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About Anne Frank

Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a German-Jewish teenager who was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She and her family, along with four others, spent over two years during World War II hiding in an annex of rooms above her fathers office in Amsterdam.

Since it was first published in 1947, Anne Franks diary has become one of the most powerful memoirs of the Holocaust. Its message of courage and hope in the face of adversity has reached millions. The diary has been translated into 67 languages with over 30 million copies sold. Anne Franks story is especially meaningful to young people today. For many she is their first, if not their only, exposure to the history of the Holocaust.

After being betrayed to the Nazis, Anne, her family, and the others living with them were arrested and deported to Nazi concentration camps. In March of 1945, nine months after she was arrested, Anne Frank died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. She was fifteen years old.

Her ideals and bravery live on however, and she is often cited as a model for today as described in this postby Marlo Thomas, recently picked up by the Huffington Post.

Read more from the original source:
About Anne Frank

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Anne Frank – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Annelies Marie “Anne” Frank (Dutch pronunciation: [nlis mari n frk], German: [anlis mai an fak]( listen); 12 June 1929 February 1945[3]) was a diarist and writer. She is one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Her wartime diary The Diary of a Young Girl has been the basis for several plays and films. Born in the city of Frankfurt in Weimar Germany, she lived most of her life in or near Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. Born a German national, Frank lost her citizenship in 1941. She gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published. It documents her experiences hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

The Frank family moved from Germany to Amsterdam in 1933, the year the Nazis gained control over Germany. By May 1940, they were trapped in Amsterdam by the German occupation of the Netherlands. As persecutions of the Jewish population increased in July 1942, the family went into hiding in some concealed rooms behind a bookcase in the building where Anne’s father worked. After two years, the group was betrayed and transported to concentration camps. Anne Frank and her sister, Margot Frank, were eventually transferred to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they died (probably of typhus) in February or March 1945.[3]

Otto Frank, the only survivor of the family, returned to Amsterdam after the war to find that Anne’s diary had been saved by one of the helpers, Miep Gies, and his efforts led to its publication in 1947. It has since been translated into many languages. It was translated from its original Dutch version and first published in English in 1952 as The Diary of a Young Girl. The diary, which was given to Anne on her thirteenth birthday, chronicles her life from 12 June 1942 until 1 August 1944.

Frank was born Annelies or Anneliese Marie Frank on 12 June 1929 in Frankfurt, Germany, to Otto Frank (18891980) and Edith Frank-Hollnder (190045). She had one elder sister named Margot (192645). The Franks were liberal Jews, and did not observe all of the customs and traditions of Judaism, and lived in an assimilated community of Jewish and non-Jewish citizens of various religions. Edith Frank was the more devout parent, while Otto Frank was interested in scholarly pursuits and had an extensive library; both parents encouraged the children to read.

On 13 March 1933, elections were held in Frankfurt for the municipal council, and Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party won. Antisemitic demonstrations occurred almost immediately, and the Franks began to fear what would happen to them if they remained in Germany. Later that year, Edith and the children went to Aachen, where they stayed with Edith’s mother, Rosa Hollnder. Otto Frank remained in Frankfurt, but after receiving an offer to start a company in Amsterdam, he moved there to organize the business and to arrange accommodations for his family. The Franks were among 300,000 Jews who fled Germany between 1933 and 1939.

Otto Frank began working at the Opekta Works, a company that sold fruit extract pectin, and found an apartment on the Merwedeplein (Merwede Square) in the Rivierenbuurt neighborhood of Amsterdam. By February 1934, Edith and the children had arrived in Amsterdam, and the two girls were enrolled in schoolMargot in public school and Anne in a Montessori school. Margot demonstrated ability in arithmetic, and Anne showed aptitude for reading and writing. Her friend Hanneli Goslar later recalled that from early childhood, Frank frequently wrote, although she shielded her work with her hands and refused to discuss the content of her writing. The Frank sisters had highly distinct personalities, Margot being well-mannered, reserved, and studious, while Anne was outspoken, energetic, and extroverted.

In 1938, Otto Frank started a second company, Pectacon, which was a wholesaler of herbs, pickling salts, and mixed spices, used in the production of sausages.Hermann van Pels was employed by Pectacon as an advisor about spices. A Jewish butcher, he had fled Osnabrck in Germany with his family. In 1939, Edith’s mother came to live with the Franks, and remained with them until her death in January 1942.

In May 1940, Germany invaded the Netherlands, and the occupation government began to persecute Jews by the implementation of restrictive and discriminatory laws; mandatory registration and segregation soon followed. The Frank sisters were excelling in their studies and had many friends, but with the introduction of a decree that Jewish children could attend only Jewish schools, they were enrolled at the Jewish Lyceum. Anne became a friend of Jacqueline van Maarsen in the Lyceum. In April 1941, Otto Frank took action to prevent Pectacon from being confiscated as a Jewish-owned business. He transferred his shares in Pectacon to Johannes Kleiman and resigned as director. The company was liquidated and all assets transferred to Gies and Company, headed by Jan Gies. In December 1941, Frank followed a similar process to save Opekta. The businesses continued with little obvious change and their survival allowed Frank to earn a minimal income, but sufficient to provide for his family.

For her thirteenth birthday on 12 June 1942, Anne Frank received a book she had shown her father in a shop window a few days earlier. Although it was an autograph book, bound with red-and-white checkered cloth and with a small lock on the front, Frank decided she would use it as a diary, and began writing in it almost immediately. While many of her early entries relate the mundane aspects of her life, she also discusses some of the changes that had taken place in the Netherlands since the German occupation. In her entry dated 20 June 1942, she lists many of the restrictions that had been placed upon the lives of the Dutch Jewish population, and also notes her sorrow at the death of her grandmother earlier in the year. Frank dreamed about becoming an actress. She loved watching movies, but the Dutch Jews were forbidden access to movie theaters from 8 January 1941 onwards.

In July 1942, Margot Frank received a call-up notice from the Zentralstelle fr jdische Auswanderung (Central Office for Jewish Emigration) ordering her to report for relocation to a work camp. Otto Frank told his family that they would go into hiding in rooms above and behind Opekta’s premises on the Prinsengracht, a street along one of Amsterdam’s canals, where some of his most trusted employees would help them. The call-up notice forced them to relocate several weeks earlier than had been anticipated.

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Anne Frank – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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#NotSilent: join the social media campaign to remember Anne Frank

Undated photo of Anne Frank. Photograph: AP

Anne Frank didnt get to see the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The young Jewish Dutch girl died in that camp, aged 15, but left behind an indelible account of her life, The Diary of a Young Girl. The exact date of her death in 1945 is unknown, but today has been chosen to commemorate its 70th anniversary, coinciding with the date of the liberation of the camp.

The commemoration is taking a rather unusual shape. Because her voice could not be silenced, we decided that one minute of silence wouldnt be as appropriate as a minute of people reading out her words, explains Gillian Walnes, co-founder and vice-president of the Anne Frank Trust UK, who have organised the campaign with Penguin Random House, the publishers of the diary.

Everyone, whether theyre at work, at home or on the street, alone or with friends, is encouraged to take one minute to film themselves reading her words, and upload the videos to social media using the hashtag #NotSilent. You can obviously choose a reading yourself, but the Anne Frank Trust has also put extracts on their site, and suggested people talk about their own lives and hopes if they prefer. Some celebrities have already joined the campaign:

You can watch their one-minute videos by following these links: actor Naomie Harris, choreographer and director Arlene Philips, author Cathy Cassidy, journalist Michael Buerk, actor Jing Lusi, poet Roger McGough, author Malorie Blackman, author Jacqueline Wilson, actor Russell Tovey, actor Ceallach Spellman, author and journalist India Knight, and former Labour politician David Miliband.

Related: A timeless voice against prejudice: your videos reading Anne Frank

One of the reasons Frank still touches people is how well she captured the struggle of any young soul against the unjust world of adults, and the yearning to get out into the world and fight injustice. Even though she lived 70 years ago, and teenagers experiences and the way they communicate have changed so dramatically, she was essentially a very modern girl, says Walnes.

She goes through things with her parents, changes in her body, injustices in a world where adults make a mess of things And that is a springboard to talk about many issues, adds Walnes, who also recently blogged about Franks writing and life for the Huffington Post. She saw herself as many things, but to her persecutors she was just one thing: a Jew.

The Anne Frank Trust works with young people in schools, prisons and deprived communities around the UK to educate and help teenagers suffering all kinds of prejudice. Now, for instance, theyre getting funding from the Department of Education for a project tackling bullying against LGBT teens.

The big concern now is that we will soon see the end of first-hand accounts, says Walnes, mindful of the responsibility to carry the story forward. Freda Wineman, one of those living witnesses, saw the Frank sisters, Anne and Margot, in both Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. In a telephone interview, she emphasised: Its very important that young people take an interest in history: they need to learn to have respect for other people. The world today is in big trouble. You have to learn, if you want to have a little bit of peace and to live in harmony, how to live with others.

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#NotSilent: join the social media campaign to remember Anne Frank

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Germany: Anne Frank’s remains may lie in newly discovered mass grave – Video



Germany: Anne Frank's remains may lie in newly discovered mass grave
Dutch researchers have discovered a new mass grave at the site of the Nazi Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where teenage diarist Anne Frank died as a prisoner in March 1945. Flowers, flags…

By: RuptlyTV

Excerpt from:
Germany: Anne Frank’s remains may lie in newly discovered mass grave – Video

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Liverpool celebrities back Anne Frank remembrance campaign

The 70th anniversary of Anne Franks death is being marked by a new one-minute social media campaign.

The Anne Frank Trust UK has joined forces with Penguin Random House, the UK publishers of Anne Franks diary, to promote #notsilent.

And they have the backing of a host of well-known faces including Liverpool poet Roger McGough and singer and actor Ray Quinn.

Instead of a one minute silence to commemorate the end of the teenagers short life, the British public is invited to record a video of themselves reading a one minute passage from her inspirational writing, at any time on or after tomorrow, and then to upload to social media channels using hashtag #notsilent.

Gillian Walnes, co-founder and vice-president of the Anne Frank Trust UK, said: Poignantly we will never know the exact date Anne died, but we have carefully chosen the date of April 14 as schools will be in session and its one day before the anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen where Anne died at age 15 of hunger and disease.

Weve a selection of passages suitable for a one minute reading on our website or readers can choose one themselves, or even read something they have written about their own life and hopes.

Through the #notsilent campaign Annes voice will resonate loudly around the country and we will stand together against the challenges of prejudice, discrimination and injustices that are still experienced today.

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Liverpool celebrities back Anne Frank remembrance campaign

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Malorie Blackman Reads Anne Frank – Video



Malorie Blackman Reads Anne Frank
Malorie Blackman reads an extract from Anne Frank's Diary as part of the Anne Frank Trust's #notsilent campaign (April 2015). Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since…

By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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Malorie Blackman Reads Anne Frank – Video

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Anne Frank could be in mass grave found with holocaust survivor's information

Mass grave was discovered at what was the end of the camp’s main road Holocaust survivors helped to pinpoint possible sites for the grave Diarist died of typhus in March 1945 but her body has never been found

By Allan Hall In Berlin For The Daily Mail

Published: 18:04 EST, 12 April 2015 | Updated: 03:37 EST, 13 April 2015

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A burial pit found near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp may be where Anne Frank (above) was buried

A burial pit found near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp may contain the remains of Anne Frank.

The mass grave, in what is now a field at the end of the German camps former main road, was pinpointed with the help of Holocaust survivors.

It is believed to contain the remains of teenage diarist Anne, who died at the camp aged 15, as well as her sister Margot and Jan Verschure, a member of the Dutch resistance.

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Anne Frank could be in mass grave found with holocaust survivor's information

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#notsilent AFT Staff Reading from the Anne Frank Diary – Video



#notsilent AFT Staff Reading from the Anne Frank Diary
Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since the end of Anne Frank's short life we read a one minute long passage of her renowned and inspiring diary. #notsilent http://www.ann…

By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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#notsilent AFT Staff Reading from the Anne Frank Diary – Video

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#notsilent David Miliband reads from the Anne Frank Diary – Video



#notsilent David Miliband reads from the Anne Frank Diary
David Miliband reads an extract from Anne Frank's Diary as part of the Anne Frank Trust's #notsilent campaign (April 2015). Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since…

By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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#notsilent David Miliband reads from the Anne Frank Diary – Video

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About Anne Frank

Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a German-Jewish teenager who was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She and her family, along with four others, spent over two years during World War II hiding in an annex of rooms above her fathers office in Amsterdam. Since it was first published in 1947, Anne Franks diary has become one of the most powerful memoirs of the Holocaust. Its message of courage and hope in the face of adversity has reached millions. The diary has been translated into 67 languages with over 30 million copies sold. Anne Franks story is especially meaningful to young people today. For many she is their first, if not their only, exposure to the history of the Holocaust. After being betrayed to the Nazis, Anne, her family, and the others living with them were arrested and deported to Nazi concentration camps. In March of 1945, nine months after she was arrested, Anne Frank died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. She was fifteen years old. Her ideals and bravery live on however, and she is often cited as a model for today as described in this postby Marlo Thomas, recently picked up by the Huffington Post.

Fair Usage Law

May 12, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Annelies Marie “Anne” Frank (Dutch pronunciation: [nlis mari n frk], German: [anlis mai an fak]( listen); 12 June 1929 February 1945[3]) was a diarist and writer. She is one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Her wartime diary The Diary of a Young Girl has been the basis for several plays and films. Born in the city of Frankfurt in Weimar Germany, she lived most of her life in or near Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. Born a German national, Frank lost her citizenship in 1941. She gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published. It documents her experiences hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. The Frank family moved from Germany to Amsterdam in 1933, the year the Nazis gained control over Germany. By May 1940, they were trapped in Amsterdam by the German occupation of the Netherlands. As persecutions of the Jewish population increased in July 1942, the family went into hiding in some concealed rooms behind a bookcase in the building where Anne’s father worked. After two years, the group was betrayed and transported to concentration camps. Anne Frank and her sister, Margot Frank, were eventually transferred to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they died (probably of typhus) in February or March 1945.[3] Otto Frank, the only survivor of the family, returned to Amsterdam after the war to find that Anne’s diary had been saved by one of the helpers, Miep Gies, and his efforts led to its publication in 1947. It has since been translated into many languages. It was translated from its original Dutch version and first published in English in 1952 as The Diary of a Young Girl. The diary, which was given to Anne on her thirteenth birthday, chronicles her life from 12 June 1942 until 1 August 1944. Frank was born Annelies or Anneliese Marie Frank on 12 June 1929 in Frankfurt, Germany, to Otto Frank (18891980) and Edith Frank-Hollnder (190045). She had one elder sister named Margot (192645). The Franks were liberal Jews, and did not observe all of the customs and traditions of Judaism, and lived in an assimilated community of Jewish and non-Jewish citizens of various religions. Edith Frank was the more devout parent, while Otto Frank was interested in scholarly pursuits and had an extensive library; both parents encouraged the children to read. On 13 March 1933, elections were held in Frankfurt for the municipal council, and Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party won. Antisemitic demonstrations occurred almost immediately, and the Franks began to fear what would happen to them if they remained in Germany. Later that year, Edith and the children went to Aachen, where they stayed with Edith’s mother, Rosa Hollnder. Otto Frank remained in Frankfurt, but after receiving an offer to start a company in Amsterdam, he moved there to organize the business and to arrange accommodations for his family. The Franks were among 300,000 Jews who fled Germany between 1933 and 1939. Otto Frank began working at the Opekta Works, a company that sold fruit extract pectin, and found an apartment on the Merwedeplein (Merwede Square) in the Rivierenbuurt neighborhood of Amsterdam. By February 1934, Edith and the children had arrived in Amsterdam, and the two girls were enrolled in schoolMargot in public school and Anne in a Montessori school. Margot demonstrated ability in arithmetic, and Anne showed aptitude for reading and writing. Her friend Hanneli Goslar later recalled that from early childhood, Frank frequently wrote, although she shielded her work with her hands and refused to discuss the content of her writing. The Frank sisters had highly distinct personalities, Margot being well-mannered, reserved, and studious, while Anne was outspoken, energetic, and extroverted. In 1938, Otto Frank started a second company, Pectacon, which was a wholesaler of herbs, pickling salts, and mixed spices, used in the production of sausages.Hermann van Pels was employed by Pectacon as an advisor about spices. A Jewish butcher, he had fled Osnabrck in Germany with his family. In 1939, Edith’s mother came to live with the Franks, and remained with them until her death in January 1942. In May 1940, Germany invaded the Netherlands, and the occupation government began to persecute Jews by the implementation of restrictive and discriminatory laws; mandatory registration and segregation soon followed. The Frank sisters were excelling in their studies and had many friends, but with the introduction of a decree that Jewish children could attend only Jewish schools, they were enrolled at the Jewish Lyceum. Anne became a friend of Jacqueline van Maarsen in the Lyceum. In April 1941, Otto Frank took action to prevent Pectacon from being confiscated as a Jewish-owned business. He transferred his shares in Pectacon to Johannes Kleiman and resigned as director. The company was liquidated and all assets transferred to Gies and Company, headed by Jan Gies. In December 1941, Frank followed a similar process to save Opekta. The businesses continued with little obvious change and their survival allowed Frank to earn a minimal income, but sufficient to provide for his family. For her thirteenth birthday on 12 June 1942, Anne Frank received a book she had shown her father in a shop window a few days earlier. Although it was an autograph book, bound with red-and-white checkered cloth and with a small lock on the front, Frank decided she would use it as a diary, and began writing in it almost immediately. While many of her early entries relate the mundane aspects of her life, she also discusses some of the changes that had taken place in the Netherlands since the German occupation. In her entry dated 20 June 1942, she lists many of the restrictions that had been placed upon the lives of the Dutch Jewish population, and also notes her sorrow at the death of her grandmother earlier in the year. Frank dreamed about becoming an actress. She loved watching movies, but the Dutch Jews were forbidden access to movie theaters from 8 January 1941 onwards. In July 1942, Margot Frank received a call-up notice from the Zentralstelle fr jdische Auswanderung (Central Office for Jewish Emigration) ordering her to report for relocation to a work camp. Otto Frank told his family that they would go into hiding in rooms above and behind Opekta’s premises on the Prinsengracht, a street along one of Amsterdam’s canals, where some of his most trusted employees would help them. The call-up notice forced them to relocate several weeks earlier than had been anticipated.

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#NotSilent: join the social media campaign to remember Anne Frank

Undated photo of Anne Frank. Photograph: AP Anne Frank didnt get to see the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The young Jewish Dutch girl died in that camp, aged 15, but left behind an indelible account of her life, The Diary of a Young Girl. The exact date of her death in 1945 is unknown, but today has been chosen to commemorate its 70th anniversary, coinciding with the date of the liberation of the camp. The commemoration is taking a rather unusual shape. Because her voice could not be silenced, we decided that one minute of silence wouldnt be as appropriate as a minute of people reading out her words, explains Gillian Walnes, co-founder and vice-president of the Anne Frank Trust UK, who have organised the campaign with Penguin Random House, the publishers of the diary. Everyone, whether theyre at work, at home or on the street, alone or with friends, is encouraged to take one minute to film themselves reading her words, and upload the videos to social media using the hashtag #NotSilent. You can obviously choose a reading yourself, but the Anne Frank Trust has also put extracts on their site, and suggested people talk about their own lives and hopes if they prefer. Some celebrities have already joined the campaign: You can watch their one-minute videos by following these links: actor Naomie Harris, choreographer and director Arlene Philips, author Cathy Cassidy, journalist Michael Buerk, actor Jing Lusi, poet Roger McGough, author Malorie Blackman, author Jacqueline Wilson, actor Russell Tovey, actor Ceallach Spellman, author and journalist India Knight, and former Labour politician David Miliband. Related: A timeless voice against prejudice: your videos reading Anne Frank One of the reasons Frank still touches people is how well she captured the struggle of any young soul against the unjust world of adults, and the yearning to get out into the world and fight injustice. Even though she lived 70 years ago, and teenagers experiences and the way they communicate have changed so dramatically, she was essentially a very modern girl, says Walnes. She goes through things with her parents, changes in her body, injustices in a world where adults make a mess of things And that is a springboard to talk about many issues, adds Walnes, who also recently blogged about Franks writing and life for the Huffington Post. She saw herself as many things, but to her persecutors she was just one thing: a Jew. The Anne Frank Trust works with young people in schools, prisons and deprived communities around the UK to educate and help teenagers suffering all kinds of prejudice. Now, for instance, theyre getting funding from the Department of Education for a project tackling bullying against LGBT teens. The big concern now is that we will soon see the end of first-hand accounts, says Walnes, mindful of the responsibility to carry the story forward. Freda Wineman, one of those living witnesses, saw the Frank sisters, Anne and Margot, in both Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. In a telephone interview, she emphasised: Its very important that young people take an interest in history: they need to learn to have respect for other people. The world today is in big trouble. You have to learn, if you want to have a little bit of peace and to live in harmony, how to live with others.

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April 14, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Germany: Anne Frank’s remains may lie in newly discovered mass grave – Video




Germany: Anne Frank's remains may lie in newly discovered mass grave Dutch researchers have discovered a new mass grave at the site of the Nazi Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where teenage diarist Anne Frank died as a prisoner in March 1945. Flowers, flags… By: RuptlyTV

Fair Usage Law

April 13, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Liverpool celebrities back Anne Frank remembrance campaign

The 70th anniversary of Anne Franks death is being marked by a new one-minute social media campaign. The Anne Frank Trust UK has joined forces with Penguin Random House, the UK publishers of Anne Franks diary, to promote #notsilent. And they have the backing of a host of well-known faces including Liverpool poet Roger McGough and singer and actor Ray Quinn. Instead of a one minute silence to commemorate the end of the teenagers short life, the British public is invited to record a video of themselves reading a one minute passage from her inspirational writing, at any time on or after tomorrow, and then to upload to social media channels using hashtag #notsilent. Gillian Walnes, co-founder and vice-president of the Anne Frank Trust UK, said: Poignantly we will never know the exact date Anne died, but we have carefully chosen the date of April 14 as schools will be in session and its one day before the anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen where Anne died at age 15 of hunger and disease. Weve a selection of passages suitable for a one minute reading on our website or readers can choose one themselves, or even read something they have written about their own life and hopes. Through the #notsilent campaign Annes voice will resonate loudly around the country and we will stand together against the challenges of prejudice, discrimination and injustices that are still experienced today.

Fair Usage Law

April 13, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Malorie Blackman Reads Anne Frank – Video




Malorie Blackman Reads Anne Frank Malorie Blackman reads an extract from Anne Frank's Diary as part of the Anne Frank Trust's #notsilent campaign (April 2015). Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since… By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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April 13, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank could be in mass grave found with holocaust survivor's information

Mass grave was discovered at what was the end of the camp’s main road Holocaust survivors helped to pinpoint possible sites for the grave Diarist died of typhus in March 1945 but her body has never been found By Allan Hall In Berlin For The Daily Mail Published: 18:04 EST, 12 April 2015 | Updated: 03:37 EST, 13 April 2015 7.7k shares 54 View comments A burial pit found near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp may be where Anne Frank (above) was buried A burial pit found near the site of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp may contain the remains of Anne Frank. The mass grave, in what is now a field at the end of the German camps former main road, was pinpointed with the help of Holocaust survivors. It is believed to contain the remains of teenage diarist Anne, who died at the camp aged 15, as well as her sister Margot and Jan Verschure, a member of the Dutch resistance.

Fair Usage Law

April 12, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

#notsilent AFT Staff Reading from the Anne Frank Diary – Video




#notsilent AFT Staff Reading from the Anne Frank Diary Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since the end of Anne Frank's short life we read a one minute long passage of her renowned and inspiring diary. #notsilent http://www.ann… By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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April 9, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

#notsilent David Miliband reads from the Anne Frank Diary – Video




#notsilent David Miliband reads from the Anne Frank Diary David Miliband reads an extract from Anne Frank's Diary as part of the Anne Frank Trust's #notsilent campaign (April 2015). Instead of a one minute's silence to commemorate 70 years since… By: ANNEFRANKTRUSTUK

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April 9, 2015   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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