Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

In a time of xenophobia, we should heed the words of Anne Frank – rabble.ca

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a “secret annex” of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Anne’s father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied.

Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago.

“Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941,” Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. “Otto Frank … was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, ‘Please, save my family. Save the Frank family.’ It didn’t work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.”

This aspect of Anne Frank’s story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Frank’s attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. “Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience,” Goldstein added. “That’s why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.”

Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned.

As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists — Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi — launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. “Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored,” they wrote, “will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centres.” Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway.

Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, “Quiet, quiet, quiet.”

After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism “horrible” and “painful.” Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized.

We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, “What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.”

Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,400 stations. She is the co-author, with Denis Moynihan and David Goodman, of the newly published New York Times bestseller Democracy Now!: 20 Years Covering the Movements Changing America.

This column was first published on Democracy Now!

Photo: bert knottenbeld/flickr

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US would do well to learn from Anne Frank – Albuquerque Journal

………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ……….

Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago.

Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941, Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Otto Frank was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, Please, save my family. Save the Frank family. It didnt work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.

This aspect of Anne Franks story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Franks attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience, Goldstein added. Thats why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.

Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Mo., just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned.

As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Womens March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored, they wrote, will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centers. Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burned to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway.

We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.

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US would do well to learn from Anne Frank – Albuquerque Journal

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February 25, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

An Evening with Eva Schloss, Step-Sister of Anne Frank – Houstonia Magazine

On the evening of February 15th,The Shul of Bellairehosted a historic event in honor of its 6th Anniversary. Holocaust survivor, author and humanitarian Eva Schlosswas invited to share her story of struggle and survival in the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. The evening was a tribute to the Jewish community and The Shul’s mission to embrace every individual in the community, regardless of background or affiliation.

Schloss sharedher personal story of struggle as well as an account of the life of Anne Frank, her childhood friend and step-sister, witha live interview on-stage at The Wortham Center inside of the Lillie and Roy Cullen Theater. The Shul’s founder and leader Rabbi Yossi Zaklikofskykicked off the event by giving a speech. The remarks were followed by honoring Dr. Doreen and Marshall Lerner with a Lamplighter Award as well as Alex and Victoria Lazar with the Parents of the Year Award.

Honorary guestBecca Cason Thrash alongside Eva Schloss lit the “Candle of the Silent Six Million” to honor the memories of those that were tragically lost in the past, as well as the “Lantern of Continuity”, that symbolizes the renewal and resilience of our nation as a strong, radiant, and inextinguishable beacon of light for the future.

The night was made possible with the support of Amy and Gary Davis, Melissa and Ron Jacobs, Momentum BMW and so many more. The rabbi also thanked Holocaust Museum Houston and the many amazing volunteers for their help.

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Anne Frank Center calls out Steve Bannon for anti-Semitic rant against ‘globalist media’ – Raw Story

The director of the Anne Frank Center took another shot at the Trump administrations apparent anti-Semitism.

Steven Goldstein, who leads the civil rights organization, ripped President Donald Trumps tardy and pathetic disavowal this week of recent attacks, vandalism and threats against synagogues and Jewish community centers which drew an angry response from White House press secretary Sean Spicer.

The day after Trumps disavowal, his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, taunted the globalist media opposing the presidents nationalist agenda and Goldstein couldnt help but notice the language he used was loaded with historically anti-Semitic tropes, reported the Chicago Tribune.

We are now seeing a pattern, and during the week in which the Trump administration has been under a microscope for anti-Semitism, this is how you refer to the press? In some of the most unfortunate anti-Semitic terms in history? Goldstein said. That doesnt happen by accident.

Anti-Semitic conspiracy theories have long featured dark tales about Jewish elites controlling the world through international banking and global media which Bannon almost certainly knows as the former chief of the alt-right Breitbart News.

Globalist and corporate media these are code words of anti-Semitism, and when theyre used by a man with an anti-Semitic history such as Steve Bannon, youd have to be living in the Stone Age not to connect the dots, Goldstein said.

Trump has refused to specifically acknowledge Jewish suffering during the Holocaust or condemn his anti-Semitic supporters, and Goldstein said Bannon is sending a similar message to those white nationalist backers.

Bannon is engaging in what I call plausible deniability anti-Semitism, Goldstein said. He can turn around and say, Well, what are you talking about? I didnt attack Jews today, I attacked the media being linked to some corporate conspiracy. By not mentioning Jews, he dares us to play rope-a-dope, to play a game of gotcha.

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Amy Goodman: Remember the lesson of Anne Frank – The Spokesman-Review

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a secret annex of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Annes father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied.

Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago.

Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941, Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Otto Frank was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, Please, save my family. Save the Frank family. It didnt work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.

This aspect of Anne Franks story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Franks attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience, Goldstein added. Thats why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.

Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned.

As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Womens March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored, they wrote, will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centers. Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway.

Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, Quiet, quiet, quiet.

After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism horrible and painful. Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized.

We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.

Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now! Denis Moynihan is an author and researcher.

Published Feb. 24, 2017, midnight in: Anne Frank, anti-Semitism, bomb threats, Donald Trump, Jewish community centers, Otto Frank, refugees

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Message from Anne Frank’s step-sister: Peace will prevail if people are good – ABC NEWS 4

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV)

The step-sister of an historical figure spent her Thursday night in the Lowcountry telling her story of the Holocaust.

Eva Schloss is the step-sister to Anne Frank, the girl known for journaling her life during World War II. Both Frank and Schloss were sent to concentration camps.

Now, Schloss travels the country sharing her story and that of her late step-sister.

She says it’s everyone’s jobs to bring awareness to the Holocaust and the present day.

“Personally I am not afraid. We have to have security yes everywhere. But that happens not just against Jewish people. So I think we just have to live with that. And just be careful. And be good citizens,” she said.

Schloss says she understand the threat to several Jewish centers across the country, but she’s convinced that peace will prevail if people are good to each other.

The 90-minute talk was sold out and the room was packed with people wanting to hear Schloss speak.

The event was moderated by ABC News 4’s Dean Stephens and simulcast on the abcnews4.com website and on the station’s Facebook page.

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‘Diary of Anne Frank’ coming to Play House in October | Briefs … – Cleveland Jewish News

The Diary of Anne Frank is coming to the Cleveland Play House Oct. 21 to Nov. 12 as part of the 2017-18 season. It will be performed in the Outcalt Theater.

Written by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, and adapted by Wendy Kesselman, the play focuses on 13-year-old Anne Frank and seven other Jews living in a secret factory annex hoping to evade Nazi deportation. Following two years of hiding, the show focuses on trust, bravery and the urge to stand up for one another in the face of intolerance, fear and hate.

As we began building our 2017-18 season, we were determined to find plays that would inspire all of us to be the very best version of ourselves plays that remind us that diversity, pluralism and multiculturalism are sound of our societies greatest strengths and they must be protected, said Laura Kepley, Cleveland Play Houses artistic director. The result is a season full of light, hope and grit, with exciting productions that will bring our audiences to the edges of their seats.

Other shows are: Shakespeare in Love from Sept. 9 to Oct. 1, Marie and Rosetta from Jan. 20 to Feb. 11, The Invisible Hand from Feb. 17 to March 11, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee from April 14 to May 6 and The Royale from May 5 to May 27.

All shows are in the venues of the Allen Theatre complex at Playhouse Square in downtown Cleveland. Tickets sales start in early August, with prices for single tickets ranging from $25 to $95. Students under age 25 are eligible for $15 rush tickets, with valid student ID. Call 216-241-6000 or visit clevelandplayhouse.com for more information.

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A Survivor Story: Remembering Anne Frank and the Holocaust – Free Times

Eva Schloss speaks Feb. 27 at the Koger Center.

Eva Schloss is a Holocaust survivor with a most unusual legacy.

First, she endured Auschwitz. Second, shes one of the few remaining people who actually knew Anne Frank, who would later become her posthumous stepsister.

Born Eva Geiringer in Austria in 1929, Schloss who will speak Monday, Feb. 27, at the Koger Center first experienced anti-Semitism at the age of nine, after Nazi Germany annexed her native country. Her family fled first to Belgium and then to the Netherlands. It was in Amsterdam that she came to know Anne Frank, whose family lived in the apartment building opposite her own.

As the Nazi threat ramped up, Evas family, like Annes, would be forced into hiding; both were discovered and experienced similar fates. Both the Frank and Geiringer families were sent to Auschwitz. Anne, her mother, and sister would all lose their lives, leaving only their father Otto behind. Eva and her mother, Elfriede, would survive; her father and brother would not. Otto and Elfriede would later marry.

Schloss has made a point of keeping these memories alive. In 2010, she published her memoir, Evas Story, a gripping account of what it is like to be a 15-year-old girl in a death camp. She has also she continued to tour the world to talk about her experiences.

Most people didnt. From the six million people, theres really only a small proportion who survived. I was still young, I was 15, I wanted to experience life. I didnt want to die. So I held on. But I couldnt have made it much longer.

Auschwitz was, of course, one of the most terrible ones, but at least there was a selection there [to decide who would be killed and who would be kept alive to work]. There were camps where there was no selection, so the whole transport to the camp went straight to the gas chambers. If I would have gone to Treblinka, for instance, I would not have had a chance.

I dont know how I would have been without it, but for many, many years I was quite shy and depressed; I didnt want really to mix with people. It was in my mind all the time, with everything. You kind of try to make a life for yourself, but this is haunting you over time, until I started to speak about it in 1986, 40 years after, and then you can sort of let go. Eventually, you make peace with the fact that that this happened and you live with it.

No, not really. It was a relief, actually. Because I felt now that it is over I can let go, and even now when somebody asks me a little detail out of the book, I have to look it up again Ive forgot, you know? Before, it was imprinted in my brain. But once it was written down and once I spoke about it, I could let go.

I knew her when she was 11 until 13. Her family had left Germany in 1934 when she was four years old, so she had not experienced any hardship, any anti-Semitism like I [did when I was] nine years old in Austria so she was very relaxed about everything. She was very clever and a very sophisticated little girl, quite a little lady. She was very interested in boys and clothes and hairstyles, and I was really a tomboy. I had an older brother. I used to play with the boys more.

She was quite an independent girl, knew what she wanted, had her own will.

She might have become a politician, because she was very interested in what was going on in the world. Or she might have become a writer. This was really something which she was good at, at that time, and interested in, whats happening in the world. She might have become somebody of Amnesty International, or somebody about womens rights, but she certainly would have done something involved in what was going on around her.

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Anne Frank Center Commends Pence for Visit to Vandalized Cemetery After Criticisms of Trump – Mediaite

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect had some particularly critical words for President Trump yesterday on the subject of anti-Semitism, but today the center praised Vice President Mike Pence for his visit to a Jewish cemetery that was recently vandalized.

During a planned speech in Missouri today, the vice president condemned the vandalism and acts of hatred and anti-Semitism.

He thenvisited the cemetery itself and spoke out against hate there again, as well as helped out the clean-up efforts.

Yesterday the Anne Frank Center released a statement blasting Trump for not doing enough to condemn anti-Semitismsomething Sean Spicer pushed back onbut today they posted another statement praising Pence:

You can watch a clip of Pences remarks at the cemetery above, via CNN.

[image via screengrab]

Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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In a time of xenophobia, we should heed the words of Anne Frank – rabble.ca

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a “secret annex” of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Anne’s father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied. Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago. “Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941,” Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. “Otto Frank … was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, ‘Please, save my family. Save the Frank family.’ It didn’t work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.” This aspect of Anne Frank’s story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Frank’s attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. “Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience,” Goldstein added. “That’s why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.” Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned. As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists — Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi — launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. “Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored,” they wrote, “will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centres.” Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway. Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, “Quiet, quiet, quiet.” After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism “horrible” and “painful.” Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized. We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, “What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.” Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,400 stations. She is the co-author, with Denis Moynihan and David Goodman, of the newly published New York Times bestseller Democracy Now!: 20 Years Covering the Movements Changing America. This column was first published on Democracy Now! Photo: bert knottenbeld/flickr Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism.

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US would do well to learn from Anne Frank – Albuquerque Journal

………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago. Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941, Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Otto Frank was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, Please, save my family. Save the Frank family. It didnt work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank. This aspect of Anne Franks story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Franks attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience, Goldstein added. Thats why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation. Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Mo., just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned. As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Womens March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored, they wrote, will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centers. Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burned to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway. We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.

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February 25, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

An Evening with Eva Schloss, Step-Sister of Anne Frank – Houstonia Magazine

On the evening of February 15th,The Shul of Bellairehosted a historic event in honor of its 6th Anniversary. Holocaust survivor, author and humanitarian Eva Schlosswas invited to share her story of struggle and survival in the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. The evening was a tribute to the Jewish community and The Shul’s mission to embrace every individual in the community, regardless of background or affiliation. Schloss sharedher personal story of struggle as well as an account of the life of Anne Frank, her childhood friend and step-sister, witha live interview on-stage at The Wortham Center inside of the Lillie and Roy Cullen Theater. The Shul’s founder and leader Rabbi Yossi Zaklikofskykicked off the event by giving a speech. The remarks were followed by honoring Dr. Doreen and Marshall Lerner with a Lamplighter Award as well as Alex and Victoria Lazar with the Parents of the Year Award. Honorary guestBecca Cason Thrash alongside Eva Schloss lit the “Candle of the Silent Six Million” to honor the memories of those that were tragically lost in the past, as well as the “Lantern of Continuity”, that symbolizes the renewal and resilience of our nation as a strong, radiant, and inextinguishable beacon of light for the future. The night was made possible with the support of Amy and Gary Davis, Melissa and Ron Jacobs, Momentum BMW and so many more. The rabbi also thanked Holocaust Museum Houston and the many amazing volunteers for their help.

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February 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center calls out Steve Bannon for anti-Semitic rant against ‘globalist media’ – Raw Story

The director of the Anne Frank Center took another shot at the Trump administrations apparent anti-Semitism. Steven Goldstein, who leads the civil rights organization, ripped President Donald Trumps tardy and pathetic disavowal this week of recent attacks, vandalism and threats against synagogues and Jewish community centers which drew an angry response from White House press secretary Sean Spicer. The day after Trumps disavowal, his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, taunted the globalist media opposing the presidents nationalist agenda and Goldstein couldnt help but notice the language he used was loaded with historically anti-Semitic tropes, reported the Chicago Tribune. We are now seeing a pattern, and during the week in which the Trump administration has been under a microscope for anti-Semitism, this is how you refer to the press? In some of the most unfortunate anti-Semitic terms in history? Goldstein said. That doesnt happen by accident. Anti-Semitic conspiracy theories have long featured dark tales about Jewish elites controlling the world through international banking and global media which Bannon almost certainly knows as the former chief of the alt-right Breitbart News. Globalist and corporate media these are code words of anti-Semitism, and when theyre used by a man with an anti-Semitic history such as Steve Bannon, youd have to be living in the Stone Age not to connect the dots, Goldstein said. Trump has refused to specifically acknowledge Jewish suffering during the Holocaust or condemn his anti-Semitic supporters, and Goldstein said Bannon is sending a similar message to those white nationalist backers. Bannon is engaging in what I call plausible deniability anti-Semitism, Goldstein said. He can turn around and say, Well, what are you talking about? I didnt attack Jews today, I attacked the media being linked to some corporate conspiracy. By not mentioning Jews, he dares us to play rope-a-dope, to play a game of gotcha.

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February 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Amy Goodman: Remember the lesson of Anne Frank – The Spokesman-Review

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a secret annex of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Annes father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied. Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago. Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941, Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Otto Frank was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, Please, save my family. Save the Frank family. It didnt work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank. This aspect of Anne Franks story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Franks attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience, Goldstein added. Thats why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation. Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned. As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Womens March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored, they wrote, will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centers. Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway. Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, Quiet, quiet, quiet. After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism horrible and painful. Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized. We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now! Denis Moynihan is an author and researcher. Published Feb. 24, 2017, midnight in: Anne Frank, anti-Semitism, bomb threats, Donald Trump, Jewish community centers, Otto Frank, refugees

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February 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Message from Anne Frank’s step-sister: Peace will prevail if people are good – ABC NEWS 4

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) The step-sister of an historical figure spent her Thursday night in the Lowcountry telling her story of the Holocaust. Eva Schloss is the step-sister to Anne Frank, the girl known for journaling her life during World War II. Both Frank and Schloss were sent to concentration camps. Now, Schloss travels the country sharing her story and that of her late step-sister. She says it’s everyone’s jobs to bring awareness to the Holocaust and the present day. “Personally I am not afraid. We have to have security yes everywhere. But that happens not just against Jewish people. So I think we just have to live with that. And just be careful. And be good citizens,” she said. Schloss says she understand the threat to several Jewish centers across the country, but she’s convinced that peace will prevail if people are good to each other. The 90-minute talk was sold out and the room was packed with people wanting to hear Schloss speak. The event was moderated by ABC News 4’s Dean Stephens and simulcast on the abcnews4.com website and on the station’s Facebook page.

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February 24, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

‘Diary of Anne Frank’ coming to Play House in October | Briefs … – Cleveland Jewish News

The Diary of Anne Frank is coming to the Cleveland Play House Oct. 21 to Nov. 12 as part of the 2017-18 season. It will be performed in the Outcalt Theater. Written by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, and adapted by Wendy Kesselman, the play focuses on 13-year-old Anne Frank and seven other Jews living in a secret factory annex hoping to evade Nazi deportation. Following two years of hiding, the show focuses on trust, bravery and the urge to stand up for one another in the face of intolerance, fear and hate. As we began building our 2017-18 season, we were determined to find plays that would inspire all of us to be the very best version of ourselves plays that remind us that diversity, pluralism and multiculturalism are sound of our societies greatest strengths and they must be protected, said Laura Kepley, Cleveland Play Houses artistic director. The result is a season full of light, hope and grit, with exciting productions that will bring our audiences to the edges of their seats. Other shows are: Shakespeare in Love from Sept. 9 to Oct. 1, Marie and Rosetta from Jan. 20 to Feb. 11, The Invisible Hand from Feb. 17 to March 11, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee from April 14 to May 6 and The Royale from May 5 to May 27. All shows are in the venues of the Allen Theatre complex at Playhouse Square in downtown Cleveland. Tickets sales start in early August, with prices for single tickets ranging from $25 to $95. Students under age 25 are eligible for $15 rush tickets, with valid student ID. Call 216-241-6000 or visit clevelandplayhouse.com for more information.

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February 23, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

A Survivor Story: Remembering Anne Frank and the Holocaust – Free Times

Eva Schloss speaks Feb. 27 at the Koger Center. Eva Schloss is a Holocaust survivor with a most unusual legacy. First, she endured Auschwitz. Second, shes one of the few remaining people who actually knew Anne Frank, who would later become her posthumous stepsister. Born Eva Geiringer in Austria in 1929, Schloss who will speak Monday, Feb. 27, at the Koger Center first experienced anti-Semitism at the age of nine, after Nazi Germany annexed her native country. Her family fled first to Belgium and then to the Netherlands. It was in Amsterdam that she came to know Anne Frank, whose family lived in the apartment building opposite her own. As the Nazi threat ramped up, Evas family, like Annes, would be forced into hiding; both were discovered and experienced similar fates. Both the Frank and Geiringer families were sent to Auschwitz. Anne, her mother, and sister would all lose their lives, leaving only their father Otto behind. Eva and her mother, Elfriede, would survive; her father and brother would not. Otto and Elfriede would later marry. Schloss has made a point of keeping these memories alive. In 2010, she published her memoir, Evas Story, a gripping account of what it is like to be a 15-year-old girl in a death camp. She has also she continued to tour the world to talk about her experiences. Most people didnt. From the six million people, theres really only a small proportion who survived. I was still young, I was 15, I wanted to experience life. I didnt want to die. So I held on. But I couldnt have made it much longer. Auschwitz was, of course, one of the most terrible ones, but at least there was a selection there [to decide who would be killed and who would be kept alive to work]. There were camps where there was no selection, so the whole transport to the camp went straight to the gas chambers. If I would have gone to Treblinka, for instance, I would not have had a chance. I dont know how I would have been without it, but for many, many years I was quite shy and depressed; I didnt want really to mix with people. It was in my mind all the time, with everything. You kind of try to make a life for yourself, but this is haunting you over time, until I started to speak about it in 1986, 40 years after, and then you can sort of let go. Eventually, you make peace with the fact that that this happened and you live with it. No, not really. It was a relief, actually. Because I felt now that it is over I can let go, and even now when somebody asks me a little detail out of the book, I have to look it up again Ive forgot, you know? Before, it was imprinted in my brain. But once it was written down and once I spoke about it, I could let go. I knew her when she was 11 until 13. Her family had left Germany in 1934 when she was four years old, so she had not experienced any hardship, any anti-Semitism like I [did when I was] nine years old in Austria so she was very relaxed about everything. She was very clever and a very sophisticated little girl, quite a little lady. She was very interested in boys and clothes and hairstyles, and I was really a tomboy. I had an older brother. I used to play with the boys more. She was quite an independent girl, knew what she wanted, had her own will. She might have become a politician, because she was very interested in what was going on in the world. Or she might have become a writer. This was really something which she was good at, at that time, and interested in, whats happening in the world. She might have become somebody of Amnesty International, or somebody about womens rights, but she certainly would have done something involved in what was going on around her.

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February 23, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center Commends Pence for Visit to Vandalized Cemetery After Criticisms of Trump – Mediaite

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect had some particularly critical words for President Trump yesterday on the subject of anti-Semitism, but today the center praised Vice President Mike Pence for his visit to a Jewish cemetery that was recently vandalized. During a planned speech in Missouri today, the vice president condemned the vandalism and acts of hatred and anti-Semitism. He thenvisited the cemetery itself and spoke out against hate there again, as well as helped out the clean-up efforts. Yesterday the Anne Frank Center released a statement blasting Trump for not doing enough to condemn anti-Semitismsomething Sean Spicer pushed back onbut today they posted another statement praising Pence: You can watch a clip of Pences remarks at the cemetery above, via CNN. [image via screengrab] Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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February 23, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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