Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

Anne Frank on antisemitism | Julie Nathan | The Blogs …

The theater production of The Diary of Anne Frank is playing in Newtown, Sydney. I saw it last month when it opened. The play was powerful, moving, and sensitive. The acting was highly professional. The characters portrayed the situation, the fears, the pressures, and the closeness of the Jews hiding in the attic. It also showed the bravery and moral courage of the gentiles who put their own lives at risk to save Jews. The Newtown production brought this 71 year old diary to life with great vibrancy. I would urge all those so inclined to see it.

However, it was disappointing to see that the 1955 play by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett which was reenacted at Newtown was not updated to recapture Annes authentic words about antisemitism. Annes words had been replaced with a sanitized version about antisemitism and the reason for the suffering they were subjected to. The playwrights put these words into Annes mouth: We are not the only people that have had to suffer sometimes one race, sometimes another. This is an egregious rewriting of history.

Whilst it is true that other peoples have also suffered, and continue to suffer, due to racism, these fabricated words negate the unique aspects of antisemitism. Racism thus becomes some bland generic universalistic phenomenon, negating the unique history and reasons for racism against different peoples, whether it be the enslavement of black Africans in previous centuries or of Yazidi women presently or the continuing persecution of Bahai, Assyrians, Roma or Rohingya, and thus disrespecting all victims of each form of racism.

As Dennis Prager and Rabbi Joseph Telushkin state in their book Why The Jews?, the elimination of Annes original words is part of the dejudaization of antisemitism [] Anne Franks beliefs that Judaism was at the root of Jew-hatred and that the Jews were different were eliminated in the Broadway version. [] The Hacketts thus presented their dejudaized interpretation of antisemitism in place of the Jewish interpretation offered by Anne Frank, that the Jews are hated precisely because of the Jews unique role in the world.

It is worth revisiting Annes original words, rather than those that have been put in her mouth. On 11 April 1944, she wrote in her diary:

Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up until now? It is God who has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again. Who knows? It might even be our religion from which the world and all peoples learn good, and for that reason and only that reason do we suffer. We can never become just Netherlanders, or just English or representatives of any country for that matter. We will always remain Jews, but we want to, too.

Anne had a far superior understanding of the reasons for, and uniqueness of, antisemitism than many people. She understood that it was not just an unfortunate confluence of random events that saw a long history of hatred and murder of Jews. Although she grew up in a secular and assimilated Jewish family, Anne realised it was Judaism, with its ethics and values, that intrinsically so rile up those who would prefer to live by brute force and have freedom without conscience. It is this, which a 14 year old Dutch/German girl understood even as she hid in that attic, trying to survive the onslaught of murderous hate. It is a pity that a great play could not appreciate Annes deep insights.

Antisemitism is on the rise once more throughout the world. Obfuscating the nature of antisemitism and the impetus for it is counterproductive to the efforts to fight it. Whether it is hostility and hatred towards the Jewish religion, the Jewish people, or the Jewish state, we need to understand the perennial nature of the toxic evil that propels this unique phenomenon.

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Anne Frank on antisemitism | Julie Nathan | The Blogs …

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July 1, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank (2001) – Rotten Tomatoes

Even at just over three hours, a reasonably fitting runtime for this subject matter and relatively shorter runtime for a miniseries, the series remains plagued by excess material, particularly filler that especially slows down the momentum and drives unevenness amidst this should-be frequently moving story. Excess material grows less and less severe as the story progresses, yet remains all too common throughout, bloating a story of such tonal dynamicity to the point of making many of the tonal shifts jarring, and it doesn’t help that there are still some spots of scenario set-up and exposition that are either glossed over or crowbarred in ever so awkwardly. These are common issues among miniseries of this type, yet with a story with this much depth, dynamicity and momentum, it can’t afford to have such storytelling flaws as excessive bloating and akward, if not hurried exposition, much less the central flaw that it all leads back to. What is one of the biggest betrayals to the series’ story, as well as the ultimate fault within the series is simply the fact that it pulls that old TV network (Especially ABC) bad move of being much too unsubtle, exploiting the aforementioned excessive filler and forced exposition, as well as some overbearingness in tone and a fair deal of almost inhumanly obvious pieces of dialogue or action, as manipulative forms of story and character fleshing, while not taking enough time to extensively explore depth or smooth out the edges, making for a series of limited dynamicity that just gel all that terribly well with the extreme dynamicity within the extremely human subject matter. This betrayal is hardly offensive, let alone as offensive as I make it sound, yet the series still leaves much to be desired, and were it more comfortable in its sprawling length, with more tightness of filler, more depth in exposition and, overall, more subtlty, depth and livliness, it would have quite possibly made for a sensational experience. As it stands, however, every flaw goes counteracted by truly remarkable strengths, some of which all but, if not decidedly redeem some of the flaws listed. The series is no huge masterpiece (Thanks a lot, ABC), yet it is a worthwhile saga, with high points that are sometimes actually contradictory to the faults, as well as consistent strengths that make it reasonably easy to power through the flaws.

Through all of its limitations, the series is considerably well-produced, with lively production designs that very cleverly replicate the era, as well as sharp art direction that almost brilliantly plays with scope, presenting a degree of sweep that reflects the reach of consequence throughout the areas plagued by the dreaded grip of the Nazis, yet still boasts a degree of intimacy that gives us a feel for the isolation and humanity of our characters in an actually subtle fashion that may go outweighed by the general unsubtlty of the final product, yet still makes good use of the excessive fleshing out. Another aspect that makes good use of the overwhelming filler is the direction, for although poor Robert Dornhelm finds his hands tied by the excessiveness, to where he can’t bypass its generally being a mess, he still manages to absorb from all of unsbutleties and filler a surprising and undeniably considerable degree of charm that certainly doesn’t redeem the unsubtlties, yet certainly helps you in somewhat accepting them until Dornhelm finally breaks through and really delivers. Now, the series has its more subtle points, yet is almost entirely rather blatant, even at its core emotional moments, and there’s nothing that Dornhelm can do about that, so thus, when he needs to most, he doesn’t so much succumb to the unsubtlties as much as he embraces them and use them to his advantage, meditating upon the center of the tone and enhancing the focus with the unsubtle supplements, pushing and pushing until he breaks in a genuinely non-manipulative fashion and creates intense resonance, thus making the most consequential moments tense and the most emotional moments near crushing, especially during the heartbreakingly unflinching final segment. If Dornhelm could do so much with unsubtle material, then I itch to find out what he could have done with a more cleverly-crafted script, yet I’ll take what I can get and what I’m getting is a product that’s more often than rather distant, yet truly impacting when emotion does carry through, and for that, credit not only goes out to Dornhelm, but his performers. As components to the unsubtlty, certain characters are written to have only so many layers, and some are not even lucky enough for their limited layers to not feel a smidge exaggerated, yet most everyone has his or her time in sun, in which they manage to transcend the flaws in the character structuring for satisfyingly contradictory depth and even a few layers. Still, it’s our young “lead” (She’s third down on the cast list on IMDB; What?) Hannah Taylor-Gordon who is presented with the most layered material and delivers the most in execution, nailing the initial youthful optimism and noble spirit of Anne Frank with electric charisma that draws you in, especially when you consider that this optimism shan’t last. Well, sure enough, tragedy and danger falls upon young Anne Frank and plunges her into a world she much mature to in order to survive, at which point, Taylor-Gordon unveils a transformation in Frank that’s so genuine, so emotional and so intensely atmospheric that it doesn’t simply steal the show, but draws unexpected depth through all of the unsubtlty from the person who should have the most depth, making for a transformative and compelling lead performance by that stands as one of the keys to the series’ ultimately emerging much more satisfying than not.

Bottom line, the excessive bloating – mostly through superfluous filler – and limited meditation upon smoothing out the story leave tonal shifts uneven and stand alongside writing spots and some overbearingness in tone as supplements to the series’ central problem of being tremendously unsubtle, not absorbing enough depth for truly impacting resonance, yet what the series does get right, it nails with impressive results, whether it be clever production and art direction that creates a feel for the environment, or Robert Dornhelm’s mostly inspired direction, which keeps the less resonant moments going with charm and strikes at opportunity of genuineness to create some undeniably strong emotional surges, and does so with the help of a myriad of strong performances, headed by an enthralling and layered Hanna Taylor-Gordon, who helps in ultimately making “Anne Frank: The Whole Story” a consistently charming, periodically resonant and ultimately rewarding extensive portrait on the timeless tale.

3/5 – Good

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Anne Frank (2001) – Rotten Tomatoes

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June 29, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Diary of Anne Frank: Read TIME’s Original Review of the Book

When the diary of Anne Frank was first published in English, as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, a full decade had passed since a young Anne received the fateful journal for her 13th birthday. Five years had passed since the diary had been published in the Netherlandson this day, June 25, in 1947, as Het Achterhuisand more than dozen had passed since its author stopped writing down her days.

And yet, despite the passage of time, her story was something new, a different way of understanding the horrors of the Holocaust. The resulting diary is one of the most moving stories that anyone, anywhere, has managed to tell about World War II, as TIMEs book reviewer put it, describing the diarists experiences:

As the war dragged on and news trickled in of mass deportations of Jews, Anne became desperate. She had terrifying fantasies about the death of Jewish friends. Often she saw rows of good, innocent people accompanied by crying children [walk] on and on . . . bullied and knocked about until they almost drop. With appalling prescience she wrote that there is nothing we can do but wait as calmly as we can till the misery comes to an end. Jews and Christians wait, the whole earth waits; and there are many who wait for death. When her pen fell into the fire, she wrote that it has been cremated.

Though not much interested in politics, Anne tried to understand what was happening to the world. I dont believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone, are guilty of the war, she wrote. Oh no, the little man is just as guilty, otherwise the peoples of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! Theres in people simply an urge to destroy, an urge to kill, to murder and rage, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged

But sometimes she cried out from the heart, as if for all the Jews of Europe: Who has inflicted this upon us? Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up to now? It is God that has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again.

Many more decades have passed by nowthis year marks the 70th anniversary of Anne Franks death at Bergen-Belsenand her fathers decision to execute her wish to have her diary published continues to prove significant. According to the Anne Frank House, it has since been published in 70 languages.

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Diary of Anne Frank: Read TIME’s Original Review of the Book

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June 25, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

January 11, 2010 : Miep Gies, who hid Anne Frank, dies at 100

On this day in 2010, Miep Gies, the last survivor of a small group of people who helped hide a Jewish girl, Anne Frank, and her family from the Nazis during World War II, dies at age 100 in the Netherlands. After the Franks were discovered in 1944 and sent to concentration camps, Gies rescued the notebooks that Anne Frank left behind describing her two years in hiding. These writings were later published as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, which became one of the most widely read accounts of the Holocaust.

Miep Gies was born into a working-class, Catholic family in Vienna, Austria, on February 15, 1909. At age 11, with food shortages in her native land following World War I, she was sent to the Netherlands to live with a foster family who nicknamed her Miep (her birth name was Hermine Santrouschitz). In 1933, she went to work as a secretary for Otto Frank, who ran a small Amsterdam company that produced a substance used to make jam. By the following year, Franks wife and two daughters, Margot and Anne, had left their native Germany to join him in the Dutch capital.

In May 1940, the Germans, who had entered World War II in September of the previous year, invaded the Netherlands and quickly made life increasingly restrictive and dangerous for the countrys Jewish population. In early July 1942, the Frank family went into hiding in an attic apartment behind Otto Franks business. They were eventually joined by Otto Franks business associate and his wife and son, as well as Miep Gies dentist, all of whom were Jewish. Gies, along with her husband Jan, a Dutch social worker, and several of Otto Franks other employees risked their own lives to smuggle food, supplies and news of the outside world into the secret apartment (which came to be known as the Secret Annex). Gies and her husband even spent a night in hiding with the group to learn firsthand what it was like.

On August 4, 1944, after 25 months in hiding, the eight people in the Secret Annex were discovered by the Gestapo, the German secret state police, who had learned about the hiding place from an anonymous tipster who has never been definitively identified. Gies was working in the building at the time of the raid and avoided arrest because the officer was from her native Vienna and felt sympathy for her. She later went to police headquarters and tried, unsuccessfully, to pay a bribe to free the group.

The occupants of the Secret Annex were sent to concentration camps; only Otto Frank survived. After he was liberated from Auschwitz by Soviet troops in January 1945, he returned to Amsterdam, where Miep Gies gave him a collection of notebooks and several hundred loose papers containing observations the teenage Anne Frank had penned during her time in hiding. Gies recovered the materials from the Secret Annex shortly after the Franks arrest and hid them in her office desk. She avoided reading the papers during the war out of respect for Annes privacy.

Otto Frank, who lived with the Gies family after the war, compiled his daughters writings into a manuscript that was first published in the Netherlands in 1947 under the title Het Acheterhuis (Rear Annex). Later published in English as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, the book went on to sell tens of millions of copies worldwide.

In 1987, Gies published a memoir, Anne Frank Remembered, in which she wrote: I am not a hero. I stand at the end of the long, long line of good Dutch people who did what I did and moremuch moreduring those dark and terrible times years ago, but always like yesterday in the heart of those of us who bear witness. Never a day goes by that I do not think of what happened then.

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January 11, 2010 : Miep Gies, who hid Anne Frank, dies at 100

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June 18, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank | biography – German diarist | Britannica.com

Anne Frank,in full Annelies Marie Frank (born June 12, 1929,Frankfurt am Main, Germanydied February/March 1945,Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, near Hannover),young Jewish girl whose diary of her familys two years in hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands became a classic of war literature.

Early in the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler, Annes father, Otto Frank (18891980), a German businessman, took his wife and two daughters to live in Amsterdam. In 1941, after German forces occupied the Netherlands, Anne was compelled to transfer from a public to a Jewish school. Faced with deportation (supposedly to a forced-labour camp), the Franks went into hiding on July 9, 1942, with four other Jews in the backroom office and warehouse of Otto Franks food-products business. With the aid of a few non-Jewish friends, among them Miep Gies, who smuggled in food and other supplies, they lived confined to their secret annex until August 4, 1944, when the Gestapo, acting on a tip from Dutch informers, discovered them.

The family was transported to Westerbork, a transit camp in the Netherlands, and from there to Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland on September 3, 1944, on the last transport to leave Westerbork for Auschwitz. Anne and her sister, Margot, were transferred to Bergen-Belsen the following month. Annes mother died in early January, just before the evacuation of Auschwitz on January 18, 1945. It was established by the Dutch government that both Anne and Margot died in a typhus epidemic in March 1945, only weeks before the liberation of Bergen-Belsen. In 2015 scholars revealed new research, including analysis of archival data and first-person accounts, indicating that the sisters might have perished in February 1945. Otto Frank was found hospitalized at Auschwitz when it was liberated by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945.

Friends who had searched the familys hiding place after their capture later gave Otto Frank the papers left behind by the Gestapo. Among them he found Annes diary, which was published as The Diary of a Young Girl (originally in Dutch, 1947). It is precocious in style and insight and traces her emotional growth amid adversity. In it she wrote, In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.

The Diary has been translated into more than 65 languages and is the most widely read diary of the Holocaust, and Anne is probably the best-known of Holocaust victims. The Diary was also made into a play that premiered on Broadway in October 1955, and in 1956 it won both the Tony Award for best play and the Pulitzer Prize for best drama. A film version directed by George Stevens was produced in 1959. The well-received play was controversial and was challenged by screenwriter Meyer Levin, who wrote an early version of the play (later realized as a 35-minute radio play) and accused Otto Frank and his chosen screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett of sanitizing and de-Judaizing the story. The play was often performed in high schools throughout the world and was revived (with additions) on Broadway in 199798. A new English translation of the Diary, published in 1995, contained material that had been edited out of the original version, making the revised translation nearly one-third longer than the first. The Frank familys hiding place on the Prinsengracht, a canal in Amsterdam, has become a museum and is consistently among the most-visited tourist sites in Amsterdam.

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June 12, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of Anne Frank

By Carol Roach, 8th Jun 2015 | Follow this author | | Short URL http://nut.bz/3v2rflqj/ Posted in Wikinut>Guides>History

Everywhere you go you hear about crimes against humanity. We will be reviewing the life of Anne Frank, a young girl who died in a Nazi concentration camp. Her story has been read by millions of people around the world.

One of the most important figures of the Nazi era was a young girl by the name of Anne Frank. She was just an ordinary teenager and had hopes and dreams like any other teenager of her day and future generations to come.

The only trouble was that she was Jewish during the Nazi era and that fate meant death for many. Death was inevitable for young innocent girls and boys and Jewish people; six million of them who were herded off to concentrations camps, imprisoned, starved, worked to death, and experimented on in the most vilest of ways. Then burned in the furnaces, and discarded like garbage. Human lives, not worth a thing to their Nazi oppressors.

The Jewish people, a fine spirited people, will not let these atrocities fade from human memory. We must never forget the holocaust, we must preserve the sanctity of human life and the health and welfare of all people’s of the world. Tikkun o’lam just as Jewish people declare, we must repair the world.

In the grand scheme of things human life is held worthless. There is no real regard for health or dignity.

I was a young girl myself when I read the Diary of Anne Frank, oh how I could identify with Anne and even though I was a Christian teenager and Anne was a Jewish one, we were both innocent young girls who had done nothing wrong. We were innocent young girls who had hopes and dreams for the life ahead of us. I examiner had a chance to make my life; Anne Frank was never given that opportunity.

My life was completely changed once I read that book. Incidentally it was required reading for my Montreal high school 9th grade English class and I was so glad that it was.

Before that book I took he peaceful life in Montreal for granted. Afterward I began to see the world outside of my own city and country was not the safe haven I had always thought it was.

The Diary of Anne Frank made me realize that World War II was not about the good guys getting rid of the bad guys as I had previously thought. War was ugly and innocent people got hurt.

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June 9, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

iTunes – Music – Anastasia / The Diary of Anne Frank by …

Album Review

Alfred Newman’s music for George Stevens’ movie The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) has been issued on a good sounding and well-produced CD from Tsunami, containing eight minutes of music that was not previously available that material consists principally of the main title, intermission, and exit music, which does isolate some themes associated with specific characters and the Frank family. Given the subject matter, that this is a serious film score is no surprise as of 1958, when the movie went into production, some 14 years after the end of World War II, Hollywood had not done too many movies (forget major films) that even referred to the destruction of European Jewry by Nazi Germany, much less dealt with this event as their main subject, and everyone involved with the movie on a creative level, whatever their background, treated it as a rare and special opportunity to say something important through their work. That said, Newman’s “Overture,” which opens the album, has always seemed appropriately profound, but the rest is far more subtle, introspective, and lyrical, almost counter-intuitive to the moods, settings, and images that one associates with the Holocaust. That’s because Newman based his score on the interior emotional life of its characters, rather than the exterior events around them. The result is one of the more beautiful bodies of movie music ever written for a Holocaust-related movie, and one of Newman’s better psychologically oriented scores, surprisingly not far removed from his work on How Green Was My Valley. It also contains some of the most beautiful string writing of Newman’s career. The CD production gives the decades-old recordings a full, rich sound, and the annotation is extremely thorough.

Born: 17 March 1901 in New Haven, CT

Genre: Soundtrack

Years Active: ’30s, ’40s, ’50s, ’60s, ’70s

Alfred Newman (1901-1970) was, for much of his career, the most influential and respected composer and music director in Hollywood. His 44 Oscar nominations and nine Academy Awards are both records that are unlikely ever to be broken. The first-born of ten children to an impoverished produce seller in New Haven, CT, Newman manifested his musical interests very early, and by the age of eight was well-known locally as a piano prodigy. He played for virtuoso Jan Ignace Paderewski, who arranged a New…

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May 31, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of Anne Frank: review | Toronto Star

By Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. Adapted by Wendy Kesselman. Directed by Jillian Keiley. Until Oct. 10 at the Avon Theatre. 1-800-567-1600

STRATFORDHow can one of the most powerful stories of our time, acted by a superb cast, wind up as a less than satisfying theatrical experience?

Ask Jillian Keiley, because it was her direction that turned Thursday nights premiere of The Diary of Anne Frank into such a mishmash.

My heart sank as soon as I saw Bretta Gereckes set, a large, looming box made out of wooden slats. It looked nothing like the cramped garret where eight hunted Jews hid out from the marauding Nazis in the Amsterdam of the 1940s.

It didnt take a major act of clairvoyance to see that it would probably be transformed in the plays final minutes into the lethal boxcars that took people to the death camps, but why destroy any sense of realism or mood for the two hours before that?

My heart continued plummeting when the entire cast came out and addressed us all with personal anecdotes that tried to tangentially connect them to the world of the show and then vanished upstage to become part of a wordless a cappella chorus that crooned Jonathan Monros sentimental music for far too much of the show.

If there ever was a story that needed no adornment, no sentiment and no fixing of any kind, its that of Anne Frank, the precocious young woman who kept a diary chronicling the brave struggle of her family and other companions in that attic in solitude for several years.

As originally dramatized by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, then later amplified by Wendy Kesselman, its a work of great power that cant help but wring the heart . . . unless its meddled with.

Even in this production, there were some long, extended scenes, like the touching Chanukah celebration that ends Act I, when the script and the actors were allowed to work their magic.

And what actors! Sara Farb continues her winning streak of Stratford performances with an Anne who is honest and feisty and totally real, someone we love because of her faults, not despite them.

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The Diary of Anne Frank: review | Toronto Star

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May 29, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

This is a must see – Review of Anne Frank House (Anne …

I knew a fair amount about Anne Frank before visiting the house, but I think one’s understanding of her situation can only go so far without being in the house and getting a feel for the size and atmosphere.

We got our tickets for first thing in the morning and were able to get in without waiting in line, feeling rushed, or like cattle in the relatively tight confines of the house. We had a bite to eat at the cafe on the way out (which was quite good) and when we stepped out the door to head over to the Van Gogh museum, the line to get into the house stretched around the block.

I highly recommend this relatively short tour to get a deeper understanding of Nazi-occupied Amsterdam.

This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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May 22, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank on antisemitism | Julie Nathan | The Blogs …

The theater production of The Diary of Anne Frank is playing in Newtown, Sydney. I saw it last month when it opened. The play was powerful, moving, and sensitive. The acting was highly professional. The characters portrayed the situation, the fears, the pressures, and the closeness of the Jews hiding in the attic. It also showed the bravery and moral courage of the gentiles who put their own lives at risk to save Jews. The Newtown production brought this 71 year old diary to life with great vibrancy. I would urge all those so inclined to see it. However, it was disappointing to see that the 1955 play by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett which was reenacted at Newtown was not updated to recapture Annes authentic words about antisemitism. Annes words had been replaced with a sanitized version about antisemitism and the reason for the suffering they were subjected to. The playwrights put these words into Annes mouth: We are not the only people that have had to suffer sometimes one race, sometimes another. This is an egregious rewriting of history. Whilst it is true that other peoples have also suffered, and continue to suffer, due to racism, these fabricated words negate the unique aspects of antisemitism. Racism thus becomes some bland generic universalistic phenomenon, negating the unique history and reasons for racism against different peoples, whether it be the enslavement of black Africans in previous centuries or of Yazidi women presently or the continuing persecution of Bahai, Assyrians, Roma or Rohingya, and thus disrespecting all victims of each form of racism. As Dennis Prager and Rabbi Joseph Telushkin state in their book Why The Jews?, the elimination of Annes original words is part of the dejudaization of antisemitism [] Anne Franks beliefs that Judaism was at the root of Jew-hatred and that the Jews were different were eliminated in the Broadway version. [] The Hacketts thus presented their dejudaized interpretation of antisemitism in place of the Jewish interpretation offered by Anne Frank, that the Jews are hated precisely because of the Jews unique role in the world. It is worth revisiting Annes original words, rather than those that have been put in her mouth. On 11 April 1944, she wrote in her diary: Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up until now? It is God who has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again. Who knows? It might even be our religion from which the world and all peoples learn good, and for that reason and only that reason do we suffer. We can never become just Netherlanders, or just English or representatives of any country for that matter. We will always remain Jews, but we want to, too. Anne had a far superior understanding of the reasons for, and uniqueness of, antisemitism than many people. She understood that it was not just an unfortunate confluence of random events that saw a long history of hatred and murder of Jews. Although she grew up in a secular and assimilated Jewish family, Anne realised it was Judaism, with its ethics and values, that intrinsically so rile up those who would prefer to live by brute force and have freedom without conscience. It is this, which a 14 year old Dutch/German girl understood even as she hid in that attic, trying to survive the onslaught of murderous hate. It is a pity that a great play could not appreciate Annes deep insights. Antisemitism is on the rise once more throughout the world. Obfuscating the nature of antisemitism and the impetus for it is counterproductive to the efforts to fight it. Whether it is hostility and hatred towards the Jewish religion, the Jewish people, or the Jewish state, we need to understand the perennial nature of the toxic evil that propels this unique phenomenon.

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July 1, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank (2001) – Rotten Tomatoes

Even at just over three hours, a reasonably fitting runtime for this subject matter and relatively shorter runtime for a miniseries, the series remains plagued by excess material, particularly filler that especially slows down the momentum and drives unevenness amidst this should-be frequently moving story. Excess material grows less and less severe as the story progresses, yet remains all too common throughout, bloating a story of such tonal dynamicity to the point of making many of the tonal shifts jarring, and it doesn’t help that there are still some spots of scenario set-up and exposition that are either glossed over or crowbarred in ever so awkwardly. These are common issues among miniseries of this type, yet with a story with this much depth, dynamicity and momentum, it can’t afford to have such storytelling flaws as excessive bloating and akward, if not hurried exposition, much less the central flaw that it all leads back to. What is one of the biggest betrayals to the series’ story, as well as the ultimate fault within the series is simply the fact that it pulls that old TV network (Especially ABC) bad move of being much too unsubtle, exploiting the aforementioned excessive filler and forced exposition, as well as some overbearingness in tone and a fair deal of almost inhumanly obvious pieces of dialogue or action, as manipulative forms of story and character fleshing, while not taking enough time to extensively explore depth or smooth out the edges, making for a series of limited dynamicity that just gel all that terribly well with the extreme dynamicity within the extremely human subject matter. This betrayal is hardly offensive, let alone as offensive as I make it sound, yet the series still leaves much to be desired, and were it more comfortable in its sprawling length, with more tightness of filler, more depth in exposition and, overall, more subtlty, depth and livliness, it would have quite possibly made for a sensational experience. As it stands, however, every flaw goes counteracted by truly remarkable strengths, some of which all but, if not decidedly redeem some of the flaws listed. The series is no huge masterpiece (Thanks a lot, ABC), yet it is a worthwhile saga, with high points that are sometimes actually contradictory to the faults, as well as consistent strengths that make it reasonably easy to power through the flaws. Through all of its limitations, the series is considerably well-produced, with lively production designs that very cleverly replicate the era, as well as sharp art direction that almost brilliantly plays with scope, presenting a degree of sweep that reflects the reach of consequence throughout the areas plagued by the dreaded grip of the Nazis, yet still boasts a degree of intimacy that gives us a feel for the isolation and humanity of our characters in an actually subtle fashion that may go outweighed by the general unsubtlty of the final product, yet still makes good use of the excessive fleshing out. Another aspect that makes good use of the overwhelming filler is the direction, for although poor Robert Dornhelm finds his hands tied by the excessiveness, to where he can’t bypass its generally being a mess, he still manages to absorb from all of unsbutleties and filler a surprising and undeniably considerable degree of charm that certainly doesn’t redeem the unsubtlties, yet certainly helps you in somewhat accepting them until Dornhelm finally breaks through and really delivers. Now, the series has its more subtle points, yet is almost entirely rather blatant, even at its core emotional moments, and there’s nothing that Dornhelm can do about that, so thus, when he needs to most, he doesn’t so much succumb to the unsubtlties as much as he embraces them and use them to his advantage, meditating upon the center of the tone and enhancing the focus with the unsubtle supplements, pushing and pushing until he breaks in a genuinely non-manipulative fashion and creates intense resonance, thus making the most consequential moments tense and the most emotional moments near crushing, especially during the heartbreakingly unflinching final segment. If Dornhelm could do so much with unsubtle material, then I itch to find out what he could have done with a more cleverly-crafted script, yet I’ll take what I can get and what I’m getting is a product that’s more often than rather distant, yet truly impacting when emotion does carry through, and for that, credit not only goes out to Dornhelm, but his performers. As components to the unsubtlty, certain characters are written to have only so many layers, and some are not even lucky enough for their limited layers to not feel a smidge exaggerated, yet most everyone has his or her time in sun, in which they manage to transcend the flaws in the character structuring for satisfyingly contradictory depth and even a few layers. Still, it’s our young “lead” (She’s third down on the cast list on IMDB; What?) Hannah Taylor-Gordon who is presented with the most layered material and delivers the most in execution, nailing the initial youthful optimism and noble spirit of Anne Frank with electric charisma that draws you in, especially when you consider that this optimism shan’t last. Well, sure enough, tragedy and danger falls upon young Anne Frank and plunges her into a world she much mature to in order to survive, at which point, Taylor-Gordon unveils a transformation in Frank that’s so genuine, so emotional and so intensely atmospheric that it doesn’t simply steal the show, but draws unexpected depth through all of the unsubtlty from the person who should have the most depth, making for a transformative and compelling lead performance by that stands as one of the keys to the series’ ultimately emerging much more satisfying than not. Bottom line, the excessive bloating – mostly through superfluous filler – and limited meditation upon smoothing out the story leave tonal shifts uneven and stand alongside writing spots and some overbearingness in tone as supplements to the series’ central problem of being tremendously unsubtle, not absorbing enough depth for truly impacting resonance, yet what the series does get right, it nails with impressive results, whether it be clever production and art direction that creates a feel for the environment, or Robert Dornhelm’s mostly inspired direction, which keeps the less resonant moments going with charm and strikes at opportunity of genuineness to create some undeniably strong emotional surges, and does so with the help of a myriad of strong performances, headed by an enthralling and layered Hanna Taylor-Gordon, who helps in ultimately making “Anne Frank: The Whole Story” a consistently charming, periodically resonant and ultimately rewarding extensive portrait on the timeless tale. 3/5 – Good

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June 29, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Diary of Anne Frank: Read TIME’s Original Review of the Book

When the diary of Anne Frank was first published in English, as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, a full decade had passed since a young Anne received the fateful journal for her 13th birthday. Five years had passed since the diary had been published in the Netherlandson this day, June 25, in 1947, as Het Achterhuisand more than dozen had passed since its author stopped writing down her days. And yet, despite the passage of time, her story was something new, a different way of understanding the horrors of the Holocaust. The resulting diary is one of the most moving stories that anyone, anywhere, has managed to tell about World War II, as TIMEs book reviewer put it, describing the diarists experiences: As the war dragged on and news trickled in of mass deportations of Jews, Anne became desperate. She had terrifying fantasies about the death of Jewish friends. Often she saw rows of good, innocent people accompanied by crying children [walk] on and on . . . bullied and knocked about until they almost drop. With appalling prescience she wrote that there is nothing we can do but wait as calmly as we can till the misery comes to an end. Jews and Christians wait, the whole earth waits; and there are many who wait for death. When her pen fell into the fire, she wrote that it has been cremated. Though not much interested in politics, Anne tried to understand what was happening to the world. I dont believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone, are guilty of the war, she wrote. Oh no, the little man is just as guilty, otherwise the peoples of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! Theres in people simply an urge to destroy, an urge to kill, to murder and rage, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged But sometimes she cried out from the heart, as if for all the Jews of Europe: Who has inflicted this upon us? Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up to now? It is God that has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again. Many more decades have passed by nowthis year marks the 70th anniversary of Anne Franks death at Bergen-Belsenand her fathers decision to execute her wish to have her diary published continues to prove significant. According to the Anne Frank House, it has since been published in 70 languages.

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June 25, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

January 11, 2010 : Miep Gies, who hid Anne Frank, dies at 100

On this day in 2010, Miep Gies, the last survivor of a small group of people who helped hide a Jewish girl, Anne Frank, and her family from the Nazis during World War II, dies at age 100 in the Netherlands. After the Franks were discovered in 1944 and sent to concentration camps, Gies rescued the notebooks that Anne Frank left behind describing her two years in hiding. These writings were later published as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, which became one of the most widely read accounts of the Holocaust. Miep Gies was born into a working-class, Catholic family in Vienna, Austria, on February 15, 1909. At age 11, with food shortages in her native land following World War I, she was sent to the Netherlands to live with a foster family who nicknamed her Miep (her birth name was Hermine Santrouschitz). In 1933, she went to work as a secretary for Otto Frank, who ran a small Amsterdam company that produced a substance used to make jam. By the following year, Franks wife and two daughters, Margot and Anne, had left their native Germany to join him in the Dutch capital. In May 1940, the Germans, who had entered World War II in September of the previous year, invaded the Netherlands and quickly made life increasingly restrictive and dangerous for the countrys Jewish population. In early July 1942, the Frank family went into hiding in an attic apartment behind Otto Franks business. They were eventually joined by Otto Franks business associate and his wife and son, as well as Miep Gies dentist, all of whom were Jewish. Gies, along with her husband Jan, a Dutch social worker, and several of Otto Franks other employees risked their own lives to smuggle food, supplies and news of the outside world into the secret apartment (which came to be known as the Secret Annex). Gies and her husband even spent a night in hiding with the group to learn firsthand what it was like. On August 4, 1944, after 25 months in hiding, the eight people in the Secret Annex were discovered by the Gestapo, the German secret state police, who had learned about the hiding place from an anonymous tipster who has never been definitively identified. Gies was working in the building at the time of the raid and avoided arrest because the officer was from her native Vienna and felt sympathy for her. She later went to police headquarters and tried, unsuccessfully, to pay a bribe to free the group. The occupants of the Secret Annex were sent to concentration camps; only Otto Frank survived. After he was liberated from Auschwitz by Soviet troops in January 1945, he returned to Amsterdam, where Miep Gies gave him a collection of notebooks and several hundred loose papers containing observations the teenage Anne Frank had penned during her time in hiding. Gies recovered the materials from the Secret Annex shortly after the Franks arrest and hid them in her office desk. She avoided reading the papers during the war out of respect for Annes privacy. Otto Frank, who lived with the Gies family after the war, compiled his daughters writings into a manuscript that was first published in the Netherlands in 1947 under the title Het Acheterhuis (Rear Annex). Later published in English as Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, the book went on to sell tens of millions of copies worldwide. In 1987, Gies published a memoir, Anne Frank Remembered, in which she wrote: I am not a hero. I stand at the end of the long, long line of good Dutch people who did what I did and moremuch moreduring those dark and terrible times years ago, but always like yesterday in the heart of those of us who bear witness. Never a day goes by that I do not think of what happened then.

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June 18, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank | biography – German diarist | Britannica.com

Anne Frank,in full Annelies Marie Frank (born June 12, 1929,Frankfurt am Main, Germanydied February/March 1945,Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, near Hannover),young Jewish girl whose diary of her familys two years in hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands became a classic of war literature. Early in the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler, Annes father, Otto Frank (18891980), a German businessman, took his wife and two daughters to live in Amsterdam. In 1941, after German forces occupied the Netherlands, Anne was compelled to transfer from a public to a Jewish school. Faced with deportation (supposedly to a forced-labour camp), the Franks went into hiding on July 9, 1942, with four other Jews in the backroom office and warehouse of Otto Franks food-products business. With the aid of a few non-Jewish friends, among them Miep Gies, who smuggled in food and other supplies, they lived confined to their secret annex until August 4, 1944, when the Gestapo, acting on a tip from Dutch informers, discovered them. The family was transported to Westerbork, a transit camp in the Netherlands, and from there to Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland on September 3, 1944, on the last transport to leave Westerbork for Auschwitz. Anne and her sister, Margot, were transferred to Bergen-Belsen the following month. Annes mother died in early January, just before the evacuation of Auschwitz on January 18, 1945. It was established by the Dutch government that both Anne and Margot died in a typhus epidemic in March 1945, only weeks before the liberation of Bergen-Belsen. In 2015 scholars revealed new research, including analysis of archival data and first-person accounts, indicating that the sisters might have perished in February 1945. Otto Frank was found hospitalized at Auschwitz when it was liberated by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945. Friends who had searched the familys hiding place after their capture later gave Otto Frank the papers left behind by the Gestapo. Among them he found Annes diary, which was published as The Diary of a Young Girl (originally in Dutch, 1947). It is precocious in style and insight and traces her emotional growth amid adversity. In it she wrote, In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. The Diary has been translated into more than 65 languages and is the most widely read diary of the Holocaust, and Anne is probably the best-known of Holocaust victims. The Diary was also made into a play that premiered on Broadway in October 1955, and in 1956 it won both the Tony Award for best play and the Pulitzer Prize for best drama. A film version directed by George Stevens was produced in 1959. The well-received play was controversial and was challenged by screenwriter Meyer Levin, who wrote an early version of the play (later realized as a 35-minute radio play) and accused Otto Frank and his chosen screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett of sanitizing and de-Judaizing the story. The play was often performed in high schools throughout the world and was revived (with additions) on Broadway in 199798. A new English translation of the Diary, published in 1995, contained material that had been edited out of the original version, making the revised translation nearly one-third longer than the first. The Frank familys hiding place on the Prinsengracht, a canal in Amsterdam, has become a museum and is consistently among the most-visited tourist sites in Amsterdam.

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June 12, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of Anne Frank

By Carol Roach, 8th Jun 2015 | Follow this author | | Short URL http://nut.bz/3v2rflqj/ Posted in Wikinut> Guides> History Everywhere you go you hear about crimes against humanity. We will be reviewing the life of Anne Frank, a young girl who died in a Nazi concentration camp. Her story has been read by millions of people around the world. One of the most important figures of the Nazi era was a young girl by the name of Anne Frank. She was just an ordinary teenager and had hopes and dreams like any other teenager of her day and future generations to come. The only trouble was that she was Jewish during the Nazi era and that fate meant death for many. Death was inevitable for young innocent girls and boys and Jewish people; six million of them who were herded off to concentrations camps, imprisoned, starved, worked to death, and experimented on in the most vilest of ways. Then burned in the furnaces, and discarded like garbage. Human lives, not worth a thing to their Nazi oppressors. The Jewish people, a fine spirited people, will not let these atrocities fade from human memory. We must never forget the holocaust, we must preserve the sanctity of human life and the health and welfare of all people’s of the world. Tikkun o’lam just as Jewish people declare, we must repair the world. In the grand scheme of things human life is held worthless. There is no real regard for health or dignity. I was a young girl myself when I read the Diary of Anne Frank, oh how I could identify with Anne and even though I was a Christian teenager and Anne was a Jewish one, we were both innocent young girls who had done nothing wrong. We were innocent young girls who had hopes and dreams for the life ahead of us. I examiner had a chance to make my life; Anne Frank was never given that opportunity. My life was completely changed once I read that book. Incidentally it was required reading for my Montreal high school 9th grade English class and I was so glad that it was. Before that book I took he peaceful life in Montreal for granted. Afterward I began to see the world outside of my own city and country was not the safe haven I had always thought it was. The Diary of Anne Frank made me realize that World War II was not about the good guys getting rid of the bad guys as I had previously thought. War was ugly and innocent people got hurt.

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June 9, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

iTunes – Music – Anastasia / The Diary of Anne Frank by …

Album Review Alfred Newman’s music for George Stevens’ movie The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) has been issued on a good sounding and well-produced CD from Tsunami, containing eight minutes of music that was not previously available that material consists principally of the main title, intermission, and exit music, which does isolate some themes associated with specific characters and the Frank family. Given the subject matter, that this is a serious film score is no surprise as of 1958, when the movie went into production, some 14 years after the end of World War II, Hollywood had not done too many movies (forget major films) that even referred to the destruction of European Jewry by Nazi Germany, much less dealt with this event as their main subject, and everyone involved with the movie on a creative level, whatever their background, treated it as a rare and special opportunity to say something important through their work. That said, Newman’s “Overture,” which opens the album, has always seemed appropriately profound, but the rest is far more subtle, introspective, and lyrical, almost counter-intuitive to the moods, settings, and images that one associates with the Holocaust. That’s because Newman based his score on the interior emotional life of its characters, rather than the exterior events around them. The result is one of the more beautiful bodies of movie music ever written for a Holocaust-related movie, and one of Newman’s better psychologically oriented scores, surprisingly not far removed from his work on How Green Was My Valley. It also contains some of the most beautiful string writing of Newman’s career. The CD production gives the decades-old recordings a full, rich sound, and the annotation is extremely thorough. Born: 17 March 1901 in New Haven, CT Genre: Soundtrack Years Active: ’30s, ’40s, ’50s, ’60s, ’70s Alfred Newman (1901-1970) was, for much of his career, the most influential and respected composer and music director in Hollywood. His 44 Oscar nominations and nine Academy Awards are both records that are unlikely ever to be broken. The first-born of ten children to an impoverished produce seller in New Haven, CT, Newman manifested his musical interests very early, and by the age of eight was well-known locally as a piano prodigy. He played for virtuoso Jan Ignace Paderewski, who arranged a New…

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May 31, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Diary of Anne Frank: review | Toronto Star

By Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. Adapted by Wendy Kesselman. Directed by Jillian Keiley. Until Oct. 10 at the Avon Theatre. 1-800-567-1600 STRATFORDHow can one of the most powerful stories of our time, acted by a superb cast, wind up as a less than satisfying theatrical experience? Ask Jillian Keiley, because it was her direction that turned Thursday nights premiere of The Diary of Anne Frank into such a mishmash. My heart sank as soon as I saw Bretta Gereckes set, a large, looming box made out of wooden slats. It looked nothing like the cramped garret where eight hunted Jews hid out from the marauding Nazis in the Amsterdam of the 1940s. It didnt take a major act of clairvoyance to see that it would probably be transformed in the plays final minutes into the lethal boxcars that took people to the death camps, but why destroy any sense of realism or mood for the two hours before that? My heart continued plummeting when the entire cast came out and addressed us all with personal anecdotes that tried to tangentially connect them to the world of the show and then vanished upstage to become part of a wordless a cappella chorus that crooned Jonathan Monros sentimental music for far too much of the show. If there ever was a story that needed no adornment, no sentiment and no fixing of any kind, its that of Anne Frank, the precocious young woman who kept a diary chronicling the brave struggle of her family and other companions in that attic in solitude for several years. As originally dramatized by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, then later amplified by Wendy Kesselman, its a work of great power that cant help but wring the heart . . . unless its meddled with. Even in this production, there were some long, extended scenes, like the touching Chanukah celebration that ends Act I, when the script and the actors were allowed to work their magic. And what actors! Sara Farb continues her winning streak of Stratford performances with an Anne who is honest and feisty and totally real, someone we love because of her faults, not despite them.

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May 29, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

This is a must see – Review of Anne Frank House (Anne …

I knew a fair amount about Anne Frank before visiting the house, but I think one’s understanding of her situation can only go so far without being in the house and getting a feel for the size and atmosphere. We got our tickets for first thing in the morning and were able to get in without waiting in line, feeling rushed, or like cattle in the relatively tight confines of the house. We had a bite to eat at the cafe on the way out (which was quite good) and when we stepped out the door to head over to the Van Gogh museum, the line to get into the house stretched around the block. I highly recommend this relatively short tour to get a deeper understanding of Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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May 22, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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