Archive for the ‘Anne Frank’ Category

‘Anne & Emmett’ at MetroStage – Virginia Connection Newspapers

Alexandria For a limited engagement, MetroStage in Alexandria is presenting “Anne & Emmett” from July 28 to 30.

The play by Janet Langhart Cohen is an imaginary conversation between Anne Frank and Emmett Till, both victims of racial intolerance and hatred. Anne is

the 15-year-old Jewish girl whose diary offered the world a gripping perspective of the Holocaust and touched the hearts of humanity. Emmett is the 14-year-old African American boy whose brutal murder in Mississippi sparked the modern Civil Rights movement.

“It is a remarkable play, and Cohens concept of bringing together these two teens who so vividly represent the Holocaust and the Civil Rights movement is unique and a perfect vehicle on stage to tell their stories,” said Carolyn Griffin, producing artistic director of MetroStage. “The impact on the audience is powerful, and it is a play we believe in and hope all ages, all generations and all backgrounds will see. It is a call to action ‘tikkun olam’ to repair the world. Something that theatre and individuals can work together to achieve.”

Enoch King plays the role of Emmett, a highly energetic, inquisitive, curious and sometimes hot-tempered young man. “He is funny and is always ready to laugh or find a way to make someone else laugh,” he said. “He is very quick-witted, not afraid to share his opinions and ideas, but also not afraid to learn more.”

The challenge, he said, was not playing the tragedy of how he died and the

MetroStage in Alexandria is presenting “Anne & Emmett” from July 28 to 30. Tickets are $35. The venue is located at 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria, VA 22314. Call the box office at 703-548-9044 or visit www.metrostage.org.

circumstances surrounding it; instead, focusing on his life, his thoughts, hopes, fears, loves and wants. “It’s difficult because Emmett was real. He really lived and died. There are moments in the show where it hits me how young he was and it can be overwhelming, but I remind myself to let him breathe and live in the piece,” he said.

Roz White plays the role of Mamie Till (Mobley), the mother of Emmett. “She is a soft spoken, strong, and loving mother who wants the best for her only son,” she said. “She did what she could to prepare and protect Emmett from the hatred of Southern whites, but she couldn’t foresee the horrible murder he would suffer as a result of the alleged flirtation he was accused of with a white woman.”

She added: “Mrs. Till gathered her strength and used Emmett’s senseless murder to open the eyes of America to the injustices that were being imposed upon blacks, and this exposure spearheaded what we now know as the Civil Rights movement.”

She said the challenges that she faced delving into this role were mostly personal. “Being a mother of two teen-aged boys, I immediately connected with the character, and her desperation to keep her son safe, while seeking not to break his strong spirit. Another challenge was keeping her (Mamie) human, and not over-playing her to the point of martyrdom. I hope the audiences will see her strength and resilience, while also being aware of her vulnerability.”

Abigail Williams plays the role of Anne, a curious, passionate, hope-filled, stubborn, beautiful soul. “She has heart, desires to continue to see and believe in the good in the world, and fights until the very end to hold on to hope,” she said. “She wants to understand how to make sense of all she has been through, yet she never loses her child-like curiosity throughout.”

She said the challenge was trying to honor the real life that Anne lived while understanding that, as an actor, she had to put some of herself into her character to make her feel true in the moments that she’s portraying her.

“Making choices about someone who lived a real life is obviously different than making choices about a fictional character,” she said. “And the weight of responsibility in playing a role that is internationally known for being so heroic and brave, and whose private thought-life is actually popularly circulated throughout the general public means that, in some ways, Im going up against the thoughts people already have about who Anne is this, at times, has felt deeply challenging.”

Roger Grunwald plays two roles in the play: Otto Frank and J.W. Milam. “It would be hard to find two more antipodal characters (or people). As an actor, I always try as best as I can to find a characters humanity, humor and vulnerabilities. Milam, the murderer of Emmett Till, however, is an unrepentant killer, a racist and a braggart.”

He continued: “Otto Frank, by contrast, is a fundamentally decent man who tries, as best as he can, to hold his family together, instilling hope and doing whatever is necessary to avoid detection and capture by the Nazis. Needless to say, it proves to be an impossible task. As the familys sole survivor, he dedicates his post-war life to bringing Annes message and her belief in the fundamental goodness of humankind to the world.”

Griffin met playwright Cohen several years ago and introduced her to the resident director Thomas W. Jones II. She said the play was further developed with Jones and his team that included music director William Knowles, and was performed for a weekend on MetroStage in 2015. It has since toured Indianapolis, Chicago, and New York City. The play returns to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C. and then back to MetroStage. It will be filmed at MetroStage and then performed July 28-30 before leaving for the National Black Theatre Festival.

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‘Anne & Emmett’ at MetroStage – Virginia Connection Newspapers

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Palm Beach County students presenting ‘Diary of Anne Frank’ – Sun Sentinel

On Saturday evening, Aug. 12, a cast and crew of middle and high school students involved in the Youth Artists Chair summer program at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre will produce the Jewish-themed play, “The Diary of Anne Frank.”

“The Diary of Anne Frank” tells the true story about eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic during the Holocaust.

Based on the diary entries of young German-born teen Anne Frank one of the most-discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust this play captures the realities of their daily existence: their fears, hopes, laughter and grief.

As the Anne Frank character says during the play, “When I write, I shake off all my cares. But I want to achieve more than that. I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!”

This play is a stage adaptation of Frank’s popular 1947 book, “The Diary of a Young Girl,” which is the original book of writings from Frank’s Dutch language diary.

Johanna Cohan, production manager for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre (who is Jewish), said she is proud to see all the students embracing the strong Jewish themes of the play.

“The story of Anne Frank is a challenging and inspiring piece as it gives audiences a glimpse into the darkest moments of a family’s life, while also allowing audiences to believe that even in the most horrible of times hope, love and kindness can exist,” Cohan said. “These amazing students are working so hard to bring respect and honor to the memories of these people and the hundreds of thousands of young men and women whose stories will never be told.

“In a time where anti-Semitism is becoming more prevalent around the world, it is important for the youngsters to learn, share and understand stories like this. That is the only way we can ensure that atrocities like the Holocaust never happen again.”

The Jewish students involved in the production have a close connection to the content of this play.

Jewish teen actress Skye Alyssa Friedman, 15, of Jupiter, will portray Anne Frank.

“We need to tell this story to constantly remind people what happened,” Friedman said. “It’s a part of history that cannot be forgotten.”

Jewish teen actor Daniel Reiter. 13, of Palm Beach Gardens, also is in the cast.

“This is an authentic play,” Reiter said. “There’s some Hebrew in the script that the actors are getting help from me in order to deliver.”

Brielle Cohen, 15, of Jupiter, is the play’s student costume designer.

“This is an emotional play for me because this happened to our ancestors,” Cohen said. “I could have been Anne Frank. But, it’s also a great story that applies to everyone.”

Non-Jewish cast and crew members have also been touched by the play.

Lauren Thomas, 16, of Jupiter, is the play’s dramaturg (in-house critic).

“The process of producing this play has been very impactful for all of us, because not only do we discuss the Holocaust, but we talk about how to prevent an event like it from ever happening again,” Thomas said.

Taylor Buddemeier, 18, of Jupiter Farms the play’s student marketing director said, “Though this play is about a sad time in history, it’s ultimately about hope for a better future for all.”

The Youth Artists Chair is a free summer intensive mentorship program the Maltz has provided for area teens since 2011. The project aligns high school students with individual theater staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the play’s creation process.

“The Diary of Anne Frank is a young person’s story being brought to life by young people,” said Julie Rowe, the theater’s education director. “This program is a wonderful annual opportunity for local students to spend their summers working on a relevant, important project with their peers.”

Tickets for the play which explores mature themes are $25 for adults and $20 for children. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call 561-575-2223.

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Janet Langhart Cohen on Anne & Emmett, when will the hatred that … – DC Theatre Scene

Talking with Janet Langhart Cohen is like stepping back in time and talking to a time traveler shes been everywhere and knows everybody. A broadcast journalist and President and CEO of Langhart Communications, Cohen is well known throughout the world. At the same time, she lives and feels life from the inside out and palpably feels injustice within the depths of her soul. It was natural that she was drawn to the near parallel stories of Emmett Till and Anne Frank.

When Cohen started imagining a surreal interaction between these two historical figures, she was struck by their similarities and how they were both tragically murdered at such young ages by systemic hatred. The more she researched, their stories kept wrapping around in her head like a double helix, until they sprang forth in a two-person dialog. In the first reading, she felt the spirits of their parents nearby so strongly that she could barely keep her concentration and focus on the stage. As she watched, she could almost hear Otto Frank and Mamie Till-Mobley asking no, demanding to be heard, for their sensibilities and sacrifices to be acknowledged and recognized. As a result there are four characters relaying the lives and connections between them all.

Emmett Till is our Anne Frank, she says. Keeping him in our thoughts keeps his memory alive. In fact his brutal murder as a 14-year old visiting relatives in Mississippi with no reprisal for the killers who were paid thousands to tell the story, helped spark the Civil Rights Movement. Just this year, even LeBron James referenced Emmett Till when referring to the racial incident of slurring vandalism against him. Emmett Till is our marker, says Cohen.

Keith Lorias interview with Cohen described the early workings of the play including the planned debut at the Holocaust Museum in 2009 where a white supremacist opened fire and killed black security guard Stephen Tyrone Johns. Three days later the play opened on what would have been Anne Franks 80th birthday.

Since then, the blatant racism of the Charleston massacre June 2015 and the increasingly visible numbers of hate crimes since the presidential election have made seeing the production even more urgent. Last year, the New York City Police Commissioner joined by Mayor Bill DeBlasio invited the cast to perform for new recruits.

Cohen reminds us that were in a life and death situation. The current disregard for whole segments of communities didnt come from nowhere. Its always been there, just tucked away from view by most. Now its just more blatant, accepted, honored.

She reminds us of the conditions that resulted in the tragedies of Anne and Emmett started with acceptance of injustice to groups of people. The slippery slope of accepting intolerance is deeply rooted in racism, self-preservation and fear, very much todays current conditions stoked by day to day anxiety. What happened to them (Anne and Emmett) was normalized, she says. Today, travel bans and mass deportations are tearing families apart and entire swatches of Americans are losing a sense of care and compassion.

Anne Frank and Emmett Till were both victims of a deliberate social construct of racism. In a fascinating historical observation, Cohen noted a connection between pervasive Jim Crow tactics and Nazism Hitler apparently considered the elements of the Jim Crow South as he was devising the extermination of Jews, but decided that the systemic pervasive elements were too harsh.

Cohen reminds us that Anne and Emmett were children destroyed by unspeakable acts of violence and cruelty in civilized societies. At the same time, mans inhumanity to man is as old as time. Is there no other way of being? Will the legacy of hate and violence continue to divide us? When I asked her point blank if hate is an integral part of the human heart, she reluctantly responded Yes but so is love. Care and tenderness are felt throughout the script, along with poignant passages of humor as these two young souls share and learn about each other.

The pattern throughout history is crystal clear hate will always be with us. Civilized people just figure out how to manage it with open eyes to see it. Then do something about it. Heres where laws, enforcement and consequences come into play, she explains. Our history IS American history, and should be valued.

She suggests listen to the deepest part of yourself Theres so much noise and needless distraction out theresoul crushing to our own innate humanity. We should see ourselves in each other instead of seeing as the other.

Janet Langhart Cohens Anne & Emmett is a treasured opportunity to listen to and witness an extraordinary imaginary interaction, and to appreciate our own souls capacity to care in the process. Directed by Thomas W. Jones II and with original music by William Knowles, the show is sure to leave an endearing impression on all to see.

After a limited run at MetroStage, it will be featured at the National Black Theater Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, with more productions to come including a showing in Amsterdam in collaboration with Chicagos DuSable Museum.

The show is a tikkun olam, a call to action to repair the world, to Never Forget. And for all kinds of reasons, its needed now more than ever.

Anne & Emmett by Janet Langhart Cohen . Directed by Thomas W. Jones II .Musical Direction by William Knowles .Cast: Abigail Williams; Enoch King; Roger Grunwald; Roz White . Presented by MetroStage

Debbie Minter Jackson is a writer and has performed in musical theater for decades. Originally from Chicago, she has hit stages throughout the Midwest and the Washington, D.C. area including the Kennedy Center in productions with the legendary Mike Malone. Her scripts have been commissioned and produced by the old Source Theater and festivals in New York. She is a member of the play reading and discussion group Footlights and the Black Women Playwrights Group. By day she happily works in a federal public health agency as a Senior Program Analyst and is in blissful partnership with her Bill.

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Janet Langhart Cohen on Anne & Emmett, when will the hatred that … – DC Theatre Scene

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The Sudden Purpose Tour Cancellation and More of Justin Bieber’s Most Controversial Moments – PEOPLE.com

Like all kids who grow up, Justin Bieber has made some mistakes along the way.

Unlike all kids, the world watched as Bieber blundered in front of millions of social media followers in endlessly shared videos and in oft-re-quoted interviews.

Below, some of the most memorable moves that left fans waiting for the Biebs to say Sorry.

The tour cancellation

On July 24, Biebers rep announced through a statement that the remainder of hisPurposeworld tour dates would be canceled due to unforeseen circumstances.

Justin loves his fans and hates to disappoint them. He thanks his fans for the incredible experience of thePurposeWorld Tour over last 18 months, the statement continued. He is grateful and honored to have shared that experience with his cast and crew for over 150 successful shows across six continents during this run. However, after careful consideration, he has decided he will not be performing any further dates.

The statement provided little explanation as to the exact reasoning behind the cancellation, sparking major backlash from the Beliebers.

A source told PEOPLE that Bieber is super exhausted, adding, He actually does like being on tour, but hes been touring for 18 months straight and it takes a toll.

I love you guys. I think you guys are awesome, Biebertold TMZwhen the outlet caught him out and about in California after the announcement. Sorry for anyone who feels disappointed or betrayed, its not my heart or anything. And have a blessed day.

Biebers manager, Scooter Braun, added in his own statement,On behalf of myself, Justin, and the team, we are sorry. That was never our intent. But a mans soul and well being I truly care about came first and we must all respect and honor that. Justin will be back and I know he looks forward to performing for you and with you all again. One chapter ends and another begins. Thank you again.

The vandalism civil suit

In 2014, Biebers Calabasas, California, neighbor Jeffrey Schwartz called the police after the Love Yourself singer allegedly pelted his house with eggs. Schwartz would go on to claim that the pop star had previously spit in his face when confronted with requests that he drive slower in the neighborhood.

Bieber pleaded no contest to a charge of misdemeanor vandalism, received two years of probation and already paid Schwartz $89,000 in restitution for damages to his home.

In January 2017, PEOPLE obtained new court documents filed by Schwartz, who slammed Biebers legal team for trying to cap damages from his civil suit at $25,000.

Following the offensive and indecent attack on Mr. Schwartz, Bieber continued to harass, intimidate, and threaten the Schwartz family at every opportunity possible, which included yelling obscenities and threats at the Plaintiffs and their minor daughter, as well as making anti-Semitic statements to Plaintiff, the recently revealed documents allege.

Schwartz claims that the actual damages, including his familys pain and suffering, emotional distress and property damage, exceed $1 million.

The Prince shade Guitarist Andrew Watt posted an emotional tribute to Prince after news broke of the music legends death. Today waking up to this news I am truly beside myself devastated the last of the greatest living performers my guitar idol, the musician wrote on Instagram.

Well not the last greatest living performer, Bieber appeared to write in response. Although the singers camp said the comments were a total fraud, the viral fake-out was enough to stir up controversy and make headlines.

The Anne Frank comments A then-19-year-old Bieber visited Amsterdams Anne Frank House in-between stops on the European leg of his 2013 tour. At the time, a source told PEOPLE that he made the trip after reading the famous diary Frank wrote while in hiding during the Holocaust. One would think bad PR couldnt possibly stem from a celebrity taking interest in one of the most poignant, tragic figures of the 20th century, but Bieber again found himself on the receiving end of vitriolic criticism.

Truly inspiring to be able to come here. Anne was a great girl. Hopefully she would have been a belieber, he wrote in the museums guestbook, according to their Facebook page.

A number of celebrities poked fun at Bieber for the message on Twitter.

The Japanese war criminal shrine incident While visiting Japan in 2014, Bieber posted a picture of himself bowing in front of Yasukuni Shrine with the caption Thank you for your blessings. Unbeknown to him, the highly controversial monument is said to enshrine the souls of some of the countrys most brutal war criminals, including military leaders involved in the atrocities of World War II.

The pop star complied when Chinese fans began flooding Twitter and Instagram with requests that he remove the offending photo. While in Japan I asked my driver to pull over for which I saw a beautiful shrine. I was mislead to think the Shrines were only a place of prayer, he explained on Instagram. To anyone I have offended I am extremely sorry. I love you China and I love you Japan.

His comments on abortion Rolling Stone asked a 16-year-old Bieber for his thoughts on some political and social issues, and as you would probably expect from any teenager, his comments were not entirely well-considered.

I really dont believe in abortion, Bieber said. Its like killing a baby. When it comes to cases of rape, he added, Um. Well, I think thats really sad, but everything happens for a reason. I dont know how that would be a reason. I guess I havent been in that position, so I wouldnt be able to judge that.

The n-word videos The year 2014 brought some struggles for Bieber as videos of his 14 and 15-year-old selves making jokes that involved the n-word surfaced.

The first footage to emerge, which was published by TMZ, showed the teen telling a joke that begins Why are black people afraid of chainsaws? and ends with a string of the racial slur.

Bieber issued an apology to the Associated Press when the years-old video came to light. Im very sorry, he said. I take all my friendships with people of all cultures very seriously and I apologize for offending or hurting anyone with my childish and inexcusable behavior.

I thought it was ok to repeat hurtful words and jokes, but I didnt realize at the time that it wasnt funny and that in fact my actions were continuing the ignorance, the statement continued. Thanks to friends and family I learned from my mistakes and grew up and apologized for those wrongs. Now that these mistakes from the past have become public I need to apologize again to all of those who I have offended Ignorance has no place in our society and I hope the sharing of my faults can prevent others from making the same mistake in the future. I thought long and hard about what I wanted to say but telling the truth is always whats right. Once again Im sorry.

Unfortunately for him, another slur-filled video of Bieber emerged within the week. In the clip, the teen star parodies his hit One Less Lonely Girl. One less lonely n, he sings through a smile. If I kill you, Id be part of the KKK, and theres gonna be one less lonely n.

Bieber issued his second apology in an interview with The Sun. Facing my mistakes from years ago has been one of the hardest things Ive ever dealt with, he said. But I feel now that I need to take responsibility for those mistakes and not let them linger. I just hope that the next 14-year-old kid who doesnt understand the power of these words does not make the same mistakes I made years ago. At the end of the day I just need to step up and own what I did.

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Dutch Maccabiah Delegation Visits the Anne Frank Memorial – The Jerusalem Post mobile website

Dutch Maccabiah Delegation Visits the Anne Frank Memorial. (photo credit:KKL-JNF)

The 20th Maccabiah, also known as the Jewish Olympic Games, has come to a close. Between the 5-18th of July, 10000 Jewish athletes from 80 countries came to Israel to participate in 3000 tournaments for 47 different sports.

The Dutch delegation consisted of sixty participants this year, including medical staff and the board. The Netherlands participated in mens and womens hockey, swimming, chess, bridge, cycling, the half marathon and karate.

For many of the Dutch participants, it was the first time they visited Israel. For that reason, the Dutch Maccabiah organization and KKL-JNF decided to organize a visit for the team to the Anne Frank Memorial Park, a forest park planted in the Jerusalem Hills in1960 to commemorate Anne Frank. This young girl would leave a powerful legacy after the diary she kept while spending her teenage years in hiding was discovered and published. She perished in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in 1945. Otto Frank, her father, planted the first tree in the forest.

In May 2011, with the support of JNF Holland, a special monument was created symbolizing Annes life during her years in hiding. The installation is made of steel, depicting the edges of a cube. On one side, the cube is filled in, with small spaces showing between the branches of a stylized chestnut tree. Anne Frank looked out from her little room in the back of the house on a chestnut tree, a small piece of the nature and freedom that she so desperately longed for. Her monument is stands in the middle of Israels nature and depicts so well the feeling of constraint and the longing for freedom.

The visit to the park moved the Dutch delegation deeply.

“I have just realized how special it is that I can be in Israel,” said one of the young team members. “Anne Frank had never been allowed to experience this, which gives me a great responsibility to ensure that Israel remains.”

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Exhibition honouring life of Anne Frank opens in Kalgoorlie – The West Australian

The opening of the highly anticipated exhibition, Let Me Be Myself The Life Story Of Anne Frank will be held at the Goldfields Arts Centre tonight.

Melbourne art director and exhibition co-ordinator Iet Fuijkschot will speak at the event, providing a greater insight into the significance and themes of the exhibition.

Tonights opening celebration, which is free to the public, begins at 5.30pm and marks the beginning of a month-long visit to Kalgoorlie-Boulder to educate people about Annes remarkable story hiding with her family in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation in World War II.

Mrs Fuijkschot has been managing the projects Australian tour since it began in 2013 and said she enjoyed seeing peoples reaction to the exhibition.

The reactions of the public are very powerful, many older people get very emotional, she said.

Many people have lost family members or know of people who were lost in World War II, and for young people it is still very relevant because what happened to Anne Frank is still happening in places around the world.

The showcase contains seven historical display panels which are designed to enable visitors to identify with the personal story of Anne, through images of her childhood, her immigration to Amsterdam and her time in hiding.

The exhibition also draws on contemporary themes from Annes story, including identity and discrimination.

Mrs Fuikschot also said she enjoyed travelling to regional locations to showcase the exhibition. It is always nice to see that smaller places appreciate the exhibition just as much as anywhere else, she said.

Although it is not the same as visiting Amsterdam, it gives people who cant travel to the Netherlands the opportunity to experience an Anne Frank showcase.

We have a copy of Anne Franks diary and a model of the house which she hid in with eight others.

Goldfields Arts Centre co-ordinator Tegan Yaich said bringing the exhibition to Kalgoorlie-Boulder was quite expensive, but its powerful themes, historical significance and educational value justified the decision.

Because of the calibre of our gallery we are able to really do this exhibition justice, she said.

I think its something that people from all ages can engage with.

The story of Anne Frank is one that resonates with older people and younger people and the themes of prejudice and discrimination are still relevant today. The story is a part of most school curriculums, and we have a lot of school groups booked in to see the exhibition.

The exhibition will run at the Goldfields Arts Centre until August 30 and is free to the public.

After being on display in Kalgoorlie-Boulder, the exhibition will head to Fremantle where it will continue its national tour.

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Berlin Anne Frank center guide says Holocaust suffering like Palestinian strife – The Times of Israel

BERLIN The Anne Frank Center in Berlin has distanced itself from the statement of a freelance guide who compared the suffering of Jews under the Nazis to that of Palestinians under Israeli control.

At issue was a profile of Nesreen Hajjaj, a 24-year-old Berliner of Palestinian background, in the July 19 online English version of Al Arabiya, a Saudi-owned news outlet. Hajjaj is one of 25 freelance guides who introduce visitors to the exhibition at the Anne Frank Zentrum Berlin.

Hajjaj told the interviewer that many things that happened to the Jews during the Nazi rule are happening to the Palestinians now. Jewish people were kicked out of their homes and denied an education. Today Palestinian lands and houses are being conquered, she told the online publication.

She said she had been called an infidel and a hypocrite on social media for taking the job with the center.

Her answer to critics: We must be open-minded toward different people, especially if you live within their societies.

Patrick Siegele, director of the Anne Frank Zentrum, told JTA that Hajjajs comment was incorrect and painful and does not reflect the official position of the Anne Frank Zentrum. Furthermore, the Anne Frank Zentrum distances itself from this position.

He said his staff would discuss the issue with Hajjaj and others who bring guests through the exhibit in central Berlin, which deals with the history of Anne Frank and the Holocaust, as well as current anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination.

Elke Gryglewski, too, recently had to speak with guides at the House of the Wannsee Conference in Berlin, where she is director of education. The memorial is located in the villa where chief Nazis coordinated plans to exterminate European Jewry in 1942.

After one guide compared the United States under US President Donald Trump to the Third Reich and another compared certain welfare regulations in Germany today to Nazi discrimination against Jews, Gryglewski told her staff: I dont want comparisons in the exhibition, whether with Palestine, which is highly controversial, but also in general. Comparisons are not helpful and in general people dont get the point.

But if [the comparison] comes from visitors, we do have to react by going into the differences, she stressed. Even if there are some structural similarities between historical events, in general there are more differences.

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Berlin Anne Frank center guide says Holocaust suffering like Palestinian strife – The Times of Israel

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Guide at Anne Frank Center compares Israel to Nazi Germany – Arutz Sheva

JTA – The Anne Frank Center in Berlin has distanced itself from the statement of a freelance guide who compared Jews suffering at the hands of the Nazis in World War II to Arabs living in Israel today.

At issue was a profile of Nesreen Hajjaj, a 24-year-old Berliner of Arab background, in the July 19 online English version of Al Arabiya. Hajjaj is one of 25 freelance guides who introduces visitors to the exhibition at the Anne Frank Zentrum Berlin.

Hajjaj told the interviewer that many things that happened to the Jews during the Nazi rule are happening to the Palestinians now. Jewish people were kicked out of their homes and denied an education. Today Palestinian lands and houses are being conquered, she told the online publication.

She said she had been called an infidel and a hypocrite on social media for taking the job with the center.

Her answer to critics: We must be open-minded toward different people, especially if you live within their societies.

Patrick Siegele, director of the Anne Frank Zentrum, told JTA that Hajjajs comparison as stated in the Al Arabiya article was incorrect and painful and does not reflect the official position of the Anne Frank Zentrum. Furthermore, the Anne Frank Zentrum distances itself from this position.

He said his staff would discuss the issue with Hajjaj and others who bring guests through the exhibit in central Berlin, which deals with the history of Anne Frank and the Holocaust, as well as current anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination.

Elke Gryglewski, too, recently had to speak with guides at the House of the Wannsee Conference in Berlin, where she is director of education. The memorial is located in the villa where chief Nazis coordinated plans to exterminate European Jewry in 1942.

After one guide compared the United States under President Donald Trump to the Third Reich and another compared certain welfare regulations in Germany today to Nazi discrimination against Jews, Gryglewski told her staff: I dont want comparisons in the exhibition, whether with Palestine, which is highly controversial, but also in general. Comparisons are not helpful and in general people dont get the point.

But if [the comparison] comes from visitors, we do have to react by going into the differences, she stressed. Even if there are some structural similarities between historical events, in general there are more differences.

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Guide at Anne Frank Center compares Israel to Nazi Germany – Arutz Sheva

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Maltz Jupiter Theatre Students Work Together to Produce THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

A cast and creative team made up of local middle and high school students are dedicating their summer to retelling the powerful true story of Anne Frank and her family.

Under the guidance of industry professionals at Florida’s largest award-winning professional regional theatre, students are taking part in a free summer mentorship program to produce the drama The Diary of Anne Frank. The show will take place on the Theatre’s stage on Saturday, August 12.

The Diary of Anne Frank tells the true story about the lives of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic. Based on the diary entries of a young teen, this play captures the claustrophobic realities of their daily existence; their fear, hope, laughter and grief.

Each day of these two dark years, Anne’s voice shines through: “When I write, I shake off all my cares. But I want to achieve more than that. I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!”

A stage adaptation of the popular book, The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (the original book of writings from Frank’s Dutch language diary), the play is a dramatization by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman.

Known as the Youth Artists’ Chair, the project aligns high school students with individual Theatre staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the creation process of the show. Since 2011, students have produced the dramas Rhinoceros, The Glass Menagerie, The Crucible, Hamlet, The Laramie Project and The Good Times are Killing Me.

“The Diary of Anne Frank is a young person’s story being brought to life by young people,” said Julie Rowe, the Theatre’s director of education. “The Youth Artists’ Chair program is a wonderful annual opportunity for local students to spend their summer working on a relevant, important project with their peers.”

After passing through an extensive interview and selection process, the student creative team consists of: Ashley Banker (Director), 16, of Jupiter; Cassidy Batts (Lighting Designer), 17, of Jupiter Farms; Emily Betts (Producer), 17, of Jupiter; Taylor Buddemeier (Marketing Director), 18, of Jupiter Farms; Brielle Cohen (Costume Designer), 15, of Jupiter; Lorena Forero (Run Crew) 15, Jupiter; Mitchell Hockenson (Props Assistant), 15, of Jupiter; Chloe Laine-Lobsinger (Production Stage Manager), 13, of Jupiter; Abbey Matusik (Sound Designer), 16, of Jupiter; Emily Matusik (Props Master), 14, of Jupiter; Dylan Plotkin (Scenic Designer), 16, of Jupiter; Mia Rubin (Audio Assistant), 12, of Jupiter; Katelyn Smallwood ( Dramaturg Assistant), 16, of Jupiter; Ashley Smith (Wardrobe), 15, of Jupiter; Lauren Thomas (Dramaturg),16, of Jupiter.

“My experience as a dramaturg has opened my eyes to a new side of theatre. Not only has my creativity blossomed, but I have learned the true meaning of research – and how a show with such rich history needs utmost accuracy to be complete,” said the production’s dramaturg Lauren Thomas, a junior homeschooled student. “The process of producing this show has been very impactful for all of us because not only do we discuss the holocaust, but we discuss how to prevent an event like it from ever happening again.”

Tickets are on sale now for The Diary of Anne Frank, which will take place on the Theatre’s stage on Saturday, August 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for children. Please note that this piece explores mature themes. Visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call (561) 575-2223.

About the Maltz Jupiter Theatre The not-for-profit Maltz Jupiter Theatre has become one of Florida’s preeminent professional theatres, committed to production and education through its collaborations with local and national artists. Currently the state’s largest award-winning regional theatre, the Theatre draws 100,000 people annually, serves a subscription base of more than 7,760 and has world-class classroom facilities in support of its Goldner Conservatory of Performing Arts, which serves hundreds of youth and adults. The Theatre is a member of the prestigious League of Resident Theatres and has earned numerous Carbonell Awards, South Florida’s highest honor for artistic excellence, including the prestigious Bill Von Maurer Award for Theatrical Excellence. For more information about the Theatre’s upcoming shows and Conservatory, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call the box office at (561) 575-2223.

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Maltz Jupiter Theatre Students Work Together to Produce THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

‘Anne & Emmett’ at MetroStage – Virginia Connection Newspapers

Alexandria For a limited engagement, MetroStage in Alexandria is presenting “Anne & Emmett” from July 28 to 30. The play by Janet Langhart Cohen is an imaginary conversation between Anne Frank and Emmett Till, both victims of racial intolerance and hatred. Anne is the 15-year-old Jewish girl whose diary offered the world a gripping perspective of the Holocaust and touched the hearts of humanity. Emmett is the 14-year-old African American boy whose brutal murder in Mississippi sparked the modern Civil Rights movement. “It is a remarkable play, and Cohens concept of bringing together these two teens who so vividly represent the Holocaust and the Civil Rights movement is unique and a perfect vehicle on stage to tell their stories,” said Carolyn Griffin, producing artistic director of MetroStage. “The impact on the audience is powerful, and it is a play we believe in and hope all ages, all generations and all backgrounds will see. It is a call to action ‘tikkun olam’ to repair the world. Something that theatre and individuals can work together to achieve.” Enoch King plays the role of Emmett, a highly energetic, inquisitive, curious and sometimes hot-tempered young man. “He is funny and is always ready to laugh or find a way to make someone else laugh,” he said. “He is very quick-witted, not afraid to share his opinions and ideas, but also not afraid to learn more.” The challenge, he said, was not playing the tragedy of how he died and the MetroStage in Alexandria is presenting “Anne & Emmett” from July 28 to 30. Tickets are $35. The venue is located at 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria, VA 22314. Call the box office at 703-548-9044 or visit www.metrostage.org. circumstances surrounding it; instead, focusing on his life, his thoughts, hopes, fears, loves and wants. “It’s difficult because Emmett was real. He really lived and died. There are moments in the show where it hits me how young he was and it can be overwhelming, but I remind myself to let him breathe and live in the piece,” he said. Roz White plays the role of Mamie Till (Mobley), the mother of Emmett. “She is a soft spoken, strong, and loving mother who wants the best for her only son,” she said. “She did what she could to prepare and protect Emmett from the hatred of Southern whites, but she couldn’t foresee the horrible murder he would suffer as a result of the alleged flirtation he was accused of with a white woman.” She added: “Mrs. Till gathered her strength and used Emmett’s senseless murder to open the eyes of America to the injustices that were being imposed upon blacks, and this exposure spearheaded what we now know as the Civil Rights movement.” She said the challenges that she faced delving into this role were mostly personal. “Being a mother of two teen-aged boys, I immediately connected with the character, and her desperation to keep her son safe, while seeking not to break his strong spirit. Another challenge was keeping her (Mamie) human, and not over-playing her to the point of martyrdom. I hope the audiences will see her strength and resilience, while also being aware of her vulnerability.” Abigail Williams plays the role of Anne, a curious, passionate, hope-filled, stubborn, beautiful soul. “She has heart, desires to continue to see and believe in the good in the world, and fights until the very end to hold on to hope,” she said. “She wants to understand how to make sense of all she has been through, yet she never loses her child-like curiosity throughout.” She said the challenge was trying to honor the real life that Anne lived while understanding that, as an actor, she had to put some of herself into her character to make her feel true in the moments that she’s portraying her. “Making choices about someone who lived a real life is obviously different than making choices about a fictional character,” she said. “And the weight of responsibility in playing a role that is internationally known for being so heroic and brave, and whose private thought-life is actually popularly circulated throughout the general public means that, in some ways, Im going up against the thoughts people already have about who Anne is this, at times, has felt deeply challenging.” Roger Grunwald plays two roles in the play: Otto Frank and J.W. Milam. “It would be hard to find two more antipodal characters (or people). As an actor, I always try as best as I can to find a characters humanity, humor and vulnerabilities. Milam, the murderer of Emmett Till, however, is an unrepentant killer, a racist and a braggart.” He continued: “Otto Frank, by contrast, is a fundamentally decent man who tries, as best as he can, to hold his family together, instilling hope and doing whatever is necessary to avoid detection and capture by the Nazis. Needless to say, it proves to be an impossible task. As the familys sole survivor, he dedicates his post-war life to bringing Annes message and her belief in the fundamental goodness of humankind to the world.” Griffin met playwright Cohen several years ago and introduced her to the resident director Thomas W. Jones II. She said the play was further developed with Jones and his team that included music director William Knowles, and was performed for a weekend on MetroStage in 2015. It has since toured Indianapolis, Chicago, and New York City. The play returns to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C. and then back to MetroStage. It will be filmed at MetroStage and then performed July 28-30 before leaving for the National Black Theatre Festival.

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Palm Beach County students presenting ‘Diary of Anne Frank’ – Sun Sentinel

On Saturday evening, Aug. 12, a cast and crew of middle and high school students involved in the Youth Artists Chair summer program at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre will produce the Jewish-themed play, “The Diary of Anne Frank.” “The Diary of Anne Frank” tells the true story about eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic during the Holocaust. Based on the diary entries of young German-born teen Anne Frank one of the most-discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust this play captures the realities of their daily existence: their fears, hopes, laughter and grief. As the Anne Frank character says during the play, “When I write, I shake off all my cares. But I want to achieve more than that. I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!” This play is a stage adaptation of Frank’s popular 1947 book, “The Diary of a Young Girl,” which is the original book of writings from Frank’s Dutch language diary. Johanna Cohan, production manager for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre (who is Jewish), said she is proud to see all the students embracing the strong Jewish themes of the play. “The story of Anne Frank is a challenging and inspiring piece as it gives audiences a glimpse into the darkest moments of a family’s life, while also allowing audiences to believe that even in the most horrible of times hope, love and kindness can exist,” Cohan said. “These amazing students are working so hard to bring respect and honor to the memories of these people and the hundreds of thousands of young men and women whose stories will never be told. “In a time where anti-Semitism is becoming more prevalent around the world, it is important for the youngsters to learn, share and understand stories like this. That is the only way we can ensure that atrocities like the Holocaust never happen again.” The Jewish students involved in the production have a close connection to the content of this play. Jewish teen actress Skye Alyssa Friedman, 15, of Jupiter, will portray Anne Frank. “We need to tell this story to constantly remind people what happened,” Friedman said. “It’s a part of history that cannot be forgotten.” Jewish teen actor Daniel Reiter. 13, of Palm Beach Gardens, also is in the cast. “This is an authentic play,” Reiter said. “There’s some Hebrew in the script that the actors are getting help from me in order to deliver.” Brielle Cohen, 15, of Jupiter, is the play’s student costume designer. “This is an emotional play for me because this happened to our ancestors,” Cohen said. “I could have been Anne Frank. But, it’s also a great story that applies to everyone.” Non-Jewish cast and crew members have also been touched by the play. Lauren Thomas, 16, of Jupiter, is the play’s dramaturg (in-house critic). “The process of producing this play has been very impactful for all of us, because not only do we discuss the Holocaust, but we talk about how to prevent an event like it from ever happening again,” Thomas said. Taylor Buddemeier, 18, of Jupiter Farms the play’s student marketing director said, “Though this play is about a sad time in history, it’s ultimately about hope for a better future for all.” The Youth Artists Chair is a free summer intensive mentorship program the Maltz has provided for area teens since 2011. The project aligns high school students with individual theater staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the play’s creation process. “The Diary of Anne Frank is a young person’s story being brought to life by young people,” said Julie Rowe, the theater’s education director. “This program is a wonderful annual opportunity for local students to spend their summers working on a relevant, important project with their peers.” Tickets for the play which explores mature themes are $25 for adults and $20 for children. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call 561-575-2223.

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Janet Langhart Cohen on Anne & Emmett, when will the hatred that … – DC Theatre Scene

Talking with Janet Langhart Cohen is like stepping back in time and talking to a time traveler shes been everywhere and knows everybody. A broadcast journalist and President and CEO of Langhart Communications, Cohen is well known throughout the world. At the same time, she lives and feels life from the inside out and palpably feels injustice within the depths of her soul. It was natural that she was drawn to the near parallel stories of Emmett Till and Anne Frank. When Cohen started imagining a surreal interaction between these two historical figures, she was struck by their similarities and how they were both tragically murdered at such young ages by systemic hatred. The more she researched, their stories kept wrapping around in her head like a double helix, until they sprang forth in a two-person dialog. In the first reading, she felt the spirits of their parents nearby so strongly that she could barely keep her concentration and focus on the stage. As she watched, she could almost hear Otto Frank and Mamie Till-Mobley asking no, demanding to be heard, for their sensibilities and sacrifices to be acknowledged and recognized. As a result there are four characters relaying the lives and connections between them all. Emmett Till is our Anne Frank, she says. Keeping him in our thoughts keeps his memory alive. In fact his brutal murder as a 14-year old visiting relatives in Mississippi with no reprisal for the killers who were paid thousands to tell the story, helped spark the Civil Rights Movement. Just this year, even LeBron James referenced Emmett Till when referring to the racial incident of slurring vandalism against him. Emmett Till is our marker, says Cohen. Keith Lorias interview with Cohen described the early workings of the play including the planned debut at the Holocaust Museum in 2009 where a white supremacist opened fire and killed black security guard Stephen Tyrone Johns. Three days later the play opened on what would have been Anne Franks 80th birthday. Since then, the blatant racism of the Charleston massacre June 2015 and the increasingly visible numbers of hate crimes since the presidential election have made seeing the production even more urgent. Last year, the New York City Police Commissioner joined by Mayor Bill DeBlasio invited the cast to perform for new recruits. Cohen reminds us that were in a life and death situation. The current disregard for whole segments of communities didnt come from nowhere. Its always been there, just tucked away from view by most. Now its just more blatant, accepted, honored. She reminds us of the conditions that resulted in the tragedies of Anne and Emmett started with acceptance of injustice to groups of people. The slippery slope of accepting intolerance is deeply rooted in racism, self-preservation and fear, very much todays current conditions stoked by day to day anxiety. What happened to them (Anne and Emmett) was normalized, she says. Today, travel bans and mass deportations are tearing families apart and entire swatches of Americans are losing a sense of care and compassion. Anne Frank and Emmett Till were both victims of a deliberate social construct of racism. In a fascinating historical observation, Cohen noted a connection between pervasive Jim Crow tactics and Nazism Hitler apparently considered the elements of the Jim Crow South as he was devising the extermination of Jews, but decided that the systemic pervasive elements were too harsh. Cohen reminds us that Anne and Emmett were children destroyed by unspeakable acts of violence and cruelty in civilized societies. At the same time, mans inhumanity to man is as old as time. Is there no other way of being? Will the legacy of hate and violence continue to divide us? When I asked her point blank if hate is an integral part of the human heart, she reluctantly responded Yes but so is love. Care and tenderness are felt throughout the script, along with poignant passages of humor as these two young souls share and learn about each other. The pattern throughout history is crystal clear hate will always be with us. Civilized people just figure out how to manage it with open eyes to see it. Then do something about it. Heres where laws, enforcement and consequences come into play, she explains. Our history IS American history, and should be valued. She suggests listen to the deepest part of yourself Theres so much noise and needless distraction out theresoul crushing to our own innate humanity. We should see ourselves in each other instead of seeing as the other. Janet Langhart Cohens Anne & Emmett is a treasured opportunity to listen to and witness an extraordinary imaginary interaction, and to appreciate our own souls capacity to care in the process. Directed by Thomas W. Jones II and with original music by William Knowles, the show is sure to leave an endearing impression on all to see. After a limited run at MetroStage, it will be featured at the National Black Theater Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, with more productions to come including a showing in Amsterdam in collaboration with Chicagos DuSable Museum. The show is a tikkun olam, a call to action to repair the world, to Never Forget. And for all kinds of reasons, its needed now more than ever. Anne & Emmett by Janet Langhart Cohen . Directed by Thomas W. Jones II .Musical Direction by William Knowles .Cast: Abigail Williams; Enoch King; Roger Grunwald; Roz White . Presented by MetroStage Debbie Minter Jackson is a writer and has performed in musical theater for decades. Originally from Chicago, she has hit stages throughout the Midwest and the Washington, D.C. area including the Kennedy Center in productions with the legendary Mike Malone. Her scripts have been commissioned and produced by the old Source Theater and festivals in New York. She is a member of the play reading and discussion group Footlights and the Black Women Playwrights Group. By day she happily works in a federal public health agency as a Senior Program Analyst and is in blissful partnership with her Bill.

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July 26, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

The Sudden Purpose Tour Cancellation and More of Justin Bieber’s Most Controversial Moments – PEOPLE.com

Like all kids who grow up, Justin Bieber has made some mistakes along the way. Unlike all kids, the world watched as Bieber blundered in front of millions of social media followers in endlessly shared videos and in oft-re-quoted interviews. Below, some of the most memorable moves that left fans waiting for the Biebs to say Sorry. The tour cancellation On July 24, Biebers rep announced through a statement that the remainder of hisPurposeworld tour dates would be canceled due to unforeseen circumstances. Justin loves his fans and hates to disappoint them. He thanks his fans for the incredible experience of thePurposeWorld Tour over last 18 months, the statement continued. He is grateful and honored to have shared that experience with his cast and crew for over 150 successful shows across six continents during this run. However, after careful consideration, he has decided he will not be performing any further dates. The statement provided little explanation as to the exact reasoning behind the cancellation, sparking major backlash from the Beliebers. A source told PEOPLE that Bieber is super exhausted, adding, He actually does like being on tour, but hes been touring for 18 months straight and it takes a toll. I love you guys. I think you guys are awesome, Biebertold TMZwhen the outlet caught him out and about in California after the announcement. Sorry for anyone who feels disappointed or betrayed, its not my heart or anything. And have a blessed day. Biebers manager, Scooter Braun, added in his own statement,On behalf of myself, Justin, and the team, we are sorry. That was never our intent. But a mans soul and well being I truly care about came first and we must all respect and honor that. Justin will be back and I know he looks forward to performing for you and with you all again. One chapter ends and another begins. Thank you again. The vandalism civil suit In 2014, Biebers Calabasas, California, neighbor Jeffrey Schwartz called the police after the Love Yourself singer allegedly pelted his house with eggs. Schwartz would go on to claim that the pop star had previously spit in his face when confronted with requests that he drive slower in the neighborhood. Bieber pleaded no contest to a charge of misdemeanor vandalism, received two years of probation and already paid Schwartz $89,000 in restitution for damages to his home. In January 2017, PEOPLE obtained new court documents filed by Schwartz, who slammed Biebers legal team for trying to cap damages from his civil suit at $25,000. Following the offensive and indecent attack on Mr. Schwartz, Bieber continued to harass, intimidate, and threaten the Schwartz family at every opportunity possible, which included yelling obscenities and threats at the Plaintiffs and their minor daughter, as well as making anti-Semitic statements to Plaintiff, the recently revealed documents allege. Schwartz claims that the actual damages, including his familys pain and suffering, emotional distress and property damage, exceed $1 million. The Prince shade Guitarist Andrew Watt posted an emotional tribute to Prince after news broke of the music legends death. Today waking up to this news I am truly beside myself devastated the last of the greatest living performers my guitar idol, the musician wrote on Instagram. Well not the last greatest living performer, Bieber appeared to write in response. Although the singers camp said the comments were a total fraud, the viral fake-out was enough to stir up controversy and make headlines. The Anne Frank comments A then-19-year-old Bieber visited Amsterdams Anne Frank House in-between stops on the European leg of his 2013 tour. At the time, a source told PEOPLE that he made the trip after reading the famous diary Frank wrote while in hiding during the Holocaust. One would think bad PR couldnt possibly stem from a celebrity taking interest in one of the most poignant, tragic figures of the 20th century, but Bieber again found himself on the receiving end of vitriolic criticism. Truly inspiring to be able to come here. Anne was a great girl. Hopefully she would have been a belieber, he wrote in the museums guestbook, according to their Facebook page. A number of celebrities poked fun at Bieber for the message on Twitter. The Japanese war criminal shrine incident While visiting Japan in 2014, Bieber posted a picture of himself bowing in front of Yasukuni Shrine with the caption Thank you for your blessings. Unbeknown to him, the highly controversial monument is said to enshrine the souls of some of the countrys most brutal war criminals, including military leaders involved in the atrocities of World War II. The pop star complied when Chinese fans began flooding Twitter and Instagram with requests that he remove the offending photo. While in Japan I asked my driver to pull over for which I saw a beautiful shrine. I was mislead to think the Shrines were only a place of prayer, he explained on Instagram. To anyone I have offended I am extremely sorry. I love you China and I love you Japan. His comments on abortion Rolling Stone asked a 16-year-old Bieber for his thoughts on some political and social issues, and as you would probably expect from any teenager, his comments were not entirely well-considered. I really dont believe in abortion, Bieber said. Its like killing a baby. When it comes to cases of rape, he added, Um. Well, I think thats really sad, but everything happens for a reason. I dont know how that would be a reason. I guess I havent been in that position, so I wouldnt be able to judge that. The n-word videos The year 2014 brought some struggles for Bieber as videos of his 14 and 15-year-old selves making jokes that involved the n-word surfaced. The first footage to emerge, which was published by TMZ, showed the teen telling a joke that begins Why are black people afraid of chainsaws? and ends with a string of the racial slur. Bieber issued an apology to the Associated Press when the years-old video came to light. Im very sorry, he said. I take all my friendships with people of all cultures very seriously and I apologize for offending or hurting anyone with my childish and inexcusable behavior. I thought it was ok to repeat hurtful words and jokes, but I didnt realize at the time that it wasnt funny and that in fact my actions were continuing the ignorance, the statement continued. Thanks to friends and family I learned from my mistakes and grew up and apologized for those wrongs. Now that these mistakes from the past have become public I need to apologize again to all of those who I have offended Ignorance has no place in our society and I hope the sharing of my faults can prevent others from making the same mistake in the future. I thought long and hard about what I wanted to say but telling the truth is always whats right. Once again Im sorry. Unfortunately for him, another slur-filled video of Bieber emerged within the week. In the clip, the teen star parodies his hit One Less Lonely Girl. One less lonely n, he sings through a smile. If I kill you, Id be part of the KKK, and theres gonna be one less lonely n. Bieber issued his second apology in an interview with The Sun. Facing my mistakes from years ago has been one of the hardest things Ive ever dealt with, he said. But I feel now that I need to take responsibility for those mistakes and not let them linger. I just hope that the next 14-year-old kid who doesnt understand the power of these words does not make the same mistakes I made years ago. At the end of the day I just need to step up and own what I did.

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Dutch Maccabiah Delegation Visits the Anne Frank Memorial – The Jerusalem Post mobile website

Dutch Maccabiah Delegation Visits the Anne Frank Memorial. (photo credit:KKL-JNF) The 20th Maccabiah, also known as the Jewish Olympic Games, has come to a close. Between the 5-18th of July, 10000 Jewish athletes from 80 countries came to Israel to participate in 3000 tournaments for 47 different sports. The Dutch delegation consisted of sixty participants this year, including medical staff and the board. The Netherlands participated in mens and womens hockey, swimming, chess, bridge, cycling, the half marathon and karate. For many of the Dutch participants, it was the first time they visited Israel. For that reason, the Dutch Maccabiah organization and KKL-JNF decided to organize a visit for the team to the Anne Frank Memorial Park, a forest park planted in the Jerusalem Hills in1960 to commemorate Anne Frank. This young girl would leave a powerful legacy after the diary she kept while spending her teenage years in hiding was discovered and published. She perished in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in 1945. Otto Frank, her father, planted the first tree in the forest. In May 2011, with the support of JNF Holland, a special monument was created symbolizing Annes life during her years in hiding. The installation is made of steel, depicting the edges of a cube. On one side, the cube is filled in, with small spaces showing between the branches of a stylized chestnut tree. Anne Frank looked out from her little room in the back of the house on a chestnut tree, a small piece of the nature and freedom that she so desperately longed for. Her monument is stands in the middle of Israels nature and depicts so well the feeling of constraint and the longing for freedom. The visit to the park moved the Dutch delegation deeply. “I have just realized how special it is that I can be in Israel,” said one of the young team members. “Anne Frank had never been allowed to experience this, which gives me a great responsibility to ensure that Israel remains.” Read more about the Dutch Maccabiah delegation to the Anne Frank Memorial Share on facebook

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Exhibition honouring life of Anne Frank opens in Kalgoorlie – The West Australian

The opening of the highly anticipated exhibition, Let Me Be Myself The Life Story Of Anne Frank will be held at the Goldfields Arts Centre tonight. Melbourne art director and exhibition co-ordinator Iet Fuijkschot will speak at the event, providing a greater insight into the significance and themes of the exhibition. Tonights opening celebration, which is free to the public, begins at 5.30pm and marks the beginning of a month-long visit to Kalgoorlie-Boulder to educate people about Annes remarkable story hiding with her family in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation in World War II. Mrs Fuijkschot has been managing the projects Australian tour since it began in 2013 and said she enjoyed seeing peoples reaction to the exhibition. The reactions of the public are very powerful, many older people get very emotional, she said. Many people have lost family members or know of people who were lost in World War II, and for young people it is still very relevant because what happened to Anne Frank is still happening in places around the world. The showcase contains seven historical display panels which are designed to enable visitors to identify with the personal story of Anne, through images of her childhood, her immigration to Amsterdam and her time in hiding. The exhibition also draws on contemporary themes from Annes story, including identity and discrimination. Mrs Fuikschot also said she enjoyed travelling to regional locations to showcase the exhibition. It is always nice to see that smaller places appreciate the exhibition just as much as anywhere else, she said. Although it is not the same as visiting Amsterdam, it gives people who cant travel to the Netherlands the opportunity to experience an Anne Frank showcase. We have a copy of Anne Franks diary and a model of the house which she hid in with eight others. Goldfields Arts Centre co-ordinator Tegan Yaich said bringing the exhibition to Kalgoorlie-Boulder was quite expensive, but its powerful themes, historical significance and educational value justified the decision. Because of the calibre of our gallery we are able to really do this exhibition justice, she said. I think its something that people from all ages can engage with. The story of Anne Frank is one that resonates with older people and younger people and the themes of prejudice and discrimination are still relevant today. The story is a part of most school curriculums, and we have a lot of school groups booked in to see the exhibition. The exhibition will run at the Goldfields Arts Centre until August 30 and is free to the public. After being on display in Kalgoorlie-Boulder, the exhibition will head to Fremantle where it will continue its national tour.

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Berlin Anne Frank center guide says Holocaust suffering like Palestinian strife – The Times of Israel

BERLIN The Anne Frank Center in Berlin has distanced itself from the statement of a freelance guide who compared the suffering of Jews under the Nazis to that of Palestinians under Israeli control. At issue was a profile of Nesreen Hajjaj, a 24-year-old Berliner of Palestinian background, in the July 19 online English version of Al Arabiya, a Saudi-owned news outlet. Hajjaj is one of 25 freelance guides who introduce visitors to the exhibition at the Anne Frank Zentrum Berlin. Hajjaj told the interviewer that many things that happened to the Jews during the Nazi rule are happening to the Palestinians now. Jewish people were kicked out of their homes and denied an education. Today Palestinian lands and houses are being conquered, she told the online publication. She said she had been called an infidel and a hypocrite on social media for taking the job with the center. Her answer to critics: We must be open-minded toward different people, especially if you live within their societies. Patrick Siegele, director of the Anne Frank Zentrum, told JTA that Hajjajs comment was incorrect and painful and does not reflect the official position of the Anne Frank Zentrum. Furthermore, the Anne Frank Zentrum distances itself from this position. He said his staff would discuss the issue with Hajjaj and others who bring guests through the exhibit in central Berlin, which deals with the history of Anne Frank and the Holocaust, as well as current anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination. Elke Gryglewski, too, recently had to speak with guides at the House of the Wannsee Conference in Berlin, where she is director of education. The memorial is located in the villa where chief Nazis coordinated plans to exterminate European Jewry in 1942. After one guide compared the United States under US President Donald Trump to the Third Reich and another compared certain welfare regulations in Germany today to Nazi discrimination against Jews, Gryglewski told her staff: I dont want comparisons in the exhibition, whether with Palestine, which is highly controversial, but also in general. Comparisons are not helpful and in general people dont get the point. But if [the comparison] comes from visitors, we do have to react by going into the differences, she stressed. Even if there are some structural similarities between historical events, in general there are more differences.

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Guide at Anne Frank Center compares Israel to Nazi Germany – Arutz Sheva

JTA – The Anne Frank Center in Berlin has distanced itself from the statement of a freelance guide who compared Jews suffering at the hands of the Nazis in World War II to Arabs living in Israel today. At issue was a profile of Nesreen Hajjaj, a 24-year-old Berliner of Arab background, in the July 19 online English version of Al Arabiya. Hajjaj is one of 25 freelance guides who introduces visitors to the exhibition at the Anne Frank Zentrum Berlin. Hajjaj told the interviewer that many things that happened to the Jews during the Nazi rule are happening to the Palestinians now. Jewish people were kicked out of their homes and denied an education. Today Palestinian lands and houses are being conquered, she told the online publication. She said she had been called an infidel and a hypocrite on social media for taking the job with the center. Her answer to critics: We must be open-minded toward different people, especially if you live within their societies. Patrick Siegele, director of the Anne Frank Zentrum, told JTA that Hajjajs comparison as stated in the Al Arabiya article was incorrect and painful and does not reflect the official position of the Anne Frank Zentrum. Furthermore, the Anne Frank Zentrum distances itself from this position. He said his staff would discuss the issue with Hajjaj and others who bring guests through the exhibit in central Berlin, which deals with the history of Anne Frank and the Holocaust, as well as current anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination. Elke Gryglewski, too, recently had to speak with guides at the House of the Wannsee Conference in Berlin, where she is director of education. The memorial is located in the villa where chief Nazis coordinated plans to exterminate European Jewry in 1942. After one guide compared the United States under President Donald Trump to the Third Reich and another compared certain welfare regulations in Germany today to Nazi discrimination against Jews, Gryglewski told her staff: I dont want comparisons in the exhibition, whether with Palestine, which is highly controversial, but also in general. Comparisons are not helpful and in general people dont get the point. But if [the comparison] comes from visitors, we do have to react by going into the differences, she stressed. Even if there are some structural similarities between historical events, in general there are more differences.

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed

Maltz Jupiter Theatre Students Work Together to Produce THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK – Broadway World

A cast and creative team made up of local middle and high school students are dedicating their summer to retelling the powerful true story of Anne Frank and her family. Under the guidance of industry professionals at Florida’s largest award-winning professional regional theatre, students are taking part in a free summer mentorship program to produce the drama The Diary of Anne Frank. The show will take place on the Theatre’s stage on Saturday, August 12. The Diary of Anne Frank tells the true story about the lives of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic. Based on the diary entries of a young teen, this play captures the claustrophobic realities of their daily existence; their fear, hope, laughter and grief. Each day of these two dark years, Anne’s voice shines through: “When I write, I shake off all my cares. But I want to achieve more than that. I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!” A stage adaptation of the popular book, The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (the original book of writings from Frank’s Dutch language diary), the play is a dramatization by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman. Known as the Youth Artists’ Chair, the project aligns high school students with individual Theatre staff members for one-on-one mentoring and guidance during the creation process of the show. Since 2011, students have produced the dramas Rhinoceros, The Glass Menagerie, The Crucible, Hamlet, The Laramie Project and The Good Times are Killing Me. “The Diary of Anne Frank is a young person’s story being brought to life by young people,” said Julie Rowe, the Theatre’s director of education. “The Youth Artists’ Chair program is a wonderful annual opportunity for local students to spend their summer working on a relevant, important project with their peers.” After passing through an extensive interview and selection process, the student creative team consists of: Ashley Banker (Director), 16, of Jupiter; Cassidy Batts (Lighting Designer), 17, of Jupiter Farms; Emily Betts (Producer), 17, of Jupiter; Taylor Buddemeier (Marketing Director), 18, of Jupiter Farms; Brielle Cohen (Costume Designer), 15, of Jupiter; Lorena Forero (Run Crew) 15, Jupiter; Mitchell Hockenson (Props Assistant), 15, of Jupiter; Chloe Laine-Lobsinger (Production Stage Manager), 13, of Jupiter; Abbey Matusik (Sound Designer), 16, of Jupiter; Emily Matusik (Props Master), 14, of Jupiter; Dylan Plotkin (Scenic Designer), 16, of Jupiter; Mia Rubin (Audio Assistant), 12, of Jupiter; Katelyn Smallwood ( Dramaturg Assistant), 16, of Jupiter; Ashley Smith (Wardrobe), 15, of Jupiter; Lauren Thomas (Dramaturg),16, of Jupiter. “My experience as a dramaturg has opened my eyes to a new side of theatre. Not only has my creativity blossomed, but I have learned the true meaning of research – and how a show with such rich history needs utmost accuracy to be complete,” said the production’s dramaturg Lauren Thomas, a junior homeschooled student. “The process of producing this show has been very impactful for all of us because not only do we discuss the holocaust, but we discuss how to prevent an event like it from ever happening again.” Tickets are on sale now for The Diary of Anne Frank, which will take place on the Theatre’s stage on Saturday, August 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for children. Please note that this piece explores mature themes. Visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call (561) 575-2223. About the Maltz Jupiter Theatre The not-for-profit Maltz Jupiter Theatre has become one of Florida’s preeminent professional theatres, committed to production and education through its collaborations with local and national artists. Currently the state’s largest award-winning regional theatre, the Theatre draws 100,000 people annually, serves a subscription base of more than 7,760 and has world-class classroom facilities in support of its Goldner Conservatory of Performing Arts, which serves hundreds of youth and adults. The Theatre is a member of the prestigious League of Resident Theatres and has earned numerous Carbonell Awards, South Florida’s highest honor for artistic excellence, including the prestigious Bill Von Maurer Award for Theatrical Excellence. For more information about the Theatre’s upcoming shows and Conservatory, visit www.jupitertheatre.org or call the box office at (561) 575-2223.

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Anne Frank  Comments Closed


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