Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

Backstage: Theater to mentor students for ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ – TCPalm

Carol Saunders, Special to The Courier Newsweekly 12:02 a.m. ET March 9, 2017

Under the guidance of industry professionals at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, students in grades six to 12 were invited to apply to be part of a free summer mentorship program to produce a new adaptation of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hacketts 1955 Tony Award-winning play The Diary of Anne Frank, as adapted by Wendy Kesselman. The show will take place on the theaters stage on Saturday, Aug. 12.(Photo: ARTWORK BY BRAD BRETT/CGC DESIGN)

Young peoplein high school or middle school and in love with theaterhave been asked totake part in a free summerintensivementorship program that offers one-on-one guidance to produce a real show on a professional theater stage.

The Maltz Jupiter Theatreis offering local students the chance to produce a powerful historic drama.

Under the guidance of industry professionals at Floridas largest award-winning professional regional theater, students in grades six through 12 have been invited to apply to be part of a program to produce a new adaptation of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hacketts 1955 Tony Award-winning play The Diary of Anne Frank, as adapted by Wendy Kesselman.

The show will take place on the theaters stage Saturday, Aug. 12.

Adapted from the book “The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank, the play tells the true story of the lives of eight people who spent two years hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic. It is based on the writings from the Dutch-language diary kept by 13-year-old Anne as she and her family hid during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. The book has since been published in more than 60 languages.

Story still resonates

Though Annes diary was written more than 60 years ago, her story still resonates with its universal themes of isolation, loneliness, oppression and struggling to find and express ones own identity, said Julie Rowe, director of education at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. This is a new adaptation for a new generation, and I think this will be a moving and relevant drama for our students to produce.

Known as the Youth Artists Chair, the project aligns middle and high school students with individual staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the creation process of the show. Through the project, students have produced the dramas”Rhinoceros,” The Glass Menagerie, The Crucible, Hamlet, The Laramie Project and The Good Times are Killing Me since 2011.

‘The Diary of Anne Frank’is one of the most important plays of this century, and Im excited to see how our students interpret it, Rowe said. The Maltz Jupiter Theatres mentorship program has become a place where students can spend their summer working on a relevant, important project with their peers.

Chosen by committee

Applicants for the project will be interviewed and chosen by a committee.

Winning students will then take on specific roles throughout the summer months that include producer, director, set designer, costume designer, lighting designer, sound designer, properties designer, stage manager, assistant stage manager, marketing, press relations, development, carpentry/electrics, run crew and wardrobe. The students will then lead three weeks of rehearsals before mounting the show on stage.

The deadline to apply for the project wasMarch 6, with interviews taking place through March 10. Please note: This production explores mature themes.

Those chosen for the role of director and producer will also assist in casting the shows young performers. With casting open for local students in grades six through 12, open auditions and callbacks for the show will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on April 23.

Students interested in auditioning for The Diary of Anne Frank were told to beprepared with a 1-minute monologue in the style of the show; pre-registration highly recommended. For additional audition information, call 561- 575-2672.

For more information about the upcoming season of theater shows and the conservatory, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call the box office at 561-575-2223.

Band brings back Sousa-inspired concert

Join the New Gardens Band for a Sousa-inspired performance, Marching Along with Sousa, at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 11at the Eissey Campus Theatre.

This concert will feature a variety of Sousa marches and other music, including overtures and several authentic traditions that John Philip Sousa and his band regularly used during their concert tours.

Ticket prices are $20 and can be purchased by calling 561-207-5900 or visiting the theaterat 11051 Campus Drive in Palm Beach Gardens.

Chioldi to sing title role in Palm Beach Operas ‘Rigoletto’

Internationally acclaimed, Emmy award-winning opera starMichael Chioldireturns to Palm Beach Opera in Verdis “Rigoletto” on March 10 and 12 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts.

Chioldi, of New York,lends his rich, powerful voice to the vigorous role of Iago. Chioldi has quickly gained the reputation as one of the most sought-after dramatic baritones of his generation.

Praised for his “warm, rich tone” (Opera News) and “deeply communicative phrasing” (The Baltimore Sun), he has received unanimous acclaim from critics and audiences around the world for his portrayals of the dramatic baritone roles of Verdi, Puccini, and Strauss.

His recent performances include the title roles in Verdi’s Rigoletto with the Orquesta Filarmnica de Jalisco,”Macbeth with Palm Beach Opera, and Nabucco with Lyric Opera Baltimore; as Conte di Luna in Il Trovatore with Utah Opera; and as Rodrigo in Don Carlo with Austin Lyric Opera.

A dramatic journey of undeniable force, Rigoletto was immensely popular from its premiere and remains fresh and powerful to this day.

The story, based on a controversial play by Victor Hugo, tells of an outsider a hunchbacked jester who struggles to balance the dueling elements of beauty and evil that exist in his life. Written during the most fertile period of Verdis artistic life, the opera resonates with a universality that is frequently called Shakespearean.

Tickets start at $20 and are available at 561-833-7888 or pbopera.org. Tickets are also available at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts at 561-832-7469 or www.kravis.org.

Send news items and photos toCarolchatter@aol.com.

Read or Share this story: http://www.tcpalm.com/story/specialty-publications/jupiter-courier/2017/03/09/backstage-theater-mentor-students-diary-anne-frank/98684206/

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Backstage: Theater to mentor students for ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ – TCPalm

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Landmark Community Theatre present The Diary of Anne Frank, opening March 17; accompanying exhibit tells family’s … – Torrington Register Citizen

THOMASTON >> The memoirs of a young Jewish girl, The Diary of Anne Frank is one of the most acclaimed documentations of the Nazi occupation during World War II. Landmark Community Theatre is staging this important work at the Thomaston Opera House, along with an exhibition from the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect.

Under the direction of Lucia Dressel, the play follows the Frank family and their attempt to avoid persecution by hiding for two years in a secret annex at the top of an office building. With the addition of the van Pels family and family friend Fritz Pfeffer, Anne recounts their struggle to survive.

Lexi White, 12, of Southbury, stars as Anne Frank. White started her career at age 10, landing the role of Geraldine in Lifetimes film Wishin and Hopin, starring Molly Ringwald. Her latest film, Christmas All Over Again starring Sean Ryan Rox from Nickelodeons Henry Danger was released in December.

She is also a credited singer, co-writing and releasing her first single Hurricane on iTunes last September. White says she is honored to be playing the title role in the production. Her past stage credits include Lion King (Zazu), Peter Pan (Smee), and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Brother Simeon).

Advertisement

In partnership with the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, Landmark Community Theatre was invited to share the exhibition, Anne Frank: A History for Today, with the Thomaston community. Anne Franks diary is a not only a beautifully written portrayal of a young girls time in hiding, but also a powerful historical document that provides an intimate glimpse into one familys struggle against Nazi tyranny.

Through a variety of innovative education programs and exhibitions, the center promotes Anne Frank as a role model for today. Her insights and courage continue to inspire students, educators and citizens more than 60 years after her diary was first published. The centers exhibitions about the life and times of Anne Frank have traveled to more than 250 communities and have been viewed by more than 5.5 million people throughout North America.

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, founded in 1959 by Otto Frank, is a non-sectarian 501c3 educational organization, based in New York City. The center, a partner of the Anne Frank House, uses the diary and spirit of Anne Frank as unique tools to advance her legacy, to educate young people and communities about the dangers of intolerance, anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination, and to inspire the next generation to build a world based on equal rights and mutual respect.

Anne Frank: A History for Today was developed by the Anne Frank House and is sponsored in North America by the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. For more information visit the AFC website www.annefrank.com

The Diary of Anne Frank will be performed on Fridays and Saturdays, March 18, 24, 25, 31 and April 1 at 8 p.m., and Sundays, March 19, 26, April 2 at 2 p.m., with special weekday performances on March 17 and 23 at 10 a.m. on the Thomaston Opera House main stage.

For more information on tickets and group sales, contact the box office at 860-283-6250. Hours are Monday through Friday, 1-6 p.m. and Saturday, 1-4 p.m. at 158 Main Street Thomaston. Or purchase tickets online at www.landmarkcommuntytheatre.org.

Story contributed by Landmark Community Theatre, Thomaston.

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Landmark Community Theatre present The Diary of Anne Frank, opening March 17; accompanying exhibit tells family’s … – Torrington Register Citizen

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Eva Schloss, stepsister of Anne Frank, visits Knoxville to share her … – The Highland Echo


The Highland Echo
Eva Schloss, stepsister of Anne Frank, visits Knoxville to share her …
The Highland Echo
Eva Schloss, Holocaust survivor and stepsister to Anne Frank, spoke at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium on Feb. 21. Photo by Allison Franklin. On Feb. 21 seated …

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The Haunting Story of Hlne Berr, The French Anne Frank – Reno Public Radio

Hlne Berr is often referred to as the Anne Frank of France. A traveling exhibit based on her personal diary is now open at the Northwest Reno Library. There will be an opening reception Thursday night from 6-8 pm.

Deborah Farnault-Sinclair is with the Memorial de la Shoah in Paris, which curated the work. She says it’s especially relevant in light of several recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

Farnault-Sinclair spoke with our News Director Michelle Billman to share more about the exhibit.

KUNR: The exhibit centers around the life and death of Hlne Berr. Who was she?

Deborah Farnault-Sinclair (DFS): Hlne Berr was a young, French woman. She was Jewish, living in Paris, and studying English literature at the Sorbonne University in Paris.

KUNR: Weve often heard about the diary of Anne Frank, but Hlne Berr also had a diary.

DFS: That document differs quite a bit from the one of Anne Frank. She was significantly older; she was 21, so she was legally an adult, so she was involved in the political life in France and she was actually very political herself and very engaged in social work. Her insight is very different from the one of Anne Frank because of a maturity standpoint but also because Anne Frank was living in hiding and Hlne Berr was living out in the open.

KUNR: That diarywhat length of time does that narrative share of her life?

DFS: She started that diary in 1942, so we are already in occupied Paris. At the beginning of the diary, we dont really feel the persecution. We feel it intensifying pretty quickly, but at the beginning, shes very much taken by the life of a young woman as we can imagine it. Shes in love with a young man at the university and shes passionate about the arts, music, literature, and so she really lives in this beautiful world of letters. And, so, the journal ends in 1944 right before her arrest as well as the arrest of her parents.

KUNR: And what do we know happens next?

DFS: The three of them were arrested and interned in the Drancy Camp, north of Paris, which was an internment camp from which most trains were departing to Auschwitz. She was deported to Auschwitz with her parents. Her mother was gassed upon arrival. Her father was experimented on, and she died a few days before the liberation of the camp. She was very sick with typhus and one morning she was beaten to death by one of the guards.

KUNR: Does a story like this haunt you? Do you think about this throughout your day?

DFS: Yes, very, very much. I didnt know about Hlne Berr until I started working at the Memorial de la Shoah, so one of the first things I did was read the diary and I was very much taken by it. Its a gorgeous piece of literature; its really a gem. Also, because I grew up myself in Paris and I studied in the same area where she studied. I went to the same parks where she went with her friends. I took the subway at the same subway stops as her. My life in Paris was very close to hers, and, so I very much identified with her and she did haunt me. And she keeps haunting me in my dreams sometimes.

KUNR: Deborah, Hlnes journal is unique in comparison to other personal documents from the Holocaust era. Can you explain why?

DFS: The persecution in France was not perceived as strongly at first compared to the persecution in the East, like in Poland. A lot of journals were found buried in the ground of the ghettoes; whereas, in France, people were still living out in the open. And especially for French Jews, they felt like France was always going to protect them because its a land of freedom and equality. Refugees are always welcome in France, and for that reason, I think Jews of France felt very safe, and only foreign Jews were being rounded up and deported. That makes it a very interesting document because it gives us the insight into how the persecution was perceived by the Jews themselves.

KUNR: Thank you.

DFS: Thank you.

WEB EXTRA: Farnault-Sinclair discusses some of the concerns fueled by recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

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Amsterdam’s Anne Frank gets an overhaul, more facilities – DutchNews.nl

Visitors queuing. Photo: Massimo Catarinella via Wikimedia Commons

The Anne Frank House museum in Amsterdam is to undergo a two year overhaul including a new entrance and extra space for education, the foundation which runs the house said on Monday.

The aim is to improve the historical context of the house where the World War II diarist lived while hiding from the Nazis, the foundation said. The museum, which attracted 1.2 million visitors last year, will remain open during the rebuilding process.

Many youngsters from outside Europe visit the house and this makes it important to take a more in-depth look at the historical context and the background to Anne Franks story, director Ronald Leopold said.

Well be giving more information on what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen, and what this means for us todayBut of course we will retain the authentic character of the house: experience and meaning will always be our priorities.

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New, larger entrance part of Anne Frank House renovation plans – NL Times

The Anne Frank House in Amsterdam is being renovated. The renovations will include a new, larger entrance on the Westermark and more space for educational visits, AD reports.

The former student housing on the Westermark will become part of the Anne Frank House, making more space available at the museum for educational tours and visitor facilities. The museum also plans to offer visitors more historical context, so that they can better experience the story of Anne Frank and her hiding place.

The museum will focus on keeping the authentic character of the house intact during the renovations.

“Many of our visitors are under 25 years old and come from countries outside Europe”, said Ronald Leopold, managing director fo the Anne Frank House. “It is therefore important to go deeper into the historical context of the museum and the background of Anne Frank’s story. We will provide more information about what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen and what it means for the present. Also, we will go deeper into the hiding history and the main players of this house.”

Renovation works started on Monday and will last approximately two years. The Anne Frank House will remain open during this time.

The Anne Frank House attracts over 1.2 million visitors per year.

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Tower Chorale presents haunting ‘Voice of Anne Frank’ – Chicago Tribune

We know the story of Anne Frank, the young German girl whose Jewish family went into hiding in an attic room in Amsterdam, only to be betrayed and to perish in a concentration camp a few months before the camp was liberated in May of 1945.

Anne began writing her diary in 1942 describing their years in hiding. It was found by a friend and kept until Anne’s father, Otto, the family’s only survivor, returned at the end of World War II in Europe. He had it published and it became an international best-seller, a Hollywood movie, an opera, and has been presented in numerous forms on stage and television.

British composer James Whitbourn wrote a 14-movement oratorio, “Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank,” which had its world premiere in April 2005 in London, with the Choir of Clare College Cambridge and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.

The Tower Chorale will give perform the choral piece on March 5 in Western Springs and March 12 in River Forest. About 80-plus members of the chorale will be conducted by Patrick Godon, music director since 2011.

“(“Annelies”) is new to me,” Godon said, “but I fell in love with it when I first heard it on James Whitbourn’s website. I encountered the piece over the summer when I was planning the season looking at various websites of other choral ensembles.

“I knew this was a perfect piece for the singers of the Tower Chorale,” he continued. “They are able to meet the vocal challenges of the work and are enjoying singing a work of such quality that they’ve never sung before.”

“Patrick is challenging us, stretching us,” said Craig Fisher, chairman of the board of the Tower Chorale and a bass with the chorus. “We have spent many years singing choral pieces from the Western European classical repertoire. He wants to expand our horizons.” Fisher describes the music as “haunting. It is the most moving piece I’ve ever sung,” he said.

“Those who attend this performance will feel Anne’s feelings for themselves in a powerfully direct way,” Godon concluded. “I highly encourage everyone to attend. You will be glad you did.”

The Tower Chorale, established in Chicago’s western suburbs in 1986, is a 100-voice community chorus comprised of amateur and professional singers, including former members of the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Grant Park Symphony Chorus, Light Opera Works, Chicago Opera Theater, plus various community theater and music organizations as well as singers from many church choirs.

Children 10 and under are admitted free to Tower Chorale concerts, but need a ticket, due to the seating capacity of the venues. HoweverThose bringing children are encouraged to arrive early when doors open at 2:30 p.m. to obtain a free ticket for children.

‘Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank’

What: Tower Chorale concerts

When and where: 3 p.m. March 5 at Western Springs Christian Reformed Church, 5140 Wolf Road, Western Springs; and 3 p.m. March 12 at Concordia University Chapel, 7400 Augusta St., River Forest

Tickets: $20; $17 for seniors and students in advance; $23, $20 for students and seniors at the door.

ContactL 708- 580-0997; www. towerchorale.org

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Anne Frank center criticizes Trump’s remarks on Jewish attacks – Los Angeles Times

Feb. 28, 2017, 7:47 p.m.

President Trump condemned attacks against Jews in hisspeech Tuesday to a joint session of Congress and calledthreats against Jewish community centers examples of”hate and evil.”

At theAnne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, that wasn’t enough.

“After weeks of our organizations having to plead, cajole and criticize this president to speak out against anti-Semitism, we give him credit for doing the right thing tonight by beginning his speech to address anti-Semitism and other hate. But his suddenly dulcet tones werent matched by substantive kindness,” executive directorSteven Goldstein said ina statement.

“The president didnt say exactly what he would do to fight anti-Semitism how he could have stayed so vague? Weve endured weeks of anti-Semitic attacks across America and we didnt hear a single proposal from the president tonight to stop them,” Goldstein said.

The Anti-Defamation League, which has also criticized Trump’s response to the nearly 100 bomb threats against Jewish institutions since Jan. 9, was more subdued in its response.

“Thanks @POTUS for condemning #hate ag Jews & immigrants. Now let’s fight it. See our plan. Let’s do it together,” tweeted ADL CEOJonathan Greenblatt.

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Anne Frank Center Says Trump ‘Partly to Blame’ for Wave of Antisemitism – Common Dreams


Common Dreams
Anne Frank Center Says Trump 'Partly to Blame' for Wave of Antisemitism
Common Dreams
Following the most recent round of bomb threats against Jewish community centers on Monday, the head of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said that President Donald Trump is at least partly to blame due to the nationalistic thread that runs
After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to ActPoliticusUSA
Bomb threatsVICE News
Another Wave Of Bomb Threats Hits Jewish Community Centers, SchoolsHuffington Post
BuzzFeed News –CTV News –International Business Times
all 310 news articles »

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Anne Frank Center Says Trump ‘Partly to Blame’ for Wave of Antisemitism – Common Dreams

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Backstage: Theater to mentor students for ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ – TCPalm

Carol Saunders, Special to The Courier Newsweekly 12:02 a.m. ET March 9, 2017 Under the guidance of industry professionals at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, students in grades six to 12 were invited to apply to be part of a free summer mentorship program to produce a new adaptation of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hacketts 1955 Tony Award-winning play The Diary of Anne Frank, as adapted by Wendy Kesselman. The show will take place on the theaters stage on Saturday, Aug. 12.(Photo: ARTWORK BY BRAD BRETT/CGC DESIGN) Young peoplein high school or middle school and in love with theaterhave been asked totake part in a free summerintensivementorship program that offers one-on-one guidance to produce a real show on a professional theater stage. The Maltz Jupiter Theatreis offering local students the chance to produce a powerful historic drama. Under the guidance of industry professionals at Floridas largest award-winning professional regional theater, students in grades six through 12 have been invited to apply to be part of a program to produce a new adaptation of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hacketts 1955 Tony Award-winning play The Diary of Anne Frank, as adapted by Wendy Kesselman. The show will take place on the theaters stage Saturday, Aug. 12. Adapted from the book “The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank, the play tells the true story of the lives of eight people who spent two years hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic. It is based on the writings from the Dutch-language diary kept by 13-year-old Anne as she and her family hid during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. The book has since been published in more than 60 languages. Story still resonates Though Annes diary was written more than 60 years ago, her story still resonates with its universal themes of isolation, loneliness, oppression and struggling to find and express ones own identity, said Julie Rowe, director of education at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. This is a new adaptation for a new generation, and I think this will be a moving and relevant drama for our students to produce. Known as the Youth Artists Chair, the project aligns middle and high school students with individual staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the creation process of the show. Through the project, students have produced the dramas”Rhinoceros,” The Glass Menagerie, The Crucible, Hamlet, The Laramie Project and The Good Times are Killing Me since 2011. ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’is one of the most important plays of this century, and Im excited to see how our students interpret it, Rowe said. The Maltz Jupiter Theatres mentorship program has become a place where students can spend their summer working on a relevant, important project with their peers. Chosen by committee Applicants for the project will be interviewed and chosen by a committee. Winning students will then take on specific roles throughout the summer months that include producer, director, set designer, costume designer, lighting designer, sound designer, properties designer, stage manager, assistant stage manager, marketing, press relations, development, carpentry/electrics, run crew and wardrobe. The students will then lead three weeks of rehearsals before mounting the show on stage. The deadline to apply for the project wasMarch 6, with interviews taking place through March 10. Please note: This production explores mature themes. Those chosen for the role of director and producer will also assist in casting the shows young performers. With casting open for local students in grades six through 12, open auditions and callbacks for the show will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on April 23. Students interested in auditioning for The Diary of Anne Frank were told to beprepared with a 1-minute monologue in the style of the show; pre-registration highly recommended. For additional audition information, call 561- 575-2672. For more information about the upcoming season of theater shows and the conservatory, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call the box office at 561-575-2223. Band brings back Sousa-inspired concert Join the New Gardens Band for a Sousa-inspired performance, Marching Along with Sousa, at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 11at the Eissey Campus Theatre. This concert will feature a variety of Sousa marches and other music, including overtures and several authentic traditions that John Philip Sousa and his band regularly used during their concert tours. Ticket prices are $20 and can be purchased by calling 561-207-5900 or visiting the theaterat 11051 Campus Drive in Palm Beach Gardens. Chioldi to sing title role in Palm Beach Operas ‘Rigoletto’ Internationally acclaimed, Emmy award-winning opera starMichael Chioldireturns to Palm Beach Opera in Verdis “Rigoletto” on March 10 and 12 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. Chioldi, of New York,lends his rich, powerful voice to the vigorous role of Iago. Chioldi has quickly gained the reputation as one of the most sought-after dramatic baritones of his generation. Praised for his “warm, rich tone” (Opera News) and “deeply communicative phrasing” (The Baltimore Sun), he has received unanimous acclaim from critics and audiences around the world for his portrayals of the dramatic baritone roles of Verdi, Puccini, and Strauss. His recent performances include the title roles in Verdi’s Rigoletto with the Orquesta Filarmnica de Jalisco,”Macbeth with Palm Beach Opera, and Nabucco with Lyric Opera Baltimore; as Conte di Luna in Il Trovatore with Utah Opera; and as Rodrigo in Don Carlo with Austin Lyric Opera. A dramatic journey of undeniable force, Rigoletto was immensely popular from its premiere and remains fresh and powerful to this day. The story, based on a controversial play by Victor Hugo, tells of an outsider a hunchbacked jester who struggles to balance the dueling elements of beauty and evil that exist in his life. Written during the most fertile period of Verdis artistic life, the opera resonates with a universality that is frequently called Shakespearean. Tickets start at $20 and are available at 561-833-7888 or pbopera.org. Tickets are also available at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts at 561-832-7469 or www.kravis.org. Send news items and photos toCarolchatter@aol.com. Read or Share this story: http://www.tcpalm.com/story/specialty-publications/jupiter-courier/2017/03/09/backstage-theater-mentor-students-diary-anne-frank/98684206/

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Landmark Community Theatre present The Diary of Anne Frank, opening March 17; accompanying exhibit tells family’s … – Torrington Register Citizen

THOMASTON > > The memoirs of a young Jewish girl, The Diary of Anne Frank is one of the most acclaimed documentations of the Nazi occupation during World War II. Landmark Community Theatre is staging this important work at the Thomaston Opera House, along with an exhibition from the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Under the direction of Lucia Dressel, the play follows the Frank family and their attempt to avoid persecution by hiding for two years in a secret annex at the top of an office building. With the addition of the van Pels family and family friend Fritz Pfeffer, Anne recounts their struggle to survive. Lexi White, 12, of Southbury, stars as Anne Frank. White started her career at age 10, landing the role of Geraldine in Lifetimes film Wishin and Hopin, starring Molly Ringwald. Her latest film, Christmas All Over Again starring Sean Ryan Rox from Nickelodeons Henry Danger was released in December. She is also a credited singer, co-writing and releasing her first single Hurricane on iTunes last September. White says she is honored to be playing the title role in the production. Her past stage credits include Lion King (Zazu), Peter Pan (Smee), and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Brother Simeon). Advertisement In partnership with the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, Landmark Community Theatre was invited to share the exhibition, Anne Frank: A History for Today, with the Thomaston community. Anne Franks diary is a not only a beautifully written portrayal of a young girls time in hiding, but also a powerful historical document that provides an intimate glimpse into one familys struggle against Nazi tyranny. Through a variety of innovative education programs and exhibitions, the center promotes Anne Frank as a role model for today. Her insights and courage continue to inspire students, educators and citizens more than 60 years after her diary was first published. The centers exhibitions about the life and times of Anne Frank have traveled to more than 250 communities and have been viewed by more than 5.5 million people throughout North America. The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, founded in 1959 by Otto Frank, is a non-sectarian 501c3 educational organization, based in New York City. The center, a partner of the Anne Frank House, uses the diary and spirit of Anne Frank as unique tools to advance her legacy, to educate young people and communities about the dangers of intolerance, anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination, and to inspire the next generation to build a world based on equal rights and mutual respect. Anne Frank: A History for Today was developed by the Anne Frank House and is sponsored in North America by the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. For more information visit the AFC website www.annefrank.com The Diary of Anne Frank will be performed on Fridays and Saturdays, March 18, 24, 25, 31 and April 1 at 8 p.m., and Sundays, March 19, 26, April 2 at 2 p.m., with special weekday performances on March 17 and 23 at 10 a.m. on the Thomaston Opera House main stage. For more information on tickets and group sales, contact the box office at 860-283-6250. Hours are Monday through Friday, 1-6 p.m. and Saturday, 1-4 p.m. at 158 Main Street Thomaston. Or purchase tickets online at www.landmarkcommuntytheatre.org. Story contributed by Landmark Community Theatre, Thomaston.

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Eva Schloss, stepsister of Anne Frank, visits Knoxville to share her … – The Highland Echo

The Highland Echo Eva Schloss, stepsister of Anne Frank, visits Knoxville to share her … The Highland Echo Eva Schloss, Holocaust survivor and stepsister to Anne Frank, spoke at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium on Feb. 21. Photo by Allison Franklin. On Feb. 21 seated … and more »

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March 8, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Haunting Story of Hlne Berr, The French Anne Frank – Reno Public Radio

Hlne Berr is often referred to as the Anne Frank of France. A traveling exhibit based on her personal diary is now open at the Northwest Reno Library. There will be an opening reception Thursday night from 6-8 pm. Deborah Farnault-Sinclair is with the Memorial de la Shoah in Paris, which curated the work. She says it’s especially relevant in light of several recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S. Farnault-Sinclair spoke with our News Director Michelle Billman to share more about the exhibit. KUNR: The exhibit centers around the life and death of Hlne Berr. Who was she? Deborah Farnault-Sinclair (DFS): Hlne Berr was a young, French woman. She was Jewish, living in Paris, and studying English literature at the Sorbonne University in Paris. KUNR: Weve often heard about the diary of Anne Frank, but Hlne Berr also had a diary. DFS: That document differs quite a bit from the one of Anne Frank. She was significantly older; she was 21, so she was legally an adult, so she was involved in the political life in France and she was actually very political herself and very engaged in social work. Her insight is very different from the one of Anne Frank because of a maturity standpoint but also because Anne Frank was living in hiding and Hlne Berr was living out in the open. KUNR: That diarywhat length of time does that narrative share of her life? DFS: She started that diary in 1942, so we are already in occupied Paris. At the beginning of the diary, we dont really feel the persecution. We feel it intensifying pretty quickly, but at the beginning, shes very much taken by the life of a young woman as we can imagine it. Shes in love with a young man at the university and shes passionate about the arts, music, literature, and so she really lives in this beautiful world of letters. And, so, the journal ends in 1944 right before her arrest as well as the arrest of her parents. KUNR: And what do we know happens next? DFS: The three of them were arrested and interned in the Drancy Camp, north of Paris, which was an internment camp from which most trains were departing to Auschwitz. She was deported to Auschwitz with her parents. Her mother was gassed upon arrival. Her father was experimented on, and she died a few days before the liberation of the camp. She was very sick with typhus and one morning she was beaten to death by one of the guards. KUNR: Does a story like this haunt you? Do you think about this throughout your day? DFS: Yes, very, very much. I didnt know about Hlne Berr until I started working at the Memorial de la Shoah, so one of the first things I did was read the diary and I was very much taken by it. Its a gorgeous piece of literature; its really a gem. Also, because I grew up myself in Paris and I studied in the same area where she studied. I went to the same parks where she went with her friends. I took the subway at the same subway stops as her. My life in Paris was very close to hers, and, so I very much identified with her and she did haunt me. And she keeps haunting me in my dreams sometimes. KUNR: Deborah, Hlnes journal is unique in comparison to other personal documents from the Holocaust era. Can you explain why? DFS: The persecution in France was not perceived as strongly at first compared to the persecution in the East, like in Poland. A lot of journals were found buried in the ground of the ghettoes; whereas, in France, people were still living out in the open. And especially for French Jews, they felt like France was always going to protect them because its a land of freedom and equality. Refugees are always welcome in France, and for that reason, I think Jews of France felt very safe, and only foreign Jews were being rounded up and deported. That makes it a very interesting document because it gives us the insight into how the persecution was perceived by the Jews themselves. KUNR: Thank you. DFS: Thank you. WEB EXTRA: Farnault-Sinclair discusses some of the concerns fueled by recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

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March 8, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Amsterdam’s Anne Frank gets an overhaul, more facilities – DutchNews.nl

Visitors queuing. Photo: Massimo Catarinella via Wikimedia Commons The Anne Frank House museum in Amsterdam is to undergo a two year overhaul including a new entrance and extra space for education, the foundation which runs the house said on Monday. The aim is to improve the historical context of the house where the World War II diarist lived while hiding from the Nazis, the foundation said. The museum, which attracted 1.2 million visitors last year, will remain open during the rebuilding process. Many youngsters from outside Europe visit the house and this makes it important to take a more in-depth look at the historical context and the background to Anne Franks story, director Ronald Leopold said. Well be giving more information on what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen, and what this means for us todayBut of course we will retain the authentic character of the house: experience and meaning will always be our priorities.

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March 6, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

New, larger entrance part of Anne Frank House renovation plans – NL Times

The Anne Frank House in Amsterdam is being renovated. The renovations will include a new, larger entrance on the Westermark and more space for educational visits, AD reports. The former student housing on the Westermark will become part of the Anne Frank House, making more space available at the museum for educational tours and visitor facilities. The museum also plans to offer visitors more historical context, so that they can better experience the story of Anne Frank and her hiding place. The museum will focus on keeping the authentic character of the house intact during the renovations. “Many of our visitors are under 25 years old and come from countries outside Europe”, said Ronald Leopold, managing director fo the Anne Frank House. “It is therefore important to go deeper into the historical context of the museum and the background of Anne Frank’s story. We will provide more information about what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen and what it means for the present. Also, we will go deeper into the hiding history and the main players of this house.” Renovation works started on Monday and will last approximately two years. The Anne Frank House will remain open during this time. The Anne Frank House attracts over 1.2 million visitors per year.

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March 6, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Tower Chorale presents haunting ‘Voice of Anne Frank’ – Chicago Tribune

We know the story of Anne Frank, the young German girl whose Jewish family went into hiding in an attic room in Amsterdam, only to be betrayed and to perish in a concentration camp a few months before the camp was liberated in May of 1945. Anne began writing her diary in 1942 describing their years in hiding. It was found by a friend and kept until Anne’s father, Otto, the family’s only survivor, returned at the end of World War II in Europe. He had it published and it became an international best-seller, a Hollywood movie, an opera, and has been presented in numerous forms on stage and television. British composer James Whitbourn wrote a 14-movement oratorio, “Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank,” which had its world premiere in April 2005 in London, with the Choir of Clare College Cambridge and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin. The Tower Chorale will give perform the choral piece on March 5 in Western Springs and March 12 in River Forest. About 80-plus members of the chorale will be conducted by Patrick Godon, music director since 2011. “(“Annelies”) is new to me,” Godon said, “but I fell in love with it when I first heard it on James Whitbourn’s website. I encountered the piece over the summer when I was planning the season looking at various websites of other choral ensembles. “I knew this was a perfect piece for the singers of the Tower Chorale,” he continued. “They are able to meet the vocal challenges of the work and are enjoying singing a work of such quality that they’ve never sung before.” “Patrick is challenging us, stretching us,” said Craig Fisher, chairman of the board of the Tower Chorale and a bass with the chorus. “We have spent many years singing choral pieces from the Western European classical repertoire. He wants to expand our horizons.” Fisher describes the music as “haunting. It is the most moving piece I’ve ever sung,” he said. “Those who attend this performance will feel Anne’s feelings for themselves in a powerfully direct way,” Godon concluded. “I highly encourage everyone to attend. You will be glad you did.” The Tower Chorale, established in Chicago’s western suburbs in 1986, is a 100-voice community chorus comprised of amateur and professional singers, including former members of the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Grant Park Symphony Chorus, Light Opera Works, Chicago Opera Theater, plus various community theater and music organizations as well as singers from many church choirs. Children 10 and under are admitted free to Tower Chorale concerts, but need a ticket, due to the seating capacity of the venues. HoweverThose bringing children are encouraged to arrive early when doors open at 2:30 p.m. to obtain a free ticket for children. ‘Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank’ What: Tower Chorale concerts When and where: 3 p.m. March 5 at Western Springs Christian Reformed Church, 5140 Wolf Road, Western Springs; and 3 p.m. March 12 at Concordia University Chapel, 7400 Augusta St., River Forest Tickets: $20; $17 for seniors and students in advance; $23, $20 for students and seniors at the door. ContactL 708- 580-0997; www. towerchorale.org

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank center criticizes Trump’s remarks on Jewish attacks – Los Angeles Times

Feb. 28, 2017, 7:47 p.m. President Trump condemned attacks against Jews in hisspeech Tuesday to a joint session of Congress and calledthreats against Jewish community centers examples of”hate and evil.” At theAnne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, that wasn’t enough. “After weeks of our organizations having to plead, cajole and criticize this president to speak out against anti-Semitism, we give him credit for doing the right thing tonight by beginning his speech to address anti-Semitism and other hate. But his suddenly dulcet tones werent matched by substantive kindness,” executive directorSteven Goldstein said ina statement. “The president didnt say exactly what he would do to fight anti-Semitism how he could have stayed so vague? Weve endured weeks of anti-Semitic attacks across America and we didnt hear a single proposal from the president tonight to stop them,” Goldstein said. The Anti-Defamation League, which has also criticized Trump’s response to the nearly 100 bomb threats against Jewish institutions since Jan. 9, was more subdued in its response. “Thanks @POTUS for condemning #hate ag Jews & immigrants. Now let’s fight it. See our plan. Let’s do it together,” tweeted ADL CEOJonathan Greenblatt.

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center Says Trump ‘Partly to Blame’ for Wave of Antisemitism – Common Dreams

Common Dreams Anne Frank Center Says Trump 'Partly to Blame' for Wave of Antisemitism Common Dreams Following the most recent round of bomb threats against Jewish community centers on Monday, the head of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said that President Donald Trump is at least partly to blame due to the nationalistic thread that runs … After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to Act PoliticusUSA Bomb threats VICE News Another Wave Of Bomb Threats Hits Jewish Community Centers, Schools Huffington Post BuzzFeed News  – CTV News  – International Business Times all 310 news articles »

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February 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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