Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

Editor who plucked ‘Diary of Anne Frank’ from rejection pile dies – New York Post

Judith JonesGetty Images

Judith Jones, a legend in the New York publishing world who plucked The Diary of Anne Frank out of a rejection pile, died Wednesday at her summer home in Vermont at the age of 93.

Jones worked for Knopf publishing for more than five decades, joining the company in 1957 and retiring in 2011. Over the course of her storied career, Jones convinced Alfred Knopf to publish Julia Childs now-iconic Mastering the Art of French Cooking in 1961, and she championed other cookbook authors like James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Lidia Bastianich, and literary writers like John Updike, Anne Tyler, William Maxwell, and Sharon Olds.

It is impossible to imagine book publishing without Judith, said Knopf Chairman and Editor in Chief Sonny Mehta. Her authors have been recipients of five Pulitzer Prizes, five National Book Awards, and three National Book Critics Circle Awards, and her cookbook authors have been recipients of 41 awards from the James Beard Foundation and thirteen awards from the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

Prior to joining Knopf, Jones worked as an assistant at Doubleday, first in New York and then in Paris. It was there that she noticed Holocaust victim Anne Franks diary in a slush pile that had been rejected by other publishers for translation into English.

When Anne Franks father Otto returned to Amsterdam after the liberation of Auschwitz in 1945, he went to see Miep Gies, who was one of the people who helped hide the Frank family in a secret annex above Otto Franks business. Gies had found the diary after the Gestapo raid of the annex and hid it, unread, hoping that Anne would one day return for it.

Instead, Otto would be the only member of the eight annex residents to return. Anne died in March 1945 in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, only about 2 months before the Germans were defeated.

Anne Frank made it clear in her diary that she wanted it published. Despite initial misgivings, Otto followed her wishes. The diary was printed in Dutch in 1947 and in Germany and France in 1950, but had not been translated into English.

Jones was drawn by Annes picture on the advance copy of the French edition, and spent all day reading it in tears.

When my boss returned, I told him, We have to publish this book. He said, What? That book by that kid? Jones explained in a 2001 interview with the Associated Press.

She brought the diary to the attention of Doubledays New York office, and the book was published in the US in 1952 to wide acclaim. I was so taken with it, and I felt it would have a real market in America. Its one of those seminal books that will never be forgotten.

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Editor who plucked ‘Diary of Anne Frank’ from rejection pile dies – New York Post

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August 2, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Judith Jones, cookbook author who brought Julia Child and others to the table, dies at 93 – Washington Post

Judith Jones, the legendary editor who rescued The Diary of Anne Frank from a publishers reject pile and later introduced readers to the likes of Julia Child and a host of other influential cookbook authors, died Aug. 2 at her summer home in Walden, Vt. She was 93.

The cause was complications from Alzheimers disease, said her step-daughter Bronwyn Dunne.

Mrs. Jones helped open a world of cuisines to a public previously bound by convenience foods, and her impact on cookbook publishing, home cooking and the American palate was monumental.

Beginning in the 1950s, she followed her own curiosity and her instincts for what readers wanted to cook and needed to know, and she championed the work of unknown authors who became icons and whose books became classics.

The list of these scholar-cooks who owe her their career includes Madhur Jaffrey, Claudia Roden, Marcella Hazan, Joan Nathan, Edna Lewis, Lidia Bastianich, Anna Thomas, Hiroko Shimbo, Michael Field and Nina Simonds. She also edited some of Alfred A. Knopf Inc.s most famous fiction writers, including John Updike and Anne Tyler.

Without her discovery of Franks memoir, while she was at Doubleday in Paris, American readers might never have been introduced to Franks startling, first-person narrative, one of the first Holocaust accounts to reach the United States. Her role was small but pivotal, and it was enough to get her noticed and hired by Knopf co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1957.

As a junior editor at Knopf, Mrs. Jones began primarily as a translator of such French writers as Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus, and she had no intention of editing cookbooks, the work for which she became famous.

But she had fallen in love with French food when she lived in Paris after college, and upon returning to the United States with a new husband, she was desperate for help unlocking the cuisines secrets in their New York kitchen.

One day in 1959, a huge manuscript arrived on her desk. From the moment I started turning the pages, I was bouleverse, as the French say knocked out, she wrote in her memoir, The Tenth Muse (2007).This was the book Id been searching for.

This was also the book that Child, with co-authors Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle, had spent six years unsuccessfully trying to shorten for an editor at Houghton Mifflin. Child worried that the book was unpublishable, she wrote in her own memoir, My Life in France. Maybe the editors were right. After all, there probably werent many people like me who liked to fuss around in the kitchen.

Fortunately for Child and for generations of cooks who fell in love with her there was at least one who did: Mrs. Jones, who spent months trying recipes before deciding the book must see the light of day.

If the book was so right for me, there were bound to be maybe thousands like me who really wanted to learn the whys and wherefores of good French cooking, she wrote. Ordinary Americans, not just the privileged, were traveling to Europe now, in droves, and their taste buds had been awakened. I hoped wed had our fill of quick-and-easy, and there was an appetite for the real thing.

She prevailed, and as Childs editor, Mrs. Jones got her hands, and kitchen, dirty. She scouted for ingredients and equipment, practiced making omelettes and fluting mushrooms, and gave recipes to a cooking neophyte in the Knopf office to try all to make sure the recipes would work in American kitchens. She even was responsible for the books title, Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

When I triumphantly showed our title to Mr. Knopf, he scowled and said, Well, Ill eat my hat if that title sells, she wrote. I like to think of all the hats he had to eat.

We are flying blind

The diminutive Mrs. Jones, known for her classic suits and pageboy haircut, was also good at getting her authors noticed. When Mastering was nearing publication, she sent copies to taste-makers James Beard and Craig Claiborne, the latter the food editor of the New York Times.

They both loved it. Beard threw a party for Child & Co., and Claiborne agreed to review it but only if Mrs. Jones and her husband, Evan, would first agree to be the subjects of a Times story about their own cooking.

Mastering sold millions of copies, and Child who had emerged from her co-authors as the books guiding force became a TV star, culinary treasure and household name.

Mrs. Jones formed similar partnerships with other authors, having particular success with those writing about global cuisines curious to Americans.

With a new, exotic, unfamiliar style of cooking, more than ever we are flying blind we may never even have tasted the dish we are trying to reproduce and we need a lot of hand-holding, she wrote. So I kept my eyes and ears, to say nothing of my taste buds, open to the kind of writer-cook who was particularly gifted, like Julia, at explaining the techniques of a different cooking culture.

The best ones, she found, were often transplants, longing to re-create the foods of their homeland. That describes Hazan, whose passion for cooking didnt emerge until she and her husband had moved to the United States from Italy.

She and Hazan clashed often, with Hazan insisting on authenticity and Mrs. Jones wanting recipes to be accessible.

Mrs. Jones also developed a longstanding interest in regional American cuisine. After she was referred to Lewis, the granddaughter of a former slave who wanted to write a book about Southern cooking, Mrs. Jones was disappointed when sample pages Lewis wrote with a co-author didnt have Lewiss voice.

The co-author quit, and Mrs. Jones and Lewis instead began regularly meeting to talk about Lewiss upbringing in a small Virginia community founded by freed slaves. While we were both still giddy with the pleasures she had evoked and the ease with which the details of each anecdote had surfaced, I suggested she go home right away and put everything down just as she had told it to me, Mrs. Jones wrote. It worked miraculously. The stories and recipes in 1976 became The Taste of Country Cooking, which served to transform the publics perception of Southern food and is still considered a masterpiece.

Nathan, the eminent Jewish-cooking authority, worked on four books with Mrs. Jones and traveled with her to Israel while working on The Foods of Israel Today.

She only wanted to do books that made a difference, Nathan said in an interview. Shes a real editor. There aren’t many of them left.

Her favorite lesson from Mrs. Jones: Find your voice, Nathan said. Find who you are and dont be afraid to show it.

We have to publish this book

She came from Barbados and at my urging would tell me about the foods she grew up on strange fruits Id never heard of, hot peppers that made one sweat, and, of course, garlic, she wrote in her memoir. Her father recognized her adventurous palate and indulged her on restaurant visits.

After she graduated in 1945 from Bennington College in Vermont, she returned briefly to New York to work in publishing before a three-week vacation in Europe turned into a full-time move to Paris.

At 27, working as a girl Friday at Doubleday in Paris, she was tasked one day in 1950 with filing rejected submissions.

My boss went off to lunch with his fellow editors, and left me with a pile of stuff, she told the Jewish Chronicle in 2009. I came to this lovely face, she said, referring to Anne Franks photo on the advance copy of the French edition of the book. I read it all day. When my boss returned, I told him, We have to publish this book. He said, What? That book by that kid?

It had been published in Dutch and was set for publication in French, but was rejected by other English-language publishers, too, before she successfully argued that the New York office of Doubleday should take it on. The story of the Holocaust as seen through a young girls eyes became an international sensation, one of the best-selling books of all time and adapted for stage and screen.

Early in her Paris years, the future cookbook editor had been an assistant to Evan Jones, who edited a magazine aimed at American tourists. They wed in 1951, eventually settling in New York and maintaining their summer home in Vermont.

Survivors include four stepchildren, Bronwyn Dunne of South Burlington, Vt., Pamela Richards of Stamford, Conn., Audrey Bierman of Grinnell, Iowa, and John Christopher Vandercook of Honolulu; five grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

In addition to her cookbook editing, Mrs. Jones wrote three books with Evan: The Book of Bread; Knead It, Punch It, Bake It! (a childrens book); and The Book of New New England Cookery.

She worked at Knopf for a half-century, but her early time there was not without struggle.

For many years, she and Blanche were the only women in the Knopf offices, Sara Franklin, who spent months interviewing Mrs. Jones for an oral history on behalf of the Julia Child Foundation, wrote in Cherry Bombe magazine in 2014. While editing prestigious writers helped Jones climb the ranks, her culinary pursuits were often perceived as fluff. Women were kept down, she remembers, and people often assumed she was a secretary rather than an editor.

In 2006, Mrs. Jones was awarded the James Beard Foundations Lifetime Achievement Award. She retired from Knopf in 2010 as senior editor and vice president.

Her husband died in 1996, but Mrs. Jones was determined to not let his absence deter her from continuing their favorite ritual: cooking. Instead of walking into what might have seemed an empty apartment actually, Ive always had a dog who is hungry to greet me I gravitate toward the kitchen, she wrote in The Tenth Muse.

After her memoir was published, Mrs. Jones received so many requests to write more about her solo cooking that in 2010 she published The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Rather than dwell on the challenges, the book praises the joys of lighting a candle, pouring a glass of wine and laying out her best linens for a meal she would savor. She drew on a lifetime of cooking and lessons from the authors she had edited to espouse her belief in frugality and the smart use of leftovers, repurposing them into other dishes.

Her last book was 2014s Love Me, Feed Me, a guide to making food that a cook could share with a dog. Its no accident that many of the recipes she wrote about doling out for herself and her little pooch, Mabon Moroccan moussaka, Indian red lentils, Southern-style shrimp and grits are staples of some of the same cuisines Mrs. Jones had long before helped demystify.

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Judith Jones, cookbook author who brought Julia Child and others to the table, dies at 93 – Washington Post

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August 2, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank wrote her last diary entry on this day – The Jerusalem Post

Jews around the world today are observing the 9th of Av or Tisha Be’av, a Jewish holiday that commemorates the destruction of the ancient Temples in Jerusalem.

Coincedentally, this year the somber fasting holiday shares the same gregorian calendar date as another sad anniversary in Jewish history.

August 1, 1944 was the date of Anne Frank’s last diary entry. Frank wrote the diary during the two-year period that her family hid in the attic of Opekta, her father Otto’s former place of business, in Amsterdam.

The Frank family went into hiding on June 12, 1942 and Anne began writing in her diary two days later on the 14th. From June 14, 1942 to August 1, 1944, the teenager would document life inside the attic in her diary, which she addressed to “Kitty,” ultimately becoming one of the most complete first-hand accounts of a Holocaust victim.

The original occupants of the attic were Anne, her older sister Margot, and their parents Otto and Edith. Three members of the van Pels family — Hermann, Auguste, and their son Peter — and Fritz Pfeffer, a German-born dentist, moved into the attic later in 1942.

Three days after her last diary entry, on August 4, 1944, German police entered the attic and arrested all the occupants.

Anne and Margot were sent to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. Both died of typhus shortly before the camp was liberated in 1945. The exact dates of their deaths are unknown.

Of the seven occupants of the attic, only Otto Frank survived. After the war, he devoted much of his life to publishing his daughter’s diary. The diary (published in English as The Diary of a Young Girl) has been translated into over 60 languages and adapted into multiple award-winning plays and films.

15-year-old Anne’s entry from August 1, 1944 reads as follows: Dearest Kitty,

“A bundle of contradictions” was the end of my previous letter and is the beginning of this one. Can you please tell me exactly what “a bundle of contradictions” is? What does “contradiction” mean? Like so many words, it can be interpreted in two ways: a contradiction imposed from without and one imposed from within.

The former means not accepting other people’s opinions, always knowing best, having the last word; in short, all those unpleasant traits for which I’m known. The latter, for which I’m not known, is my own secret.

As I’ve told you many times, I’m split in two. One side contains my exuberant cheerfulness, my flippancy, my joy in life and, above all, my ability to appreciate the lighter side of things. By that I mean not finding anything wrong with flirtations, a kiss, an embrace, an off-color joke. This side of me is usually lying in wait to ambush the other one, which is much purer, deeper and finer. No one knows Anne’s better side, and that’s why most people can’t stand me.

Oh, I can be an amusing clown for an afternoon, but after that everyone’s had enough of me to last a month. Actually, I’m what a romantic movie is to a profound thinker a mere diversion, a comic interlude, something that is soon forgotten: not bad, but not particularly good either.

I hate having to tell you this, but why shouldn’t I admit it when I know it’s true? My lighter, more superficial side will always steal a march on the deeper side and therefore always win. You can’t imagine how often I’ve tried to push away this Anne, which is only half of what is known as Anne-to beat her down, hide her. But it doesn’t work, and I know why.

I’m afraid that people who know me as I usually am will discover I have another side, a better and finer side. I’m afraid they’ll mock me, think I’m ridiculous and sentimental and not take me seriously. I’m used to not being taken seriously, but only the “light-hearted” Anne is used to it and can put up with it; the “deeper” Anne is too weak. If I force the good Anne into the spotlight for even fifteen minutes, she shuts up like a clam the moment she’s called upon to speak, and lets Anne number one do the talking. Before I realize it, she’s disappeared.

So the nice Anne is never seen in company. She’s never made a single appearance, though she almost always takes the stage when I’m alone. I know exactly how I’d like to be, how I am on the inside. But unfortunately I’m only like that with myself. And perhaps that’s why-no, I’m sure that’s the reason why I think of myself as happy on the inside and other people think I’m happy on the outside. I’m guided by the pure Anne within, but on the outside I’m nothing but a frolicsome little goat tugging at its tether.

As I’ve told you, what I say is not what I feel, which is why I have a reputation for being boy-crazy as well as a flirt, a smart aleck and a reader of romances. The happy-go-lucky Anne laughs, gives a flippant reply, shrugs her shoulders and pretends she doesn’t give a darn. The quiet Anne reacts in just the opposite way. If I’m being completely honest, I’ll have to admit that it does matter to me, that I’m trying very hard to change myself, but that I I’m always up against a more powerful enemy.

A voice within me is sobbing, “You see, that’s what’s become of you. You’re surrounded by negative opinions, dismayed looks and mocking faces, people, who dislike you, and all because you don’t listen to the advice of your own better half.”

Believe me, I’d like to listen, but it doesn’t work, because if I’m quiet and serious, everyone thinks I’m putting on a new act and I have to save myself with a joke, and then I’m not even talking about my own family, who assume I must be sick, stuff me with aspirins and sedatives, feel my neck and forehead to see if I have a temperature, ask about my bowel movements and berate me for being in a bad mood, until I just can’t keep it up anymore, because when everybody starts hovering over me, I get cross, then sad, and finally end up turning my heart inside out, the bad part on the outside and the good part on the inside, and keep trying to find a way to become what I’d like to be and what I could be if if only there were no other people in the world.

Yours, Anne M. Frank

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Anne Frank wrote her last diary entry on this day – The Jerusalem Post

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Anne Frank Center Tweets Rant Against Trump and Ivanka For Transgender Ban – MRCTV (blog)

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, an organization which theoretically fights against the kind of prejudice that led to the Holocaust, has been using its Twitter account to attack President Trump and Ivanka Trump over Trumps proposed transgender troop ban.

The Anne Frank Center began their tweeting spree by issuing an official statement by calling the transgender troop ban a NEW LOVE OF HATRED and EVIL:

They continued the rant by calling Trump evil, even trying to draw a connection between the day former President Truman desegregated the military and Trumps transgender tweet:

The Anne Frank Center then questioned Trumps own courage:

The Center even went as far as to say Trump terrorized U.S. military preparedness with his ban and needs extreme vetting:

The Anne Frank Center even repeatedly tweeted that an example of a world leader is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, not Trump:

Even Trumps daughter was not spared from the Anne Frank Centers scorn. In a now-deleted tweet, the Anne Frank Center tweeted a still image from a Saturday Night Live skit about Ivanka Trump (archive here), calling her complicit:

Another tweet claimed Ivanka, who has said she supports the gay community before, can no longer do more good from the inside:

The Center even scolded fellow human rights organizations for not vocally opposing the transgender ban.

As of Monday morning (approximately 9 a.m. ET) the Anne Frank Center has issued approximately 20 tweets regarding the transgender troop ban.

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect claims to be a U.S. organization dedicated to addressing civil and human rights across America.

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July 31, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Human Condition: Remembering Anne Frank, and a world of families lost – The Advocate

Aug. 4 marks the 73rd anniversary of the capture of Anne Frank and her family by the Gestapo in Amsterdam during World War II.

Part of her family would die in Auschwitz. Anne and her sister, Margot, would perish at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

From the ashes of those days of racist fire, the world was bequeathed a diary of family history to twist the souls of reasonable beings.

I am an addict to history.

I love reading about history.

I just wish I had one.

Many of my friends, using sites like Ancestry.com, can excavate their family past. I know one person who does it the old-fashioned way, digging through dusty archives in courthouses and public libraries. She’s even gone so far as to travel to Europe to uncover her past all the way back to the royal court of France’s Louis XIV.

I’m not so lucky.

In an ironic way, I don’t have a history because of history.

What I do know is this: My grandfather, Reuben Kamenitz, arrived in New York City from Kovno, Lithuania, sometime around 1910. I don’t know what he worked at, but he saved his money to bring his family over. First his father, Kusiel. Later came his brothers, including Murray, who was a deaf mute.

The rest of our direct line of descendants remained in Kovno, whose 35,000 Jews made up about a third of the city’s population. According to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the city was home to 40 synagogues and four Hebrew high schools, among many other Jewish institutions. Kovno was the educational, historical and religious center for the Jews of Lithuania.

It is there, on the streets of Kovno on June 25, 1941, that my family history ends.

That’s the day the Nazis arrived.

There werent enough of them at the time to do too much damage, so they just whipped up the local Jew haters in town to lend a helping hand, carrying out Hitler’s “Final Solution to the Jewish Problem.”

Some 3,800 Jews were hacked, beaten and shot to death. Many were beaten to death with metal rods. One anonymous individual, nicknamed “Death Dealer, has been pictured with his handiwork. He tortured 50 Jews while they hung in a garage.

In a way, then, it was fortunate that at in July, Police Battalion 65, a German mobile extermination unit, arrived. They just systematically lined up another 3,000 Jews and shot them.

As heinous as this litany from hell’s playbook may seem, it was just the warm-up act for Kovno. On the following Oct. 29, the ever-efficient bookkeeping and killing Nazis, with help of Lithuanian volunteers, shot 2,007 Jewish men, 2,920 women and 4,273 children in a single day. It was called “The Great Action” and is documented by the U.S. National Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Before they were forced to retreat in 1944 from advancing Soviet forces, the Nazis used hand grenades and dynamite to burn the Jewish Ghetto to the ground along with anything else Jewish, right down to the last scrap of paper.

So I don’t get to spend a day in a dusty room with genealogy or an afternoon at my desk poking around websites for my bloodline.

Our small family history is basically derived from two sources: an oral narrative from my dad and an old photo stuffed in an envelope I found after he died.

He answered most of my questions about our family tree with “I dont know” or “They are all dead, and we will never know.”

I cant say he was sad, just a little lost when it came to the subject.

I guess its just me wanting roots, to hear family stories that will never be told. To learn about the people who aren’t in the photos.

The old photo on my shelf shows Grandpa Reuben holding my infant father on his lap with my pregnant Grandma Esther and other family members nearby as they make their new life in the tenement houses of Brooklyn.

In a way, it says a lot.

But it’s also a dead end. There are so many people missing.

On Aug. 4, 73 years after they took Anne Frank away, we should all try to remember our history and, hopefully, learn something from it.

Kamenitz lives in New Orleans

Advocate readers may submit stories of about 500 words to The Human Condition at features@theadvocate.com or The Advocate, EatPlayLive, 10705 Rieger Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. There is no payment, and stories will be edited. Authors should include their city of residence.

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Human Condition: Remembering Anne Frank, and a world of families lost – The Advocate

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Protests against ICA show are off-base – The Boston Globe

Tragedy belongs to all humanity artists take should be supported

Some members of the black community are protesting the decision of the Institute of Contemporary Art to show paintings of the artist Dana Schutz (ICA deals with a controversy over a painting that isnt there, Metro, July 27). The issue is that Schutz has done a painting not being shown at the ICA that contains an image of the beaten and lynched Emmett Till in an open casket. The protesters complaint derives from a white artists appropriation of a murdered black man.

As an American Jew, I can say this: If a Christian artist of any color were to incorporate Anne Frank into a painting showing the cruelty and tragedy of the Holocaust, I would have no problem. I would, in fact, be gratified. A so-called Christian nation killed Anne Frank, but her murder belongs to all humanity. Any effort to spread knowledge of this tragedy deserves to be supported. The same goes for the story of Emmett Till; his mother wanted his body displayed in an open casket, and there is a reason for this.

A. David Wunsch

Belmont

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The ICA has an institutional accountability to present cutting-edge, controversial shows, and it should ignore activists who bleat about cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation is a good thing that enriches cultures and broadens the human mind. Paul Gauguin and his South Pacific paintings or Impressionist Japonais art are examples that readily come to mind.

To object to an art show that LEAVES OUT the objectionable painting is simply laughable. Perhaps the ICA directors should include the painting and introduce the activists to Amendment 1 of the Constitution. If they dont like the show, let them vote with their feet and not go.

Frederick Liberatore

North Billerica

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Protests against ICA show are off-base – The Boston Globe

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July 31, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

70 years of Anne Frank: Powerful lines from the diary which have inspired us – Hindustan Times

New Delhi

In June 1942,13-year-old Anne Frank, who lived in Amsterdam in Europe, was given a red-checked diary as a birthday present. Little did she know, that one day this diary would be read by millions of people all over the world.

Anne Frank in 1941.

The next month, Anne and her family went into hiding, to escape from falling into the hands of the Nazis, who were determined to send all the Jews to concentration and death camps, as part of their deadly ethnic-cleansing plan. Annes hiding place was in her father Otto Franks office, concealed behind a bookcase. Another family moved in with them, along with a dentist. They were helped by Ottos office colleagues. For two years, Anne chronicled her experiences of hiding in vivid detail, along with the difficulties of living with people in such confined quarters. She wrote about how quiet they had to be during the day, when they could use the washroom, and the fear of being discovered, and the shock of what was happening to their numerous Jewish friends.

However in August 1944, Nazis stormed their hiding place, and all eight people were taken away to concentration camps. Anne died at Bergen-Belsen camp in early March, 1945, a few months before she was to turn 16. Her father was the only one out of the eight people who survived. On his return, he published Annes diary, which had been saved by Miep, one of the helpers. Thus, he fullfilled Annes dream of becoming a writer, and Annes words, I want to continue living after my death, rings true today.

A photo of Anne Frank at the opening of the exhibition: Anne Frank, a History for Today, at the Westerbork Remembrance Centre in Hooghalen, northeast Netherlands. (AP File Photo)

Today, Annes diary is a testament, a powerful reminder, about a dark time where hatred of one particular race almost took over the world. As 2017 marks 70 years of the diarys publication, here are some of the most moving lines which Anne had written in her diary. From self-reflection to state of the world, Annes words resonate with us. It is admirable, that a girl at that age, had such a mature understanding of the world.

1) Women should be respected as well! Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldnt women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honoured and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers?

2) Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you dont know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!

3) Its difficult in times like these: Ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. Its a wonder I havent abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.

4) We arent allowed to have any opinions. People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but it doesnt stop you having your own opinion. Even if people are still very young, they shouldnt be prevented from saying what they think.

The bookcase which concealed the hiding place.

5) How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.

6) What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.

7) I dont think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains.

8) Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up until now? It is God who has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again. Who knows? It might even be our religion from which the world and all peoples learn good, and for that reason and only that reason do we suffer. We can never become just Netherlanders, or just English or representatives of any country for that matter. We will always remain Jews, but we want to, too.

9) As long as this exists, this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad?

10) I know what I want, I have a goal, an opinion, I have a religion and love. Let me be myself and then I am satisfied. I know that Im a woman, a woman with inward strength and plenty of courage.

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70 years of Anne Frank: Powerful lines from the diary which have inspired us – Hindustan Times

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July 28, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

‘Anne & Emmett’ playing at MetroStage – Fairfaxtimes.com

All this weekend, MetroStage in Alexandria is staging the celebrated play Anne & Emmett; an imaginary conversation between two iconic figures of civil rights history Anne Frank and Emmett Till. Written by Janet Langhart Cohen, this show examines the innocence of children thrust into the most horrific of circumstances. Though worlds away from each other, both Anne Frank and Emmett Till were just 14 years old when they fell victim to hate and intolerance.

Anne Frank was the Jewish girl whose diary kept a chilling account of the Holocaust, giving the world a glimpse into the atrocities of genocide. Emmett Till was an African-American boy who, after offending a white woman in 1955 Mississippi, was brutally beaten and murdered, sparking the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s. Cohen born in 1941 wrote the play after reflecting on her own life, having lived in two vastly different periods of American history.

She explained: I was finishing up my autobiography From Rage to Reason: My Life in Two Americas and I was born during apartheid America when things are segregated at schools, buses, lunch counters; couples like my husband and I (former Secretary of Defense William Cohen), it would have been illegal for us to have even married each other, so thats the period where I came of age.

Coincidentally, Cohen was reading The Diary of Anne Frank as required reading in her all-black high school when the news of Emmett Tills death came out. It was this revelation that injustices akin to the ones she was learning about in the Holocaust could happen to her own people in America that stole her innocence.

When I thought about Anne Frank and Emmett Till, I of course had them segregated in my mind because I lived in a segregated society, she said. People are always telling black people to get over it, to forget their history, she said. And the Jewish community, rightfully so, is saying remember, never forget. So I wondered what Anne Frank would have said to Emmett Till. I bet she would have understood; she would have never said anything so insensitive to him.

For Roz White, playing Emmett Tills mother Mamie Till, this is a show that hits close to home, both as African-Americans and as a mother of boys. However, she believes in letting her role into her personal life in order to offer a more genuine performance.

Just knowing the story of Emmett Till and being a parent of teenage boys; wanting to explore what kind of resilience and what kind of resolve it would take for a mother to endure what Mamie Till had to endure, said White of taking on this role. I dont think I have to keep [the role] separate, I think thats one of the gifts of being an actor… What you do have to keep separate is your response and your actions but using it on stage benefits me greatly to really be able to connect with the character. I allow all of that to come in and it makes for a much more real and transparent performance.

Though the subject matter of the play is sorrowful, it nevertheless stands as a powerful tribute to two children taken too soon and a timely call to action for us to choose love over hate, and to welcome new and differing perspectives.

Being open and willing to hear another side of the story thats not your own perspective is everything, said White. Even though Emmett and Anne meet in a fictional place called Memory to discuss these things, its very clear that we could be having these conversations in the real world. We need to open up lines of communication and have these conversations with our children, with our peers, and even people who we disagree with.

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‘Anne & Emmett’ playing at MetroStage – Fairfaxtimes.com

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank exhibit in Thornhill forever preserves her life – York Region – YorkRegion.com

Anne Frank thought about becoming a journalist.

She never got the chance to pursue this career.

But, pieces of her life, dreams, and hopes are forever preserved in her diary and in an exhibit focusing on her life called Anne Frank: A History for Today, at Dufferin Clark Library until Aug. 31.

From the Anne Frank House in the Netherlands, this exhibit includes a half-hour descriptive video about Anne Franks life, pieces from her diary, photos of where she lived, and pictures with her friends and family.

It brings to life her story, said Melanie Mowat, communications assistant with Vaughan Public Libraries. “It brings you close to Anne Franks life. You get to know her as a person. It brings facts in history together with what her family was going through.

Anne Frank was a Jewish girl forced to go into hiding in Amsterdam with her family during the Second World War. They hid for more than two years before they were discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people in the group to survive. Anne Frank became famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding.

Mowat suggests people opt for an organized tour. People sometimes just skim reading material but a guide can point out detail, she said.

Thirteen local volunteers have been trained to give tours of the travelling exhibit.

This exhibit is available for viewing during the librarys open hours. Guided tours, self-guided tours, and group bookings are available.

Guided tours are offered during the following hours:

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Anne Frank exhibit in Thornhill forever preserves her life – York Region – YorkRegion.com

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Editor who plucked ‘Diary of Anne Frank’ from rejection pile dies – New York Post

Judith JonesGetty Images Judith Jones, a legend in the New York publishing world who plucked The Diary of Anne Frank out of a rejection pile, died Wednesday at her summer home in Vermont at the age of 93. Jones worked for Knopf publishing for more than five decades, joining the company in 1957 and retiring in 2011. Over the course of her storied career, Jones convinced Alfred Knopf to publish Julia Childs now-iconic Mastering the Art of French Cooking in 1961, and she championed other cookbook authors like James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Lidia Bastianich, and literary writers like John Updike, Anne Tyler, William Maxwell, and Sharon Olds. It is impossible to imagine book publishing without Judith, said Knopf Chairman and Editor in Chief Sonny Mehta. Her authors have been recipients of five Pulitzer Prizes, five National Book Awards, and three National Book Critics Circle Awards, and her cookbook authors have been recipients of 41 awards from the James Beard Foundation and thirteen awards from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. Prior to joining Knopf, Jones worked as an assistant at Doubleday, first in New York and then in Paris. It was there that she noticed Holocaust victim Anne Franks diary in a slush pile that had been rejected by other publishers for translation into English. When Anne Franks father Otto returned to Amsterdam after the liberation of Auschwitz in 1945, he went to see Miep Gies, who was one of the people who helped hide the Frank family in a secret annex above Otto Franks business. Gies had found the diary after the Gestapo raid of the annex and hid it, unread, hoping that Anne would one day return for it. Instead, Otto would be the only member of the eight annex residents to return. Anne died in March 1945 in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, only about 2 months before the Germans were defeated. Anne Frank made it clear in her diary that she wanted it published. Despite initial misgivings, Otto followed her wishes. The diary was printed in Dutch in 1947 and in Germany and France in 1950, but had not been translated into English. Jones was drawn by Annes picture on the advance copy of the French edition, and spent all day reading it in tears. When my boss returned, I told him, We have to publish this book. He said, What? That book by that kid? Jones explained in a 2001 interview with the Associated Press. She brought the diary to the attention of Doubledays New York office, and the book was published in the US in 1952 to wide acclaim. I was so taken with it, and I felt it would have a real market in America. Its one of those seminal books that will never be forgotten.

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August 2, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Judith Jones, cookbook author who brought Julia Child and others to the table, dies at 93 – Washington Post

Judith Jones, the legendary editor who rescued The Diary of Anne Frank from a publishers reject pile and later introduced readers to the likes of Julia Child and a host of other influential cookbook authors, died Aug. 2 at her summer home in Walden, Vt. She was 93. The cause was complications from Alzheimers disease, said her step-daughter Bronwyn Dunne. Mrs. Jones helped open a world of cuisines to a public previously bound by convenience foods, and her impact on cookbook publishing, home cooking and the American palate was monumental. Beginning in the 1950s, she followed her own curiosity and her instincts for what readers wanted to cook and needed to know, and she championed the work of unknown authors who became icons and whose books became classics. The list of these scholar-cooks who owe her their career includes Madhur Jaffrey, Claudia Roden, Marcella Hazan, Joan Nathan, Edna Lewis, Lidia Bastianich, Anna Thomas, Hiroko Shimbo, Michael Field and Nina Simonds. She also edited some of Alfred A. Knopf Inc.s most famous fiction writers, including John Updike and Anne Tyler. Without her discovery of Franks memoir, while she was at Doubleday in Paris, American readers might never have been introduced to Franks startling, first-person narrative, one of the first Holocaust accounts to reach the United States. Her role was small but pivotal, and it was enough to get her noticed and hired by Knopf co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1957. As a junior editor at Knopf, Mrs. Jones began primarily as a translator of such French writers as Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus, and she had no intention of editing cookbooks, the work for which she became famous. But she had fallen in love with French food when she lived in Paris after college, and upon returning to the United States with a new husband, she was desperate for help unlocking the cuisines secrets in their New York kitchen. One day in 1959, a huge manuscript arrived on her desk. From the moment I started turning the pages, I was bouleverse, as the French say knocked out, she wrote in her memoir, The Tenth Muse (2007).This was the book Id been searching for. This was also the book that Child, with co-authors Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle, had spent six years unsuccessfully trying to shorten for an editor at Houghton Mifflin. Child worried that the book was unpublishable, she wrote in her own memoir, My Life in France. Maybe the editors were right. After all, there probably werent many people like me who liked to fuss around in the kitchen. Fortunately for Child and for generations of cooks who fell in love with her there was at least one who did: Mrs. Jones, who spent months trying recipes before deciding the book must see the light of day. If the book was so right for me, there were bound to be maybe thousands like me who really wanted to learn the whys and wherefores of good French cooking, she wrote. Ordinary Americans, not just the privileged, were traveling to Europe now, in droves, and their taste buds had been awakened. I hoped wed had our fill of quick-and-easy, and there was an appetite for the real thing. She prevailed, and as Childs editor, Mrs. Jones got her hands, and kitchen, dirty. She scouted for ingredients and equipment, practiced making omelettes and fluting mushrooms, and gave recipes to a cooking neophyte in the Knopf office to try all to make sure the recipes would work in American kitchens. She even was responsible for the books title, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. When I triumphantly showed our title to Mr. Knopf, he scowled and said, Well, Ill eat my hat if that title sells, she wrote. I like to think of all the hats he had to eat. We are flying blind The diminutive Mrs. Jones, known for her classic suits and pageboy haircut, was also good at getting her authors noticed. When Mastering was nearing publication, she sent copies to taste-makers James Beard and Craig Claiborne, the latter the food editor of the New York Times. They both loved it. Beard threw a party for Child & Co., and Claiborne agreed to review it but only if Mrs. Jones and her husband, Evan, would first agree to be the subjects of a Times story about their own cooking. Mastering sold millions of copies, and Child who had emerged from her co-authors as the books guiding force became a TV star, culinary treasure and household name. Mrs. Jones formed similar partnerships with other authors, having particular success with those writing about global cuisines curious to Americans. With a new, exotic, unfamiliar style of cooking, more than ever we are flying blind we may never even have tasted the dish we are trying to reproduce and we need a lot of hand-holding, she wrote. So I kept my eyes and ears, to say nothing of my taste buds, open to the kind of writer-cook who was particularly gifted, like Julia, at explaining the techniques of a different cooking culture. The best ones, she found, were often transplants, longing to re-create the foods of their homeland. That describes Hazan, whose passion for cooking didnt emerge until she and her husband had moved to the United States from Italy. She and Hazan clashed often, with Hazan insisting on authenticity and Mrs. Jones wanting recipes to be accessible. Mrs. Jones also developed a longstanding interest in regional American cuisine. After she was referred to Lewis, the granddaughter of a former slave who wanted to write a book about Southern cooking, Mrs. Jones was disappointed when sample pages Lewis wrote with a co-author didnt have Lewiss voice. The co-author quit, and Mrs. Jones and Lewis instead began regularly meeting to talk about Lewiss upbringing in a small Virginia community founded by freed slaves. While we were both still giddy with the pleasures she had evoked and the ease with which the details of each anecdote had surfaced, I suggested she go home right away and put everything down just as she had told it to me, Mrs. Jones wrote. It worked miraculously. The stories and recipes in 1976 became The Taste of Country Cooking, which served to transform the publics perception of Southern food and is still considered a masterpiece. Nathan, the eminent Jewish-cooking authority, worked on four books with Mrs. Jones and traveled with her to Israel while working on The Foods of Israel Today. She only wanted to do books that made a difference, Nathan said in an interview. Shes a real editor. There aren’t many of them left. Her favorite lesson from Mrs. Jones: Find your voice, Nathan said. Find who you are and dont be afraid to show it. We have to publish this book She came from Barbados and at my urging would tell me about the foods she grew up on strange fruits Id never heard of, hot peppers that made one sweat, and, of course, garlic, she wrote in her memoir. Her father recognized her adventurous palate and indulged her on restaurant visits. After she graduated in 1945 from Bennington College in Vermont, she returned briefly to New York to work in publishing before a three-week vacation in Europe turned into a full-time move to Paris. At 27, working as a girl Friday at Doubleday in Paris, she was tasked one day in 1950 with filing rejected submissions. My boss went off to lunch with his fellow editors, and left me with a pile of stuff, she told the Jewish Chronicle in 2009. I came to this lovely face, she said, referring to Anne Franks photo on the advance copy of the French edition of the book. I read it all day. When my boss returned, I told him, We have to publish this book. He said, What? That book by that kid? It had been published in Dutch and was set for publication in French, but was rejected by other English-language publishers, too, before she successfully argued that the New York office of Doubleday should take it on. The story of the Holocaust as seen through a young girls eyes became an international sensation, one of the best-selling books of all time and adapted for stage and screen. Early in her Paris years, the future cookbook editor had been an assistant to Evan Jones, who edited a magazine aimed at American tourists. They wed in 1951, eventually settling in New York and maintaining their summer home in Vermont. Survivors include four stepchildren, Bronwyn Dunne of South Burlington, Vt., Pamela Richards of Stamford, Conn., Audrey Bierman of Grinnell, Iowa, and John Christopher Vandercook of Honolulu; five grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. In addition to her cookbook editing, Mrs. Jones wrote three books with Evan: The Book of Bread; Knead It, Punch It, Bake It! (a childrens book); and The Book of New New England Cookery. She worked at Knopf for a half-century, but her early time there was not without struggle. For many years, she and Blanche were the only women in the Knopf offices, Sara Franklin, who spent months interviewing Mrs. Jones for an oral history on behalf of the Julia Child Foundation, wrote in Cherry Bombe magazine in 2014. While editing prestigious writers helped Jones climb the ranks, her culinary pursuits were often perceived as fluff. Women were kept down, she remembers, and people often assumed she was a secretary rather than an editor. In 2006, Mrs. Jones was awarded the James Beard Foundations Lifetime Achievement Award. She retired from Knopf in 2010 as senior editor and vice president. Her husband died in 1996, but Mrs. Jones was determined to not let his absence deter her from continuing their favorite ritual: cooking. Instead of walking into what might have seemed an empty apartment actually, Ive always had a dog who is hungry to greet me I gravitate toward the kitchen, she wrote in The Tenth Muse. After her memoir was published, Mrs. Jones received so many requests to write more about her solo cooking that in 2010 she published The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Rather than dwell on the challenges, the book praises the joys of lighting a candle, pouring a glass of wine and laying out her best linens for a meal she would savor. She drew on a lifetime of cooking and lessons from the authors she had edited to espouse her belief in frugality and the smart use of leftovers, repurposing them into other dishes. Her last book was 2014s Love Me, Feed Me, a guide to making food that a cook could share with a dog. Its no accident that many of the recipes she wrote about doling out for herself and her little pooch, Mabon Moroccan moussaka, Indian red lentils, Southern-style shrimp and grits are staples of some of the same cuisines Mrs. Jones had long before helped demystify.

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August 2, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank wrote her last diary entry on this day – The Jerusalem Post

Jews around the world today are observing the 9th of Av or Tisha Be’av, a Jewish holiday that commemorates the destruction of the ancient Temples in Jerusalem. Coincedentally, this year the somber fasting holiday shares the same gregorian calendar date as another sad anniversary in Jewish history. August 1, 1944 was the date of Anne Frank’s last diary entry. Frank wrote the diary during the two-year period that her family hid in the attic of Opekta, her father Otto’s former place of business, in Amsterdam. The Frank family went into hiding on June 12, 1942 and Anne began writing in her diary two days later on the 14th. From June 14, 1942 to August 1, 1944, the teenager would document life inside the attic in her diary, which she addressed to “Kitty,” ultimately becoming one of the most complete first-hand accounts of a Holocaust victim. The original occupants of the attic were Anne, her older sister Margot, and their parents Otto and Edith. Three members of the van Pels family — Hermann, Auguste, and their son Peter — and Fritz Pfeffer, a German-born dentist, moved into the attic later in 1942. Three days after her last diary entry, on August 4, 1944, German police entered the attic and arrested all the occupants. Anne and Margot were sent to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. Both died of typhus shortly before the camp was liberated in 1945. The exact dates of their deaths are unknown. Of the seven occupants of the attic, only Otto Frank survived. After the war, he devoted much of his life to publishing his daughter’s diary. The diary (published in English as The Diary of a Young Girl) has been translated into over 60 languages and adapted into multiple award-winning plays and films. 15-year-old Anne’s entry from August 1, 1944 reads as follows: Dearest Kitty, “A bundle of contradictions” was the end of my previous letter and is the beginning of this one. Can you please tell me exactly what “a bundle of contradictions” is? What does “contradiction” mean? Like so many words, it can be interpreted in two ways: a contradiction imposed from without and one imposed from within. The former means not accepting other people’s opinions, always knowing best, having the last word; in short, all those unpleasant traits for which I’m known. The latter, for which I’m not known, is my own secret. As I’ve told you many times, I’m split in two. One side contains my exuberant cheerfulness, my flippancy, my joy in life and, above all, my ability to appreciate the lighter side of things. By that I mean not finding anything wrong with flirtations, a kiss, an embrace, an off-color joke. This side of me is usually lying in wait to ambush the other one, which is much purer, deeper and finer. No one knows Anne’s better side, and that’s why most people can’t stand me. Oh, I can be an amusing clown for an afternoon, but after that everyone’s had enough of me to last a month. Actually, I’m what a romantic movie is to a profound thinker a mere diversion, a comic interlude, something that is soon forgotten: not bad, but not particularly good either. I hate having to tell you this, but why shouldn’t I admit it when I know it’s true? My lighter, more superficial side will always steal a march on the deeper side and therefore always win. You can’t imagine how often I’ve tried to push away this Anne, which is only half of what is known as Anne-to beat her down, hide her. But it doesn’t work, and I know why. I’m afraid that people who know me as I usually am will discover I have another side, a better and finer side. I’m afraid they’ll mock me, think I’m ridiculous and sentimental and not take me seriously. I’m used to not being taken seriously, but only the “light-hearted” Anne is used to it and can put up with it; the “deeper” Anne is too weak. If I force the good Anne into the spotlight for even fifteen minutes, she shuts up like a clam the moment she’s called upon to speak, and lets Anne number one do the talking. Before I realize it, she’s disappeared. So the nice Anne is never seen in company. She’s never made a single appearance, though she almost always takes the stage when I’m alone. I know exactly how I’d like to be, how I am on the inside. But unfortunately I’m only like that with myself. And perhaps that’s why-no, I’m sure that’s the reason why I think of myself as happy on the inside and other people think I’m happy on the outside. I’m guided by the pure Anne within, but on the outside I’m nothing but a frolicsome little goat tugging at its tether. As I’ve told you, what I say is not what I feel, which is why I have a reputation for being boy-crazy as well as a flirt, a smart aleck and a reader of romances. The happy-go-lucky Anne laughs, gives a flippant reply, shrugs her shoulders and pretends she doesn’t give a darn. The quiet Anne reacts in just the opposite way. If I’m being completely honest, I’ll have to admit that it does matter to me, that I’m trying very hard to change myself, but that I I’m always up against a more powerful enemy. A voice within me is sobbing, “You see, that’s what’s become of you. You’re surrounded by negative opinions, dismayed looks and mocking faces, people, who dislike you, and all because you don’t listen to the advice of your own better half.” Believe me, I’d like to listen, but it doesn’t work, because if I’m quiet and serious, everyone thinks I’m putting on a new act and I have to save myself with a joke, and then I’m not even talking about my own family, who assume I must be sick, stuff me with aspirins and sedatives, feel my neck and forehead to see if I have a temperature, ask about my bowel movements and berate me for being in a bad mood, until I just can’t keep it up anymore, because when everybody starts hovering over me, I get cross, then sad, and finally end up turning my heart inside out, the bad part on the outside and the good part on the inside, and keep trying to find a way to become what I’d like to be and what I could be if if only there were no other people in the world. Yours, Anne M. Frank Share on facebook

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August 1, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank Center Tweets Rant Against Trump and Ivanka For Transgender Ban – MRCTV (blog)

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, an organization which theoretically fights against the kind of prejudice that led to the Holocaust, has been using its Twitter account to attack President Trump and Ivanka Trump over Trumps proposed transgender troop ban. The Anne Frank Center began their tweeting spree by issuing an official statement by calling the transgender troop ban a NEW LOVE OF HATRED and EVIL: They continued the rant by calling Trump evil, even trying to draw a connection between the day former President Truman desegregated the military and Trumps transgender tweet: The Anne Frank Center then questioned Trumps own courage: The Center even went as far as to say Trump terrorized U.S. military preparedness with his ban and needs extreme vetting: The Anne Frank Center even repeatedly tweeted that an example of a world leader is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, not Trump: Even Trumps daughter was not spared from the Anne Frank Centers scorn. In a now-deleted tweet, the Anne Frank Center tweeted a still image from a Saturday Night Live skit about Ivanka Trump (archive here), calling her complicit: Another tweet claimed Ivanka, who has said she supports the gay community before, can no longer do more good from the inside: The Center even scolded fellow human rights organizations for not vocally opposing the transgender ban. As of Monday morning (approximately 9 a.m. ET) the Anne Frank Center has issued approximately 20 tweets regarding the transgender troop ban. The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect claims to be a U.S. organization dedicated to addressing civil and human rights across America. Thank you for supporting MRCTV! As a tax-deductible, charitable organization, we rely on the support of our readers to keep us running! Keep MRCTV going with your gift here!

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July 31, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Human Condition: Remembering Anne Frank, and a world of families lost – The Advocate

Aug. 4 marks the 73rd anniversary of the capture of Anne Frank and her family by the Gestapo in Amsterdam during World War II. Part of her family would die in Auschwitz. Anne and her sister, Margot, would perish at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. From the ashes of those days of racist fire, the world was bequeathed a diary of family history to twist the souls of reasonable beings. I am an addict to history. I love reading about history. I just wish I had one. Many of my friends, using sites like Ancestry.com, can excavate their family past. I know one person who does it the old-fashioned way, digging through dusty archives in courthouses and public libraries. She’s even gone so far as to travel to Europe to uncover her past all the way back to the royal court of France’s Louis XIV. I’m not so lucky. In an ironic way, I don’t have a history because of history. What I do know is this: My grandfather, Reuben Kamenitz, arrived in New York City from Kovno, Lithuania, sometime around 1910. I don’t know what he worked at, but he saved his money to bring his family over. First his father, Kusiel. Later came his brothers, including Murray, who was a deaf mute. The rest of our direct line of descendants remained in Kovno, whose 35,000 Jews made up about a third of the city’s population. According to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the city was home to 40 synagogues and four Hebrew high schools, among many other Jewish institutions. Kovno was the educational, historical and religious center for the Jews of Lithuania. It is there, on the streets of Kovno on June 25, 1941, that my family history ends. That’s the day the Nazis arrived. There werent enough of them at the time to do too much damage, so they just whipped up the local Jew haters in town to lend a helping hand, carrying out Hitler’s “Final Solution to the Jewish Problem.” Some 3,800 Jews were hacked, beaten and shot to death. Many were beaten to death with metal rods. One anonymous individual, nicknamed “Death Dealer, has been pictured with his handiwork. He tortured 50 Jews while they hung in a garage. In a way, then, it was fortunate that at in July, Police Battalion 65, a German mobile extermination unit, arrived. They just systematically lined up another 3,000 Jews and shot them. As heinous as this litany from hell’s playbook may seem, it was just the warm-up act for Kovno. On the following Oct. 29, the ever-efficient bookkeeping and killing Nazis, with help of Lithuanian volunteers, shot 2,007 Jewish men, 2,920 women and 4,273 children in a single day. It was called “The Great Action” and is documented by the U.S. National Holocaust Memorial Museum. Before they were forced to retreat in 1944 from advancing Soviet forces, the Nazis used hand grenades and dynamite to burn the Jewish Ghetto to the ground along with anything else Jewish, right down to the last scrap of paper. So I don’t get to spend a day in a dusty room with genealogy or an afternoon at my desk poking around websites for my bloodline. Our small family history is basically derived from two sources: an oral narrative from my dad and an old photo stuffed in an envelope I found after he died. He answered most of my questions about our family tree with “I dont know” or “They are all dead, and we will never know.” I cant say he was sad, just a little lost when it came to the subject. I guess its just me wanting roots, to hear family stories that will never be told. To learn about the people who aren’t in the photos. The old photo on my shelf shows Grandpa Reuben holding my infant father on his lap with my pregnant Grandma Esther and other family members nearby as they make their new life in the tenement houses of Brooklyn. In a way, it says a lot. But it’s also a dead end. There are so many people missing. On Aug. 4, 73 years after they took Anne Frank away, we should all try to remember our history and, hopefully, learn something from it. Kamenitz lives in New Orleans Advocate readers may submit stories of about 500 words to The Human Condition at features@theadvocate.com or The Advocate, EatPlayLive, 10705 Rieger Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. There is no payment, and stories will be edited. Authors should include their city of residence.

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July 31, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Protests against ICA show are off-base – The Boston Globe

Tragedy belongs to all humanity artists take should be supported Some members of the black community are protesting the decision of the Institute of Contemporary Art to show paintings of the artist Dana Schutz (ICA deals with a controversy over a painting that isnt there, Metro, July 27). The issue is that Schutz has done a painting not being shown at the ICA that contains an image of the beaten and lynched Emmett Till in an open casket. The protesters complaint derives from a white artists appropriation of a murdered black man. As an American Jew, I can say this: If a Christian artist of any color were to incorporate Anne Frank into a painting showing the cruelty and tragedy of the Holocaust, I would have no problem. I would, in fact, be gratified. A so-called Christian nation killed Anne Frank, but her murder belongs to all humanity. Any effort to spread knowledge of this tragedy deserves to be supported. The same goes for the story of Emmett Till; his mother wanted his body displayed in an open casket, and there is a reason for this. A. David Wunsch Belmont Advertisement The ICA has an institutional accountability to present cutting-edge, controversial shows, and it should ignore activists who bleat about cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation is a good thing that enriches cultures and broadens the human mind. Paul Gauguin and his South Pacific paintings or Impressionist Japonais art are examples that readily come to mind. To object to an art show that LEAVES OUT the objectionable painting is simply laughable. Perhaps the ICA directors should include the painting and introduce the activists to Amendment 1 of the Constitution. If they dont like the show, let them vote with their feet and not go. Frederick Liberatore North Billerica

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July 31, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

70 years of Anne Frank: Powerful lines from the diary which have inspired us – Hindustan Times

New Delhi In June 1942,13-year-old Anne Frank, who lived in Amsterdam in Europe, was given a red-checked diary as a birthday present. Little did she know, that one day this diary would be read by millions of people all over the world. Anne Frank in 1941. The next month, Anne and her family went into hiding, to escape from falling into the hands of the Nazis, who were determined to send all the Jews to concentration and death camps, as part of their deadly ethnic-cleansing plan. Annes hiding place was in her father Otto Franks office, concealed behind a bookcase. Another family moved in with them, along with a dentist. They were helped by Ottos office colleagues. For two years, Anne chronicled her experiences of hiding in vivid detail, along with the difficulties of living with people in such confined quarters. She wrote about how quiet they had to be during the day, when they could use the washroom, and the fear of being discovered, and the shock of what was happening to their numerous Jewish friends. However in August 1944, Nazis stormed their hiding place, and all eight people were taken away to concentration camps. Anne died at Bergen-Belsen camp in early March, 1945, a few months before she was to turn 16. Her father was the only one out of the eight people who survived. On his return, he published Annes diary, which had been saved by Miep, one of the helpers. Thus, he fullfilled Annes dream of becoming a writer, and Annes words, I want to continue living after my death, rings true today. A photo of Anne Frank at the opening of the exhibition: Anne Frank, a History for Today, at the Westerbork Remembrance Centre in Hooghalen, northeast Netherlands. (AP File Photo) Today, Annes diary is a testament, a powerful reminder, about a dark time where hatred of one particular race almost took over the world. As 2017 marks 70 years of the diarys publication, here are some of the most moving lines which Anne had written in her diary. From self-reflection to state of the world, Annes words resonate with us. It is admirable, that a girl at that age, had such a mature understanding of the world. 1) Women should be respected as well! Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldnt women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honoured and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers? 2) Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you dont know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is! 3) Its difficult in times like these: Ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. Its a wonder I havent abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. 4) We arent allowed to have any opinions. People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but it doesnt stop you having your own opinion. Even if people are still very young, they shouldnt be prevented from saying what they think. The bookcase which concealed the hiding place. 5) How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. 6) What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again. 7) I dont think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains. 8) Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up until now? It is God who has made us as we are, but it will be God, too, who will raise us up again. Who knows? It might even be our religion from which the world and all peoples learn good, and for that reason and only that reason do we suffer. We can never become just Netherlanders, or just English or representatives of any country for that matter. We will always remain Jews, but we want to, too. 9) As long as this exists, this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad? 10) I know what I want, I have a goal, an opinion, I have a religion and love. Let me be myself and then I am satisfied. I know that Im a woman, a woman with inward strength and plenty of courage.

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July 28, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

‘Anne & Emmett’ playing at MetroStage – Fairfaxtimes.com

All this weekend, MetroStage in Alexandria is staging the celebrated play Anne & Emmett; an imaginary conversation between two iconic figures of civil rights history Anne Frank and Emmett Till. Written by Janet Langhart Cohen, this show examines the innocence of children thrust into the most horrific of circumstances. Though worlds away from each other, both Anne Frank and Emmett Till were just 14 years old when they fell victim to hate and intolerance. Anne Frank was the Jewish girl whose diary kept a chilling account of the Holocaust, giving the world a glimpse into the atrocities of genocide. Emmett Till was an African-American boy who, after offending a white woman in 1955 Mississippi, was brutally beaten and murdered, sparking the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s. Cohen born in 1941 wrote the play after reflecting on her own life, having lived in two vastly different periods of American history. She explained: I was finishing up my autobiography From Rage to Reason: My Life in Two Americas and I was born during apartheid America when things are segregated at schools, buses, lunch counters; couples like my husband and I (former Secretary of Defense William Cohen), it would have been illegal for us to have even married each other, so thats the period where I came of age. Coincidentally, Cohen was reading The Diary of Anne Frank as required reading in her all-black high school when the news of Emmett Tills death came out. It was this revelation that injustices akin to the ones she was learning about in the Holocaust could happen to her own people in America that stole her innocence. When I thought about Anne Frank and Emmett Till, I of course had them segregated in my mind because I lived in a segregated society, she said. People are always telling black people to get over it, to forget their history, she said. And the Jewish community, rightfully so, is saying remember, never forget. So I wondered what Anne Frank would have said to Emmett Till. I bet she would have understood; she would have never said anything so insensitive to him. For Roz White, playing Emmett Tills mother Mamie Till, this is a show that hits close to home, both as African-Americans and as a mother of boys. However, she believes in letting her role into her personal life in order to offer a more genuine performance. Just knowing the story of Emmett Till and being a parent of teenage boys; wanting to explore what kind of resilience and what kind of resolve it would take for a mother to endure what Mamie Till had to endure, said White of taking on this role. I dont think I have to keep [the role] separate, I think thats one of the gifts of being an actor… What you do have to keep separate is your response and your actions but using it on stage benefits me greatly to really be able to connect with the character. I allow all of that to come in and it makes for a much more real and transparent performance. Though the subject matter of the play is sorrowful, it nevertheless stands as a powerful tribute to two children taken too soon and a timely call to action for us to choose love over hate, and to welcome new and differing perspectives. Being open and willing to hear another side of the story thats not your own perspective is everything, said White. Even though Emmett and Anne meet in a fictional place called Memory to discuss these things, its very clear that we could be having these conversations in the real world. We need to open up lines of communication and have these conversations with our children, with our peers, and even people who we disagree with.

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Anne Frank exhibit in Thornhill forever preserves her life – York Region – YorkRegion.com

Anne Frank thought about becoming a journalist. She never got the chance to pursue this career. But, pieces of her life, dreams, and hopes are forever preserved in her diary and in an exhibit focusing on her life called Anne Frank: A History for Today, at Dufferin Clark Library until Aug. 31. From the Anne Frank House in the Netherlands, this exhibit includes a half-hour descriptive video about Anne Franks life, pieces from her diary, photos of where she lived, and pictures with her friends and family. It brings to life her story, said Melanie Mowat, communications assistant with Vaughan Public Libraries. “It brings you close to Anne Franks life. You get to know her as a person. It brings facts in history together with what her family was going through. Anne Frank was a Jewish girl forced to go into hiding in Amsterdam with her family during the Second World War. They hid for more than two years before they were discovered and deported to concentration camps. Annes father, Otto Frank, is the only one of the eight people in the group to survive. Anne Frank became famous because of the diary she wrote while in hiding. Mowat suggests people opt for an organized tour. People sometimes just skim reading material but a guide can point out detail, she said. Thirteen local volunteers have been trained to give tours of the travelling exhibit. This exhibit is available for viewing during the librarys open hours. Guided tours, self-guided tours, and group bookings are available. Guided tours are offered during the following hours:

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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