Anne Frank’s hiding place

View the citys timeline before, during and after the war.

With exceptional photographs and audio and video fragments.

Discover the story behind Anne Frank’s diary.

Anne Frank was born on 12 June 1929 in the German city of Frankfurt am Main, where her fathers family had lived for generations. She has a sister, Margot, who is three and a half years older. The economic crisis, Hitlers rise to power and growing antisemitism put an end to the familys carefree life. Like many other Jews, Otto Frank and his wife, Edith, decide to leave Germany.

Otto sets up a business in Amsterdam and the family finds a home on the Merwedeplein. The children go to school, Otto works hard at his business and Edith looks after the home. When the threat of war in Europe increases, Otto and his family try to emigrate to England or the USA but these attempts fail. On 1 September 1939 Germany invades Poland. It is the beginning of the Second World War.

For a while there is hope that The Netherlands will not become involved in the war, but on 10 May 1940 German troops invade the country. Five days later The Netherlands surrenders and is occupied. Anti-Jewish regulations soon follow. Jews are allowed into fewer and fewer places. Anne and Margot must attend a Jewish school and Otto loses his business.When a renewed attempt to emigrate to the U.S.A. fails, Otto and Edith decide to go into hiding. Otto sets up a hiding place in the rear annexe of his firm at Prinsengracht 263. He does this together with his Jewish business partner Hermann van Pels and with help from his associates Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler.

On 5 July 1942 Margot Frank receives a call-up to report for a German work camp. The next day the Frank family goes into hiding. The Van Pels family follows a week later and in November 1942 they are joined by an eighth person: the dentist Fritz Pfeffer. They remain in the secret annexe for more than two years.In hiding, they have to keep very quiet, are often frightened and pass the time together as well as they can. They are helped by the office workers, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler, Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl; by Mieps husband, Jan Gies; and by the warehouse manager, Johannes Voskuijl, Beps father. These helpers not only arrange food, clothes and books, they are the groups contact with the outside world.

Shortly before going into hiding Anne receives a diary for her birthday. She starts writing straightaway and during her time in hiding she writes about events in the secret annex and about herself. Her diary is a great support to her. Anne also writes short stories and collects quotations from other writers in her book of beautiful sentences.When the Dutch minister of education in exile in London appeals on British radio for people to keep war diaries, Anne decides to edit her diary and create a novel called ‘The Secret Annex’. She starts to rewrite, but she and the others are discovered and arrested before she has finished.

On 4 August 1944 the people in hiding are arrested, along with their helpers Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. They pass from the security service headquarters and prison to the transit camp Westerbork, from where they are deported to Auschwitz. The two helpers are sent to the Amersfoort camp. Johannes Kleiman is released shortly after his arrest and six months later Victor Kugler escapes. Immediately after the arrests Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl rescue Anne’s diary and papers that have been left behind in the secret annex. Despite intensive investigations it has never been clear how the hiding place was discovered.

Otto Frank is the only one of the eight people in hiding to survive the war. During his long journey back to The Netherlands he learns that his wife, Edith, has died. He knows nothing about his daughters and still hopes to see them again. He arrives back in Amsterdam at the beginning of July. He goes straight to Miep and Jan Gies and remains with them for another seven years.Otto Frank tries to find his daughters, but in July he receives the news that they both died of disease and deprivation in Bergen-Belsen. Miep Gies then gives him Annes diary papers. Otto reads the diary and discovers a completely different Anne. He is very moved by her writing.

Anne wrote in her diary that she wants to become a writer or a journalist in the future, and that she wants to publish her diary as a novel. Friends convince Otto Frank that the diary has great expressive power and on 25 June 1947 The Secret Annexe is published in an edition of 3,000. Many more editions follow, also translations, a play and a film.People from all over the world learn of Anne Frank’s story. Over the years Otto Frank answers thousands of letters from people who have read his daughter’s diary. In 1960 the Anne Frank House becomes a museum. Otto Frank remains involved with the Anne Frank House until his death in 1980 and campaigns for human rights and respect.

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January 17, 2018   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

The Italian football federation (FICG) has announced plans to read out a passage from Anne Franks diary before matches this week in response to acts of antisemitism by Lazio fans.

During Sundays league game against Cagliari, supporters of the club defaced their Stadio Olimpico home in Rome with antisemitic graffiti and stickers showing images of Frank, the teenager who was killed at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945, wearing a jersey of their rivals Roma. Their actions have been widely condemned, with Lazios president, Claudio Lotito paying a visit to Romes main synagogue on Tuesday to lay a wreath to remember victims of the Holocaust.

He also promised a new education campaign culminating in an annual trip to Auschwitz with 200 young fans at a club which has a history of antisemitic behaviour, including a Lazio banner in the city derby nearly 20 years ago aimed at Roma supporters that read: Auschwitz Is Your Homeland; The Ovens Are Your Homes.

An image of Frank will be put on Lazios shirts for Wednesdays game at Bologna, the club said, to demonstrate their fight against all forms of racism and antisemitism. The FIGC also said a minute of silence will be observed before Serie A, B and C matches this week, plus amateur and youth games over the weekend, with a passage from Franks diary entry on 15 July, 1944 being read out over loudspeakers.

It reads: I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquillity will return once more.

A statement from Anne Frank House, one of Amsterdams most visited tourist sites, condemned the Lazio supporters attitudes but welcomed the response since Sundays match.

We are shocked by these anti-Jewish expressions, which are extremely painful to those who have experienced the consequences of the Jewish persecution, they said in a statement. Fighting football-related antisemitism is part of our educational activities. We are pleased to see that others, including Italian football clubs, have expressed their indignation about this action.

The head of the European Parliament has also denounced Lazio fans behaviour. Antonio Tajani, who is also Italian, told the European Parliament in Strasbourg that using the image of Anne Frank as an insult against others is a very grave matter.

The Italian prime minister, Paolo Gentiloni, said the stickers were unbelievable, unacceptable and to not be minimised.

A statement on Lazios website outlined the plans to place Franks image on the clubs shirts.

The president of SS Lazio, Claudio Lotito, has decided that tomorrow the team will be coming to the stadium at Renato DallAra Stadium in Bologna with an image of Anne Frank on the Biancoceleste shirt, demonstrating the clubs commitment to fighting all forms of racism and anti-Semitism, it said.

Lotito announced the Auschwitz trip initiative in comments reported by Gazzetta dello Sport: Today, I can officially announce that Lazio will partake in a new initiative, organising an annual trip to Auschwitz for 200 Lazio fans to educate and make sure we dont forget certain episodes, so that these lads can know what it is were talking about.

You cant play around with these facts, we condemn all forms of racism. Lazio will launch this initiative.

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Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

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Anne Frank Center Disgusted by Anne Frank Halloween Costume …

10/17/2017 10:30 AM PDT

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Some genius thought Holocaust victim Anne Frank would make one helluva Halloween costume for kids — but the institution named for Anne is just glad the company behind it got a clue. Eventually.

Online retailer HalloweenCostumes.com rightfully caught major flak Monday for selling a “WW2 Anne Frank Girls Costume.” The backlash was so swift and severe they pulled the tone-deaf item from their site … which featured this highly-offensive costume description.

A rep for the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect — a nonprofit supporting her legacy — tells TMZ … HalloweenCostumes.com’s gimmick is offensive and trivializes Anne’s suffering and the suffering of millions during the Holocaust.

The AFC says there are more appropriate ways to commemorate Anne’s legacy, and it’s happy the costume was yanked. HalloweenCostumes.com has apologized for the stunt, but c’mon.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Company apologizes for its Anne Frank Halloween costume

From the Anne Frank exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (Photo: Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images)

This years competition for worst Halloween costume ideas picked up steam last month with sexy border control agent and pregnant (but still sexy) reality TV star. The latest ill-advised concept isnt part of that risqu trend, but is otherwise pretty damn offensive. Until recently, HalloweenCostumes.com was selling a getup that was alternately marketed as Anne Frank girls costume and child World War Two evacuee costume, both of which are in bad taste, especially when the child model has been directed to hold a sassy pose and smile.

Heres a description of the outfit, which includes (ugh) a felt destination tag that some folks are pointing out would have been for a WWII evacuee, but again, this is a costume that has been marketed as being modeled after Anne Frank, who was one of six million Jews killed in the Holocaust.

The company probably hoped that calling it a historical costume would clear the decency bar, but that didnt really fly with social media users, who shared images of the costume until HalloweenCostumes.com removed it from its store. Later, a spokesman issued this statement, in which he talked up the historical accuracy of the offerings at a company called Halloween Costumes (or, is also the case, Fun Costumes).

The Miami Herald notes the costume is sold out at some online retailers, while others, like Walmart, are still looking into the matter.

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Company apologizes for its Anne Frank Halloween costume

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Bad Halloween Costumes: Anne Frank, Trayvon Martin, Kim …

Lets start with a rather uncontroversial statement: Its important to learn about the Holocaust, and Anne Franks diary is an excellent way to start. What seems more contentious, however, is the notionthat it would be a good idea to dress up as one of the Holocausts most famous victims for Halloween.

One online costume retailer recently discovered the hard way just how offensive many people findthat idea. HalloweenCostumes.com pulled an Anne Frank costume for girls off its website on Sunday after being criticized for putting it up in the first place.

It is utterly inappropriate, offensive and quite simply beggars belief. The Holocaust is not a jokethis company needs to have a serious rethink,”Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust in the U.K., told The Jewish Chronicle.

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Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, toldNewsweekin an emailed statement: “We are glad the Anne Frank costume was removed from the catalogue, but its hard to believe that anyone thought this was an appropriate costume for Halloween. It shows we still have a long way to go in terms of educating people about what happened during the Holocaust, and why this unique event in human history should never be trivialized.”

The online retailer HalloweenCostumes.com pulled an Anne Frank costume from its site Sunday after it spurred criticism. The author Daniel Arenson posted a screenshot of the costume page on the EU version of the retailer’s website. Twitter

The costumewhich is still being sold elsewhere as a more generic World War II Evacuee Girl Fancy Dress Costume Girls and Child’s World War II Girl Costumewas marketed on HalloweenCostumes.com as educational.World War II created some unexpected heroes, where even a young girl like Anne Frank with nothing but a diary and hope could become an inspiration to us all. We can all learn from someone like that!,”the description read. Ross Walker Smith, a public relations specialist for Fun.com (HalloweenCostumes.com is listed as a brand of Fun.com), responded in a tweet with a statement. “We sell costumes not only for Halloween, but for many uses outside of the Halloween season, such as school projects and plays,” he wrote. We apologize for any offense it has caused, as thats never our intention.

But this isnt the first time a company or individual thought it was a good idea to dress up as a victim and was slammed for it. Last year, Costumeish.com started selling a Parisian Heist Robbery Victim Kit for $69.99 so that people could dress up as Kim Kardashian the robbery victim (though she wasnt mentioned by name, the details of the costume left little room for doubt). Less than a month before Halloween, Kardashianwasrobbed at gunpoint and tied up by a group of men at the luxurious guesthouse where she was staying in Paris. They reportedly stole $10 million worth of jewelry and other valuables. That costume also was pulled.

Sometimes, the costume is homemade rather than mass manufactured, but the outrage is just as palpable. In 2014, there were costumes of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice that incorporated his arreston charges ofassaulting his fiance in an elevator, both with real humans and battered dolls playing his domestic violence victim. The year before, a Michigan woman who dressed up as a Boston Marathon bombing victim and posted a photo on Twitter was lambasted. She reportedly received death threats and was fired from her job. And 2013 also saw a Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman costume that, like some of the Ray Rice get-ups, caused offense for using blackface as well as for depicting a victim of violence for entertainment.

Since it keeps happening over and over again, it might be worth asking oneself before settling on a Halloween costume whether it casually portrays someone who was murdered, robbed, abused or targeted in some other crime. If the answer is yes, then the best answer to the next question”Is this a good Halloween costume?”is probably no.

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Bad Halloween Costumes: Anne Frank, Trayvon Martin, Kim …

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Halloween store removes Anne Frank costume after complaints …

At least one online retailer has pulled a costume from its website that depicted the teenage diarist and Holocaust victim Anne Frank, but an identical costume is still available at several online retailers.

Screenshots of the costume for sale at HalloweenCostumes.com posted to social media show a smiling girl wearing World War II-era clothing and a beret.

The costume quickly received criticism. Carlos Galindo-Elvira, who leads the Anti-Defamation League’s Arizona office, said on Twitter that it trivializes Frank’s memory. “There [are] better ways [to] commemorate Anne Frank. This is not one,” he tweeted.

Fun.com, based in North Mankato, Minnesota, runs the website where the costume was featured. Spokesman Ross Walker SmithtweetedSunday that the costume had been pulled.

He explained that the company sells costumes for activities other than Halloween, like “school projects and plays.” He apologized for any offense caused by the costume.

Anne Frank is known for the diary she wrote while in hiding from the Nazis in an attic in Amsterdam during the war. Her family was discovered in 1944 and sent to a concentration camp, where Anne died at the age of 15.

Google search results for “Anne Frank kids costume” still show an identical costume being sold on Walmart.com, TheHalloweenSpot.com, ziggosparty.com and several other online retailers. It’s labeled as a “WWII girl costume” or “WWII evacuee costume.”

2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young …

If the success of female-centric biopics like Hidden Figures has taught Hollywood anything, it’s that there are riches to be found in the lives of history-making women. Well, as lovers of a good true story, we’ve got a slew of suggestions for heroines who deserve their own big biopics. How has there not been a prestige pic about the life and times of Harriet Tubman? After nearly 30 years of abuse and subjugation, Tubman followed the North Star to escape slavery. Such a trek might, on its own, be worthy of a movie. But Tubman, of course, did so much more. A year after she fled north, she risked her freedom and her life to return and try to rescue her sisters. Then again to save her brother. And again for her husband, who in the meantime took a new wife. By 1856, she was a notorious outlaw with a bounty of $40,000 on her head. To evade capture, she stole masters’ buggies, perfected escape strategies, and effected clever disguises. Over 10 years, she made 19 trips back into the South, freeing an estimated 300 people. Sure, she’s nowhere near as well known as Anne Bonny or Grace O’Malley, but Sadie’s pirate story would make for a thrilling action-comedy. This petite thief was a tiny terror of 1860s New York, earning her nickname by head-butting those she mugged. But when a brutal brawl with a female bouncer named Gallus Mag ended with Sadie’s ear being bitten off, she fled to the Hudson River with a makeshift crew. Sadie’s summer was made up of swashbuckling, pillaging waterside mansions, and an eventual reunion with her ear. (Mag had preserved it in a pickling jar for her trophy collection.) What more could you ask for? The Oscars love a good tale of overcoming adversity, so how about the story of this German Jewish mathematician? Today she is celebrated for her contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics, but in 20th-century Bavaria, Amalie Noether had to fight for every bit of education and academic achievement. Women were not allowed to enroll at the University of Erlangen, so Noether had to petition each professor to attend classes. She later found academic employment similarly unwelcoming. Noether secured work as a teacher, but on the condition that she wouldn’t be paida condition that lasted for 15 years! Still, she dedicated herself tirelessly to mathematics. She also fled the Nazis, and befriended Albert Einstein, whose eulogy for Noether would make for a marvelous introductory monologue: “In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fraulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. For a stirring drama about the tenacity of the human spirit, consider the story of this sideshow performer. Smith rose to fame for her abilities to write, paint, sew, play piano, and even do woodworkall with her feet. But aside from being beloved, she was inspiring. Smith’s lack of arms came at the hands of her abusive father, who basically burned them beyond repair when she was just nine years old. However, Smith persevered, focused on her education and rehabilitation, and made a life for herself as a performer and author, penning a memoir in which she forgave her deeply flawed dad. The life of the “Joan of Arc of the Arabs” would make for a thrilling political drama. Abid was born into the lap of luxury, the educated daughter of an affluent Damascene aristocrat at the turn of the 20th century. But rather than spend her days reveling in wealth and its privileges, Abid became an outspoken and frequently exiled advocate, most notably for fighting for national independence and women’s rights. But her biggest battle was a literal one: She fought against the French invaders in the the bloody Battle of Maysaloun, of which she was said to be the only Syrian survivor. In honor of her service, King Faisal made her an honorary general. But the French ultimately overthrew Faisal, forcing Abid into exile. She would return to Syria to help advance feminist causes. When she died in 1959, it was within the bounds of her homeland, which was now free as well as a place where women were thriving under the social changes Abid helped enact. Show biz comedy-meets-discovery drama in the life of Hedy Lamarr, Hollywood glamour girl by day, world-changing inventor by night. Her tale not only includes fame, but also an escape from a brutish, arms-dealing husband, and her quest to defeat the Nazis through applied science. With the help of her friend, avant-garde composer George Antheil, Lamarr developed “frequency hopping,” an advancement in torpedo systems that aimed to make them jam-proof. Though the Navy didn’t take advantage of this tech until the 1960s, Lamarr’s contributions to spread spectrum technology later won recognition from the science community as her discoveries preceded the widespread adoption of wireless communications, like cell phones and Wi-Fi. At 83, Lamarr was honored with the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award as well as the BULBIE Gnass Spirit of Achievement Award, also regarded as “the Oscar of Inventing.” A celebratory biopic is long overdue. Want a good gangster tale? After emigrating to the U.S. in 1912, this woman of French and African descent made her home in Harlem. By the 1930s, “Queenie” St. Clair was not to be trifled with, running a crew that fiercely protected their neighbors. St. Clair got corrupt cops booted from the police force. And when Bronx crime boss Dutch Schultz tried to push in on her turf, she made alliances that helped lead to his assassination. Memorably, she sent a letter to his deathbed that read, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” And yet St. Clair has only been a supporting character in films like Hoodlum and The Cotton Club. Numerous works of this 19th century American author have earned screen adaptations, but Chopin’s life is the stuff of compelling and heartwarming drama. In the 1880s, she was a happily married mother of six, living on a plantation in Louisiana. But when both her husband and mother died within the same year, Chopin fell into a deep depression. A doctor advised her to use writing as a tool to work through her grief. Chopin’s short stories and essays proved not only to be a saving passion for her, but also a career that saved her family from financial ruin. Though her novel The Awakening was scorned when first published in 1899, it’s now highly regarded as a masterpiece, and a landmark in early feminist literature. Looking for a fanciful ghost story about the girl whose charm and fashion sense helped popularize the word flapper? This all-American ingnue made the leap from Ziegfeld Follies showgirl to Hollywood starlet, even marrying the brother of America’s Sweetheart Mary Pickford. At 25, Thomas was gone too soon. Yet her story lived on, as rumors spread that her sassy ghost took up residence in her old haunt, the New Amsterdam Theater. To this day, stagehands keep this party girl happy by wishing her goodnight before they leave the theater. Hollywood loves a tale of a self-made mogul, so why not tackle that of the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire? Walker came from humble beginnings, born to recently freed slaves on a cotton plantation in 1867. By 14, she was married. By 20, she was a widow and single mother. Yet Walker overcame, finding work in her brothers’ barbershop as a washerwoman, where she noticed that her hair was falling out. She developed a tonic that helped re-grow her hair, and began marketing it across the country, and even into Latin America. Rebranded as Madam C.J. Walker, she’d tour the U.S. selling her products and growing her empire. As her company expanded to factories and beauty schools, so did her philanthropic efforts toward the advancement of African Americans. Her story is not just one of personal success, but of drive, community, and advocacy. They called her “The Confidence Queen,” and what better name for a crime-drama about this Prussian immigrant with a twisted take on the American Dream. In 1880s New York, Heyman repeatedly exploited people’s thirst for wealth to line her own pockets. Not even arrest could cage her. She continued to scam from her prison cell, and repeatedly convinced the cops to let her leave for outings to the theater and carriage rides around Central Park. Perhaps you’d prefer an incredible epic about an unparalleled warrior? Well, this Vietnamese heroine’s legend is overflowing with flashy details. It’s said the 20-year-old was 9 feet tall with a voice that sounded loud as a temple bell. Dressed in vibrant yellow and wielding two swords, she rode into battle on a war elephant as she fended off the relentless Chinese forces. But best of all, Trinh delivered the kind of speeches made for big movie moments, like: “I only want to ride the wind and walk the waves, slay the big whales of the Eastern sea, clean up our frontiers, and save the people from drowning. Why should I imitate others, bow my head, stoop over and be a slave? Why resign myself to menial housework?” And the music soars! You might know this Creole triple threat for her saucy dance routines and dazzling persona. But a biopic about Baker would be incomplete without an espionage angle. During World War II, Josephine Baker was recruited by the French Resistance to be a spy. Her acceptance is the stuff of great screenplays: “France made me what I am. I will be grateful forever. The people of Paris have given me everything. They have given me their hearts, and I have given them mine. I am ready, Captain, to give my life. You can use me as you wish.” Baker’s beauty and fame served as a great cover for her covert ops. Her international acclaim gave her access to high-ranking Axis officials, allowing her to secure information. In secret, she trained in karate, and supposedly became such a skilled marksman with a pistol that she could shoot out the flame on a candle. She hid her notes in her unmentionables, and delivered messages on music sheets using invisible ink. There was also a narrow escape from Nazi forces, a torrid romance with her intelligence contact, Jacques Abtey, a false report of her demise, and being decorated for valor by General Charles de Gaulle. And all the while, Baker kept her career as a performer. Not even James Bond could pull all that off! For a World War II adventure complete with edge-of-your-seat action sequences, turn to the tale of the all-female Night Bomber Regiment of the Soviet Air Forces. Over the course of three years, these young women (ages 17 to 26) flew 30,000 missions and dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on the invading Nazi forces. Even more remarkable, these fighter pilots favored the cover of night for their attacks, and flew planes made of plywood and canvasall the better to silently sneak up on German bombers. It’s for the soft whooshing of their planes and their nightly assaults that these patriots won their fantastic name. It took two women, a pilot and a navigator, to man each of the Night Witches’ planesmaking for the perfect setting not only to explore the adventure of these fearless flyers, but also the sisterhood that helped the Soviet Union resist Nazi invasion. A gifted painter with a vibrant imagination and influential use of color, Mary Blair was a concept artist whose works defined a generation of Disney animation, from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad and Peter Pan to Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella. As a young woman she dreamed of going into the fine arts, but the Depression pushed her into animation. There, she ultimately channeled her passion for color and distinctive aesthetic into groundbreaking designs. It’s Blair who is credited with introducing Walt Disney to modern art, inciting a shift in his studio’s aesthetic. Disney himself called her in to design the look of his iconic It’s A Small World ride. Her rise through the Disney ranks to one of their official “legends” could be beautifully illustrated with the same kind of whimsy and color that her works were.

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February 27, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Maybe the first thing that most people would get shocked is that I rate with only 3 stars one of the best selling books of the 20th century (and now 21st century too) and even more, a book about the Holocaust. First thing that I learned about this book is honesty. Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same. For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybod First thing that I learned about this book is honesty. Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same. For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybody tells you that it’s a book that all people should read, and then they got in this commnunity for readers and maybe they feel the compromise to make the rest to think that you really read the book. If not the case, hey, I don’t see why anyone can be offended by this comment, and it’s true, I don’t see either anyone who will complain, since to me it would be only a defense mechanism behind their own guilt of really not reading the book but making the rest that they did. I didn’t think about this scenario but commenting about other thing with a reader friend, that thought stuck in my mind. I invested so much time in that because, one has to be honest, the book is tedious since it’s not really a novel, it’s a collection of diary writings without a coherent line of constructing a story, even you need editors’ further notes to know what happened to the people in the Secret Annex since obviously, Anne was unable to tell the final events. So, since it’s so tedious, I wouldn’t be surprised that some reader tried to read it but at the end they just rated with 5 stars to denote that they are “cultured” readers that they appreciate the book as one of the most important books of the 20th century. Between the passages, you learn a lot of things. The first thing that surprised me it’s how this diary collection that it was written in the 40’s, in Holland, by a teenage girl, almost anybody can relate to the comments and you don’t feel them as outdated. Sometimes if you read an “old” book, you sensed the outdated of the prose, selection of words, etc… but here I didn’t feel it. This diary could be easily being written in present time and I don’t think that it would change at all. I think that it was one of its strengths since I am sure that it will be as relevant for many more time. Other thing that surprised me a lot was how much Anne Frank (and by association, the rest of the group in the Secret Annex) were informed about the events in the war, I know, they had a radio, but from stuff that I had read about WWII, there were certain elements of the information that people weren’t aware. I mean, at many moments, they denote a certainty that Jewish people were murdered in the extermination camps, of course if you call them “extermination camps”, of course you know that people got killed there, but that’s a term used by me, now, they called them labor camps, and so far I read, Jewish people really thought that they will receive “baths” when they were really gassed or burned to death, and it’s kinda logical thing since if they were so certained about their deaths, there would be riots on the ghettos to flee in mass and they wouldn’t march without protest to the gas chambers and the ovens. Even, Allied forces used espionage methods to know from Nazi prisoners what was happening to the Jewish people on the camps. Anyway, also, there are elements like the assasination attempt to Hitler that they were aware that it was made by their own generals. I don’t think that kind of stuff would be informed so easily since it was a clear fact of how divided was the opinions of the high ranking staff of the Third Reich. I am not saying that the diary is not authentic as some dumb people commented that the Holocaust didn’t happen. The Holocaust happened. It was real and we never forget that to avoid that it would happen again. I am just commenting that surprised me how well they were informed about key sensitive info of war events taking in account that they were a bunch of people living hidden for like 3 years in an isolated annex of a building. I know, they got visits by the people that helped them but even so. I am not questioning its authenticity, just expressing my surprise when I read it. There were other things here and there that I was surprised by the use of terms like “diet: low fat”, geez! I didn’t know that in the 1940’s they used terms like that in the 1980’s were like the rush of “healthy food”, but again, I supposed it’s the effect that stuff that we think are new, they are just recycled and labeled as “new”. I am amazed that this book is banned in some schools, okay, there are comments relating to sex and sexual preferences, but so what? If a teenage girl from the 1940’s can think about stuff like that while she was isolated with a war outside, don’t you think that teenagers of today can think just the same? I think that books like this one can help them to know that they are not alone, that they are not weird for thinking things like that, that was normal in the 1940s and it’s normal now too. I was amazed that the group tried to “live normal”, I mean, kids making school work and so. I think that in such extraordinary circumstances, they needed to do extraordinary things like to make circles and to talk in group and hearing all about topics. I mean, they were like trapped and living together, really too close in the sense of physical space and yet, nobody cares about what Anne thinks or what she has to offer? Geez! Sure, they need to be really still and in silence, usually at day, but they should like making a “tribe”, I don’t know, I am babbling, but to try to live like regular families was evidently wrong for the sanity of their interrelationships. What didn’t surprised me were behaviors like trying to hide food or keeping money from the group. In times where the group work were essential to survive, the human selfishness risen as a second nature. Resumming, I just want to explain that my rating is based on my “entertaining” experience while reading the book and the format of the book itself. And this didn’t have to do with my respect for the subject of the Holocaust and its terrible events.

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Was Anne Frank Denied Refugee Status by the U.S.?

CLAIM The family of Anne Frank sought (and was denied) refugee status in the United States. In November 2015, debate raged on social media networks regarding the escalating plight of Syrian refugees; during that time, a circulating rumor claimed Anne Frank was denied entry to the United States before her death in the Holocaust. While most Americans were familiar with Anne Frank (and many read her diary in school), the claim labeling her a prospective refugee seemed novel. Its appearance during an ongoing debate about Syrian refugees similarly prompted some skepticism among those who hadnt before heard it, as Franks ordeal and death are a story with which so many are familiar. On 14 February 2007The New York Timespublished an article titled Letters reveal desperate plight of Anne Franks family, reporting that documents newly uncovered by an accident of circumstance revealed the Frank familys failed attempts at entry to the U.S.: After lying undisturbed in a New Jersey warehouse for nearly 30 years, documents revealing the desperate efforts of Anne Franks family to escape to the United States and Cuba from Nazi-occupied Holland in 1941 have been discovered thanks to a clerical error. I am forced to look out for emigration and as far as I can see U.S.A. is the only country we could go to, Annes father, Otto, wrote to his college friend, Nathan Straus Jr., the head of the federal Housing Authority, a friend of Eleanor Roosevelts and the son of a Macys co-owner, asking him to put up a $5,000 bond. It is for the sake of the children mainly that we have to care for. Our own fate is of less importance, Otto Frank wrote. Page by page, the papers illustrate the tortuous process for gaining entry to the United States in those days. Even with powerful connections and money, European Jews could not overcome the State Departments restrictions against refugees, said two Holocaust scholars who examined the documents. As the war in Europe intensified, so too did Otto Franks efforts to transport his family to safety. He ultimately settled on an attempt to enter through Cuba, a plan which never reached fruition: By June 1941, no one with close relatives still in Germany was allowed into the United States because of suspicions that the Nazis could use them to blackmail refugees into clandestine cooperation. That development ended the possibility of getting the Frank girls out through a childrens rescue agency. Because of the uncertainty, Otto Frank decided to try for a single visa for himself. It was granted and forwarded to him on Dec. 1. No one knows if it arrived. Ten days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States and Havana canceled the visa. Reuters covered the discovery on 14 February 2007, including commentary from Holocaust scholars who lamented the familys failed attempt at passage: If her father had sought help sooner, Anne Frank could be a 77-year-old woman living in Boston today, a writer. That is what the YIVOs documents suggest, said Richard Breitman, a professor at American University. However, Otto Frank decided to try to escape just as the Nazis were making it more difficult to leave and the United States was making it more difficult to enter, Breitman said. Cuba issued Otto Frank a visa on December 1, 1941, according to the documents, but it was canceled 10 days later when Germany declared war on the United States. A 2007TIMEarticle provided further details of Otto Franks increasingly desperate efforts: For nine months, they tried to secure visas first to the U.S. and then to Cuba until that window shut. Just three letters of the file were written by Otto Frank, all addressed to university friend Nathan Straus Jr., son of a co-owner of Macys department store and head of the U.S. Housing Authority. Straus and Franks brother-in-law, Julius Hollander, regularly corresponded with two private Jewish agencies, the National Refugee Service in New York and the Boston Committee for Refugees. Straus also contacted the State Department on Franks behalf. Hollander and his brother arranged affidavits from their employers, Jacob Hiatt of E.F. Dodge Paper Box Co. and Harry Levine of the New England Novelty Co., both of Leominster, Mass. An April 2015 articletitled Op-Ed: Getting Anne Frank All Wrong published toArutz Shevaaddressed the plight of Anne Frank and other Jewish refugee children who perished: Otto Frank, Annes father, dutifully filled out the small mountain of required application formsand obtained supporting affidavits from the familys relatives in Massachusetts. But that was not enough for those who zealously guarded Americas gates against refugees. In fact, in 1941, the Roosevelt administration even added a new restriction: no refugee with close relatives in Europe could come to the U.S., on the grounds that the Nazis might hold their relatives hostage in order to force the refugee to undertake espionage for Hitler. Thats right: Anne Frank, Nazi spy. Annes mother, Edith, wrote to a friend in 1939: I believe that all Germanys Jews are looking around the world, but can find nowhere to go. On 4 September 2015, Anne Franks step-sister Eva Schloss drew direct parallels between the Syrian refugee crisis and the Jewish refugee crisis of World War II: You must not be selfish and you must share whatever you have and help in a desperate situation. They need help from you. These people have had the courage to do a very difficult thing- to take your family and your whole life to another country requires bravery and strength. This is history repeating itself. These Syrians are valuable, educated people. These are doctors and nurses who are only too willing to help our society and they will become leaders in the community if you let them. The claim that Anne Frank was a refugee confused some readers, as they hadnt heard it prior to the Syrian refugee crisis. But the extent to which Otto Frank tried (and failed) to save his family from death during World War II was only first reported in 2007, and thus didnt appear in many history lessons before that. Ultimately Frank perished (likely of typhus) at Bergen-Belsen in 1945, shortly after the deaths of her mother and sister Margot. Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here. Fact Checker:Kim LaCapria Published:19 November 2015

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January 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The story of Anne Frank: The story in brief

Anne Frank is a Jewish girl who has to go into hiding during World War Two to escape from the Nazis. Together with seven others she hides in the secret annex at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam. After more thantwo years in hiding they are discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people to survive. After her death Anne becomes world famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding. Discover Anne Frank’s hiding place View the citys timeline before, during and after the war. With exceptional photographs and audio and video fragments. Discover the story behind Anne Frank’s diary. Anne Frank was born on 12 June 1929 in the German city of Frankfurt am Main, where her fathers family had lived for generations. She has a sister, Margot, who is three and a half years older. The economic crisis, Hitlers rise to power and growing antisemitism put an end to the familys carefree life. Like many other Jews, Otto Frank and his wife, Edith, decide to leave Germany. Otto sets up a business in Amsterdam and the family finds a home on the Merwedeplein. The children go to school, Otto works hard at his business and Edith looks after the home. When the threat of war in Europe increases, Otto and his family try to emigrate to England or the USA but these attempts fail. On 1 September 1939 Germany invades Poland. It is the beginning of the Second World War. For a while there is hope that The Netherlands will not become involved in the war, but on 10 May 1940 German troops invade the country. Five days later The Netherlands surrenders and is occupied. Anti-Jewish regulations soon follow. Jews are allowed into fewer and fewer places. Anne and Margot must attend a Jewish school and Otto loses his business.When a renewed attempt to emigrate to the U.S.A. fails, Otto and Edith decide to go into hiding. Otto sets up a hiding place in the rear annexe of his firm at Prinsengracht 263. He does this together with his Jewish business partner Hermann van Pels and with help from his associates Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. On 5 July 1942 Margot Frank receives a call-up to report for a German work camp. The next day the Frank family goes into hiding. The Van Pels family follows a week later and in November 1942 they are joined by an eighth person: the dentist Fritz Pfeffer. They remain in the secret annexe for more than two years.In hiding, they have to keep very quiet, are often frightened and pass the time together as well as they can. They are helped by the office workers, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler, Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl; by Mieps husband, Jan Gies; and by the warehouse manager, Johannes Voskuijl, Beps father. These helpers not only arrange food, clothes and books, they are the groups contact with the outside world. Shortly before going into hiding Anne receives a diary for her birthday. She starts writing straightaway and during her time in hiding she writes about events in the secret annex and about herself. Her diary is a great support to her. Anne also writes short stories and collects quotations from other writers in her book of beautiful sentences.When the Dutch minister of education in exile in London appeals on British radio for people to keep war diaries, Anne decides to edit her diary and create a novel called ‘The Secret Annex’. She starts to rewrite, but she and the others are discovered and arrested before she has finished. On 4 August 1944 the people in hiding are arrested, along with their helpers Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. They pass from the security service headquarters and prison to the transit camp Westerbork, from where they are deported to Auschwitz. The two helpers are sent to the Amersfoort camp. Johannes Kleiman is released shortly after his arrest and six months later Victor Kugler escapes. Immediately after the arrests Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl rescue Anne’s diary and papers that have been left behind in the secret annex. Despite intensive investigations it has never been clear how the hiding place was discovered. Otto Frank is the only one of the eight people in hiding to survive the war. During his long journey back to The Netherlands he learns that his wife, Edith, has died. He knows nothing about his daughters and still hopes to see them again. He arrives back in Amsterdam at the beginning of July. He goes straight to Miep and Jan Gies and remains with them for another seven years.Otto Frank tries to find his daughters, but in July he receives the news that they both died of disease and deprivation in Bergen-Belsen. Miep Gies then gives him Annes diary papers. Otto reads the diary and discovers a completely different Anne. He is very moved by her writing. Anne wrote in her diary that she wants to become a writer or a journalist in the future, and that she wants to publish her diary as a novel. Friends convince Otto Frank that the diary has great expressive power and on 25 June 1947 The Secret Annexe is published in an edition of 3,000. Many more editions follow, also translations, a play and a film.People from all over the world learn of Anne Frank’s story. Over the years Otto Frank answers thousands of letters from people who have read his daughter’s diary. In 1960 the Anne Frank House becomes a museum. Otto Frank remains involved with the Anne Frank House until his death in 1980 and campaigns for human rights and respect.

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January 17, 2018   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

The Italian football federation (FICG) has announced plans to read out a passage from Anne Franks diary before matches this week in response to acts of antisemitism by Lazio fans. During Sundays league game against Cagliari, supporters of the club defaced their Stadio Olimpico home in Rome with antisemitic graffiti and stickers showing images of Frank, the teenager who was killed at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945, wearing a jersey of their rivals Roma. Their actions have been widely condemned, with Lazios president, Claudio Lotito paying a visit to Romes main synagogue on Tuesday to lay a wreath to remember victims of the Holocaust. He also promised a new education campaign culminating in an annual trip to Auschwitz with 200 young fans at a club which has a history of antisemitic behaviour, including a Lazio banner in the city derby nearly 20 years ago aimed at Roma supporters that read: Auschwitz Is Your Homeland; The Ovens Are Your Homes. An image of Frank will be put on Lazios shirts for Wednesdays game at Bologna, the club said, to demonstrate their fight against all forms of racism and antisemitism. The FIGC also said a minute of silence will be observed before Serie A, B and C matches this week, plus amateur and youth games over the weekend, with a passage from Franks diary entry on 15 July, 1944 being read out over loudspeakers. It reads: I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquillity will return once more. A statement from Anne Frank House, one of Amsterdams most visited tourist sites, condemned the Lazio supporters attitudes but welcomed the response since Sundays match. We are shocked by these anti-Jewish expressions, which are extremely painful to those who have experienced the consequences of the Jewish persecution, they said in a statement. Fighting football-related antisemitism is part of our educational activities. We are pleased to see that others, including Italian football clubs, have expressed their indignation about this action. The head of the European Parliament has also denounced Lazio fans behaviour. Antonio Tajani, who is also Italian, told the European Parliament in Strasbourg that using the image of Anne Frank as an insult against others is a very grave matter. The Italian prime minister, Paolo Gentiloni, said the stickers were unbelievable, unacceptable and to not be minimised. A statement on Lazios website outlined the plans to place Franks image on the clubs shirts. The president of SS Lazio, Claudio Lotito, has decided that tomorrow the team will be coming to the stadium at Renato DallAra Stadium in Bologna with an image of Anne Frank on the Biancoceleste shirt, demonstrating the clubs commitment to fighting all forms of racism and anti-Semitism, it said. Lotito announced the Auschwitz trip initiative in comments reported by Gazzetta dello Sport: Today, I can officially announce that Lazio will partake in a new initiative, organising an annual trip to Auschwitz for 200 Lazio fans to educate and make sure we dont forget certain episodes, so that these lads can know what it is were talking about. You cant play around with these facts, we condemn all forms of racism. Lazio will launch this initiative.

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December 26, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center Disgusted by Anne Frank Halloween Costume …

10/17/2017 10:30 AM PDT Exclusive Details Some genius thought Holocaust victim Anne Frank would make one helluva Halloween costume for kids — but the institution named for Anne is just glad the company behind it got a clue. Eventually. Online retailer HalloweenCostumes.com rightfully caught major flak Monday for selling a “WW2 Anne Frank Girls Costume.” The backlash was so swift and severe they pulled the tone-deaf item from their site … which featured this highly-offensive costume description. A rep for the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect — a nonprofit supporting her legacy — tells TMZ … HalloweenCostumes.com’s gimmick is offensive and trivializes Anne’s suffering and the suffering of millions during the Holocaust. The AFC says there are more appropriate ways to commemorate Anne’s legacy, and it’s happy the costume was yanked. HalloweenCostumes.com has apologized for the stunt, but c’mon.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Company apologizes for its Anne Frank Halloween costume

From the Anne Frank exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (Photo: Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images) This years competition for worst Halloween costume ideas picked up steam last month with sexy border control agent and pregnant (but still sexy) reality TV star. The latest ill-advised concept isnt part of that risqu trend, but is otherwise pretty damn offensive. Until recently, HalloweenCostumes.com was selling a getup that was alternately marketed as Anne Frank girls costume and child World War Two evacuee costume, both of which are in bad taste, especially when the child model has been directed to hold a sassy pose and smile. Heres a description of the outfit, which includes (ugh) a felt destination tag that some folks are pointing out would have been for a WWII evacuee, but again, this is a costume that has been marketed as being modeled after Anne Frank, who was one of six million Jews killed in the Holocaust. The company probably hoped that calling it a historical costume would clear the decency bar, but that didnt really fly with social media users, who shared images of the costume until HalloweenCostumes.com removed it from its store. Later, a spokesman issued this statement, in which he talked up the historical accuracy of the offerings at a company called Halloween Costumes (or, is also the case, Fun Costumes). The Miami Herald notes the costume is sold out at some online retailers, while others, like Walmart, are still looking into the matter.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Bad Halloween Costumes: Anne Frank, Trayvon Martin, Kim …

Lets start with a rather uncontroversial statement: Its important to learn about the Holocaust, and Anne Franks diary is an excellent way to start. What seems more contentious, however, is the notionthat it would be a good idea to dress up as one of the Holocausts most famous victims for Halloween. One online costume retailer recently discovered the hard way just how offensive many people findthat idea. HalloweenCostumes.com pulled an Anne Frank costume for girls off its website on Sunday after being criticized for putting it up in the first place. It is utterly inappropriate, offensive and quite simply beggars belief. The Holocaust is not a jokethis company needs to have a serious rethink,”Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust in the U.K., told The Jewish Chronicle. Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, toldNewsweekin an emailed statement: “We are glad the Anne Frank costume was removed from the catalogue, but its hard to believe that anyone thought this was an appropriate costume for Halloween. It shows we still have a long way to go in terms of educating people about what happened during the Holocaust, and why this unique event in human history should never be trivialized.” The online retailer HalloweenCostumes.com pulled an Anne Frank costume from its site Sunday after it spurred criticism. The author Daniel Arenson posted a screenshot of the costume page on the EU version of the retailer’s website. Twitter The costumewhich is still being sold elsewhere as a more generic World War II Evacuee Girl Fancy Dress Costume Girls and Child’s World War II Girl Costumewas marketed on HalloweenCostumes.com as educational.World War II created some unexpected heroes, where even a young girl like Anne Frank with nothing but a diary and hope could become an inspiration to us all. We can all learn from someone like that!,”the description read. Ross Walker Smith, a public relations specialist for Fun.com (HalloweenCostumes.com is listed as a brand of Fun.com), responded in a tweet with a statement. “We sell costumes not only for Halloween, but for many uses outside of the Halloween season, such as school projects and plays,” he wrote. We apologize for any offense it has caused, as thats never our intention. But this isnt the first time a company or individual thought it was a good idea to dress up as a victim and was slammed for it. Last year, Costumeish.com started selling a Parisian Heist Robbery Victim Kit for $69.99 so that people could dress up as Kim Kardashian the robbery victim (though she wasnt mentioned by name, the details of the costume left little room for doubt). Less than a month before Halloween, Kardashianwasrobbed at gunpoint and tied up by a group of men at the luxurious guesthouse where she was staying in Paris. They reportedly stole $10 million worth of jewelry and other valuables. That costume also was pulled. Sometimes, the costume is homemade rather than mass manufactured, but the outrage is just as palpable. In 2014, there were costumes of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice that incorporated his arreston charges ofassaulting his fiance in an elevator, both with real humans and battered dolls playing his domestic violence victim. The year before, a Michigan woman who dressed up as a Boston Marathon bombing victim and posted a photo on Twitter was lambasted. She reportedly received death threats and was fired from her job. And 2013 also saw a Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman costume that, like some of the Ray Rice get-ups, caused offense for using blackface as well as for depicting a victim of violence for entertainment. Since it keeps happening over and over again, it might be worth asking oneself before settling on a Halloween costume whether it casually portrays someone who was murdered, robbed, abused or targeted in some other crime. If the answer is yes, then the best answer to the next question”Is this a good Halloween costume?”is probably no.

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Halloween store removes Anne Frank costume after complaints …

At least one online retailer has pulled a costume from its website that depicted the teenage diarist and Holocaust victim Anne Frank, but an identical costume is still available at several online retailers. Screenshots of the costume for sale at HalloweenCostumes.com posted to social media show a smiling girl wearing World War II-era clothing and a beret. The costume quickly received criticism. Carlos Galindo-Elvira, who leads the Anti-Defamation League’s Arizona office, said on Twitter that it trivializes Frank’s memory. “There [are] better ways [to] commemorate Anne Frank. This is not one,” he tweeted. Fun.com, based in North Mankato, Minnesota, runs the website where the costume was featured. Spokesman Ross Walker SmithtweetedSunday that the costume had been pulled. He explained that the company sells costumes for activities other than Halloween, like “school projects and plays.” He apologized for any offense caused by the costume. Anne Frank is known for the diary she wrote while in hiding from the Nazis in an attic in Amsterdam during the war. Her family was discovered in 1944 and sent to a concentration camp, where Anne died at the age of 15. Google search results for “Anne Frank kids costume” still show an identical costume being sold on Walmart.com, TheHalloweenSpot.com, ziggosparty.com and several other online retailers. It’s labeled as a “WWII girl costume” or “WWII evacuee costume.” 2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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October 16, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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