Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

The Haunting Story of Hlne Berr, The French Anne Frank – Reno Public Radio

Hlne Berr is often referred to as the Anne Frank of France. A traveling exhibit based on her personal diary is now open at the Northwest Reno Library. There will be an opening reception Thursday night from 6-8 pm.

Deborah Farnault-Sinclair is with the Memorial de la Shoah in Paris, which curated the work. She says it’s especially relevant in light of several recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

Farnault-Sinclair spoke with our News Director Michelle Billman to share more about the exhibit.

KUNR: The exhibit centers around the life and death of Hlne Berr. Who was she?

Deborah Farnault-Sinclair (DFS): Hlne Berr was a young, French woman. She was Jewish, living in Paris, and studying English literature at the Sorbonne University in Paris.

KUNR: Weve often heard about the diary of Anne Frank, but Hlne Berr also had a diary.

DFS: That document differs quite a bit from the one of Anne Frank. She was significantly older; she was 21, so she was legally an adult, so she was involved in the political life in France and she was actually very political herself and very engaged in social work. Her insight is very different from the one of Anne Frank because of a maturity standpoint but also because Anne Frank was living in hiding and Hlne Berr was living out in the open.

KUNR: That diarywhat length of time does that narrative share of her life?

DFS: She started that diary in 1942, so we are already in occupied Paris. At the beginning of the diary, we dont really feel the persecution. We feel it intensifying pretty quickly, but at the beginning, shes very much taken by the life of a young woman as we can imagine it. Shes in love with a young man at the university and shes passionate about the arts, music, literature, and so she really lives in this beautiful world of letters. And, so, the journal ends in 1944 right before her arrest as well as the arrest of her parents.

KUNR: And what do we know happens next?

DFS: The three of them were arrested and interned in the Drancy Camp, north of Paris, which was an internment camp from which most trains were departing to Auschwitz. She was deported to Auschwitz with her parents. Her mother was gassed upon arrival. Her father was experimented on, and she died a few days before the liberation of the camp. She was very sick with typhus and one morning she was beaten to death by one of the guards.

KUNR: Does a story like this haunt you? Do you think about this throughout your day?

DFS: Yes, very, very much. I didnt know about Hlne Berr until I started working at the Memorial de la Shoah, so one of the first things I did was read the diary and I was very much taken by it. Its a gorgeous piece of literature; its really a gem. Also, because I grew up myself in Paris and I studied in the same area where she studied. I went to the same parks where she went with her friends. I took the subway at the same subway stops as her. My life in Paris was very close to hers, and, so I very much identified with her and she did haunt me. And she keeps haunting me in my dreams sometimes.

KUNR: Deborah, Hlnes journal is unique in comparison to other personal documents from the Holocaust era. Can you explain why?

DFS: The persecution in France was not perceived as strongly at first compared to the persecution in the East, like in Poland. A lot of journals were found buried in the ground of the ghettoes; whereas, in France, people were still living out in the open. And especially for French Jews, they felt like France was always going to protect them because its a land of freedom and equality. Refugees are always welcome in France, and for that reason, I think Jews of France felt very safe, and only foreign Jews were being rounded up and deported. That makes it a very interesting document because it gives us the insight into how the persecution was perceived by the Jews themselves.

KUNR: Thank you.

DFS: Thank you.

WEB EXTRA: Farnault-Sinclair discusses some of the concerns fueled by recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

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Amsterdam’s Anne Frank gets an overhaul, more facilities – DutchNews.nl

Visitors queuing. Photo: Massimo Catarinella via Wikimedia Commons

The Anne Frank House museum in Amsterdam is to undergo a two year overhaul including a new entrance and extra space for education, the foundation which runs the house said on Monday.

The aim is to improve the historical context of the house where the World War II diarist lived while hiding from the Nazis, the foundation said. The museum, which attracted 1.2 million visitors last year, will remain open during the rebuilding process.

Many youngsters from outside Europe visit the house and this makes it important to take a more in-depth look at the historical context and the background to Anne Franks story, director Ronald Leopold said.

Well be giving more information on what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen, and what this means for us todayBut of course we will retain the authentic character of the house: experience and meaning will always be our priorities.

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Amsterdam’s Anne Frank gets an overhaul, more facilities – DutchNews.nl

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New, larger entrance part of Anne Frank House renovation plans – NL Times

The Anne Frank House in Amsterdam is being renovated. The renovations will include a new, larger entrance on the Westermark and more space for educational visits, AD reports.

The former student housing on the Westermark will become part of the Anne Frank House, making more space available at the museum for educational tours and visitor facilities. The museum also plans to offer visitors more historical context, so that they can better experience the story of Anne Frank and her hiding place.

The museum will focus on keeping the authentic character of the house intact during the renovations.

“Many of our visitors are under 25 years old and come from countries outside Europe”, said Ronald Leopold, managing director fo the Anne Frank House. “It is therefore important to go deeper into the historical context of the museum and the background of Anne Frank’s story. We will provide more information about what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen and what it means for the present. Also, we will go deeper into the hiding history and the main players of this house.”

Renovation works started on Monday and will last approximately two years. The Anne Frank House will remain open during this time.

The Anne Frank House attracts over 1.2 million visitors per year.

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Tower Chorale presents haunting ‘Voice of Anne Frank’ – Chicago Tribune

We know the story of Anne Frank, the young German girl whose Jewish family went into hiding in an attic room in Amsterdam, only to be betrayed and to perish in a concentration camp a few months before the camp was liberated in May of 1945.

Anne began writing her diary in 1942 describing their years in hiding. It was found by a friend and kept until Anne’s father, Otto, the family’s only survivor, returned at the end of World War II in Europe. He had it published and it became an international best-seller, a Hollywood movie, an opera, and has been presented in numerous forms on stage and television.

British composer James Whitbourn wrote a 14-movement oratorio, “Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank,” which had its world premiere in April 2005 in London, with the Choir of Clare College Cambridge and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.

The Tower Chorale will give perform the choral piece on March 5 in Western Springs and March 12 in River Forest. About 80-plus members of the chorale will be conducted by Patrick Godon, music director since 2011.

“(“Annelies”) is new to me,” Godon said, “but I fell in love with it when I first heard it on James Whitbourn’s website. I encountered the piece over the summer when I was planning the season looking at various websites of other choral ensembles.

“I knew this was a perfect piece for the singers of the Tower Chorale,” he continued. “They are able to meet the vocal challenges of the work and are enjoying singing a work of such quality that they’ve never sung before.”

“Patrick is challenging us, stretching us,” said Craig Fisher, chairman of the board of the Tower Chorale and a bass with the chorus. “We have spent many years singing choral pieces from the Western European classical repertoire. He wants to expand our horizons.” Fisher describes the music as “haunting. It is the most moving piece I’ve ever sung,” he said.

“Those who attend this performance will feel Anne’s feelings for themselves in a powerfully direct way,” Godon concluded. “I highly encourage everyone to attend. You will be glad you did.”

The Tower Chorale, established in Chicago’s western suburbs in 1986, is a 100-voice community chorus comprised of amateur and professional singers, including former members of the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Grant Park Symphony Chorus, Light Opera Works, Chicago Opera Theater, plus various community theater and music organizations as well as singers from many church choirs.

Children 10 and under are admitted free to Tower Chorale concerts, but need a ticket, due to the seating capacity of the venues. HoweverThose bringing children are encouraged to arrive early when doors open at 2:30 p.m. to obtain a free ticket for children.

‘Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank’

What: Tower Chorale concerts

When and where: 3 p.m. March 5 at Western Springs Christian Reformed Church, 5140 Wolf Road, Western Springs; and 3 p.m. March 12 at Concordia University Chapel, 7400 Augusta St., River Forest

Tickets: $20; $17 for seniors and students in advance; $23, $20 for students and seniors at the door.

ContactL 708- 580-0997; www. towerchorale.org

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Anne Frank center criticizes Trump’s remarks on Jewish attacks – Los Angeles Times

Feb. 28, 2017, 7:47 p.m.

President Trump condemned attacks against Jews in hisspeech Tuesday to a joint session of Congress and calledthreats against Jewish community centers examples of”hate and evil.”

At theAnne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, that wasn’t enough.

“After weeks of our organizations having to plead, cajole and criticize this president to speak out against anti-Semitism, we give him credit for doing the right thing tonight by beginning his speech to address anti-Semitism and other hate. But his suddenly dulcet tones werent matched by substantive kindness,” executive directorSteven Goldstein said ina statement.

“The president didnt say exactly what he would do to fight anti-Semitism how he could have stayed so vague? Weve endured weeks of anti-Semitic attacks across America and we didnt hear a single proposal from the president tonight to stop them,” Goldstein said.

The Anti-Defamation League, which has also criticized Trump’s response to the nearly 100 bomb threats against Jewish institutions since Jan. 9, was more subdued in its response.

“Thanks @POTUS for condemning #hate ag Jews & immigrants. Now let’s fight it. See our plan. Let’s do it together,” tweeted ADL CEOJonathan Greenblatt.

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Anne Frank Center Says Trump ‘Partly to Blame’ for Wave of Antisemitism – Common Dreams


Common Dreams
Anne Frank Center Says Trump 'Partly to Blame' for Wave of Antisemitism
Common Dreams
Following the most recent round of bomb threats against Jewish community centers on Monday, the head of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said that President Donald Trump is at least partly to blame due to the nationalistic thread that runs
After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to ActPoliticusUSA
Bomb threatsVICE News
Another Wave Of Bomb Threats Hits Jewish Community Centers, SchoolsHuffington Post
BuzzFeed News –CTV News –International Business Times
all 310 news articles »

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After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to Act – PoliticusUSA

A week after slamming Donald Trump for his cowardly reaction to rising anti-Semitism in the United States, the Anne Frank Center has called on the president to act following an attack on a Jewish cemetery near St. Louis and then another in Philadelphia:

Watch the report courtesy of CNN:

Donald Trump, who draws so much support from his anti-Semitic, white supremacist base, has been reluctant to upset his followers by defending Jews from these increasingly violent acts, from bomb threats to vandalism. Over 150 tombstones were damaged in the first attack and at least 100 in the second. A nearby Christian cemetery was untouched.

In fact, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) documented over one thousand Bias-related incidents in the first month following the election, including over 100 swastikas and scores of bomb threats against Jewish community centers in just the last month.

The Anne Frank Center wants Donald Trump to speak out against anti-Semitism. He is unlikely to do so. Trumps popularity continues to sink as his disapproval rating climbs, and he is more reliant than ever on the very people who promote this kind of behavior.

Trumps crowd in Melbourne, Florida, was smaller than earlier crowds there, only highlighting his problems. If he were to disavow this demographic, his next such rally would be given only to his cheering staff.

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Half Moon Theatre Announces YOURS, ANNE: A Retelling of the Anne Frank Story – Broadway World

When she was 13 years old, Anne Frank, like many young girls, received a diary for her birthday. More than 70 years later, the diary she kept is read in classrooms around the world, produced as movies, plays and musicals. This spring, Half Moon Theatre proudly presents a play based on Anne’s diary called Yours, Anne. The play has a limited run of two weekends at The Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion.

Yours, Anne by Enid Futterman is an 80-minute musical adaptation of “Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank and “The Diary of Anne Frank” by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. The show features music by Michael Cohen and is directed by Michael Schiralli. Yours, Anne premiered off-Broadway in 1996 and has been performed around the world, including venues in the Netherlands, South Africa, Japan and Lincoln Center.

This critically-acclaimed musical brings to life Anne’s diary about her experiences as a young girl living in hiding with her family for two years during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands during WWII. “More than seven decades later, the contradiction between the tragedy of Anne Frank’s circumstances, and the triumph of her spiritual survival, is even more striking. Anne transcended the oppression of the Holocaust by inspiring generations throughout the world with her writing,” Futterman said. Yours, Anne is a beautiful and timely coming-of-age story that lifts up important themes for audiences of all ages, including the need for tolerance, and the power of love, friendship and the and the power of words to take us through and beyond dark times.

Half Moon Theatre, a professional theatre company based in Poughkeepsie, NY sought to bring Yours, Anne to the Hudson Valley as part of its 10th anniversary season. “One of the maIn Focuses of Half Moon Theatre is to present professional theatre productions which tell an authentic story as it relates to the human spirit,” Molly Katz, executive director of Half Moon Theatre, said. “Several months ago local theatre enthusiasts and community leaders such as Rabbi Leah Berkawitz from Vassar Temple expressed an interest in producing this show, and our team at Half Moon agreed. Yours Anne embodies everything we want to bring to Hudson Valley, and more. We felt that it was definitely a story that needed to be told and it fit perfectly within our 10th anniversary season.”

Yours, Anne will be performed at The Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion from March 25 through April 2 and weekday matinee performances for schools and community groups will be held on Friday, March 31 and Tuesday, April 4 at 10 a.m. Tickets range from $18 – $35 and discounts are available for groups of 8 or more. Opening night audiences will enjoy a complimentary reception featuring traditional Jewish dishes immediately following the show, and on March 26 a ‘talk-back” with the cast and creative team will follow the performance. For tickets, visit www.halfmoontheatre.org or call (845) 235-9885.

Preceding the opening of Yours, Anne, Half Moon Theatre, in collaboration with the FDR Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY, will present “Anne Frank: Contemporary Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities,” a panel discussion. This free, public event will take place on Sunday, March 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Library’s Henry A. Wallace Center. The discussion will be moderated by Paul Sparrow, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum, and will include: Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities; Edna Nahshon, Professor of Jewish Theater and Drama at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York; and Enid Futterman, lyricist and librettist of Yours, Anne. Cast members of Yours, Anne will also perform musical excerpts from the show. A reception with light refreshments will immediately follow the discussion. For reservations visit FDRLibary.org.

Photo credit: photos are of public domain/Wikimedia.

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In a time of xenophobia, we should heed the words of Anne Frank – rabble.ca

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a “secret annex” of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Anne’s father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied.

Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago.

“Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941,” Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. “Otto Frank … was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, ‘Please, save my family. Save the Frank family.’ It didn’t work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.”

This aspect of Anne Frank’s story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Frank’s attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. “Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience,” Goldstein added. “That’s why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.”

Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned.

As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists — Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi — launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. “Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored,” they wrote, “will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centres.” Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway.

Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, “Quiet, quiet, quiet.”

After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism “horrible” and “painful.” Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized.

We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, “What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.”

Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,400 stations. She is the co-author, with Denis Moynihan and David Goodman, of the newly published New York Times bestseller Democracy Now!: 20 Years Covering the Movements Changing America.

This column was first published on Democracy Now!

Photo: bert knottenbeld/flickr

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The Haunting Story of Hlne Berr, The French Anne Frank – Reno Public Radio

Hlne Berr is often referred to as the Anne Frank of France. A traveling exhibit based on her personal diary is now open at the Northwest Reno Library. There will be an opening reception Thursday night from 6-8 pm. Deborah Farnault-Sinclair is with the Memorial de la Shoah in Paris, which curated the work. She says it’s especially relevant in light of several recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S. Farnault-Sinclair spoke with our News Director Michelle Billman to share more about the exhibit. KUNR: The exhibit centers around the life and death of Hlne Berr. Who was she? Deborah Farnault-Sinclair (DFS): Hlne Berr was a young, French woman. She was Jewish, living in Paris, and studying English literature at the Sorbonne University in Paris. KUNR: Weve often heard about the diary of Anne Frank, but Hlne Berr also had a diary. DFS: That document differs quite a bit from the one of Anne Frank. She was significantly older; she was 21, so she was legally an adult, so she was involved in the political life in France and she was actually very political herself and very engaged in social work. Her insight is very different from the one of Anne Frank because of a maturity standpoint but also because Anne Frank was living in hiding and Hlne Berr was living out in the open. KUNR: That diarywhat length of time does that narrative share of her life? DFS: She started that diary in 1942, so we are already in occupied Paris. At the beginning of the diary, we dont really feel the persecution. We feel it intensifying pretty quickly, but at the beginning, shes very much taken by the life of a young woman as we can imagine it. Shes in love with a young man at the university and shes passionate about the arts, music, literature, and so she really lives in this beautiful world of letters. And, so, the journal ends in 1944 right before her arrest as well as the arrest of her parents. KUNR: And what do we know happens next? DFS: The three of them were arrested and interned in the Drancy Camp, north of Paris, which was an internment camp from which most trains were departing to Auschwitz. She was deported to Auschwitz with her parents. Her mother was gassed upon arrival. Her father was experimented on, and she died a few days before the liberation of the camp. She was very sick with typhus and one morning she was beaten to death by one of the guards. KUNR: Does a story like this haunt you? Do you think about this throughout your day? DFS: Yes, very, very much. I didnt know about Hlne Berr until I started working at the Memorial de la Shoah, so one of the first things I did was read the diary and I was very much taken by it. Its a gorgeous piece of literature; its really a gem. Also, because I grew up myself in Paris and I studied in the same area where she studied. I went to the same parks where she went with her friends. I took the subway at the same subway stops as her. My life in Paris was very close to hers, and, so I very much identified with her and she did haunt me. And she keeps haunting me in my dreams sometimes. KUNR: Deborah, Hlnes journal is unique in comparison to other personal documents from the Holocaust era. Can you explain why? DFS: The persecution in France was not perceived as strongly at first compared to the persecution in the East, like in Poland. A lot of journals were found buried in the ground of the ghettoes; whereas, in France, people were still living out in the open. And especially for French Jews, they felt like France was always going to protect them because its a land of freedom and equality. Refugees are always welcome in France, and for that reason, I think Jews of France felt very safe, and only foreign Jews were being rounded up and deported. That makes it a very interesting document because it gives us the insight into how the persecution was perceived by the Jews themselves. KUNR: Thank you. DFS: Thank you. WEB EXTRA: Farnault-Sinclair discusses some of the concerns fueled by recent anti-Semitic acts across the U.S.

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Amsterdam’s Anne Frank gets an overhaul, more facilities – DutchNews.nl

Visitors queuing. Photo: Massimo Catarinella via Wikimedia Commons The Anne Frank House museum in Amsterdam is to undergo a two year overhaul including a new entrance and extra space for education, the foundation which runs the house said on Monday. The aim is to improve the historical context of the house where the World War II diarist lived while hiding from the Nazis, the foundation said. The museum, which attracted 1.2 million visitors last year, will remain open during the rebuilding process. Many youngsters from outside Europe visit the house and this makes it important to take a more in-depth look at the historical context and the background to Anne Franks story, director Ronald Leopold said. Well be giving more information on what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen, and what this means for us todayBut of course we will retain the authentic character of the house: experience and meaning will always be our priorities.

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New, larger entrance part of Anne Frank House renovation plans – NL Times

The Anne Frank House in Amsterdam is being renovated. The renovations will include a new, larger entrance on the Westermark and more space for educational visits, AD reports. The former student housing on the Westermark will become part of the Anne Frank House, making more space available at the museum for educational tours and visitor facilities. The museum also plans to offer visitors more historical context, so that they can better experience the story of Anne Frank and her hiding place. The museum will focus on keeping the authentic character of the house intact during the renovations. “Many of our visitors are under 25 years old and come from countries outside Europe”, said Ronald Leopold, managing director fo the Anne Frank House. “It is therefore important to go deeper into the historical context of the museum and the background of Anne Frank’s story. We will provide more information about what happened during the Second World War and the Holocaust, how it could happen and what it means for the present. Also, we will go deeper into the hiding history and the main players of this house.” Renovation works started on Monday and will last approximately two years. The Anne Frank House will remain open during this time. The Anne Frank House attracts over 1.2 million visitors per year.

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Tower Chorale presents haunting ‘Voice of Anne Frank’ – Chicago Tribune

We know the story of Anne Frank, the young German girl whose Jewish family went into hiding in an attic room in Amsterdam, only to be betrayed and to perish in a concentration camp a few months before the camp was liberated in May of 1945. Anne began writing her diary in 1942 describing their years in hiding. It was found by a friend and kept until Anne’s father, Otto, the family’s only survivor, returned at the end of World War II in Europe. He had it published and it became an international best-seller, a Hollywood movie, an opera, and has been presented in numerous forms on stage and television. British composer James Whitbourn wrote a 14-movement oratorio, “Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank,” which had its world premiere in April 2005 in London, with the Choir of Clare College Cambridge and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin. The Tower Chorale will give perform the choral piece on March 5 in Western Springs and March 12 in River Forest. About 80-plus members of the chorale will be conducted by Patrick Godon, music director since 2011. “(“Annelies”) is new to me,” Godon said, “but I fell in love with it when I first heard it on James Whitbourn’s website. I encountered the piece over the summer when I was planning the season looking at various websites of other choral ensembles. “I knew this was a perfect piece for the singers of the Tower Chorale,” he continued. “They are able to meet the vocal challenges of the work and are enjoying singing a work of such quality that they’ve never sung before.” “Patrick is challenging us, stretching us,” said Craig Fisher, chairman of the board of the Tower Chorale and a bass with the chorus. “We have spent many years singing choral pieces from the Western European classical repertoire. He wants to expand our horizons.” Fisher describes the music as “haunting. It is the most moving piece I’ve ever sung,” he said. “Those who attend this performance will feel Anne’s feelings for themselves in a powerfully direct way,” Godon concluded. “I highly encourage everyone to attend. You will be glad you did.” The Tower Chorale, established in Chicago’s western suburbs in 1986, is a 100-voice community chorus comprised of amateur and professional singers, including former members of the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Grant Park Symphony Chorus, Light Opera Works, Chicago Opera Theater, plus various community theater and music organizations as well as singers from many church choirs. Children 10 and under are admitted free to Tower Chorale concerts, but need a ticket, due to the seating capacity of the venues. HoweverThose bringing children are encouraged to arrive early when doors open at 2:30 p.m. to obtain a free ticket for children. ‘Annelies: The Voice of Anne Frank’ What: Tower Chorale concerts When and where: 3 p.m. March 5 at Western Springs Christian Reformed Church, 5140 Wolf Road, Western Springs; and 3 p.m. March 12 at Concordia University Chapel, 7400 Augusta St., River Forest Tickets: $20; $17 for seniors and students in advance; $23, $20 for students and seniors at the door. ContactL 708- 580-0997; www. towerchorale.org

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Anne Frank center criticizes Trump’s remarks on Jewish attacks – Los Angeles Times

Feb. 28, 2017, 7:47 p.m. President Trump condemned attacks against Jews in hisspeech Tuesday to a joint session of Congress and calledthreats against Jewish community centers examples of”hate and evil.” At theAnne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, that wasn’t enough. “After weeks of our organizations having to plead, cajole and criticize this president to speak out against anti-Semitism, we give him credit for doing the right thing tonight by beginning his speech to address anti-Semitism and other hate. But his suddenly dulcet tones werent matched by substantive kindness,” executive directorSteven Goldstein said ina statement. “The president didnt say exactly what he would do to fight anti-Semitism how he could have stayed so vague? Weve endured weeks of anti-Semitic attacks across America and we didnt hear a single proposal from the president tonight to stop them,” Goldstein said. The Anti-Defamation League, which has also criticized Trump’s response to the nearly 100 bomb threats against Jewish institutions since Jan. 9, was more subdued in its response. “Thanks @POTUS for condemning #hate ag Jews & immigrants. Now let’s fight it. See our plan. Let’s do it together,” tweeted ADL CEOJonathan Greenblatt.

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center Says Trump ‘Partly to Blame’ for Wave of Antisemitism – Common Dreams

Common Dreams Anne Frank Center Says Trump 'Partly to Blame' for Wave of Antisemitism Common Dreams Following the most recent round of bomb threats against Jewish community centers on Monday, the head of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect said that President Donald Trump is at least partly to blame due to the nationalistic thread that runs … After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to Act PoliticusUSA Bomb threats VICE News Another Wave Of Bomb Threats Hits Jewish Community Centers, Schools Huffington Post BuzzFeed News  – CTV News  – International Business Times all 310 news articles »

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February 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

After Another Jewish Cemetery Vandalized, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to Act – PoliticusUSA

A week after slamming Donald Trump for his cowardly reaction to rising anti-Semitism in the United States, the Anne Frank Center has called on the president to act following an attack on a Jewish cemetery near St. Louis and then another in Philadelphia: Watch the report courtesy of CNN: Donald Trump, who draws so much support from his anti-Semitic, white supremacist base, has been reluctant to upset his followers by defending Jews from these increasingly violent acts, from bomb threats to vandalism. Over 150 tombstones were damaged in the first attack and at least 100 in the second. A nearby Christian cemetery was untouched. In fact, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) documented over one thousand Bias-related incidents in the first month following the election, including over 100 swastikas and scores of bomb threats against Jewish community centers in just the last month. The Anne Frank Center wants Donald Trump to speak out against anti-Semitism. He is unlikely to do so. Trumps popularity continues to sink as his disapproval rating climbs, and he is more reliant than ever on the very people who promote this kind of behavior. Trumps crowd in Melbourne, Florida, was smaller than earlier crowds there, only highlighting his problems. If he were to disavow this demographic, his next such rally would be given only to his cheering staff. Ann Frank Center, anne frank center, Anne Frank Center Calls on Trump to Act, Anti-Semitic Vandalism, anti-Semitism, Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, Donald Trump, Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Rise in Anti-Semitism, Steve Bannon, Trump and Anti-Semitism, Trumps White Supremacist Base

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February 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Half Moon Theatre Announces YOURS, ANNE: A Retelling of the Anne Frank Story – Broadway World

When she was 13 years old, Anne Frank, like many young girls, received a diary for her birthday. More than 70 years later, the diary she kept is read in classrooms around the world, produced as movies, plays and musicals. This spring, Half Moon Theatre proudly presents a play based on Anne’s diary called Yours, Anne. The play has a limited run of two weekends at The Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion. Yours, Anne by Enid Futterman is an 80-minute musical adaptation of “Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank and “The Diary of Anne Frank” by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. The show features music by Michael Cohen and is directed by Michael Schiralli. Yours, Anne premiered off-Broadway in 1996 and has been performed around the world, including venues in the Netherlands, South Africa, Japan and Lincoln Center. This critically-acclaimed musical brings to life Anne’s diary about her experiences as a young girl living in hiding with her family for two years during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands during WWII. “More than seven decades later, the contradiction between the tragedy of Anne Frank’s circumstances, and the triumph of her spiritual survival, is even more striking. Anne transcended the oppression of the Holocaust by inspiring generations throughout the world with her writing,” Futterman said. Yours, Anne is a beautiful and timely coming-of-age story that lifts up important themes for audiences of all ages, including the need for tolerance, and the power of love, friendship and the and the power of words to take us through and beyond dark times. Half Moon Theatre, a professional theatre company based in Poughkeepsie, NY sought to bring Yours, Anne to the Hudson Valley as part of its 10th anniversary season. “One of the maIn Focuses of Half Moon Theatre is to present professional theatre productions which tell an authentic story as it relates to the human spirit,” Molly Katz, executive director of Half Moon Theatre, said. “Several months ago local theatre enthusiasts and community leaders such as Rabbi Leah Berkawitz from Vassar Temple expressed an interest in producing this show, and our team at Half Moon agreed. Yours Anne embodies everything we want to bring to Hudson Valley, and more. We felt that it was definitely a story that needed to be told and it fit perfectly within our 10th anniversary season.” Yours, Anne will be performed at The Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion from March 25 through April 2 and weekday matinee performances for schools and community groups will be held on Friday, March 31 and Tuesday, April 4 at 10 a.m. Tickets range from $18 – $35 and discounts are available for groups of 8 or more. Opening night audiences will enjoy a complimentary reception featuring traditional Jewish dishes immediately following the show, and on March 26 a ‘talk-back” with the cast and creative team will follow the performance. For tickets, visit www.halfmoontheatre.org or call (845) 235-9885. Preceding the opening of Yours, Anne, Half Moon Theatre, in collaboration with the FDR Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY, will present “Anne Frank: Contemporary Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities,” a panel discussion. This free, public event will take place on Sunday, March 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Library’s Henry A. Wallace Center. The discussion will be moderated by Paul Sparrow, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum, and will include: Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities; Edna Nahshon, Professor of Jewish Theater and Drama at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York; and Enid Futterman, lyricist and librettist of Yours, Anne. Cast members of Yours, Anne will also perform musical excerpts from the show. A reception with light refreshments will immediately follow the discussion. For reservations visit FDRLibary.org. Photo credit: photos are of public domain/Wikimedia.

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February 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

In a time of xenophobia, we should heed the words of Anne Frank – rabble.ca

Anne Frank would be 87 years old had she not perished in Bergen-Belsen, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany. What words of wisdom might she offer the Trump administration as it crafts its latest iteration of its Muslim and refugee ban? Anne Frank is known for her famous diary, written while she and her family hid from the Gestapo in a “secret annex” of a house in Amsterdam from 1942 to 1944. Long before the family went into hiding, Anne’s father, Otto Frank, desperately sought visas to bring his family to the United States. Like tens of thousands of other European Jews at the time, they were repeatedly denied. Anne Frank and her family were betrayed and sent to the concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. He went on to publish her writing as The Diary of a Young Girl, which has entered the canon of resistance literature. It should be required reading as Donald Trump and his coterie of xenophobes attempt to ban Muslims and refugees from gaining the same safe haven that the Frank family was denied 75 years ago. “Anne Frank was denied immigration at least twice. Otto Frank, her father, appealed to the Franklin Roosevelt administration, roughly between the periods of 1939 to 1941,” Stephen Goldstein told us on the Democracy Now! news hour. He is the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. “Otto Frank … was able to get communications very high up in the Roosevelt administration, saying, ‘Please, save my family. Save the Frank family.’ It didn’t work. FDR refused refugee Anne Frank.” This aspect of Anne Frank’s story was unknown until papers were discovered decades later and made public in 2007. The 81 pages document Otto Frank’s attempts to gain visas for his family for travel to the United States. Fanning flames of fear that Nazi Germany would be sending agents and saboteurs amidst the potential flood of refugees, anti-Semites in the State Department blocked as many refugees as they could, condemning tens of thousands to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis. “Whether this kind of evil prejudice against refugees was perpetrated by a Democrat like Franklin Roosevelt or a Republican like Donald Trump, it is an unconscionable blot on the American national conscience,” Goldstein added. “That’s why, in the name of Anne Frank, we have an obligation to stand with Muslim refugees and to stand with all refugees to help them come into this nation.” Since President Trump took office, there has been a surge in threats and attacks against both Jews and Muslims. At least 69 bomb threats have been directed at 54 Jewish Community Centers across the United States since the inauguration. On Wednesday morning, the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks these threats, received a bomb threat at its New York City offices. In University Hills, Missouri, just outside of St. Louis, more than 100 headstones at a Jewish cemetery were overturned. As images of the anti-Semitic vandalism emerged, two Muslim activists — Linda Sarsour, co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, and Tarek El-Messidi — launched a crowdsourced campaign to raise funds to repair the damage. They hoped to raise $20,000. Within 24 hours, they had raised more than $90,000. “Any remaining funds after the cemetery is restored,” they wrote, “will be allocated to repair any other vandalized Jewish centres.” Two weeks earlier, on Saturday, Jan. 28, the Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, was burnt to the ground. The local Jewish community gave the Muslim worshippers the keys to their synagogue, saying there was room for them all to pray there. An online campaign was launched to rebuild the mosque. Within weeks, more than $1.1 million was raised. Construction is already underway. Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day. President Trump issued a statement that was widely criticized for failing to mention Jews at all. Then, at a press conference held with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, when asked by an Israeli reporter about the rise of anti-Semitism since his election, Trump responded by gloating about his election victory. When questioned several days later by a Hasidic Jewish reporter, again about the rise of anti-Semitism, Trump scolded the reporter, telling him to sit down, saying, “Quiet, quiet, quiet.” After widespread criticism over his failure to condemn the waves of bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, President Trump finally called anti-Semitism “horrible” and “painful.” Then Vice President Mike Pence visited the Missouri cemetery that had been vandalized. We all would benefit in these times of resurgent right-wing nationalism and xenophobia to heed the words of Anne Frank, “What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.” Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,400 stations. She is the co-author, with Denis Moynihan and David Goodman, of the newly published New York Times bestseller Democracy Now!: 20 Years Covering the Movements Changing America. This column was first published on Democracy Now! Photo: bert knottenbeld/flickr Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism.

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February 25, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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