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SparkNotes: Diary of a Young Girl: Anne Frank

When Anne Frank is given a diary for her thirteenth birthday,she immediately fills it with the details of her life: descriptionsof her friends, boys who like her, and her classes at school. Annefinds comfort writing in her diary because she feels she has difficultyopening up to her friends and therefore has no true confidants.Anne also records her perceptions of herself. She does not thinkshe is pretty, but she is confident that her personality and othergood traits make up for it. Through her writing, Anne comes acrossas playful and comical but with a serious side.

Annes diary entries show from the outset that she iscontent and optimistic despite the threats and danger that her familyfaces. The tone and substance of her writing change considerablywhile she is in hiding. Anne is remarkably forthright and perceptiveat the beginning of the diary, but as she leaves her normal childhoodbehind and enters the dire and unusual circumstances of the Holocaust,she becomes more introspective and thoughtful.

During her first year in the annex, Anne struggles withthe adults, who constantly criticize her behavior and consider herexasperating. Anne feels extremely lonely and in need of kindnessand affection, which she feels her mother is incapable of providing.She also wrestles with her inner self and considers what type ofperson she wants to become as she enters womanhood. Anne tries tounderstand her identity in the microcosm of the annex and attemptsto understand the workings of the cruel world outside. As she matures, Annecomes to long not for female companionship, but intimacy with amale counterpart. She becomes infatuated with Peter, the van Daansteenage son, and comes to consider him a close friend, confidant,and eventually an object of romantic desire.

In her final diary entries, Anne is particularly lucidabout the changes she has undergone, her ambitions, and how herexperience is changing her. She has a clear perspective of how shehas matured during their time in the annex, from an insolent andobstinate girl to a more emotionally independent young woman. Annebegins to think about her place in society as a woman, and her plansfor overcoming the obstacles that have defeated the ambitions ofwomen from previous generations, such as her mother. Anne continuesto struggle with how she can be a good person when there are somany obstacles in her world. She writes eloquently about her confusion overher identify, raising the question of whether she will consider herselfDutch, as she hears that the Dutch have become anti-Semitic. Annethinks philosophically about the nature of war and humanity andabout her role as a young Jewish girl in a challenging world. Fromher diary, it is clear that she had the potential to become an engaging,challenging, and sophisticated writer.

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The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) – IMDb

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In Nazi-occupied Holland in World War II, shopkeeper Kraler hides two Jewish families in his attic. Young Anne Frank keeps a diary of everyday life for the Franks and the Van Daans, chronicling the Nazi threat as well as family dynamics. A romance with Peter Van Daan causes jealousy between Anne and her sister, Margot. Otto Frank returns to the attic many years after the eventual capture of both families and finds his late daughter’s diary. Written byJwelch5742

Budget:$3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA: $5,014,000

Runtime: 180 min | 171 min (FMC Library Print)

Aspect Ratio: 2.35 : 1

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Who betrayed Anne Frank? Book claims to shed new light on …

A new book has provided what it claims is fresh evidence that Anne Frank and her family were betrayed by a Jewish woman who was executed after the second world war for collaborating with the Nazis.

The mystery of how the Franks were found in a secret annex in a building on Amsterdams Prinsengracht in August 1944 has thwarted formal investigations and troubled academics ever since.

The involvement of Ans van Dijk, who was executed in 1948 after admitting to collaborating in the capture of 145 people, including her own brother and his family, had been previously claimed. But, the Anne Frank House museum and research centre had been unable to come to any conclusion, despite police investigations and its own studies.

Fresh claims have now been made in a book by Gerard Kremer, 70, the son of a member of the Dutch resistance of the same name, who was an acquaintance of Van Dijk in Amsterdam.

According to the book, Kremer Sr, who died in 1978, was the caretaker of an office building at the back of Prinsengracht on Amsterdams Westermarkt, two floors of which was taken over by the German authorities and the Dutch Nazi organisation the NSB during the occupation of the Netherlands.

It is claimed that after her arrest on Easter Sunday 1943 by the Nazi intelligence service known as the the Sicherheitsdienst, Van Dijk became a regular visitor to the building, albeit in disguise. She would also use the telephones in the requisitioned offices, Kremer noticed.

The book suggests that in early August 1944, Kremer overheard Van Dijk taking part in discussions in the Nazi offices about Prinsengracht, where the Franks were hiding. The Franks were arrested on 4 August, while Van Dijk was said to have left for The Hague.

Anne had been hidden for two years in the concealed annex above the canalside warehouse with her father, Otto, mother, Edith, and sister, Margot.

The 15-year-old was sent to the Westerbork transit camp, and on to Auschwitz before finally ending up at Bergen-Belsen, where she died in February 1945 from typhus. Her published diary spans the period in hiding between 1942 and 1944.

A spokeswoman for Anne Frank House said the museum had been in touch with the author of The Backyard of the Secret Annex, but that there remained no proof of Van Dijks guilt.

We consider Gerard Kremers book as a tribute to his parents, based on what he remembers and has heard. In 2016, the Anne Frank House carried out research into the arrest of the Frank family and the other four people in hiding in the secret annex.

Ans van Dijk was included as a potential traitor in this study. We have not been able to find evidence for this theory, nor for other betrayal theories.

Simone van Hoof, a spokesman for the books publishing house, Lantaarn, said: We cant claim that this is 100% the answer but we really do think it is a part of the puzzle that may be able to complete the story.

Last year an FBI agent launched a cold case review into the Frank familys discovery by the Gestapo in 1944. Investigative techniques developed in the past decade, including the crunching of big data to uncover leads, are being used by a team of 19 forensic experts led by Vince Pankoke. Van Hoof said the review led by Pankoke was examining the claims in the book.

A 2010 book by Sytze van der Zee, a former editor-in-chief of the Het Parool newspaper, previously noted that many of Van Dijks victims had lived near Prinsengracht.

David Barnouw, an emeritus researcher at the Dutch Institute for war, holocaust and genocide studies, offered a cautious response to the books claims, and suggested the Franks discovery may have been pure chance.

Speaking to the De Volkskrant newspaper, Barnouw said there lacked a smoking gun in regard to Van Dijks claims. He said: And I wonder if well ever see that smoking gun. I fear that it is now too late to establish conclusively who it was.

After the war, Van Dijk moved to The Hague, where she was arrested at a friends home on 20 June 1945. Two years later she was charged on 23 counts of treason and brought to the special court in Amsterdam, where she confessed on all counts, and was sentenced to death.

Her attempts to appeal the decision and gain a royal pardon on the grounds that she had acted out of self-preservation failed. In January 1948 she was executed by firing squad at Fort Bijlmer, in Amsterdam. She converted to Roman Catholicism the night before her execution.

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Top 20 Anne Frank Facts – Life, Family, Death… | Facts.net

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One of the most basic Anne Frank facts is that she is one of the most well-known Holocaust victims. Growing up in a German-Jewish family when Hitler was holding power over Europe, Anne Frank witnessed firsthand the widespread discrimination and crimes against Jews. She died at the age of just 15 while in a Nazi concentration camp. The publication of her diary provided a stunning revelation of the lives of Jewish families during this dark time. Her notes and stories are among the most detailed and comprehensive works that are left from the period.

There are many Anne Frank facts regarding her family background. Anne Frank was born in Germany, where her family was originally from. When Anne was four years old, the Nazis took control over Germany. Annes father, Otto Frank, feared for the familys safety and decided to move to the Netherlands. Anne was born a German, but her citizenship was lost after the move.

The family settled in Amsterdam, where Otto Frank set up a business. This was where the Frank family lived until they were taken into concentration camps in 1944.

While many other Jewish families in Amsterdam were taken away by the Nazis, Anne Frank and her family were fortunate enough to be prepared, and went into hiding early in the war. After her sister Margot received a call-up for a working camp, the family moved to a secret hiding place in her fathers office building on July 6, 1942.

With the help of Victor Kugler, Johannes Kleiman, Miep Gies, and Bep Voskujil, coworkers of Anne Franks father, the family was able to survive in their confined hiding spot for over two years. On August 4, 1944, however, the family was discovered after a tip-off to the authorities from an anonymous informer.

One of the most well-known Anne Frank facts is that she was a talented writer. From her diary, we learn that by 1944, Anne had already expressed her wish to become a professional journalist after the war was over. She wanted to pursue her passion for writing. At first, Anne kept the diary purely to herself, mentioning more than once that no one else would ever read it. She changed her mind later on, after hearing a radio broadcast on March 28, 1944. On this day, Gerrit Bolkestein, the Dutch Education Minister, gave a speech that asked people to save diaries. The speech inspired Anne to dream of publishing her own diary after the war was over.

There were eight people living in the secret annex before it was discovered. These were the four members of the Frank family, three members of the Van Daan family, and a man named Fritz Pfeffer. After the group was discovered, they were all taken into concentration camps and were separated from each other. After the war, Otto Frank, Annes father, learned of his wifes death after returning to Amsterdam. In July 1945, he met his daughters friend, who told him about the death of his daughters, Anne and Margot. Otto Frank was the only survivor of the group after the end of the war.

Both Anne and her sister Margot were described as avid readers and excelled in school. Anne attended a Montessori school, where she showed great aptitude in reading and writing. Anne made many friends at this school, but she had to transfer to a different school later. After the German invasion of the Netherlands, it was dictated that Jewish children like Anne and Margot could only attend Jewish schools. This was just one of many strict segregation rules at this time. Anne and Margot were then enrolled in the Jewish Lyceum until they had to go into hiding.

Otto Frank was first able to get his daughters diary published in 1950. The book received positive responses and was then published in several countries around the world, including Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

The books biggest success, however, came in Japan. The book received critical acclaim and the first edition sold out, selling more than 100,000 copies. Anne Frank was quickly recognized as a cultural figure in Japan, and is seen as a representation of young victims of the war.

After Anne Franks diary was published, the secret annex received many visitors, who were shown to the secret rooms by the employees who helped the families. By 1955, the company moved, and the building was going to be demolished to make room for a factory. Otto Frank, Annes father, started a campaign to preserve the building and the secret room.

In 1960, the building where the families hid was turned into a museum, now called the Anne Frank House. The museum receives millions of visitors every year. The Anne Frank House is now the third most-visited museum in the Netherlands.

Annes diary was written in a letter format, with each entry addressed to Kitty. The identity of Kitty is one of the Anne Frank facts that still presents a mystery to readers. Many people speculated that Kitty refers to Annes pre-war friend, Kitty Egyedi. However, Anne did not mention her in any of her writings.

The most popular theory is that Kitty is a fictional character that Anne made up. Otto Frank, her father, reasoned though that his daughter may have had a real person in mind when she addressed Kitty.

Because of the chaos in the concentration camp, the exact date(s) of Anne and her sister Margots deaths are still a mystery. In early 1945, 17,000 prisoners from the same camp were killed by a typhus epidemic. Witnesses later reported that they had seen Anne and her sister weakened by the disease, but no one knew exactly when they had died. Margot was said to have fallen from her bunk, the shock of which killed her, while Anne died a few days later.

Initially, it was thought that the sisters deaths might have taken place only weeks before the camp was liberated in April 1945. However, the Frank sisters are believed to have displayed typhus symptoms by February. Without treatment, victims often die within 12 days of the first symptoms appearing. To date, the exact location of the sisters graves remains unknown. There have been many attempts to discover Anne Frank facts surrounding her death; however, we may never know all about the situation, given the chaotic conditions in the camp at that time.

After Anne Frank and her family had been captured from their secret hiding place, Annes diary was left behind with all her other belongings. Miep Gies, one of the people who helped keep the family in hiding, took the diary away before the place was searched, wanting to return it one day to Anne. After the war, when Annes death had been confirmed, Miep returned her diary to Otto Frank.

If she had read it, Miep said, she would have immediately burnt the book. The reason she said this was because the diary contained the names of her, her husband, and other people who helped shelter the Jewish families. The book would have served as evidence against them all, leading to probable execution. Luckily, Miep never read a word of Annes diary until after it was published.

While the book has received critical acclaim since its very first edition, it has still come up against skepticism. Many people, including some famous critics, questioned the authenticity of some Anne Frank facts relating to the diary. Some called it a hoax. Surprisingly, among these skeptical critics are many Holocaust victims.

The main reason behind such skepticism is that many people cannot believe the book was actually written by a child. Some people even went as far as to suggest Anne Frank never existed. Otto Frank, Annes father, relentlessly fought against such false allegations in court. In 1960, a court confirmed the authenticity of the book, by examining the handwriting in the book against Annes handwriting in previous letters. Later on, a forensic study was also carried out on the diary. The conclusion was that Annes handwriting was authentic, and that the paper, glue, and ink were indeed from the time when the diary was supposed to have been written.

In her book, Anne described her sister Margot as a very different person from her. Margot was said to be smart with an excellent academic record. While Anne is more independent and strong-willed, Margot had a better relationship with their mother and everyone else.

In Annes diary, she mentioned that Margot also kept a diary during the time they were in hiding. This prompted many readers and experts to go on a search for Margots side of the story. So far, however, there has been no trace of Margots diary.

The commander who captured Anne Frank and her family was Karl Silberbauer, an inspector in the Vienna police at the time. During the raid, Silberbauer confiscated the familys valuables and money. He emptied Otto Franks briefcase to hold these valuables, and dumped the briefcases original contents, including papers and notebooks, on the ground. Among these papers was Anne Franks diary, which was later retrieved by Miep Gies.

After the war, when Anne Franks diary was published, Silberbauer admitted to buying her book. He wanted to find out if his name was mentioned in there. Silberbauer also later testified as to the authenticity of Anne Frank and her arrest.

One of the most surprising Anne Frank facts is that many parents were against the book being taught in schools. Most objections were against the unedited version, where there were parts that described Annes curiosity about her body and sexuality. This part was originally omitted by her father, Otto Frank, in the first edition. Later on, the unedited version was published without omitting such intimate parts.Some critics have even stranger reasons to protest Annes diary. In 1983, a school in Alabama even banned the book for being a real downer.

Anne Franks diary has inspired several films and plays where actors and actresses reenact her life story. Examples include the Anne Frank Ballet and the choral work Annelies.

However, when it comes to real film footage of Anne Frank, there is only one short piece of footage left. The footage is part of a 1941 silent film. The film is actually footage of Anne Franks neighbors getting married. Anne was seen on screen for a few brief seconds when she leaned out of her window to watch the newlyweds. The film was given by the couple to the Anne Frank House after the war.

Initially, Anne wrote the diary purely for herself, thinking that no one else would ever read it. This is the original, unedited version of her diary. After hearing Gerrit Bolkesteins speech, however, Anne decided she wanted to publish her diary after the war ended. At this point, she reread what she had already written and thought that many parts would be unclear to readers, or would be too boring. Anne started to edit her own book to get it ready for publishing. In the Diary of Anne Frank: The Critical Edition, the original version is called Version A, and the later, edited one, is referred to as Version B.

One of the Anne Frank facts that we can learn from her diary is that she had a difficult relationship with her mother. Anne was closer to her father, while her sister Margot was more attached to their mother, Edith Frank. In the original version of Anne Franks diary, her father Otto decided to edit out some of the most heated comments that Anne wrote about her mother.

Despite the difficult relationship between mother and strong-willed teenage daughter, Edith Frank was described as a very devoted mother. Witnesses claimed that Edith Frank saved every last bit of her food for her daughters before they were transported to a different camp. Edith Frank died on January 6, 1945 in Auschwitz.

After the Germans invaded the Netherlands, Otto Frank saw the rising threats against his family and other Jewish families. In 1938 and 1941, he attempted to get visas for his family to emigrate to the United States or Cuba. This process was described as extremely costly, complicated and corrupted at the time. In 1941, Otto Frank was granted a single visa to Cuba, just 10 days before Nazi Germany declared war on the United States. It wasnt clear if the visa ever reached Otto, but it was canceled after the war declaration. Because the plan to emigrate didnt work out, Otto Frank resorted to his backup plan, and prepared a hiding place for his family, known to us now as the secret annex.

In June 1999, Time magazine officially included Anne Frank in their special edition, called Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century. Annes name was listed among the Heroes and Icons.

Talking about Anne Frank, Roger Rosenblat, a Time writer, noted that Anne is admired not only for her courage and representation of the victims, but also for the quality of her writing and her ability to analyze her thoughts and emotions. Roger wrote:

The reason for her immortality was basically literary. She was an extraordinarily good writer, for any age, and the quality of her work seemed a direct result of a ruthlessly honest disposition.

Anne Frank facts tell a sad story of one of the most well-known Holocaust victims. Anne Frank grew up in a Jewish family. She and her family lived in hiding for almost two years before they were captured by the Nazis and sent to concentration camps. Her father was the only survivor after the end of World War 2, and it was he who published her diary after the war. There are still many mysteries about Anne Frank, including the time of her death, where she is buried, and just who the mysterious Kitty who she addressed in her diary is.

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young …

If the success of female-centric biopics like Hidden Figures has taught Hollywood anything, it’s that there are riches to be found in the lives of history-making women. Well, as lovers of a good true story, we’ve got a slew of suggestions for heroines who deserve their own big biopics.

How has there not been a prestige pic about the life and times of Harriet Tubman? After nearly 30 years of abuse and subjugation, Tubman followed the North Star to escape slavery. Such a trek might, on its own, be worthy of a movie. But Tubman, of course, did so much more. A year after she fled north, she risked her freedom and her life to return and try to rescue her sisters. Then again to save her brother. And again for her husband, who in the meantime took a new wife.

By 1856, she was a notorious outlaw with a bounty of $40,000 on her head. To evade capture, she stole masters’ buggies, perfected escape strategies, and effected clever disguises. Over 10 years, she made 19 trips back into the South, freeing an estimated 300 people.

Sure, she’s nowhere near as well known as Anne Bonny or Grace O’Malley, but Sadie’s pirate story would make for a thrilling action-comedy. This petite thief was a tiny terror of 1860s New York, earning her nickname by head-butting those she mugged. But when a brutal brawl with a female bouncer named Gallus Mag ended with Sadie’s ear being bitten off, she fled to the Hudson River with a makeshift crew. Sadie’s summer was made up of swashbuckling, pillaging waterside mansions, and an eventual reunion with her ear. (Mag had preserved it in a pickling jar for her trophy collection.) What more could you ask for?

The Oscars love a good tale of overcoming adversity, so how about the story of this German Jewish mathematician? Today she is celebrated for her contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics, but in 20th-century Bavaria, Amalie Noether had to fight for every bit of education and academic achievement. Women were not allowed to enroll at the University of Erlangen, so Noether had to petition each professor to attend classes. She later found academic employment similarly unwelcoming.

Noether secured work as a teacher, but on the condition that she wouldn’t be paida condition that lasted for 15 years! Still, she dedicated herself tirelessly to mathematics. She also fled the Nazis, and befriended Albert Einstein, whose eulogy for Noether would make for a marvelous introductory monologue: “In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fraulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began.

For a stirring drama about the tenacity of the human spirit, consider the story of this sideshow performer. Smith rose to fame for her abilities to write, paint, sew, play piano, and even do woodworkall with her feet. But aside from being beloved, she was inspiring. Smith’s lack of arms came at the hands of her abusive father, who basically burned them beyond repair when she was just nine years old. However, Smith persevered, focused on her education and rehabilitation, and made a life for herself as a performer and author, penning a memoir in which she forgave her deeply flawed dad.

The life of the “Joan of Arc of the Arabs” would make for a thrilling political drama. Abid was born into the lap of luxury, the educated daughter of an affluent Damascene aristocrat at the turn of the 20th century. But rather than spend her days reveling in wealth and its privileges, Abid became an outspoken and frequently exiled advocate, most notably for fighting for national independence and women’s rights. But her biggest battle was a literal one: She fought against the French invaders in the the bloody Battle of Maysaloun, of which she was said to be the only Syrian survivor. In honor of her service, King Faisal made her an honorary general. But the French ultimately overthrew Faisal, forcing Abid into exile. She would return to Syria to help advance feminist causes. When she died in 1959, it was within the bounds of her homeland, which was now free as well as a place where women were thriving under the social changes Abid helped enact.

Show biz comedy-meets-discovery drama in the life of Hedy Lamarr, Hollywood glamour girl by day, world-changing inventor by night. Her tale not only includes fame, but also an escape from a brutish, arms-dealing husband, and her quest to defeat the Nazis through applied science.

With the help of her friend, avant-garde composer George Antheil, Lamarr developed “frequency hopping,” an advancement in torpedo systems that aimed to make them jam-proof. Though the Navy didn’t take advantage of this tech until the 1960s, Lamarr’s contributions to spread spectrum technology later won recognition from the science community as her discoveries preceded the widespread adoption of wireless communications, like cell phones and Wi-Fi. At 83, Lamarr was honored with the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award as well as the BULBIE Gnass Spirit of Achievement Award, also regarded as “the Oscar of Inventing.” A celebratory biopic is long overdue.

Want a good gangster tale? After emigrating to the U.S. in 1912, this woman of French and African descent made her home in Harlem. By the 1930s, “Queenie” St. Clair was not to be trifled with, running a crew that fiercely protected their neighbors. St. Clair got corrupt cops booted from the police force. And when Bronx crime boss Dutch Schultz tried to push in on her turf, she made alliances that helped lead to his assassination.

Memorably, she sent a letter to his deathbed that read, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” And yet St. Clair has only been a supporting character in films like Hoodlum and The Cotton Club.

Numerous works of this 19th century American author have earned screen adaptations, but Chopin’s life is the stuff of compelling and heartwarming drama. In the 1880s, she was a happily married mother of six, living on a plantation in Louisiana. But when both her husband and mother died within the same year, Chopin fell into a deep depression. A doctor advised her to use writing as a tool to work through her grief. Chopin’s short stories and essays proved not only to be a saving passion for her, but also a career that saved her family from financial ruin. Though her novel The Awakening was scorned when first published in 1899, it’s now highly regarded as a masterpiece, and a landmark in early feminist literature.

Looking for a fanciful ghost story about the girl whose charm and fashion sense helped popularize the word flapper? This all-American ingnue made the leap from Ziegfeld Follies showgirl to Hollywood starlet, even marrying the brother of America’s Sweetheart Mary Pickford. At 25, Thomas was gone too soon. Yet her story lived on, as rumors spread that her sassy ghost took up residence in her old haunt, the New Amsterdam Theater. To this day, stagehands keep this party girl happy by wishing her goodnight before they leave the theater.

Hollywood loves a tale of a self-made mogul, so why not tackle that of the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire? Walker came from humble beginnings, born to recently freed slaves on a cotton plantation in 1867. By 14, she was married. By 20, she was a widow and single mother. Yet Walker overcame, finding work in her brothers’ barbershop as a washerwoman, where she noticed that her hair was falling out. She developed a tonic that helped re-grow her hair, and began marketing it across the country, and even into Latin America.

Rebranded as Madam C.J. Walker, she’d tour the U.S. selling her products and growing her empire. As her company expanded to factories and beauty schools, so did her philanthropic efforts toward the advancement of African Americans. Her story is not just one of personal success, but of drive, community, and advocacy.

They called her “The Confidence Queen,” and what better name for a crime-drama about this Prussian immigrant with a twisted take on the American Dream. In 1880s New York, Heyman repeatedly exploited people’s thirst for wealth to line her own pockets. Not even arrest could cage her. She continued to scam from her prison cell, and repeatedly convinced the cops to let her leave for outings to the theater and carriage rides around Central Park.

Perhaps you’d prefer an incredible epic about an unparalleled warrior? Well, this Vietnamese heroine’s legend is overflowing with flashy details. It’s said the 20-year-old was 9 feet tall with a voice that sounded loud as a temple bell. Dressed in vibrant yellow and wielding two swords, she rode into battle on a war elephant as she fended off the relentless Chinese forces.

But best of all, Trinh delivered the kind of speeches made for big movie moments, like: “I only want to ride the wind and walk the waves, slay the big whales of the Eastern sea, clean up our frontiers, and save the people from drowning. Why should I imitate others, bow my head, stoop over and be a slave? Why resign myself to menial housework?” And the music soars!

You might know this Creole triple threat for her saucy dance routines and dazzling persona. But a biopic about Baker would be incomplete without an espionage angle. During World War II, Josephine Baker was recruited by the French Resistance to be a spy. Her acceptance is the stuff of great screenplays:

“France made me what I am. I will be grateful forever. The people of Paris have given me everything. They have given me their hearts, and I have given them mine. I am ready, Captain, to give my life. You can use me as you wish.”

Baker’s beauty and fame served as a great cover for her covert ops. Her international acclaim gave her access to high-ranking Axis officials, allowing her to secure information. In secret, she trained in karate, and supposedly became such a skilled marksman with a pistol that she could shoot out the flame on a candle. She hid her notes in her unmentionables, and delivered messages on music sheets using invisible ink. There was also a narrow escape from Nazi forces, a torrid romance with her intelligence contact, Jacques Abtey, a false report of her demise, and being decorated for valor by General Charles de Gaulle. And all the while, Baker kept her career as a performer. Not even James Bond could pull all that off!

For a World War II adventure complete with edge-of-your-seat action sequences, turn to the tale of the all-female Night Bomber Regiment of the Soviet Air Forces. Over the course of three years, these young women (ages 17 to 26) flew 30,000 missions and dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on the invading Nazi forces. Even more remarkable, these fighter pilots favored the cover of night for their attacks, and flew planes made of plywood and canvasall the better to silently sneak up on German bombers. It’s for the soft whooshing of their planes and their nightly assaults that these patriots won their fantastic name.

It took two women, a pilot and a navigator, to man each of the Night Witches’ planesmaking for the perfect setting not only to explore the adventure of these fearless flyers, but also the sisterhood that helped the Soviet Union resist Nazi invasion.

A gifted painter with a vibrant imagination and influential use of color, Mary Blair was a concept artist whose works defined a generation of Disney animation, from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad and Peter Pan to Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella. As a young woman she dreamed of going into the fine arts, but the Depression pushed her into animation. There, she ultimately channeled her passion for color and distinctive aesthetic into groundbreaking designs.

It’s Blair who is credited with introducing Walt Disney to modern art, inciting a shift in his studio’s aesthetic. Disney himself called her in to design the look of his iconic It’s A Small World ride. Her rise through the Disney ranks to one of their official “legends” could be beautifully illustrated with the same kind of whimsy and color that her works were.

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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Maybe the first thing that most people would get shocked is that I rate with only 3 stars one of the best selling books of the 20th century (and now 21st century too) and even more, a book about the Holocaust.

First thing that I learned about this book is honesty.

Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same.

For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybod

First thing that I learned about this book is honesty.

Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same.

For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybody tells you that it’s a book that all people should read, and then they got in this commnunity for readers and maybe they feel the compromise to make the rest to think that you really read the book.

If not the case, hey, I don’t see why anyone can be offended by this comment, and it’s true, I don’t see either anyone who will complain, since to me it would be only a defense mechanism behind their own guilt of really not reading the book but making the rest that they did.

I didn’t think about this scenario but commenting about other thing with a reader friend, that thought stuck in my mind.

I invested so much time in that because, one has to be honest, the book is tedious since it’s not really a novel, it’s a collection of diary writings without a coherent line of constructing a story, even you need editors’ further notes to know what happened to the people in the Secret Annex since obviously, Anne was unable to tell the final events.

So, since it’s so tedious, I wouldn’t be surprised that some reader tried to read it but at the end they just rated with 5 stars to denote that they are “cultured” readers that they appreciate the book as one of the most important books of the 20th century.

Between the passages, you learn a lot of things. The first thing that surprised me it’s how this diary collection that it was written in the 40’s, in Holland, by a teenage girl, almost anybody can relate to the comments and you don’t feel them as outdated.

Sometimes if you read an “old” book, you sensed the outdated of the prose, selection of words, etc… but here I didn’t feel it. This diary could be easily being written in present time and I don’t think that it would change at all. I think that it was one of its strengths since I am sure that it will be as relevant for many more time.

Other thing that surprised me a lot was how much Anne Frank (and by association, the rest of the group in the Secret Annex) were informed about the events in the war, I know, they had a radio, but from stuff that I had read about WWII, there were certain elements of the information that people weren’t aware.

I mean, at many moments, they denote a certainty that Jewish people were murdered in the extermination camps, of course if you call them “extermination camps”, of course you know that people got killed there, but that’s a term used by me, now, they called them labor camps, and so far I read, Jewish people really thought that they will receive “baths” when they were really gassed or burned to death, and it’s kinda logical thing since if they were so certained about their deaths, there would be riots on the ghettos to flee in mass and they wouldn’t march without protest to the gas chambers and the ovens. Even, Allied forces used espionage methods to know from Nazi prisoners what was happening to the Jewish people on the camps.

Anyway, also, there are elements like the assasination attempt to Hitler that they were aware that it was made by their own generals. I don’t think that kind of stuff would be informed so easily since it was a clear fact of how divided was the opinions of the high ranking staff of the Third Reich.

I am not saying that the diary is not authentic as some dumb people commented that the Holocaust didn’t happen.

The Holocaust happened.

It was real and we never forget that to avoid that it would happen again. I am just commenting that surprised me how well they were informed about key sensitive info of war events taking in account that they were a bunch of people living hidden for like 3 years in an isolated annex of a building.

I know, they got visits by the people that helped them but even so. I am not questioning its authenticity, just expressing my surprise when I read it. There were other things here and there that I was surprised by the use of terms like “diet: low fat”, geez! I didn’t know that in the 1940’s they used terms like that in the 1980’s were like the rush of “healthy food”, but again, I supposed it’s the effect that stuff that we think are new, they are just recycled and labeled as “new”.

I am amazed that this book is banned in some schools, okay, there are comments relating to sex and sexual preferences, but so what? If a teenage girl from the 1940’s can think about stuff like that while she was isolated with a war outside, don’t you think that teenagers of today can think just the same?

I think that books like this one can help them to know that they are not alone, that they are not weird for thinking things like that, that was normal in the 1940s and it’s normal now too.

I was amazed that the group tried to “live normal”, I mean, kids making school work and so. I think that in such extraordinary circumstances, they needed to do extraordinary things like to make circles and to talk in group and hearing all about topics. I mean, they were like trapped and living together, really too close in the sense of physical space and yet, nobody cares about what Anne thinks or what she has to offer? Geez! Sure, they need to be really still and in silence, usually at day, but they should like making a “tribe”, I don’t know, I am babbling, but to try to live like regular families was evidently wrong for the sanity of their interrelationships.

What didn’t surprised me were behaviors like trying to hide food or keeping money from the group. In times where the group work were essential to survive, the human selfishness risen as a second nature.

Resumming, I just want to explain that my rating is based on my “entertaining” experience while reading the book and the format of the book itself.

And this didn’t have to do with my respect for the subject of the Holocaust and its terrible events.

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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Was Anne Frank Denied Refugee Status by the U.S.?

CLAIM

The family of Anne Frank sought (and was denied) refugee status in the United States.

In November 2015, debate raged on social media networks regarding the escalating plight of Syrian refugees; during that time, a circulating rumor claimed Anne Frank was denied entry to the United States before her death in the Holocaust.

While most Americans were familiar with Anne Frank (and many read her diary in school), the claim labeling her a prospective refugee seemed novel. Its appearance during an ongoing debate about Syrian refugees similarly prompted some skepticism among those who hadnt before heard it, as Franks ordeal and death are a story with which so many are familiar.

On 14 February 2007The New York Timespublished an article titled Letters reveal desperate plight of Anne Franks family, reporting that documents newly uncovered by an accident of circumstance revealed the Frank familys failed attempts at entry to the U.S.:

After lying undisturbed in a New Jersey warehouse for nearly 30 years, documents revealing the desperate efforts of Anne Franks family to escape to the United States and Cuba from Nazi-occupied Holland in 1941 have been discovered thanks to a clerical error.

I am forced to look out for emigration and as far as I can see U.S.A. is the only country we could go to, Annes father, Otto, wrote to his college friend, Nathan Straus Jr., the head of the federal Housing Authority, a friend of Eleanor Roosevelts and the son of a Macys co-owner, asking him to put up a $5,000 bond. It is for the sake of the children mainly that we have to care for. Our own fate is of less importance, Otto Frank wrote.

Page by page, the papers illustrate the tortuous process for gaining entry to the United States in those days. Even with powerful connections and money, European Jews could not overcome the State Departments restrictions against refugees, said two Holocaust scholars who examined the documents.

As the war in Europe intensified, so too did Otto Franks efforts to transport his family to safety. He ultimately settled on an attempt to enter through Cuba, a plan which never reached fruition:

By June 1941, no one with close relatives still in Germany was allowed into the United States because of suspicions that the Nazis could use them to blackmail refugees into clandestine cooperation. That development ended the possibility of getting the Frank girls out through a childrens rescue agency.

Because of the uncertainty, Otto Frank decided to try for a single visa for himself. It was granted and forwarded to him on Dec. 1. No one knows if it arrived. Ten days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States and Havana canceled the visa.

Reuters covered the discovery on 14 February 2007, including commentary from Holocaust scholars who lamented the familys failed attempt at passage:

If her father had sought help sooner, Anne Frank could be a 77-year-old woman living in Boston today, a writer. That is what the YIVOs documents suggest, said Richard Breitman, a professor at American University.

However, Otto Frank decided to try to escape just as the Nazis were making it more difficult to leave and the United States was making it more difficult to enter, Breitman said.

Cuba issued Otto Frank a visa on December 1, 1941, according to the documents, but it was canceled 10 days later when Germany declared war on the United States.

A 2007TIMEarticle provided further details of Otto Franks increasingly desperate efforts:

For nine months, they tried to secure visas first to the U.S. and then to Cuba until that window shut. Just three letters of the file were written by Otto Frank, all addressed to university friend Nathan Straus Jr., son of a co-owner of Macys department store and head of the U.S. Housing Authority. Straus and Franks brother-in-law, Julius Hollander, regularly corresponded with two private Jewish agencies, the National Refugee Service in New York and the Boston Committee for Refugees. Straus also contacted the State Department on Franks behalf. Hollander and his brother arranged affidavits from their employers, Jacob Hiatt of E.F. Dodge Paper Box Co. and Harry Levine of the New England Novelty Co., both of Leominster, Mass.

An April 2015 articletitled Op-Ed: Getting Anne Frank All Wrong published toArutz Shevaaddressed the plight of Anne Frank and other Jewish refugee children who perished:

Otto Frank, Annes father, dutifully filled out the small mountain of required application formsand obtained supporting affidavits from the familys relatives in Massachusetts.

But that was not enough for those who zealously guarded Americas gates against refugees. In fact, in 1941, the Roosevelt administration even added a new restriction: no refugee with close relatives in Europe could come to the U.S., on the grounds that the Nazis might hold their relatives hostage in order to force the refugee to undertake espionage for Hitler.

Thats right: Anne Frank, Nazi spy.

Annes mother, Edith, wrote to a friend in 1939: I believe that all Germanys Jews are looking around the world, but can find nowhere to go.

On 4 September 2015, Anne Franks step-sister Eva Schloss drew direct parallels between the Syrian refugee crisis and the Jewish refugee crisis of World War II:

You must not be selfish and you must share whatever you have and help in a desperate situation. They need help from you.

These people have had the courage to do a very difficult thing- to take your family and your whole life to another country requires bravery and strength. This is history repeating itself.

These Syrians are valuable, educated people. These are doctors and nurses who are only too willing to help our society and they will become leaders in the community if you let them.

The claim that Anne Frank was a refugee confused some readers, as they hadnt heard it prior to the Syrian refugee crisis. But the extent to which Otto Frank tried (and failed) to save his family from death during World War II was only first reported in 2007, and thus didnt appear in many history lessons before that. Ultimately Frank perished (likely of typhus) at Bergen-Belsen in 1945, shortly after the deaths of her mother and sister Margot.

Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here.

Fact Checker:Kim LaCapria

Published:19 November 2015

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Was Anne Frank Denied Refugee Status by the U.S.?

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January 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The story of Anne Frank: The story in brief

Anne Frank is a Jewish girl who has to go into hiding during World War Two to escape from the Nazis. Together with seven others she hides in the secret annex at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam. After more thantwo years in hiding they are discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people to survive. After her death Anne becomes world famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding.

Discover Anne Frank’s hiding place

View the citys timeline before, during and after the war.

With exceptional photographs and audio and video fragments.

Discover the story behind Anne Frank’s diary.

Anne Frank was born on 12 June 1929 in the German city of Frankfurt am Main, where her fathers family had lived for generations. She has a sister, Margot, who is three and a half years older. The economic crisis, Hitlers rise to power and growing antisemitism put an end to the familys carefree life. Like many other Jews, Otto Frank and his wife, Edith, decide to leave Germany.

Otto sets up a business in Amsterdam and the family finds a home on the Merwedeplein. The children go to school, Otto works hard at his business and Edith looks after the home. When the threat of war in Europe increases, Otto and his family try to emigrate to England or the USA but these attempts fail. On 1 September 1939 Germany invades Poland. It is the beginning of the Second World War.

For a while there is hope that The Netherlands will not become involved in the war, but on 10 May 1940 German troops invade the country. Five days later The Netherlands surrenders and is occupied. Anti-Jewish regulations soon follow. Jews are allowed into fewer and fewer places. Anne and Margot must attend a Jewish school and Otto loses his business.When a renewed attempt to emigrate to the U.S.A. fails, Otto and Edith decide to go into hiding. Otto sets up a hiding place in the rear annexe of his firm at Prinsengracht 263. He does this together with his Jewish business partner Hermann van Pels and with help from his associates Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler.

On 5 July 1942 Margot Frank receives a call-up to report for a German work camp. The next day the Frank family goes into hiding. The Van Pels family follows a week later and in November 1942 they are joined by an eighth person: the dentist Fritz Pfeffer. They remain in the secret annexe for more than two years.In hiding, they have to keep very quiet, are often frightened and pass the time together as well as they can. They are helped by the office workers, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler, Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl; by Mieps husband, Jan Gies; and by the warehouse manager, Johannes Voskuijl, Beps father. These helpers not only arrange food, clothes and books, they are the groups contact with the outside world.

Shortly before going into hiding Anne receives a diary for her birthday. She starts writing straightaway and during her time in hiding she writes about events in the secret annex and about herself. Her diary is a great support to her. Anne also writes short stories and collects quotations from other writers in her book of beautiful sentences.When the Dutch minister of education in exile in London appeals on British radio for people to keep war diaries, Anne decides to edit her diary and create a novel called ‘The Secret Annex’. She starts to rewrite, but she and the others are discovered and arrested before she has finished.

On 4 August 1944 the people in hiding are arrested, along with their helpers Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. They pass from the security service headquarters and prison to the transit camp Westerbork, from where they are deported to Auschwitz. The two helpers are sent to the Amersfoort camp. Johannes Kleiman is released shortly after his arrest and six months later Victor Kugler escapes. Immediately after the arrests Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl rescue Anne’s diary and papers that have been left behind in the secret annex. Despite intensive investigations it has never been clear how the hiding place was discovered.

Otto Frank is the only one of the eight people in hiding to survive the war. During his long journey back to The Netherlands he learns that his wife, Edith, has died. He knows nothing about his daughters and still hopes to see them again. He arrives back in Amsterdam at the beginning of July. He goes straight to Miep and Jan Gies and remains with them for another seven years.Otto Frank tries to find his daughters, but in July he receives the news that they both died of disease and deprivation in Bergen-Belsen. Miep Gies then gives him Annes diary papers. Otto reads the diary and discovers a completely different Anne. He is very moved by her writing.

Anne wrote in her diary that she wants to become a writer or a journalist in the future, and that she wants to publish her diary as a novel. Friends convince Otto Frank that the diary has great expressive power and on 25 June 1947 The Secret Annexe is published in an edition of 3,000. Many more editions follow, also translations, a play and a film.People from all over the world learn of Anne Frank’s story. Over the years Otto Frank answers thousands of letters from people who have read his daughter’s diary. In 1960 the Anne Frank House becomes a museum. Otto Frank remains involved with the Anne Frank House until his death in 1980 and campaigns for human rights and respect.

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The story of Anne Frank: The story in brief

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Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

The Italian football federation (FICG) has announced plans to read out a passage from Anne Franks diary before matches this week in response to acts of antisemitism by Lazio fans.

During Sundays league game against Cagliari, supporters of the club defaced their Stadio Olimpico home in Rome with antisemitic graffiti and stickers showing images of Frank, the teenager who was killed at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945, wearing a jersey of their rivals Roma. Their actions have been widely condemned, with Lazios president, Claudio Lotito paying a visit to Romes main synagogue on Tuesday to lay a wreath to remember victims of the Holocaust.

He also promised a new education campaign culminating in an annual trip to Auschwitz with 200 young fans at a club which has a history of antisemitic behaviour, including a Lazio banner in the city derby nearly 20 years ago aimed at Roma supporters that read: Auschwitz Is Your Homeland; The Ovens Are Your Homes.

An image of Frank will be put on Lazios shirts for Wednesdays game at Bologna, the club said, to demonstrate their fight against all forms of racism and antisemitism. The FIGC also said a minute of silence will be observed before Serie A, B and C matches this week, plus amateur and youth games over the weekend, with a passage from Franks diary entry on 15 July, 1944 being read out over loudspeakers.

It reads: I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquillity will return once more.

A statement from Anne Frank House, one of Amsterdams most visited tourist sites, condemned the Lazio supporters attitudes but welcomed the response since Sundays match.

We are shocked by these anti-Jewish expressions, which are extremely painful to those who have experienced the consequences of the Jewish persecution, they said in a statement. Fighting football-related antisemitism is part of our educational activities. We are pleased to see that others, including Italian football clubs, have expressed their indignation about this action.

The head of the European Parliament has also denounced Lazio fans behaviour. Antonio Tajani, who is also Italian, told the European Parliament in Strasbourg that using the image of Anne Frank as an insult against others is a very grave matter.

The Italian prime minister, Paolo Gentiloni, said the stickers were unbelievable, unacceptable and to not be minimised.

A statement on Lazios website outlined the plans to place Franks image on the clubs shirts.

The president of SS Lazio, Claudio Lotito, has decided that tomorrow the team will be coming to the stadium at Renato DallAra Stadium in Bologna with an image of Anne Frank on the Biancoceleste shirt, demonstrating the clubs commitment to fighting all forms of racism and anti-Semitism, it said.

Lotito announced the Auschwitz trip initiative in comments reported by Gazzetta dello Sport: Today, I can officially announce that Lazio will partake in a new initiative, organising an annual trip to Auschwitz for 200 Lazio fans to educate and make sure we dont forget certain episodes, so that these lads can know what it is were talking about.

You cant play around with these facts, we condemn all forms of racism. Lazio will launch this initiative.

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Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

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SparkNotes: Diary of a Young Girl: Anne Frank

When Anne Frank is given a diary for her thirteenth birthday,she immediately fills it with the details of her life: descriptionsof her friends, boys who like her, and her classes at school. Annefinds comfort writing in her diary because she feels she has difficultyopening up to her friends and therefore has no true confidants.Anne also records her perceptions of herself. She does not thinkshe is pretty, but she is confident that her personality and othergood traits make up for it. Through her writing, Anne comes acrossas playful and comical but with a serious side. Annes diary entries show from the outset that she iscontent and optimistic despite the threats and danger that her familyfaces. The tone and substance of her writing change considerablywhile she is in hiding. Anne is remarkably forthright and perceptiveat the beginning of the diary, but as she leaves her normal childhoodbehind and enters the dire and unusual circumstances of the Holocaust,she becomes more introspective and thoughtful. During her first year in the annex, Anne struggles withthe adults, who constantly criticize her behavior and consider herexasperating. Anne feels extremely lonely and in need of kindnessand affection, which she feels her mother is incapable of providing.She also wrestles with her inner self and considers what type ofperson she wants to become as she enters womanhood. Anne tries tounderstand her identity in the microcosm of the annex and attemptsto understand the workings of the cruel world outside. As she matures, Annecomes to long not for female companionship, but intimacy with amale counterpart. She becomes infatuated with Peter, the van Daansteenage son, and comes to consider him a close friend, confidant,and eventually an object of romantic desire. In her final diary entries, Anne is particularly lucidabout the changes she has undergone, her ambitions, and how herexperience is changing her. She has a clear perspective of how shehas matured during their time in the annex, from an insolent andobstinate girl to a more emotionally independent young woman. Annebegins to think about her place in society as a woman, and her plansfor overcoming the obstacles that have defeated the ambitions ofwomen from previous generations, such as her mother. Anne continuesto struggle with how she can be a good person when there are somany obstacles in her world. She writes eloquently about her confusion overher identify, raising the question of whether she will consider herselfDutch, as she hears that the Dutch have become anti-Semitic. Annethinks philosophically about the nature of war and humanity andabout her role as a young Jewish girl in a challenging world. Fromher diary, it is clear that she had the potential to become an engaging,challenging, and sophisticated writer. More characters from Diary of a Young Girl

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June 19, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) – IMDb

Edit Storyline In Nazi-occupied Holland in World War II, shopkeeper Kraler hides two Jewish families in his attic. Young Anne Frank keeps a diary of everyday life for the Franks and the Van Daans, chronicling the Nazi threat as well as family dynamics. A romance with Peter Van Daan causes jealousy between Anne and her sister, Margot. Otto Frank returns to the attic many years after the eventual capture of both families and finds his late daughter’s diary. Written byJwelch5742 Budget:$3,000,000 (estimated) Gross USA: $5,014,000 Runtime: 180 min | 171 min (FMC Library Print) Aspect Ratio: 2.35 : 1

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Who betrayed Anne Frank? Book claims to shed new light on …

A new book has provided what it claims is fresh evidence that Anne Frank and her family were betrayed by a Jewish woman who was executed after the second world war for collaborating with the Nazis. The mystery of how the Franks were found in a secret annex in a building on Amsterdams Prinsengracht in August 1944 has thwarted formal investigations and troubled academics ever since. The involvement of Ans van Dijk, who was executed in 1948 after admitting to collaborating in the capture of 145 people, including her own brother and his family, had been previously claimed. But, the Anne Frank House museum and research centre had been unable to come to any conclusion, despite police investigations and its own studies. Fresh claims have now been made in a book by Gerard Kremer, 70, the son of a member of the Dutch resistance of the same name, who was an acquaintance of Van Dijk in Amsterdam. According to the book, Kremer Sr, who died in 1978, was the caretaker of an office building at the back of Prinsengracht on Amsterdams Westermarkt, two floors of which was taken over by the German authorities and the Dutch Nazi organisation the NSB during the occupation of the Netherlands. It is claimed that after her arrest on Easter Sunday 1943 by the Nazi intelligence service known as the the Sicherheitsdienst, Van Dijk became a regular visitor to the building, albeit in disguise. She would also use the telephones in the requisitioned offices, Kremer noticed. The book suggests that in early August 1944, Kremer overheard Van Dijk taking part in discussions in the Nazi offices about Prinsengracht, where the Franks were hiding. The Franks were arrested on 4 August, while Van Dijk was said to have left for The Hague. Anne had been hidden for two years in the concealed annex above the canalside warehouse with her father, Otto, mother, Edith, and sister, Margot. The 15-year-old was sent to the Westerbork transit camp, and on to Auschwitz before finally ending up at Bergen-Belsen, where she died in February 1945 from typhus. Her published diary spans the period in hiding between 1942 and 1944. A spokeswoman for Anne Frank House said the museum had been in touch with the author of The Backyard of the Secret Annex, but that there remained no proof of Van Dijks guilt. We consider Gerard Kremers book as a tribute to his parents, based on what he remembers and has heard. In 2016, the Anne Frank House carried out research into the arrest of the Frank family and the other four people in hiding in the secret annex. Ans van Dijk was included as a potential traitor in this study. We have not been able to find evidence for this theory, nor for other betrayal theories. Simone van Hoof, a spokesman for the books publishing house, Lantaarn, said: We cant claim that this is 100% the answer but we really do think it is a part of the puzzle that may be able to complete the story. Last year an FBI agent launched a cold case review into the Frank familys discovery by the Gestapo in 1944. Investigative techniques developed in the past decade, including the crunching of big data to uncover leads, are being used by a team of 19 forensic experts led by Vince Pankoke. Van Hoof said the review led by Pankoke was examining the claims in the book. A 2010 book by Sytze van der Zee, a former editor-in-chief of the Het Parool newspaper, previously noted that many of Van Dijks victims had lived near Prinsengracht. David Barnouw, an emeritus researcher at the Dutch Institute for war, holocaust and genocide studies, offered a cautious response to the books claims, and suggested the Franks discovery may have been pure chance. Speaking to the De Volkskrant newspaper, Barnouw said there lacked a smoking gun in regard to Van Dijks claims. He said: And I wonder if well ever see that smoking gun. I fear that it is now too late to establish conclusively who it was. After the war, Van Dijk moved to The Hague, where she was arrested at a friends home on 20 June 1945. Two years later she was charged on 23 counts of treason and brought to the special court in Amsterdam, where she confessed on all counts, and was sentenced to death. Her attempts to appeal the decision and gain a royal pardon on the grounds that she had acted out of self-preservation failed. In January 1948 she was executed by firing squad at Fort Bijlmer, in Amsterdam. She converted to Roman Catholicism the night before her execution.

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Top 20 Anne Frank Facts – Life, Family, Death… | Facts.net

Fast FactsEssential FactsInteresting Facts One of the most basic Anne Frank facts is that she is one of the most well-known Holocaust victims. Growing up in a German-Jewish family when Hitler was holding power over Europe, Anne Frank witnessed firsthand the widespread discrimination and crimes against Jews. She died at the age of just 15 while in a Nazi concentration camp. The publication of her diary provided a stunning revelation of the lives of Jewish families during this dark time. Her notes and stories are among the most detailed and comprehensive works that are left from the period. There are many Anne Frank facts regarding her family background. Anne Frank was born in Germany, where her family was originally from. When Anne was four years old, the Nazis took control over Germany. Annes father, Otto Frank, feared for the familys safety and decided to move to the Netherlands. Anne was born a German, but her citizenship was lost after the move. The family settled in Amsterdam, where Otto Frank set up a business. This was where the Frank family lived until they were taken into concentration camps in 1944. While many other Jewish families in Amsterdam were taken away by the Nazis, Anne Frank and her family were fortunate enough to be prepared, and went into hiding early in the war. After her sister Margot received a call-up for a working camp, the family moved to a secret hiding place in her fathers office building on July 6, 1942. With the help of Victor Kugler, Johannes Kleiman, Miep Gies, and Bep Voskujil, coworkers of Anne Franks father, the family was able to survive in their confined hiding spot for over two years. On August 4, 1944, however, the family was discovered after a tip-off to the authorities from an anonymous informer. One of the most well-known Anne Frank facts is that she was a talented writer. From her diary, we learn that by 1944, Anne had already expressed her wish to become a professional journalist after the war was over. She wanted to pursue her passion for writing. At first, Anne kept the diary purely to herself, mentioning more than once that no one else would ever read it. She changed her mind later on, after hearing a radio broadcast on March 28, 1944. On this day, Gerrit Bolkestein, the Dutch Education Minister, gave a speech that asked people to save diaries. The speech inspired Anne to dream of publishing her own diary after the war was over. There were eight people living in the secret annex before it was discovered. These were the four members of the Frank family, three members of the Van Daan family, and a man named Fritz Pfeffer. After the group was discovered, they were all taken into concentration camps and were separated from each other. After the war, Otto Frank, Annes father, learned of his wifes death after returning to Amsterdam. In July 1945, he met his daughters friend, who told him about the death of his daughters, Anne and Margot. Otto Frank was the only survivor of the group after the end of the war. Both Anne and her sister Margot were described as avid readers and excelled in school. Anne attended a Montessori school, where she showed great aptitude in reading and writing. Anne made many friends at this school, but she had to transfer to a different school later. After the German invasion of the Netherlands, it was dictated that Jewish children like Anne and Margot could only attend Jewish schools. This was just one of many strict segregation rules at this time. Anne and Margot were then enrolled in the Jewish Lyceum until they had to go into hiding. Otto Frank was first able to get his daughters diary published in 1950. The book received positive responses and was then published in several countries around the world, including Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The books biggest success, however, came in Japan. The book received critical acclaim and the first edition sold out, selling more than 100,000 copies. Anne Frank was quickly recognized as a cultural figure in Japan, and is seen as a representation of young victims of the war. After Anne Franks diary was published, the secret annex received many visitors, who were shown to the secret rooms by the employees who helped the families. By 1955, the company moved, and the building was going to be demolished to make room for a factory. Otto Frank, Annes father, started a campaign to preserve the building and the secret room. In 1960, the building where the families hid was turned into a museum, now called the Anne Frank House. The museum receives millions of visitors every year. The Anne Frank House is now the third most-visited museum in the Netherlands. Annes diary was written in a letter format, with each entry addressed to Kitty. The identity of Kitty is one of the Anne Frank facts that still presents a mystery to readers. Many people speculated that Kitty refers to Annes pre-war friend, Kitty Egyedi. However, Anne did not mention her in any of her writings. The most popular theory is that Kitty is a fictional character that Anne made up. Otto Frank, her father, reasoned though that his daughter may have had a real person in mind when she addressed Kitty. Because of the chaos in the concentration camp, the exact date(s) of Anne and her sister Margots deaths are still a mystery. In early 1945, 17,000 prisoners from the same camp were killed by a typhus epidemic. Witnesses later reported that they had seen Anne and her sister weakened by the disease, but no one knew exactly when they had died. Margot was said to have fallen from her bunk, the shock of which killed her, while Anne died a few days later. Initially, it was thought that the sisters deaths might have taken place only weeks before the camp was liberated in April 1945. However, the Frank sisters are believed to have displayed typhus symptoms by February. Without treatment, victims often die within 12 days of the first symptoms appearing. To date, the exact location of the sisters graves remains unknown. There have been many attempts to discover Anne Frank facts surrounding her death; however, we may never know all about the situation, given the chaotic conditions in the camp at that time. After Anne Frank and her family had been captured from their secret hiding place, Annes diary was left behind with all her other belongings. Miep Gies, one of the people who helped keep the family in hiding, took the diary away before the place was searched, wanting to return it one day to Anne. After the war, when Annes death had been confirmed, Miep returned her diary to Otto Frank. If she had read it, Miep said, she would have immediately burnt the book. The reason she said this was because the diary contained the names of her, her husband, and other people who helped shelter the Jewish families. The book would have served as evidence against them all, leading to probable execution. Luckily, Miep never read a word of Annes diary until after it was published. While the book has received critical acclaim since its very first edition, it has still come up against skepticism. Many people, including some famous critics, questioned the authenticity of some Anne Frank facts relating to the diary. Some called it a hoax. Surprisingly, among these skeptical critics are many Holocaust victims. The main reason behind such skepticism is that many people cannot believe the book was actually written by a child. Some people even went as far as to suggest Anne Frank never existed. Otto Frank, Annes father, relentlessly fought against such false allegations in court. In 1960, a court confirmed the authenticity of the book, by examining the handwriting in the book against Annes handwriting in previous letters. Later on, a forensic study was also carried out on the diary. The conclusion was that Annes handwriting was authentic, and that the paper, glue, and ink were indeed from the time when the diary was supposed to have been written. In her book, Anne described her sister Margot as a very different person from her. Margot was said to be smart with an excellent academic record. While Anne is more independent and strong-willed, Margot had a better relationship with their mother and everyone else. In Annes diary, she mentioned that Margot also kept a diary during the time they were in hiding. This prompted many readers and experts to go on a search for Margots side of the story. So far, however, there has been no trace of Margots diary. The commander who captured Anne Frank and her family was Karl Silberbauer, an inspector in the Vienna police at the time. During the raid, Silberbauer confiscated the familys valuables and money. He emptied Otto Franks briefcase to hold these valuables, and dumped the briefcases original contents, including papers and notebooks, on the ground. Among these papers was Anne Franks diary, which was later retrieved by Miep Gies. After the war, when Anne Franks diary was published, Silberbauer admitted to buying her book. He wanted to find out if his name was mentioned in there. Silberbauer also later testified as to the authenticity of Anne Frank and her arrest. One of the most surprising Anne Frank facts is that many parents were against the book being taught in schools. Most objections were against the unedited version, where there were parts that described Annes curiosity about her body and sexuality. This part was originally omitted by her father, Otto Frank, in the first edition. Later on, the unedited version was published without omitting such intimate parts.Some critics have even stranger reasons to protest Annes diary. In 1983, a school in Alabama even banned the book for being a real downer. Anne Franks diary has inspired several films and plays where actors and actresses reenact her life story. Examples include the Anne Frank Ballet and the choral work Annelies. However, when it comes to real film footage of Anne Frank, there is only one short piece of footage left. The footage is part of a 1941 silent film. The film is actually footage of Anne Franks neighbors getting married. Anne was seen on screen for a few brief seconds when she leaned out of her window to watch the newlyweds. The film was given by the couple to the Anne Frank House after the war. Initially, Anne wrote the diary purely for herself, thinking that no one else would ever read it. This is the original, unedited version of her diary. After hearing Gerrit Bolkesteins speech, however, Anne decided she wanted to publish her diary after the war ended. At this point, she reread what she had already written and thought that many parts would be unclear to readers, or would be too boring. Anne started to edit her own book to get it ready for publishing. In the Diary of Anne Frank: The Critical Edition, the original version is called Version A, and the later, edited one, is referred to as Version B. One of the Anne Frank facts that we can learn from her diary is that she had a difficult relationship with her mother. Anne was closer to her father, while her sister Margot was more attached to their mother, Edith Frank. In the original version of Anne Franks diary, her father Otto decided to edit out some of the most heated comments that Anne wrote about her mother. Despite the difficult relationship between mother and strong-willed teenage daughter, Edith Frank was described as a very devoted mother. Witnesses claimed that Edith Frank saved every last bit of her food for her daughters before they were transported to a different camp. Edith Frank died on January 6, 1945 in Auschwitz. After the Germans invaded the Netherlands, Otto Frank saw the rising threats against his family and other Jewish families. In 1938 and 1941, he attempted to get visas for his family to emigrate to the United States or Cuba. This process was described as extremely costly, complicated and corrupted at the time. In 1941, Otto Frank was granted a single visa to Cuba, just 10 days before Nazi Germany declared war on the United States. It wasnt clear if the visa ever reached Otto, but it was canceled after the war declaration. Because the plan to emigrate didnt work out, Otto Frank resorted to his backup plan, and prepared a hiding place for his family, known to us now as the secret annex. In June 1999, Time magazine officially included Anne Frank in their special edition, called Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century. Annes name was listed among the Heroes and Icons. Talking about Anne Frank, Roger Rosenblat, a Time writer, noted that Anne is admired not only for her courage and representation of the victims, but also for the quality of her writing and her ability to analyze her thoughts and emotions. Roger wrote: The reason for her immortality was basically literary. She was an extraordinarily good writer, for any age, and the quality of her work seemed a direct result of a ruthlessly honest disposition. Anne Frank facts tell a sad story of one of the most well-known Holocaust victims. Anne Frank grew up in a Jewish family. She and her family lived in hiding for almost two years before they were captured by the Nazis and sent to concentration camps. Her father was the only survivor after the end of World War 2, and it was he who published her diary after the war. There are still many mysteries about Anne Frank, including the time of her death, where she is buried, and just who the mysterious Kitty who she addressed in her diary is.

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young …

If the success of female-centric biopics like Hidden Figures has taught Hollywood anything, it’s that there are riches to be found in the lives of history-making women. Well, as lovers of a good true story, we’ve got a slew of suggestions for heroines who deserve their own big biopics. How has there not been a prestige pic about the life and times of Harriet Tubman? After nearly 30 years of abuse and subjugation, Tubman followed the North Star to escape slavery. Such a trek might, on its own, be worthy of a movie. But Tubman, of course, did so much more. A year after she fled north, she risked her freedom and her life to return and try to rescue her sisters. Then again to save her brother. And again for her husband, who in the meantime took a new wife. By 1856, she was a notorious outlaw with a bounty of $40,000 on her head. To evade capture, she stole masters’ buggies, perfected escape strategies, and effected clever disguises. Over 10 years, she made 19 trips back into the South, freeing an estimated 300 people. Sure, she’s nowhere near as well known as Anne Bonny or Grace O’Malley, but Sadie’s pirate story would make for a thrilling action-comedy. This petite thief was a tiny terror of 1860s New York, earning her nickname by head-butting those she mugged. But when a brutal brawl with a female bouncer named Gallus Mag ended with Sadie’s ear being bitten off, she fled to the Hudson River with a makeshift crew. Sadie’s summer was made up of swashbuckling, pillaging waterside mansions, and an eventual reunion with her ear. (Mag had preserved it in a pickling jar for her trophy collection.) What more could you ask for? The Oscars love a good tale of overcoming adversity, so how about the story of this German Jewish mathematician? Today she is celebrated for her contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics, but in 20th-century Bavaria, Amalie Noether had to fight for every bit of education and academic achievement. Women were not allowed to enroll at the University of Erlangen, so Noether had to petition each professor to attend classes. She later found academic employment similarly unwelcoming. Noether secured work as a teacher, but on the condition that she wouldn’t be paida condition that lasted for 15 years! Still, she dedicated herself tirelessly to mathematics. She also fled the Nazis, and befriended Albert Einstein, whose eulogy for Noether would make for a marvelous introductory monologue: “In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fraulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. For a stirring drama about the tenacity of the human spirit, consider the story of this sideshow performer. Smith rose to fame for her abilities to write, paint, sew, play piano, and even do woodworkall with her feet. But aside from being beloved, she was inspiring. Smith’s lack of arms came at the hands of her abusive father, who basically burned them beyond repair when she was just nine years old. However, Smith persevered, focused on her education and rehabilitation, and made a life for herself as a performer and author, penning a memoir in which she forgave her deeply flawed dad. The life of the “Joan of Arc of the Arabs” would make for a thrilling political drama. Abid was born into the lap of luxury, the educated daughter of an affluent Damascene aristocrat at the turn of the 20th century. But rather than spend her days reveling in wealth and its privileges, Abid became an outspoken and frequently exiled advocate, most notably for fighting for national independence and women’s rights. But her biggest battle was a literal one: She fought against the French invaders in the the bloody Battle of Maysaloun, of which she was said to be the only Syrian survivor. In honor of her service, King Faisal made her an honorary general. But the French ultimately overthrew Faisal, forcing Abid into exile. She would return to Syria to help advance feminist causes. When she died in 1959, it was within the bounds of her homeland, which was now free as well as a place where women were thriving under the social changes Abid helped enact. Show biz comedy-meets-discovery drama in the life of Hedy Lamarr, Hollywood glamour girl by day, world-changing inventor by night. Her tale not only includes fame, but also an escape from a brutish, arms-dealing husband, and her quest to defeat the Nazis through applied science. With the help of her friend, avant-garde composer George Antheil, Lamarr developed “frequency hopping,” an advancement in torpedo systems that aimed to make them jam-proof. Though the Navy didn’t take advantage of this tech until the 1960s, Lamarr’s contributions to spread spectrum technology later won recognition from the science community as her discoveries preceded the widespread adoption of wireless communications, like cell phones and Wi-Fi. At 83, Lamarr was honored with the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award as well as the BULBIE Gnass Spirit of Achievement Award, also regarded as “the Oscar of Inventing.” A celebratory biopic is long overdue. Want a good gangster tale? After emigrating to the U.S. in 1912, this woman of French and African descent made her home in Harlem. By the 1930s, “Queenie” St. Clair was not to be trifled with, running a crew that fiercely protected their neighbors. St. Clair got corrupt cops booted from the police force. And when Bronx crime boss Dutch Schultz tried to push in on her turf, she made alliances that helped lead to his assassination. Memorably, she sent a letter to his deathbed that read, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” And yet St. Clair has only been a supporting character in films like Hoodlum and The Cotton Club. Numerous works of this 19th century American author have earned screen adaptations, but Chopin’s life is the stuff of compelling and heartwarming drama. In the 1880s, she was a happily married mother of six, living on a plantation in Louisiana. But when both her husband and mother died within the same year, Chopin fell into a deep depression. A doctor advised her to use writing as a tool to work through her grief. Chopin’s short stories and essays proved not only to be a saving passion for her, but also a career that saved her family from financial ruin. Though her novel The Awakening was scorned when first published in 1899, it’s now highly regarded as a masterpiece, and a landmark in early feminist literature. Looking for a fanciful ghost story about the girl whose charm and fashion sense helped popularize the word flapper? This all-American ingnue made the leap from Ziegfeld Follies showgirl to Hollywood starlet, even marrying the brother of America’s Sweetheart Mary Pickford. At 25, Thomas was gone too soon. Yet her story lived on, as rumors spread that her sassy ghost took up residence in her old haunt, the New Amsterdam Theater. To this day, stagehands keep this party girl happy by wishing her goodnight before they leave the theater. Hollywood loves a tale of a self-made mogul, so why not tackle that of the first American woman to become a self-made millionaire? Walker came from humble beginnings, born to recently freed slaves on a cotton plantation in 1867. By 14, she was married. By 20, she was a widow and single mother. Yet Walker overcame, finding work in her brothers’ barbershop as a washerwoman, where she noticed that her hair was falling out. She developed a tonic that helped re-grow her hair, and began marketing it across the country, and even into Latin America. Rebranded as Madam C.J. Walker, she’d tour the U.S. selling her products and growing her empire. As her company expanded to factories and beauty schools, so did her philanthropic efforts toward the advancement of African Americans. Her story is not just one of personal success, but of drive, community, and advocacy. They called her “The Confidence Queen,” and what better name for a crime-drama about this Prussian immigrant with a twisted take on the American Dream. In 1880s New York, Heyman repeatedly exploited people’s thirst for wealth to line her own pockets. Not even arrest could cage her. She continued to scam from her prison cell, and repeatedly convinced the cops to let her leave for outings to the theater and carriage rides around Central Park. Perhaps you’d prefer an incredible epic about an unparalleled warrior? Well, this Vietnamese heroine’s legend is overflowing with flashy details. It’s said the 20-year-old was 9 feet tall with a voice that sounded loud as a temple bell. Dressed in vibrant yellow and wielding two swords, she rode into battle on a war elephant as she fended off the relentless Chinese forces. But best of all, Trinh delivered the kind of speeches made for big movie moments, like: “I only want to ride the wind and walk the waves, slay the big whales of the Eastern sea, clean up our frontiers, and save the people from drowning. Why should I imitate others, bow my head, stoop over and be a slave? Why resign myself to menial housework?” And the music soars! You might know this Creole triple threat for her saucy dance routines and dazzling persona. But a biopic about Baker would be incomplete without an espionage angle. During World War II, Josephine Baker was recruited by the French Resistance to be a spy. Her acceptance is the stuff of great screenplays: “France made me what I am. I will be grateful forever. The people of Paris have given me everything. They have given me their hearts, and I have given them mine. I am ready, Captain, to give my life. You can use me as you wish.” Baker’s beauty and fame served as a great cover for her covert ops. Her international acclaim gave her access to high-ranking Axis officials, allowing her to secure information. In secret, she trained in karate, and supposedly became such a skilled marksman with a pistol that she could shoot out the flame on a candle. She hid her notes in her unmentionables, and delivered messages on music sheets using invisible ink. There was also a narrow escape from Nazi forces, a torrid romance with her intelligence contact, Jacques Abtey, a false report of her demise, and being decorated for valor by General Charles de Gaulle. And all the while, Baker kept her career as a performer. Not even James Bond could pull all that off! For a World War II adventure complete with edge-of-your-seat action sequences, turn to the tale of the all-female Night Bomber Regiment of the Soviet Air Forces. Over the course of three years, these young women (ages 17 to 26) flew 30,000 missions and dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on the invading Nazi forces. Even more remarkable, these fighter pilots favored the cover of night for their attacks, and flew planes made of plywood and canvasall the better to silently sneak up on German bombers. It’s for the soft whooshing of their planes and their nightly assaults that these patriots won their fantastic name. It took two women, a pilot and a navigator, to man each of the Night Witches’ planesmaking for the perfect setting not only to explore the adventure of these fearless flyers, but also the sisterhood that helped the Soviet Union resist Nazi invasion. A gifted painter with a vibrant imagination and influential use of color, Mary Blair was a concept artist whose works defined a generation of Disney animation, from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad and Peter Pan to Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella. As a young woman she dreamed of going into the fine arts, but the Depression pushed her into animation. There, she ultimately channeled her passion for color and distinctive aesthetic into groundbreaking designs. It’s Blair who is credited with introducing Walt Disney to modern art, inciting a shift in his studio’s aesthetic. Disney himself called her in to design the look of his iconic It’s A Small World ride. Her rise through the Disney ranks to one of their official “legends” could be beautifully illustrated with the same kind of whimsy and color that her works were.

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February 27, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Maybe the first thing that most people would get shocked is that I rate with only 3 stars one of the best selling books of the 20th century (and now 21st century too) and even more, a book about the Holocaust. First thing that I learned about this book is honesty. Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same. For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybod First thing that I learned about this book is honesty. Anne Frank teaches us all about honesty, about telling what you really think, and so I am doing the same. For starters, I wonder how many people really, I mean REALLY read the book, because to rate with 5 stars a famous book that everybody tells you that it’s a book that all people should read, and then they got in this commnunity for readers and maybe they feel the compromise to make the rest to think that you really read the book. If not the case, hey, I don’t see why anyone can be offended by this comment, and it’s true, I don’t see either anyone who will complain, since to me it would be only a defense mechanism behind their own guilt of really not reading the book but making the rest that they did. I didn’t think about this scenario but commenting about other thing with a reader friend, that thought stuck in my mind. I invested so much time in that because, one has to be honest, the book is tedious since it’s not really a novel, it’s a collection of diary writings without a coherent line of constructing a story, even you need editors’ further notes to know what happened to the people in the Secret Annex since obviously, Anne was unable to tell the final events. So, since it’s so tedious, I wouldn’t be surprised that some reader tried to read it but at the end they just rated with 5 stars to denote that they are “cultured” readers that they appreciate the book as one of the most important books of the 20th century. Between the passages, you learn a lot of things. The first thing that surprised me it’s how this diary collection that it was written in the 40’s, in Holland, by a teenage girl, almost anybody can relate to the comments and you don’t feel them as outdated. Sometimes if you read an “old” book, you sensed the outdated of the prose, selection of words, etc… but here I didn’t feel it. This diary could be easily being written in present time and I don’t think that it would change at all. I think that it was one of its strengths since I am sure that it will be as relevant for many more time. Other thing that surprised me a lot was how much Anne Frank (and by association, the rest of the group in the Secret Annex) were informed about the events in the war, I know, they had a radio, but from stuff that I had read about WWII, there were certain elements of the information that people weren’t aware. I mean, at many moments, they denote a certainty that Jewish people were murdered in the extermination camps, of course if you call them “extermination camps”, of course you know that people got killed there, but that’s a term used by me, now, they called them labor camps, and so far I read, Jewish people really thought that they will receive “baths” when they were really gassed or burned to death, and it’s kinda logical thing since if they were so certained about their deaths, there would be riots on the ghettos to flee in mass and they wouldn’t march without protest to the gas chambers and the ovens. Even, Allied forces used espionage methods to know from Nazi prisoners what was happening to the Jewish people on the camps. Anyway, also, there are elements like the assasination attempt to Hitler that they were aware that it was made by their own generals. I don’t think that kind of stuff would be informed so easily since it was a clear fact of how divided was the opinions of the high ranking staff of the Third Reich. I am not saying that the diary is not authentic as some dumb people commented that the Holocaust didn’t happen. The Holocaust happened. It was real and we never forget that to avoid that it would happen again. I am just commenting that surprised me how well they were informed about key sensitive info of war events taking in account that they were a bunch of people living hidden for like 3 years in an isolated annex of a building. I know, they got visits by the people that helped them but even so. I am not questioning its authenticity, just expressing my surprise when I read it. There were other things here and there that I was surprised by the use of terms like “diet: low fat”, geez! I didn’t know that in the 1940’s they used terms like that in the 1980’s were like the rush of “healthy food”, but again, I supposed it’s the effect that stuff that we think are new, they are just recycled and labeled as “new”. I am amazed that this book is banned in some schools, okay, there are comments relating to sex and sexual preferences, but so what? If a teenage girl from the 1940’s can think about stuff like that while she was isolated with a war outside, don’t you think that teenagers of today can think just the same? I think that books like this one can help them to know that they are not alone, that they are not weird for thinking things like that, that was normal in the 1940s and it’s normal now too. I was amazed that the group tried to “live normal”, I mean, kids making school work and so. I think that in such extraordinary circumstances, they needed to do extraordinary things like to make circles and to talk in group and hearing all about topics. I mean, they were like trapped and living together, really too close in the sense of physical space and yet, nobody cares about what Anne thinks or what she has to offer? Geez! Sure, they need to be really still and in silence, usually at day, but they should like making a “tribe”, I don’t know, I am babbling, but to try to live like regular families was evidently wrong for the sanity of their interrelationships. What didn’t surprised me were behaviors like trying to hide food or keeping money from the group. In times where the group work were essential to survive, the human selfishness risen as a second nature. Resumming, I just want to explain that my rating is based on my “entertaining” experience while reading the book and the format of the book itself. And this didn’t have to do with my respect for the subject of the Holocaust and its terrible events.

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Was Anne Frank Denied Refugee Status by the U.S.?

CLAIM The family of Anne Frank sought (and was denied) refugee status in the United States. In November 2015, debate raged on social media networks regarding the escalating plight of Syrian refugees; during that time, a circulating rumor claimed Anne Frank was denied entry to the United States before her death in the Holocaust. While most Americans were familiar with Anne Frank (and many read her diary in school), the claim labeling her a prospective refugee seemed novel. Its appearance during an ongoing debate about Syrian refugees similarly prompted some skepticism among those who hadnt before heard it, as Franks ordeal and death are a story with which so many are familiar. On 14 February 2007The New York Timespublished an article titled Letters reveal desperate plight of Anne Franks family, reporting that documents newly uncovered by an accident of circumstance revealed the Frank familys failed attempts at entry to the U.S.: After lying undisturbed in a New Jersey warehouse for nearly 30 years, documents revealing the desperate efforts of Anne Franks family to escape to the United States and Cuba from Nazi-occupied Holland in 1941 have been discovered thanks to a clerical error. I am forced to look out for emigration and as far as I can see U.S.A. is the only country we could go to, Annes father, Otto, wrote to his college friend, Nathan Straus Jr., the head of the federal Housing Authority, a friend of Eleanor Roosevelts and the son of a Macys co-owner, asking him to put up a $5,000 bond. It is for the sake of the children mainly that we have to care for. Our own fate is of less importance, Otto Frank wrote. Page by page, the papers illustrate the tortuous process for gaining entry to the United States in those days. Even with powerful connections and money, European Jews could not overcome the State Departments restrictions against refugees, said two Holocaust scholars who examined the documents. As the war in Europe intensified, so too did Otto Franks efforts to transport his family to safety. He ultimately settled on an attempt to enter through Cuba, a plan which never reached fruition: By June 1941, no one with close relatives still in Germany was allowed into the United States because of suspicions that the Nazis could use them to blackmail refugees into clandestine cooperation. That development ended the possibility of getting the Frank girls out through a childrens rescue agency. Because of the uncertainty, Otto Frank decided to try for a single visa for himself. It was granted and forwarded to him on Dec. 1. No one knows if it arrived. Ten days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States and Havana canceled the visa. Reuters covered the discovery on 14 February 2007, including commentary from Holocaust scholars who lamented the familys failed attempt at passage: If her father had sought help sooner, Anne Frank could be a 77-year-old woman living in Boston today, a writer. That is what the YIVOs documents suggest, said Richard Breitman, a professor at American University. However, Otto Frank decided to try to escape just as the Nazis were making it more difficult to leave and the United States was making it more difficult to enter, Breitman said. Cuba issued Otto Frank a visa on December 1, 1941, according to the documents, but it was canceled 10 days later when Germany declared war on the United States. A 2007TIMEarticle provided further details of Otto Franks increasingly desperate efforts: For nine months, they tried to secure visas first to the U.S. and then to Cuba until that window shut. Just three letters of the file were written by Otto Frank, all addressed to university friend Nathan Straus Jr., son of a co-owner of Macys department store and head of the U.S. Housing Authority. Straus and Franks brother-in-law, Julius Hollander, regularly corresponded with two private Jewish agencies, the National Refugee Service in New York and the Boston Committee for Refugees. Straus also contacted the State Department on Franks behalf. Hollander and his brother arranged affidavits from their employers, Jacob Hiatt of E.F. Dodge Paper Box Co. and Harry Levine of the New England Novelty Co., both of Leominster, Mass. An April 2015 articletitled Op-Ed: Getting Anne Frank All Wrong published toArutz Shevaaddressed the plight of Anne Frank and other Jewish refugee children who perished: Otto Frank, Annes father, dutifully filled out the small mountain of required application formsand obtained supporting affidavits from the familys relatives in Massachusetts. But that was not enough for those who zealously guarded Americas gates against refugees. In fact, in 1941, the Roosevelt administration even added a new restriction: no refugee with close relatives in Europe could come to the U.S., on the grounds that the Nazis might hold their relatives hostage in order to force the refugee to undertake espionage for Hitler. Thats right: Anne Frank, Nazi spy. Annes mother, Edith, wrote to a friend in 1939: I believe that all Germanys Jews are looking around the world, but can find nowhere to go. On 4 September 2015, Anne Franks step-sister Eva Schloss drew direct parallels between the Syrian refugee crisis and the Jewish refugee crisis of World War II: You must not be selfish and you must share whatever you have and help in a desperate situation. They need help from you. These people have had the courage to do a very difficult thing- to take your family and your whole life to another country requires bravery and strength. This is history repeating itself. These Syrians are valuable, educated people. These are doctors and nurses who are only too willing to help our society and they will become leaders in the community if you let them. The claim that Anne Frank was a refugee confused some readers, as they hadnt heard it prior to the Syrian refugee crisis. But the extent to which Otto Frank tried (and failed) to save his family from death during World War II was only first reported in 2007, and thus didnt appear in many history lessons before that. Ultimately Frank perished (likely of typhus) at Bergen-Belsen in 1945, shortly after the deaths of her mother and sister Margot. Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here. Fact Checker:Kim LaCapria Published:19 November 2015

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January 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The story of Anne Frank: The story in brief

Anne Frank is a Jewish girl who has to go into hiding during World War Two to escape from the Nazis. Together with seven others she hides in the secret annex at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam. After more thantwo years in hiding they are discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people to survive. After her death Anne becomes world famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding. Discover Anne Frank’s hiding place View the citys timeline before, during and after the war. With exceptional photographs and audio and video fragments. Discover the story behind Anne Frank’s diary. Anne Frank was born on 12 June 1929 in the German city of Frankfurt am Main, where her fathers family had lived for generations. She has a sister, Margot, who is three and a half years older. The economic crisis, Hitlers rise to power and growing antisemitism put an end to the familys carefree life. Like many other Jews, Otto Frank and his wife, Edith, decide to leave Germany. Otto sets up a business in Amsterdam and the family finds a home on the Merwedeplein. The children go to school, Otto works hard at his business and Edith looks after the home. When the threat of war in Europe increases, Otto and his family try to emigrate to England or the USA but these attempts fail. On 1 September 1939 Germany invades Poland. It is the beginning of the Second World War. For a while there is hope that The Netherlands will not become involved in the war, but on 10 May 1940 German troops invade the country. Five days later The Netherlands surrenders and is occupied. Anti-Jewish regulations soon follow. Jews are allowed into fewer and fewer places. Anne and Margot must attend a Jewish school and Otto loses his business.When a renewed attempt to emigrate to the U.S.A. fails, Otto and Edith decide to go into hiding. Otto sets up a hiding place in the rear annexe of his firm at Prinsengracht 263. He does this together with his Jewish business partner Hermann van Pels and with help from his associates Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. On 5 July 1942 Margot Frank receives a call-up to report for a German work camp. The next day the Frank family goes into hiding. The Van Pels family follows a week later and in November 1942 they are joined by an eighth person: the dentist Fritz Pfeffer. They remain in the secret annexe for more than two years.In hiding, they have to keep very quiet, are often frightened and pass the time together as well as they can. They are helped by the office workers, Johannes Kleiman, Victor Kugler, Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl; by Mieps husband, Jan Gies; and by the warehouse manager, Johannes Voskuijl, Beps father. These helpers not only arrange food, clothes and books, they are the groups contact with the outside world. Shortly before going into hiding Anne receives a diary for her birthday. She starts writing straightaway and during her time in hiding she writes about events in the secret annex and about herself. Her diary is a great support to her. Anne also writes short stories and collects quotations from other writers in her book of beautiful sentences.When the Dutch minister of education in exile in London appeals on British radio for people to keep war diaries, Anne decides to edit her diary and create a novel called ‘The Secret Annex’. She starts to rewrite, but she and the others are discovered and arrested before she has finished. On 4 August 1944 the people in hiding are arrested, along with their helpers Johannes Kleiman and Victor Kugler. They pass from the security service headquarters and prison to the transit camp Westerbork, from where they are deported to Auschwitz. The two helpers are sent to the Amersfoort camp. Johannes Kleiman is released shortly after his arrest and six months later Victor Kugler escapes. Immediately after the arrests Miep Gies and Bep Voskuijl rescue Anne’s diary and papers that have been left behind in the secret annex. Despite intensive investigations it has never been clear how the hiding place was discovered. Otto Frank is the only one of the eight people in hiding to survive the war. During his long journey back to The Netherlands he learns that his wife, Edith, has died. He knows nothing about his daughters and still hopes to see them again. He arrives back in Amsterdam at the beginning of July. He goes straight to Miep and Jan Gies and remains with them for another seven years.Otto Frank tries to find his daughters, but in July he receives the news that they both died of disease and deprivation in Bergen-Belsen. Miep Gies then gives him Annes diary papers. Otto reads the diary and discovers a completely different Anne. He is very moved by her writing. Anne wrote in her diary that she wants to become a writer or a journalist in the future, and that she wants to publish her diary as a novel. Friends convince Otto Frank that the diary has great expressive power and on 25 June 1947 The Secret Annexe is published in an edition of 3,000. Many more editions follow, also translations, a play and a film.People from all over the world learn of Anne Frank’s story. Over the years Otto Frank answers thousands of letters from people who have read his daughter’s diary. In 1960 the Anne Frank House becomes a museum. Otto Frank remains involved with the Anne Frank House until his death in 1980 and campaigns for human rights and respect.

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January 17, 2018   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank diary to be read at Serie A games after Lazio fans …

The Italian football federation (FICG) has announced plans to read out a passage from Anne Franks diary before matches this week in response to acts of antisemitism by Lazio fans. During Sundays league game against Cagliari, supporters of the club defaced their Stadio Olimpico home in Rome with antisemitic graffiti and stickers showing images of Frank, the teenager who was killed at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945, wearing a jersey of their rivals Roma. Their actions have been widely condemned, with Lazios president, Claudio Lotito paying a visit to Romes main synagogue on Tuesday to lay a wreath to remember victims of the Holocaust. He also promised a new education campaign culminating in an annual trip to Auschwitz with 200 young fans at a club which has a history of antisemitic behaviour, including a Lazio banner in the city derby nearly 20 years ago aimed at Roma supporters that read: Auschwitz Is Your Homeland; The Ovens Are Your Homes. An image of Frank will be put on Lazios shirts for Wednesdays game at Bologna, the club said, to demonstrate their fight against all forms of racism and antisemitism. The FIGC also said a minute of silence will be observed before Serie A, B and C matches this week, plus amateur and youth games over the weekend, with a passage from Franks diary entry on 15 July, 1944 being read out over loudspeakers. It reads: I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquillity will return once more. A statement from Anne Frank House, one of Amsterdams most visited tourist sites, condemned the Lazio supporters attitudes but welcomed the response since Sundays match. We are shocked by these anti-Jewish expressions, which are extremely painful to those who have experienced the consequences of the Jewish persecution, they said in a statement. Fighting football-related antisemitism is part of our educational activities. We are pleased to see that others, including Italian football clubs, have expressed their indignation about this action. The head of the European Parliament has also denounced Lazio fans behaviour. Antonio Tajani, who is also Italian, told the European Parliament in Strasbourg that using the image of Anne Frank as an insult against others is a very grave matter. The Italian prime minister, Paolo Gentiloni, said the stickers were unbelievable, unacceptable and to not be minimised. A statement on Lazios website outlined the plans to place Franks image on the clubs shirts. The president of SS Lazio, Claudio Lotito, has decided that tomorrow the team will be coming to the stadium at Renato DallAra Stadium in Bologna with an image of Anne Frank on the Biancoceleste shirt, demonstrating the clubs commitment to fighting all forms of racism and anti-Semitism, it said. Lotito announced the Auschwitz trip initiative in comments reported by Gazzetta dello Sport: Today, I can officially announce that Lazio will partake in a new initiative, organising an annual trip to Auschwitz for 200 Lazio fans to educate and make sure we dont forget certain episodes, so that these lads can know what it is were talking about. You cant play around with these facts, we condemn all forms of racism. Lazio will launch this initiative.

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December 26, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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