Archive for the ‘Anti-Defamation League’ Category

Anti-Defamation League Joins Call for HB Finance …

Van Der Mark and pals in Santa Monica (YouTube Screenshot)

Gracey Van Der Mark somehow remains on the Huntington Beach finance commission even after a controversy erupted around her online bigotry earlier this month. As the Weekly reported, Van Der Mark recently deleted comments on YouTube where she referred to blacks as colored people and suggested they dutifully did the bidding of Jews at a white privilege workshop in Santa Monica she helped crash last summer. Van Der Mark also scrubbed a Holocaust hoax? playlist from her YouTube channel.

But for all the online erasures, residents and concerned community members turned out to Huntington Beach city council last night to call for Van Der Marks removal from the post councilman Patrick Brenden appointed her to. This individual has posted material on the internet that one could fairly describe as anti-Semitic, as Islamophobic and as racist, said Rabbi Stephen Einstein of Fountain Valleys Congregation Bnai Tzedek. It is my urgent request that you look into this and investigate it and then take whatever appropriate action you deem as right.

The Anti-Defamation League weighed in on Van Der Mark with a letter sent to city council on Friday. We dont always write letters but when we do its because we feel very strongly that its an opportunity for you as the mayor and the city council to take the statement and do whats right and accurate, Rabbi Peter Levi, the ADLs OC regional director, said at council. Its not about liberals or conservatives. Its about extremists that are beyond the spectrum.

Obtained by the Weekly, the ADL letter echoed the call for an investigation into Van Der Marks remarks and associations. There is ample evidence she has made bigoted and hateful comments and that she has participated in activities organized and led by white supremacists, Levi wrote. These words and actions call into question her ability to serve as an appointed leader in the Huntington Beach community. The organization noted the Weeklys reporting and described Van Der Marks colored people comments about Jews as classic anti-Semitic trope in stating she should be removed from her commission post.

And its not just antisemitism. The ADL also noted Van Der Mark belonged to a Three Percenters Facebook group and made Islamophobic comments on the social media site suggesting that the U.S. Department of Education is funding sharia indoctrination in public schools. Did we mention that Van Der Mark also serves on the Ocean View School District Measure R Citizens Oversight Committee in Huntington Beach? Maybe shes making sure taxpayer funds dont go towards constructing mosques on school grounds or something.

Either way, the ADL sent the same letter to the school district. Trustee Gina Clayton-Tarvin, who appointed Van Der Mark in June, denounced her hateful statements and beliefs in calling for her removal at council. I want to note that there have been two past commissioners who have stepped down when their actions and speech were deemed unacceptable by residents, Clayton-Tarvin said. I must ask all of you, do you believe that a representative of a city commission should be publicly denying the Holocaust and posting that it is a hoax? Do you accept that? I dont.

Kim Sorgente, a Huntington Beach resident and Proud Boys reject, helped crashed the anti-racist workshop in Santa Monica with Van Der Mark and others, including two scheduled Unite the Right speakers in Charlottesville. Sorgentecame to her defense at council. I cant say Im too fond of her, he said. What I can say is this; Gracey is a person of color and shes darker than any of these people that took this podium and spoke against her. She was there to make America a better place. Sorgente babbled on about white genocide in South Africaa favored talking point among white supremacistsand how he hoped a similar poison doesnt take route in the United States.

Outside of public comments, OCs Scariest People 2016 honoree Chris Epting backed Van Der Mark in an email sent to councilman Brenden and others that he proudly posted on the infamous Huntington Beach Community Forum on Facebook. Please do not give these dishonest cowards the pound of flesh they desire, Epting wrote. OVSD Trustee John Briscoe could not even get Graceys name right tonight. Funny. Epting couldnt either, writing the commissioners last name as Larrea-Van Der throughout the email in missing the Mark. Oh, and taking a reference from The Merchant of Venice in defending an anti-Semite aint too bright either!

Notwithstanding Eptings hissy fit, if Van Der Mark already deleted her colored people comments and Holocaust hoax? YouTube playlist, why hasnt councilman Brenden dropped her from the finance commission yet?

Gabriel San Roman is from Anacrime. Hes a journalist, subversive historian and tallest Mexican in OC.

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Anti-Defamation & Mascots | NCAI

From time immemorial, the greatness of tribal nations and Native people has been the foundation of Americas story. From tribes role as Americas first governments, to modern day actors, athletes, and political leaders, Native people contribute to American greatness every single day. Negative Indian stereotypes especially those perpetuated by sports mascots affect the reputation and self-image of every single Native person and foster ongoing discrimination against tribal citizens.

In general, NCAI strongly opposes the use of derogatory Native sports mascots. However, in the case where mascots refer to a particular Native nation or nations, NCAI respects the right of individual tribal nations to work with universities and athletic programs to decide how to protect and celebrate their respective tribal heritage.

Indian mascots and stereotypes present a misleading image of Indian people and feed the historic myths that have been used to whitewash a history of oppression. Despite decades of work to eliminate the use of discrimination and derogatory images in American sports, the practice has not gone away.

NCAI is pleased that tribal advocates have succeeded in eliminating over two-thirds of derogatory Indian sports mascots and logos over the past 50 years. Today, there are fewer than 1,000 of these mascots left. In 2005, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the governing body of college athletics, formally condemned the use of disparaging mascots and banned the use of Indian names, logos, and mascots during its championship tournaments.

However, there is plenty of work yet to doespecially in the realm of professional sports. NCAI recognizes that this can be a difficult and sensitive issue, and we acknowledge the significance of athletics for the public, as well as the attachment (both emotionally and financially) of professional teams and university athletic programs to their names and logos. At the end of the day, there is no excuse for cultural stereotypes that degrade, slander, mock or belittle Native people. This misrepresentation would not be acceptable for any other minority community in America and NCAI will continue to oppose the use of offensive Native mascots and imagery that promote harmful stereotypes.

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William Cooper – The Ugly Truth About the Anti-Defamation …

Thanks to EyesForTheProfane for his artwork

Transcriptshttp://www.theforbiddenknowledge.com/…

The Ugly Truth About the Anti-Defamation League Bookhttp://www.whale.to/b/adl.pdf

This is a classic William Cooper broadcast from his shortwave radio broadcast the ‘Hour of the Time’. It was originally aired on June 23rd, 1994.

This is episode #382 from the HOTT catalogue titled ‘ADL #1’.

I hope you enjoy it..

“Read everything. Listen to everything. Don’t trust anything unless you can prove it with your own research.” –William Cooper

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Anti-Defamation League Honors Vices Nancy Dubuc Variety

Incoming Vice Media CEO Nancy Dubuc was honored by the Anti-Defamation League Wednesday night at the organizations annual Entertainment Industry Dinner. Among those on hand at the Beverly Hilton to pay tribute to Dubuc were UnReal star Shiri Appleby, Propagate co-CEO Ben Silverman, Billions actor Rob Morrow, ADL regional board chair Ivy Kagan Bierman, and ADL regional director Amanda Susskind.

Introducing Dubuc, who recently exited her post as CEO of A+E Networks to join Vice, Appleby spoke about about meeting the executive in 2014. Appleby had just been cast in UnReal, which went on to land a Peabody Award and two Primetime Emmy nominations for cable channel Lifetime.

During one of our very first meetings together I mentioned my interests that went beyond acting, Appleby said. To directing, to producing, to telling stories that moved me about issues that moved me. I really wanted to learn how to be a leader and have a leading voice. Instantly Nancy invited me to New York to come shadow her. She really took the time to teach me.

Appleby added, I cant think of a better person who has used her position of power to affect change and make a difference.

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Accepting her honor, Dubuc said that she began to understand how she could affect positive change through her platform as a programmer over a decade ago with the premiere of the A&E series Intervention, which she developed.

I began to understand that we can change lives, Dubuc said. We can change societys perceptions. We can use the power of storytelling to illuminate all types of people, all types of circumstances, and all types of worlds.

Dubuc added, Entertainment is an incredibly powerful platform in our countrys culture, and media is increasingly part of the story, not just a reflection of it. Theres no question that we are living in a time of monumental change, disruption, and fear, but also opportunity if you choose to see it that way. In the literature about ADL, one sentiment that is repeated over and over again that really stuck with me is There is no them. There is only us.

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Catholic League (U.S.) – Wikipedia

Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights

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The Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, often shortened to the Catholic League, is an American Catholic anti-defamation and civil rights organization. The Catholic League states that it “defends the right of Catholics lay and clergy alike to participate in American public life without defamation or discrimination.”[3] The Catholic League states that it is “motivated by the letter and the spirit of the First Amendment…to safeguard both the religious freedom rights and the free speech rights of Catholics whenever and wherever they are threatened.”[3] According to the Encyclopedia of American Religion and Politics, the League “is regarded by many as the preeminent organization representing the views of American lay Catholics.”[4]

Founded in 1973 by Jesuit priest Virgil Blum, the Catholic League was formed to counter discrimination against Catholics in the U.S. government and in popular culture. The low-profile group initiated public education campaigns and some lawsuits. In 1993 the group became much more aggressive with a new president, former sociology professor Bill Donohue, who also increased its size to become the largest Catholic advocacy organization in America.[4] The Catholic League is known for press releases about what it views as anti-Catholic and anti-Christian themes in mass media.

The Catholic League has taken a stand against anything they perceive as anti-Catholic, including the entertainment industry, certain art exhibits, school programs for sex education, government-funded contraception and abortion, media bias, restrictions against pro-life activism, and restrictions on religious schools.[5] It publishes a journal, Catalyst, and operates a website.

The League under Donohue’s leadership is criticized for its conservatism and for its combative responses to high-profile media stories.[4][6] Besides education campaigns, the group issues condemnations, initiates boycotts and protests, defends priests against accusations of child sexual abuse, fights proposed legislation and threatens legal action against what it sees as bigotry against Catholics, irreverence against religious figures, and attacks on Catholic dogma.[4][7] However, the Catholic League stresses that “it does not speak authoritatively for the Church as a whole.”[4]

The League was founded in Milwaukee in 1973 by Virgil C. Blum S.J.[3][8] Blum served as president of the Catholic League until 1989.

Since 1993, the League has been led by its Board of Directors president, Bill Donohue, who works with a small number of organizational staffers including Kiera McCaffrey, the League’s director of communications, who has also made media appearances for the group.[9] In a 1999 New York Times article, a reporter said Donohue is pragmatic in regards to religion, “media savvy” and “steers clear of divisive debates on theological doctrines and secular politics”.[1] The article said Donohue “fans simmering anger with inflammatory news releases, a Web site and newsletter”[1] with “scathing attacks on the blasphemous and the irreverent”.[1] In a 2007 interview, Salon Life staff writer Rebecca Traister discussed Donohue with Frances Kissling, former head of the organization Catholics for Choice, which opposes Catholic teaching on abortion, who characterized Donohue as “abusive”, and stated she avoided doing media interviews with him for this reason.[10]

The League is organized under a Board of Directors chaired by Philip K. Eichner, a Marianist priest and educator in Long Island, New York. The League also has Board of Advisors, consisting of prominent lay Catholics like Brent Bozell, Linda Chavez, Mary Ann Glendon, Alan Keyes, Tom Monaghan, Michael Novak and George Weigel.[3] The League issues a journal, Catalyst, as well as reports, such as Pope Pius XII and the Holocaust, books, brochures and an annual Report on Anti-Catholicism.

The League is not part of the Archdiocese of New York, though it does rent an office on the same floor as the headquarters of the Archdiocese.[1] According to a New York Times interviewer, the organization “maintains close ties to the [archdiocesan] leadership. Several bishops make personal donations. Cardinal O’Connor spoke at the group’s 25th anniversary reception in 1998 and vacated part of his suite for its expanding operations, said Joseph Zwilling, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of New York.”[1] The League includes on its website endorsements from such prominent clerics as Cardinal Edward Egan (former Archbishop of New York), Cardinal Roger Mahony (former Archbishop of Los Angeles), Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia, and Archbishop Edwin O’Brien of Baltimore, as well as Father Benedict Groeschel, C.F.R., all of whom have endorsed the League’s activities and exhorted Catholics to become members.[3]

The New York Times reported that the group had 11,000 total members when Donohue took over the Catholic League in 1993. This grew to 233,333 paying members in 1999, a figure which the League allegedly multiplies by 1.5 to account for non-paying members in the households of paying members, resulting in a League estimate of 350,000 members.[1] This 1999 estimate is the last statement about overall membership numbers that the League has made. The League’s 2003 statement about membership claimed 15,000 members in Nassau and Suffolk counties of New York alone.[11] Annual donations entitle members to home delivery of the print version of Catalyst, the group’s monthly journal, which is also available for free on the Catholic League’s website.

The Catholic League claims political neutrality, which is mostly required of non-profits. The website states, “The League wishes to be neither left nor right, liberal or conservative, revolutionary or reactionary.”[3] Although often characterized as conservative[12][13][14][15] the League has at times been at odds with conservative figures and organizations. For example, they criticized the anti-illegal immigration group, the Minutemen, for opposing a San Diego priest’s facilitation of employment for Latino immigrants and for condemning the Church as a whole in public statements about the matter.[16] The Catholic League also condemned pastor and televangelist John Hagee for what they called “anti-Catholic hate speech” and called upon John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign to renounce this alleged bigotry.[17]

Christian Leftist John Swomley criticized the Catholic League as the “most dangerous of the far-right organizations.”[4] Donohue has been called “right-wing”[18] and “a conservative reactionary who wants to undo the work of Vatican II and suppress varying opinions within the Church.”[19]

In 1996, Donohue took issue with Joan Osborne over her song “One of Us”, which explores the question of what it would be like if God were a human being.[20] Donohue questioned the point of the song and brought up her activism calling for support of Rock for Choice and other pro-choice groups stating, “It is no wonder that Joan Osborne instructs her fans to donate their time and money to Planned Parenthood. It is of a piece with her politics and her prejudices. Her songs and videos offer a curious mix of both, the effect of which is to dance awfully close to the line of Catholic baiting.”[21] Religious educator Paul Moses stated that Donohue’s was a “tortured reading” and he saw Osborne as having “the Catholic imagination” with the song “awakening…spiritual hunger”.[22] Osborne said, in a letter to fans, that “the church’s attitudes toward women and gays make the pope look far more ridiculous than any pop song could” and that she did not write the song, which “speaks of the pope only with respect.”[22] Donohue also admitted that he was treating the issue in a “kind of a prophylactic approach” because “cultures are changed as a result of patterns.”[22]

In 1997, Donohue declared the ABC show Nothing Sacred as deeply offensive to Catholicism, although not anti-Catholic in the traditional sense.[23][24] Calling for a boycott, he stated that the show portrayed Catholics with a traditional view as cold or cruel while glorifying more the maverick, irreverent voices in the community. However, the show was defended by some Catholics and had been written with the consultation of Jesuits, from which it later won the Humanitas Prize. Many Catholics agreed with him that the show was hostile to the beliefs and values of the Catholic Church, and ABC canceled Nothing Sacred after less than a season, reportedly for poor ratings. Observers think Donohue may have played a significant role in the show’s rapid demise as advertisers often become leery of shows deemed “controversial”.[25][26] With regard to the controversy, Henry Herx, director of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Office of Film and Broadcast (successor to the National Legion of Decency) emphasized that the Catholic League is not an official agency of the church.[27]

The year 1999 saw the release of Kevin Smith’s controversial film Dogma. Despite the fact that Smith is a practicing Catholic, as Kevin Smith confirmed in an interview on the film’s DVD, several religious groups, especially the Catholic League, said the film was anti-Catholic and blasphemous, and organized protests, including one that took place at the November 12 premiere of the film at Lincoln Center in New York City.

Smith noted that several of the protests occurred before the film was even finished, suggesting that the protests were more about media attention for the groups than for whatever was controversial about the film.[28] The Catholic League’s main complaints were that the film’s main character is supposedly a descendant of Mary, who happens to work in an abortion clinic, which were seen as ironic conventions for a Catholic.[citation needed] The film’s distributor, Miramax, removed its name from the production, and hired attorney Dan Petrocelli to defend it publicly. Petrocelli accused Donohue of trying to stir a violent reaction to the film.

According to Smith, “[Donohue] actually invited me out to have a beer after making my life hell for six months.”[29]

Donohue is a staunch defender of Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ. On the December 8, 2004 broadcast of Scarborough Country, he stated:

Hollywood is controlled by secular Jews who hate Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular. It’s not a secret, OK? And I’m not afraid to say it. That’s why they hate this movie. It’s about Jesus Christ, and it’s about truth. It’s about the Messiah.[30]

After U.S. President George W. Bush used the term “Holidays” instead of “Christmas” on the White House 2005 Christmas cards, Donohue stated “The Bush administration has suffered a loss of will andthey have capitulated to the worst elements in our culture.”[31]

“I was scheduled to be on with Mike Savage the day he savaged the Catholic Church and made bigoted comments about Latinos”, Donohue said.

“But in the pre-interview which occurred just a half hour before Savage went ballistic I let a producer know that I did not share the host’s position; after he checked with Savage, I was told they would not have me on the show. That was fine, but what is not fine is Savage’s diatribe about the ‘greedy pigs’ in the Catholic Church and how ‘the institution is rotten from the top to the bottom.’ He owes all Catholics an apology.”[32]

Donohue demanded that former Sen. John Edwards fire two presidential campaign staffers in February 2007, charging that they were “anti-Catholic, vulgar, trash-talking bigots.” He cited a blog written by Amanda Marcotte regarding the Church’s opposition to birth control, saying it forces women “to bear more tithing Catholics”. He also cited another posting called “Pope and Fascists”. Donohue also objected to one of the staffers describing President Bush’s “wingnut Christofacist base”.

Donohue called the statements “incendiary” and “inflammatory”, saying, “It’s scurrilous and has no place being part of someone’s resume who’s going to work for a potential presidential contender.” On February 8, John Edwards addressed the writings of the staffers, Amanda Marcotte and Melissa McEwan, saying ‘that kind of intolerant language will not be permitted from anyone on my campaign, whether it’s intended as satire, humor or anything else.'[citation needed] Donohue insisted that Edwards fire the pair immediately.

After the complaints, Marcotte wrote, “The Christian version of the virgin birth is generally interpreted as super-patriarchal where God is viewed as so powerful he can impregnate without befouling himself by touching a woman, and women are nothing but vessels.” After Marcotte parted with the campaign, Donohue stated, “It is not enough that one foul-mouthed anti-Christian bigot, Amanda Marcotte, has quit. Melissa McEwan must go as well. Either Edwards shows her the door or she bolts on her own. There is no third choicethe Catholic League will see to it that this issue won’t go away.” He continued, “The Edwards campaign is in total disarray and the meltdown will continue unless McEwan is removed from his staff. The fact that Marcotte had to quit suggests that Edwards doesn’t have the guts to do what is morally right.” McEwan resigned on February 13, 2007,[33] citing the hostility of the Catholic League and emails threatening rape and murder.[34]

On September 8, 2007, Kathy Griffin won her first Emmy for season two of reality show Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List. Griffin stirred up controversy with her acceptance speech, saying that “a lot of people come up here and thank Jesus for this award. I want you to know that no one had less to do with this award than Jesus. He didn’t help me a bit.” She went on to hold up her Emmy and say, “Suck it, Jesus, this award is my god now!”[35]

Her remarks were quickly condemned by Donohue, who urged the TV academy to “denounce Griffin’s obscene and blasphemous comment.”[36] After the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences decided to censor Griffin’s remark, Donohue said, “The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences reacted responsibly to our criticism of Kathy Griffin’s verbal assault on 85 percent of the U.S. population. The ball is now in Griffin’s court. The self-described ‘complete militant atheist’ needs to make a swift and unequivocal apology to Christians. If she does, she will get this issue behind her. If she does not, she will be remembered as a foul-mouthed bigot for the rest of her life.”[37]

In a statement issued by her publicist, Griffin responded to the denouncement by the Catholic League with a question: “Am I the only Catholic left with a sense of humor?”[38]

As part of a two-month protest campaign, Donohue called for a boycott of the film The Golden Compass, believing that while the religious elements of the film would be “watered down” from the source novels, the film would still encourage children to read the series, which Donohue says “denigrates Christianity” and promotes “atheism for kids”,[39] citing author Philip Pullman as saying that he is “trying to undermine the basis of Christian belief.”[40] Donohue hopes that “the film [will fail] to meet box office expectations and that [Pullman’s] books attract few buyers.”[41] The call for a boycott resulted in action by some Catholic groups in the US and Canada, and a Catholic school board in Ontario has ordered the source novel removed from its library shelves. Pullman has since said that the books do not have a religious agenda, saying of Donohue’s call for a boycott, “Why don’t we trust readers? Why don’t we trust filmgoers? Oh, it causes me to shake my head with sorrow that such nitwits could be loose in the world.”[42] Pullman described the Catholic League as “a tiny, unrepresentative organisation,” suggesting that “the only person Bill Donohue represents is himself.”[43]

Other evangelical groups, such as The Christian Film and Television Commission, adopted a “wait-and-see” approach to the film before deciding upon any action,[44] as did the Roman Catholic Church in Britain.[42]

Some commentators indicated that they believed the criticism would prove ultimately impotent and that the negative publicity would prove a boon for the film’s box office.[45][46]

In July 2008, a controversy arose surrounding a Communion rite altercation involving Webster Cook, a student and member of the University of Central Florida (UCF) student senate. Cook attended a Catholic Mass on campus and was given the Eucharist but walked out without consuming it. This action was allegedly related to his protest of the use of public funds for organized worship in the student union hall. According to Donohue, Cook’s actions were a form of desecration of the sacrament. Cook was proposed for censure by the student senate and was criticized by local media. He also received numerous death threats.[47][48]

On Pharyngula, biologist and University of Minnesota Morris (UMM) professor PZ Myers publicly expressed support for Cook as well as outrage that Fox News appeared to be inciting readers to cause further problems for the student.[47][49][50] Myers invited readers to acquire some consecrated Eucharistic Hosts, which he described as “crackers”, for him to treat “with profound disrespect.”[51]

The Catholic League accused Myers of anti-Catholic bigotry and asked UMM and the Minnesota State Legislature to take action against Myers.[52][53] Myers then also received threats and hate mail.[54] The Catholic League also called for Cook to be expelled from the university, with Donohue describing his confiscation of the Eucharist as a hate crime as well as a form of kidnapping.[51] Donohue also accused those who supported Cook of anti-Catholic bigotry, and sent a letter to the UCF asking them to take legal action against Cook.[55] A week after the initial communion Cook apologized and returned the Host. The Catholic League, however, continued to lobby the university for his expulsion.[55]

In March 2007, a sculpture created by Italian-Canadian artist Cosimo Cavallaro was to be displayed at Manhattan’s Roger Smith Hotel. The sculpture, entitled “My Sweet Lord”, was of a crucified Christ, nude, in molded chocolate. Although the artist claims to be himself a practicing Catholic, Bill Donohue decried the work as “hate speech”, “garbage”, and “one of the worst assaults on Christian sensibilities ever,”[56] describing Mr. Cavallaro as a “loser artist” and telling him in a television interview on Anderson Cooper 360, “You’re lucky I’m not like the Taliban, because you would lose more than your head.”

Under the leadership of Donohue, the Catholic League organized a boycott of the hotel aimed at forcing it to remove the statue. The hotel’s management stating that the protests “brought to our attention the unintended reaction of you and other conscientious friends”, eventually agreed to the League’s calls, prompting the curator of the gallery, Matt Semler, to resign in protest.[56] Semler claimed the six-foot sculpture was the victim of “a strong-arming from people who haven’t seen the show, seen what we’re doing. They jumped to conclusions completely contrary to our intentions.”[56]

Donohue said, in October 2009, that the Catholic Church has a “homosexual”, not a “pedophilia”, problem, citing the John Jay Report.[57] The Catholic League has blamed the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), for having “hired, hidden, defended, enabled, ignored and concealed the crimes of child molesters.”[58] The Catholic League defended attacking SNAP on the grounds that they were “a menace to the Catholic Church.”[59]

In a November 18, 2009, Politics Daily column about Smith’s research, David Gibson reported that sexual identity should be “separated from the problem of sexual abuse,” according to criminologist Margaret Smith. Smith said, “we do not find a connection between homosexual identity and an increased likelihood of sexual abuse.”[60] Nevertheless, Donohue says that this is a homosexual problem in the Catholic Church and not a pedophile one.[60]

On May 20, 2009, Reuters reported the results of a nine-year investigation by the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse, which looked into decades of endemic sexual abuse against children in Catholic-run reform schools in Ireland.[61] In reaction to this report, popularly known as the Ryan Report, Donohue issued a statement downplaying the seriousness of the cases, questioning the inclusion of voyeurism and “inappropriate sexual talk” as instances of sexual abuse along with the more serious charge of rape.[62] Donohue pointed out that rape constituted only 12% of the listed sexual abuse cases in the Ryan report, and that priests committed only 12% of the listed rapesthe other 88% were committed by lay persons and religious brothers.[62]

Since the Ryan Report was released, Donohue has been defending the Church and claiming that much of the outrage is ‘moral hysteria’. While stating that he agrees that rape and physical abuse are wrong and that he would not defend those actions, he says the report has conflated these abuses with ‘lesser’ forms of punishment and is therefore not as serious. He also says many of the purported forms of abuse found by the commission were present and acceptable in the time period.[63]

The Irish politician and child rape victim Colm O’Gorman was highly critical of such statements made by Donohue on the Irish radio show The Last Word.[63] O’Gorman later wrote that Donohue’s analysis was shockingly “simplistic”.[64]

When President Barack Obama named gay activist[65] Harry Knox to the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships in 2009, Donohue termed Knox “an anti-Catholic bigot who has called the pope a liar.”[65]

In November 2010, a portion of a video by the late artist David Wojnarowicz, which was included in an exhibit focused on gay-themed art, “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture” at the National Portrait Gallery (United States), was removed after complaints from the Catholic League.[66] Columnist Frank Rich said of the intervention and removal that the Smithsonian had been “bullied by bigots” and quoted The Los Angeles Times”s art critic, Christopher Knight, to the same effect.[67] Tracing the evolution of the issue, Rich cited a piece by Kriston Capps which in turn said “the role of Penny Starr remains hazy. [However, a]…reporter and conservative advocate, [Starr] deserves much credit for both instigating” the negative attention to the piece of art amongst a number in the show.[68]

In 1997, David Carlin of Commonweal criticized Donohue and the Catholic League for being overly sensitive in the identification of anti-Catholicism.[69] In 1999, Jesuit priest James Martin, the associate editor of the Catholic magazine America wrote “Often their criticism is right on target, but frequently they speak without seeing or experiencing what they are critiquing, and that undercuts their credibility. Unfortunately, that type of response gives people the idea that the Catholic Church is unreflective.”[1]

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The Anti-Defamation League Works to Combat Hate | Fred Turner

Anti-Defamation League

Since receiving his MA in political science from American University in 1995, Fred Turner has enjoyed a long political career in Washington, DC. Having worked as legislative assistant to Congressman Alcee Hastings and legislative director for Congresswoman Karen McCarthy, he is now chief of staff to Senator Bob Menendez. Fred Turner began his career as a graduate legislative fellow with the Anti-Defamation League.

What Is the Anti-Defamation League?

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) is a civil rights organization that was founded in 1913 to fight anti-Semitism. Now, the ADL works to fight all forms of prejudice and bigotry and has become known for its civil rights initiatives. The ADL seeks to provide information, legislation, and advocacy for victimized populations.

What Initiatives Top the ADLs Agenda?

Today, the ADL is focused broadly on combating hate. To that end, it continues to work globally to challenge leaders to fight anti-Semitism and violence. The ADL also monitors and catalogues hate and extremist groups and the crimes they commit. In 1981, the ADL drafted model legislation imposing harsh penalties on perpetrators of hate crimes. Similar legislation has since been enacted in 45 states and the District of Columbia. The ADL also educates the public on First Amendment and religious rights, provides anti-bias education to schools, and develops bullying and cyberbullying workshops and resources for youth and educators.

How Can I Support the ADL?

The ADL conducts its work through a system of 27 regional and local offices in the United States and one office in Israel, and those interested can get involved at the local level. The ADL also encourages the public to take action by sending letters to representatives on ADL issues, subscribing to the ADLs newsletter to stay apprised of current efforts, or making a donation.

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Lifer Newt: Bannon’s War Against McConnell ‘Stuningly Stupid’


Tuesday on Sean Hannity’s nationally syndicated radio show, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich voiced his objections to former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s declaration a night earlier that incumbent Republican U.S. Senators up for reelection in 2018 would be facing a primary challenge. Gingrich argued the focus should be on unseating Democrats and said the strategy of challenging the GOP lawmakers was “stunningly stupid.” “The point I would make as a strategist is you got 10 Democrats up next year in states Trump carried,” Gingrich said. “You have six Democrats up next year in states Trump carried by a huge margin. Now you take the amount of money Bannon is going to raise. If he spent that money in North Dakota, Montana, Indiana, Missouri, West Virginia – the fact is you would have such a big Republican majority, you’d pass the stuff you guys want to pass. Creating a civil war inside the Republican Party may feel good, but I think as a strategy, it is stunningly stupid. I’m just being really honest.” Follow Breitbart News on Twitter @BreitbartNews

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Lifer Newt: Bannon’s War Against McConnell ‘Stuningly Stupid’

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October 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Marco Rubio Headlines Fundraiser for Anti-Trump Senator Jeff Flake


Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) attended a fundraiser for Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) on Monday in a bid to support his 2018 Senate reelection campaign against challenger Kelli Ward.

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Marco Rubio Headlines Fundraiser for Anti-Trump Senator Jeff Flake

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October 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Rep. Diane Black Will Boycott Her Home State NFL Titans’ Games Until Players Stand for National Anthem


Rep. Diane Black (R-TN) said on Tuesday that she will not attend Tennessee Titans games until NFL players stand for the national anthem.

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Rep. Diane Black Will Boycott Her Home State NFL Titans’ Games Until Players Stand for National Anthem

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October 10, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Joins Call for HB Finance …

Van Der Mark and pals in Santa Monica (YouTube Screenshot) Gracey Van Der Mark somehow remains on the Huntington Beach finance commission even after a controversy erupted around her online bigotry earlier this month. As the Weekly reported, Van Der Mark recently deleted comments on YouTube where she referred to blacks as colored people and suggested they dutifully did the bidding of Jews at a white privilege workshop in Santa Monica she helped crash last summer. Van Der Mark also scrubbed a Holocaust hoax? playlist from her YouTube channel. But for all the online erasures, residents and concerned community members turned out to Huntington Beach city council last night to call for Van Der Marks removal from the post councilman Patrick Brenden appointed her to. This individual has posted material on the internet that one could fairly describe as anti-Semitic, as Islamophobic and as racist, said Rabbi Stephen Einstein of Fountain Valleys Congregation Bnai Tzedek. It is my urgent request that you look into this and investigate it and then take whatever appropriate action you deem as right. The Anti-Defamation League weighed in on Van Der Mark with a letter sent to city council on Friday. We dont always write letters but when we do its because we feel very strongly that its an opportunity for you as the mayor and the city council to take the statement and do whats right and accurate, Rabbi Peter Levi, the ADLs OC regional director, said at council. Its not about liberals or conservatives. Its about extremists that are beyond the spectrum. Obtained by the Weekly, the ADL letter echoed the call for an investigation into Van Der Marks remarks and associations. There is ample evidence she has made bigoted and hateful comments and that she has participated in activities organized and led by white supremacists, Levi wrote. These words and actions call into question her ability to serve as an appointed leader in the Huntington Beach community. The organization noted the Weeklys reporting and described Van Der Marks colored people comments about Jews as classic anti-Semitic trope in stating she should be removed from her commission post. And its not just antisemitism. The ADL also noted Van Der Mark belonged to a Three Percenters Facebook group and made Islamophobic comments on the social media site suggesting that the U.S. Department of Education is funding sharia indoctrination in public schools. Did we mention that Van Der Mark also serves on the Ocean View School District Measure R Citizens Oversight Committee in Huntington Beach? Maybe shes making sure taxpayer funds dont go towards constructing mosques on school grounds or something. Either way, the ADL sent the same letter to the school district. Trustee Gina Clayton-Tarvin, who appointed Van Der Mark in June, denounced her hateful statements and beliefs in calling for her removal at council. I want to note that there have been two past commissioners who have stepped down when their actions and speech were deemed unacceptable by residents, Clayton-Tarvin said. I must ask all of you, do you believe that a representative of a city commission should be publicly denying the Holocaust and posting that it is a hoax? Do you accept that? I dont. Kim Sorgente, a Huntington Beach resident and Proud Boys reject, helped crashed the anti-racist workshop in Santa Monica with Van Der Mark and others, including two scheduled Unite the Right speakers in Charlottesville. Sorgentecame to her defense at council. I cant say Im too fond of her, he said. What I can say is this; Gracey is a person of color and shes darker than any of these people that took this podium and spoke against her. She was there to make America a better place. Sorgente babbled on about white genocide in South Africaa favored talking point among white supremacistsand how he hoped a similar poison doesnt take route in the United States. Outside of public comments, OCs Scariest People 2016 honoree Chris Epting backed Van Der Mark in an email sent to councilman Brenden and others that he proudly posted on the infamous Huntington Beach Community Forum on Facebook. Please do not give these dishonest cowards the pound of flesh they desire, Epting wrote. OVSD Trustee John Briscoe could not even get Graceys name right tonight. Funny. Epting couldnt either, writing the commissioners last name as Larrea-Van Der throughout the email in missing the Mark. Oh, and taking a reference from The Merchant of Venice in defending an anti-Semite aint too bright either! Notwithstanding Eptings hissy fit, if Van Der Mark already deleted her colored people comments and Holocaust hoax? YouTube playlist, why hasnt councilman Brenden dropped her from the finance commission yet? Gabriel San Roman is from Anacrime. Hes a journalist, subversive historian and tallest Mexican in OC.

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June 12, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation & Mascots | NCAI

From time immemorial, the greatness of tribal nations and Native people has been the foundation of Americas story. From tribes role as Americas first governments, to modern day actors, athletes, and political leaders, Native people contribute to American greatness every single day. Negative Indian stereotypes especially those perpetuated by sports mascots affect the reputation and self-image of every single Native person and foster ongoing discrimination against tribal citizens. In general, NCAI strongly opposes the use of derogatory Native sports mascots. However, in the case where mascots refer to a particular Native nation or nations, NCAI respects the right of individual tribal nations to work with universities and athletic programs to decide how to protect and celebrate their respective tribal heritage. Indian mascots and stereotypes present a misleading image of Indian people and feed the historic myths that have been used to whitewash a history of oppression. Despite decades of work to eliminate the use of discrimination and derogatory images in American sports, the practice has not gone away. NCAI is pleased that tribal advocates have succeeded in eliminating over two-thirds of derogatory Indian sports mascots and logos over the past 50 years. Today, there are fewer than 1,000 of these mascots left. In 2005, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the governing body of college athletics, formally condemned the use of disparaging mascots and banned the use of Indian names, logos, and mascots during its championship tournaments. However, there is plenty of work yet to doespecially in the realm of professional sports. NCAI recognizes that this can be a difficult and sensitive issue, and we acknowledge the significance of athletics for the public, as well as the attachment (both emotionally and financially) of professional teams and university athletic programs to their names and logos. At the end of the day, there is no excuse for cultural stereotypes that degrade, slander, mock or belittle Native people. This misrepresentation would not be acceptable for any other minority community in America and NCAI will continue to oppose the use of offensive Native mascots and imagery that promote harmful stereotypes. Oct 16, 2009 Oct 10, 2013 Sep 15, 2015 Sep 28, 2015 Oct 03, 2014 Jun 11, 2014 May 07, 2018 Nov 21, 2017 Nov 03, 2017

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June 5, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

William Cooper – The Ugly Truth About the Anti-Defamation …

Thanks to EyesForTheProfane for his artwork Transcriptshttp://www.theforbiddenknowledge.com/… The Ugly Truth About the Anti-Defamation League Bookhttp://www.whale.to/b/adl.pdf This is a classic William Cooper broadcast from his shortwave radio broadcast the ‘Hour of the Time’. It was originally aired on June 23rd, 1994. This is episode #382 from the HOTT catalogue titled ‘ADL #1’. I hope you enjoy it.. “Read everything. Listen to everything. Don’t trust anything unless you can prove it with your own research.” –William Cooper

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April 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Honors Vices Nancy Dubuc Variety

Incoming Vice Media CEO Nancy Dubuc was honored by the Anti-Defamation League Wednesday night at the organizations annual Entertainment Industry Dinner. Among those on hand at the Beverly Hilton to pay tribute to Dubuc were UnReal star Shiri Appleby, Propagate co-CEO Ben Silverman, Billions actor Rob Morrow, ADL regional board chair Ivy Kagan Bierman, and ADL regional director Amanda Susskind. Introducing Dubuc, who recently exited her post as CEO of A+E Networks to join Vice, Appleby spoke about about meeting the executive in 2014. Appleby had just been cast in UnReal, which went on to land a Peabody Award and two Primetime Emmy nominations for cable channel Lifetime. During one of our very first meetings together I mentioned my interests that went beyond acting, Appleby said. To directing, to producing, to telling stories that moved me about issues that moved me. I really wanted to learn how to be a leader and have a leading voice. Instantly Nancy invited me to New York to come shadow her. She really took the time to teach me. Appleby added, I cant think of a better person who has used her position of power to affect change and make a difference. Related Accepting her honor, Dubuc said that she began to understand how she could affect positive change through her platform as a programmer over a decade ago with the premiere of the A&E series Intervention, which she developed. I began to understand that we can change lives, Dubuc said. We can change societys perceptions. We can use the power of storytelling to illuminate all types of people, all types of circumstances, and all types of worlds. Dubuc added, Entertainment is an incredibly powerful platform in our countrys culture, and media is increasingly part of the story, not just a reflection of it. Theres no question that we are living in a time of monumental change, disruption, and fear, but also opportunity if you choose to see it that way. In the literature about ADL, one sentiment that is repeated over and over again that really stuck with me is There is no them. There is only us.

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April 18, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Catholic League (U.S.) – Wikipedia

Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights Logo of the Catholic League Region served Membership Official language Budget Staff The Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, often shortened to the Catholic League, is an American Catholic anti-defamation and civil rights organization. The Catholic League states that it “defends the right of Catholics lay and clergy alike to participate in American public life without defamation or discrimination.”[3] The Catholic League states that it is “motivated by the letter and the spirit of the First Amendment…to safeguard both the religious freedom rights and the free speech rights of Catholics whenever and wherever they are threatened.”[3] According to the Encyclopedia of American Religion and Politics, the League “is regarded by many as the preeminent organization representing the views of American lay Catholics.”[4] Founded in 1973 by Jesuit priest Virgil Blum, the Catholic League was formed to counter discrimination against Catholics in the U.S. government and in popular culture. The low-profile group initiated public education campaigns and some lawsuits. In 1993 the group became much more aggressive with a new president, former sociology professor Bill Donohue, who also increased its size to become the largest Catholic advocacy organization in America.[4] The Catholic League is known for press releases about what it views as anti-Catholic and anti-Christian themes in mass media. The Catholic League has taken a stand against anything they perceive as anti-Catholic, including the entertainment industry, certain art exhibits, school programs for sex education, government-funded contraception and abortion, media bias, restrictions against pro-life activism, and restrictions on religious schools.[5] It publishes a journal, Catalyst, and operates a website. The League under Donohue’s leadership is criticized for its conservatism and for its combative responses to high-profile media stories.[4][6] Besides education campaigns, the group issues condemnations, initiates boycotts and protests, defends priests against accusations of child sexual abuse, fights proposed legislation and threatens legal action against what it sees as bigotry against Catholics, irreverence against religious figures, and attacks on Catholic dogma.[4][7] However, the Catholic League stresses that “it does not speak authoritatively for the Church as a whole.”[4] The League was founded in Milwaukee in 1973 by Virgil C. Blum S.J.[3][8] Blum served as president of the Catholic League until 1989. Since 1993, the League has been led by its Board of Directors president, Bill Donohue, who works with a small number of organizational staffers including Kiera McCaffrey, the League’s director of communications, who has also made media appearances for the group.[9] In a 1999 New York Times article, a reporter said Donohue is pragmatic in regards to religion, “media savvy” and “steers clear of divisive debates on theological doctrines and secular politics”.[1] The article said Donohue “fans simmering anger with inflammatory news releases, a Web site and newsletter”[1] with “scathing attacks on the blasphemous and the irreverent”.[1] In a 2007 interview, Salon Life staff writer Rebecca Traister discussed Donohue with Frances Kissling, former head of the organization Catholics for Choice, which opposes Catholic teaching on abortion, who characterized Donohue as “abusive”, and stated she avoided doing media interviews with him for this reason.[10] The League is organized under a Board of Directors chaired by Philip K. Eichner, a Marianist priest and educator in Long Island, New York. The League also has Board of Advisors, consisting of prominent lay Catholics like Brent Bozell, Linda Chavez, Mary Ann Glendon, Alan Keyes, Tom Monaghan, Michael Novak and George Weigel.[3] The League issues a journal, Catalyst, as well as reports, such as Pope Pius XII and the Holocaust, books, brochures and an annual Report on Anti-Catholicism. The League is not part of the Archdiocese of New York, though it does rent an office on the same floor as the headquarters of the Archdiocese.[1] According to a New York Times interviewer, the organization “maintains close ties to the [archdiocesan] leadership. Several bishops make personal donations. Cardinal O’Connor spoke at the group’s 25th anniversary reception in 1998 and vacated part of his suite for its expanding operations, said Joseph Zwilling, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of New York.”[1] The League includes on its website endorsements from such prominent clerics as Cardinal Edward Egan (former Archbishop of New York), Cardinal Roger Mahony (former Archbishop of Los Angeles), Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia, and Archbishop Edwin O’Brien of Baltimore, as well as Father Benedict Groeschel, C.F.R., all of whom have endorsed the League’s activities and exhorted Catholics to become members.[3] The New York Times reported that the group had 11,000 total members when Donohue took over the Catholic League in 1993. This grew to 233,333 paying members in 1999, a figure which the League allegedly multiplies by 1.5 to account for non-paying members in the households of paying members, resulting in a League estimate of 350,000 members.[1] This 1999 estimate is the last statement about overall membership numbers that the League has made. The League’s 2003 statement about membership claimed 15,000 members in Nassau and Suffolk counties of New York alone.[11] Annual donations entitle members to home delivery of the print version of Catalyst, the group’s monthly journal, which is also available for free on the Catholic League’s website. The Catholic League claims political neutrality, which is mostly required of non-profits. The website states, “The League wishes to be neither left nor right, liberal or conservative, revolutionary or reactionary.”[3] Although often characterized as conservative[12][13][14][15] the League has at times been at odds with conservative figures and organizations. For example, they criticized the anti-illegal immigration group, the Minutemen, for opposing a San Diego priest’s facilitation of employment for Latino immigrants and for condemning the Church as a whole in public statements about the matter.[16] The Catholic League also condemned pastor and televangelist John Hagee for what they called “anti-Catholic hate speech” and called upon John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign to renounce this alleged bigotry.[17] Christian Leftist John Swomley criticized the Catholic League as the “most dangerous of the far-right organizations.”[4] Donohue has been called “right-wing”[18] and “a conservative reactionary who wants to undo the work of Vatican II and suppress varying opinions within the Church.”[19] In 1996, Donohue took issue with Joan Osborne over her song “One of Us”, which explores the question of what it would be like if God were a human being.[20] Donohue questioned the point of the song and brought up her activism calling for support of Rock for Choice and other pro-choice groups stating, “It is no wonder that Joan Osborne instructs her fans to donate their time and money to Planned Parenthood. It is of a piece with her politics and her prejudices. Her songs and videos offer a curious mix of both, the effect of which is to dance awfully close to the line of Catholic baiting.”[21] Religious educator Paul Moses stated that Donohue’s was a “tortured reading” and he saw Osborne as having “the Catholic imagination” with the song “awakening…spiritual hunger”.[22] Osborne said, in a letter to fans, that “the church’s attitudes toward women and gays make the pope look far more ridiculous than any pop song could” and that she did not write the song, which “speaks of the pope only with respect.”[22] Donohue also admitted that he was treating the issue in a “kind of a prophylactic approach” because “cultures are changed as a result of patterns.”[22] In 1997, Donohue declared the ABC show Nothing Sacred as deeply offensive to Catholicism, although not anti-Catholic in the traditional sense.[23][24] Calling for a boycott, he stated that the show portrayed Catholics with a traditional view as cold or cruel while glorifying more the maverick, irreverent voices in the community. However, the show was defended by some Catholics and had been written with the consultation of Jesuits, from which it later won the Humanitas Prize. Many Catholics agreed with him that the show was hostile to the beliefs and values of the Catholic Church, and ABC canceled Nothing Sacred after less than a season, reportedly for poor ratings. Observers think Donohue may have played a significant role in the show’s rapid demise as advertisers often become leery of shows deemed “controversial”.[25][26] With regard to the controversy, Henry Herx, director of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Office of Film and Broadcast (successor to the National Legion of Decency) emphasized that the Catholic League is not an official agency of the church.[27] The year 1999 saw the release of Kevin Smith’s controversial film Dogma. Despite the fact that Smith is a practicing Catholic, as Kevin Smith confirmed in an interview on the film’s DVD, several religious groups, especially the Catholic League, said the film was anti-Catholic and blasphemous, and organized protests, including one that took place at the November 12 premiere of the film at Lincoln Center in New York City. Smith noted that several of the protests occurred before the film was even finished, suggesting that the protests were more about media attention for the groups than for whatever was controversial about the film.[28] The Catholic League’s main complaints were that the film’s main character is supposedly a descendant of Mary, who happens to work in an abortion clinic, which were seen as ironic conventions for a Catholic.[citation needed] The film’s distributor, Miramax, removed its name from the production, and hired attorney Dan Petrocelli to defend it publicly. Petrocelli accused Donohue of trying to stir a violent reaction to the film. According to Smith, “[Donohue] actually invited me out to have a beer after making my life hell for six months.”[29] Donohue is a staunch defender of Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ. On the December 8, 2004 broadcast of Scarborough Country, he stated: Hollywood is controlled by secular Jews who hate Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular. It’s not a secret, OK? And I’m not afraid to say it. That’s why they hate this movie. It’s about Jesus Christ, and it’s about truth. It’s about the Messiah.[30] After U.S. President George W. Bush used the term “Holidays” instead of “Christmas” on the White House 2005 Christmas cards, Donohue stated “The Bush administration has suffered a loss of will andthey have capitulated to the worst elements in our culture.”[31] “I was scheduled to be on with Mike Savage the day he savaged the Catholic Church and made bigoted comments about Latinos”, Donohue said. “But in the pre-interview which occurred just a half hour before Savage went ballistic I let a producer know that I did not share the host’s position; after he checked with Savage, I was told they would not have me on the show. That was fine, but what is not fine is Savage’s diatribe about the ‘greedy pigs’ in the Catholic Church and how ‘the institution is rotten from the top to the bottom.’ He owes all Catholics an apology.”[32] Donohue demanded that former Sen. John Edwards fire two presidential campaign staffers in February 2007, charging that they were “anti-Catholic, vulgar, trash-talking bigots.” He cited a blog written by Amanda Marcotte regarding the Church’s opposition to birth control, saying it forces women “to bear more tithing Catholics”. He also cited another posting called “Pope and Fascists”. Donohue also objected to one of the staffers describing President Bush’s “wingnut Christofacist base”. Donohue called the statements “incendiary” and “inflammatory”, saying, “It’s scurrilous and has no place being part of someone’s resume who’s going to work for a potential presidential contender.” On February 8, John Edwards addressed the writings of the staffers, Amanda Marcotte and Melissa McEwan, saying ‘that kind of intolerant language will not be permitted from anyone on my campaign, whether it’s intended as satire, humor or anything else.'[citation needed] Donohue insisted that Edwards fire the pair immediately. After the complaints, Marcotte wrote, “The Christian version of the virgin birth is generally interpreted as super-patriarchal where God is viewed as so powerful he can impregnate without befouling himself by touching a woman, and women are nothing but vessels.” After Marcotte parted with the campaign, Donohue stated, “It is not enough that one foul-mouthed anti-Christian bigot, Amanda Marcotte, has quit. Melissa McEwan must go as well. Either Edwards shows her the door or she bolts on her own. There is no third choicethe Catholic League will see to it that this issue won’t go away.” He continued, “The Edwards campaign is in total disarray and the meltdown will continue unless McEwan is removed from his staff. The fact that Marcotte had to quit suggests that Edwards doesn’t have the guts to do what is morally right.” McEwan resigned on February 13, 2007,[33] citing the hostility of the Catholic League and emails threatening rape and murder.[34] On September 8, 2007, Kathy Griffin won her first Emmy for season two of reality show Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List. Griffin stirred up controversy with her acceptance speech, saying that “a lot of people come up here and thank Jesus for this award. I want you to know that no one had less to do with this award than Jesus. He didn’t help me a bit.” She went on to hold up her Emmy and say, “Suck it, Jesus, this award is my god now!”[35] Her remarks were quickly condemned by Donohue, who urged the TV academy to “denounce Griffin’s obscene and blasphemous comment.”[36] After the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences decided to censor Griffin’s remark, Donohue said, “The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences reacted responsibly to our criticism of Kathy Griffin’s verbal assault on 85 percent of the U.S. population. The ball is now in Griffin’s court. The self-described ‘complete militant atheist’ needs to make a swift and unequivocal apology to Christians. If she does, she will get this issue behind her. If she does not, she will be remembered as a foul-mouthed bigot for the rest of her life.”[37] In a statement issued by her publicist, Griffin responded to the denouncement by the Catholic League with a question: “Am I the only Catholic left with a sense of humor?”[38] As part of a two-month protest campaign, Donohue called for a boycott of the film The Golden Compass, believing that while the religious elements of the film would be “watered down” from the source novels, the film would still encourage children to read the series, which Donohue says “denigrates Christianity” and promotes “atheism for kids”,[39] citing author Philip Pullman as saying that he is “trying to undermine the basis of Christian belief.”[40] Donohue hopes that “the film [will fail] to meet box office expectations and that [Pullman’s] books attract few buyers.”[41] The call for a boycott resulted in action by some Catholic groups in the US and Canada, and a Catholic school board in Ontario has ordered the source novel removed from its library shelves. Pullman has since said that the books do not have a religious agenda, saying of Donohue’s call for a boycott, “Why don’t we trust readers? Why don’t we trust filmgoers? Oh, it causes me to shake my head with sorrow that such nitwits could be loose in the world.”[42] Pullman described the Catholic League as “a tiny, unrepresentative organisation,” suggesting that “the only person Bill Donohue represents is himself.”[43] Other evangelical groups, such as The Christian Film and Television Commission, adopted a “wait-and-see” approach to the film before deciding upon any action,[44] as did the Roman Catholic Church in Britain.[42] Some commentators indicated that they believed the criticism would prove ultimately impotent and that the negative publicity would prove a boon for the film’s box office.[45][46] In July 2008, a controversy arose surrounding a Communion rite altercation involving Webster Cook, a student and member of the University of Central Florida (UCF) student senate. Cook attended a Catholic Mass on campus and was given the Eucharist but walked out without consuming it. This action was allegedly related to his protest of the use of public funds for organized worship in the student union hall. According to Donohue, Cook’s actions were a form of desecration of the sacrament. Cook was proposed for censure by the student senate and was criticized by local media. He also received numerous death threats.[47][48] On Pharyngula, biologist and University of Minnesota Morris (UMM) professor PZ Myers publicly expressed support for Cook as well as outrage that Fox News appeared to be inciting readers to cause further problems for the student.[47][49][50] Myers invited readers to acquire some consecrated Eucharistic Hosts, which he described as “crackers”, for him to treat “with profound disrespect.”[51] The Catholic League accused Myers of anti-Catholic bigotry and asked UMM and the Minnesota State Legislature to take action against Myers.[52][53] Myers then also received threats and hate mail.[54] The Catholic League also called for Cook to be expelled from the university, with Donohue describing his confiscation of the Eucharist as a hate crime as well as a form of kidnapping.[51] Donohue also accused those who supported Cook of anti-Catholic bigotry, and sent a letter to the UCF asking them to take legal action against Cook.[55] A week after the initial communion Cook apologized and returned the Host. The Catholic League, however, continued to lobby the university for his expulsion.[55] In March 2007, a sculpture created by Italian-Canadian artist Cosimo Cavallaro was to be displayed at Manhattan’s Roger Smith Hotel. The sculpture, entitled “My Sweet Lord”, was of a crucified Christ, nude, in molded chocolate. Although the artist claims to be himself a practicing Catholic, Bill Donohue decried the work as “hate speech”, “garbage”, and “one of the worst assaults on Christian sensibilities ever,”[56] describing Mr. Cavallaro as a “loser artist” and telling him in a television interview on Anderson Cooper 360, “You’re lucky I’m not like the Taliban, because you would lose more than your head.” Under the leadership of Donohue, the Catholic League organized a boycott of the hotel aimed at forcing it to remove the statue. The hotel’s management stating that the protests “brought to our attention the unintended reaction of you and other conscientious friends”, eventually agreed to the League’s calls, prompting the curator of the gallery, Matt Semler, to resign in protest.[56] Semler claimed the six-foot sculpture was the victim of “a strong-arming from people who haven’t seen the show, seen what we’re doing. They jumped to conclusions completely contrary to our intentions.”[56] Donohue said, in October 2009, that the Catholic Church has a “homosexual”, not a “pedophilia”, problem, citing the John Jay Report.[57] The Catholic League has blamed the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), for having “hired, hidden, defended, enabled, ignored and concealed the crimes of child molesters.”[58] The Catholic League defended attacking SNAP on the grounds that they were “a menace to the Catholic Church.”[59] In a November 18, 2009, Politics Daily column about Smith’s research, David Gibson reported that sexual identity should be “separated from the problem of sexual abuse,” according to criminologist Margaret Smith. Smith said, “we do not find a connection between homosexual identity and an increased likelihood of sexual abuse.”[60] Nevertheless, Donohue says that this is a homosexual problem in the Catholic Church and not a pedophile one.[60] On May 20, 2009, Reuters reported the results of a nine-year investigation by the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse, which looked into decades of endemic sexual abuse against children in Catholic-run reform schools in Ireland.[61] In reaction to this report, popularly known as the Ryan Report, Donohue issued a statement downplaying the seriousness of the cases, questioning the inclusion of voyeurism and “inappropriate sexual talk” as instances of sexual abuse along with the more serious charge of rape.[62] Donohue pointed out that rape constituted only 12% of the listed sexual abuse cases in the Ryan report, and that priests committed only 12% of the listed rapesthe other 88% were committed by lay persons and religious brothers.[62] Since the Ryan Report was released, Donohue has been defending the Church and claiming that much of the outrage is ‘moral hysteria’. While stating that he agrees that rape and physical abuse are wrong and that he would not defend those actions, he says the report has conflated these abuses with ‘lesser’ forms of punishment and is therefore not as serious. He also says many of the purported forms of abuse found by the commission were present and acceptable in the time period.[63] The Irish politician and child rape victim Colm O’Gorman was highly critical of such statements made by Donohue on the Irish radio show The Last Word.[63] O’Gorman later wrote that Donohue’s analysis was shockingly “simplistic”.[64] When President Barack Obama named gay activist[65] Harry Knox to the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships in 2009, Donohue termed Knox “an anti-Catholic bigot who has called the pope a liar.”[65] In November 2010, a portion of a video by the late artist David Wojnarowicz, which was included in an exhibit focused on gay-themed art, “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture” at the National Portrait Gallery (United States), was removed after complaints from the Catholic League.[66] Columnist Frank Rich said of the intervention and removal that the Smithsonian had been “bullied by bigots” and quoted The Los Angeles Times”s art critic, Christopher Knight, to the same effect.[67] Tracing the evolution of the issue, Rich cited a piece by Kriston Capps which in turn said “the role of Penny Starr remains hazy. [However, a]…reporter and conservative advocate, [Starr] deserves much credit for both instigating” the negative attention to the piece of art amongst a number in the show.[68] In 1997, David Carlin of Commonweal criticized Donohue and the Catholic League for being overly sensitive in the identification of anti-Catholicism.[69] In 1999, Jesuit priest James Martin, the associate editor of the Catholic magazine America wrote “Often their criticism is right on target, but frequently they speak without seeing or experiencing what they are critiquing, and that undercuts their credibility. Unfortunately, that type of response gives people the idea that the Catholic Church is unreflective.”[1]

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April 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

The Anti-Defamation League Works to Combat Hate | Fred Turner

Anti-Defamation League Since receiving his MA in political science from American University in 1995, Fred Turner has enjoyed a long political career in Washington, DC. Having worked as legislative assistant to Congressman Alcee Hastings and legislative director for Congresswoman Karen McCarthy, he is now chief of staff to Senator Bob Menendez. Fred Turner began his career as a graduate legislative fellow with the Anti-Defamation League. What Is the Anti-Defamation League? The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) is a civil rights organization that was founded in 1913 to fight anti-Semitism. Now, the ADL works to fight all forms of prejudice and bigotry and has become known for its civil rights initiatives. The ADL seeks to provide information, legislation, and advocacy for victimized populations. What Initiatives Top the ADLs Agenda? Today, the ADL is focused broadly on combating hate. To that end, it continues to work globally to challenge leaders to fight anti-Semitism and violence. The ADL also monitors and catalogues hate and extremist groups and the crimes they commit. In 1981, the ADL drafted model legislation imposing harsh penalties on perpetrators of hate crimes. Similar legislation has since been enacted in 45 states and the District of Columbia. The ADL also educates the public on First Amendment and religious rights, provides anti-bias education to schools, and develops bullying and cyberbullying workshops and resources for youth and educators. How Can I Support the ADL? The ADL conducts its work through a system of 27 regional and local offices in the United States and one office in Israel, and those interested can get involved at the local level. The ADL also encourages the public to take action by sending letters to representatives on ADL issues, subscribing to the ADLs newsletter to stay apprised of current efforts, or making a donation. Like Loading… Related

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March 8, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Lifer Newt: Bannon’s War Against McConnell ‘Stuningly Stupid’

Tuesday on Sean Hannity’s nationally syndicated radio show, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich voiced his objections to former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s declaration a night earlier that incumbent Republican U.S. Senators up for reelection in 2018 would be facing a primary challenge. Gingrich argued the focus should be on unseating Democrats and said the strategy of challenging the GOP lawmakers was “stunningly stupid.” “The point I would make as a strategist is you got 10 Democrats up next year in states Trump carried,” Gingrich said. “You have six Democrats up next year in states Trump carried by a huge margin. Now you take the amount of money Bannon is going to raise. If he spent that money in North Dakota, Montana, Indiana, Missouri, West Virginia – the fact is you would have such a big Republican majority, you’d pass the stuff you guys want to pass. Creating a civil war inside the Republican Party may feel good, but I think as a strategy, it is stunningly stupid. I’m just being really honest.” Follow Breitbart News on Twitter @BreitbartNews

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October 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Marco Rubio Headlines Fundraiser for Anti-Trump Senator Jeff Flake

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) attended a fundraiser for Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) on Monday in a bid to support his 2018 Senate reelection campaign against challenger Kelli Ward.

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October 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Rep. Diane Black Will Boycott Her Home State NFL Titans’ Games Until Players Stand for National Anthem

Rep. Diane Black (R-TN) said on Tuesday that she will not attend Tennessee Titans games until NFL players stand for the national anthem.

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October 10, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed


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