Archive for the ‘Anti-Defamation League’ Category

ADL blasts Likud MKs for attending launch of anti-Arab book – The Times of Israel

The Anti-Defamation League has lambasted top Likud Knesset members for attending a launch event for a book that calls Israeli Arabs parasites and posits that they should be held in camps.

Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz, Coalition Chairman David Bitan and MKs Miki Zohar and Oren Hazan all participated in the event in Ramat Gan Wednesday, leading the ADL to condemn the affair Friday as dangerous and inhumane.

The book, The Arab Minority in Israel: Open and Hidden Processes by historian Raphael Israeli, describes Arabs as a danger to the Jewish states future, Haaretz reported. It calls them parasites who suckle at the teat of the state and a fifth column due to their support for the Palestinians.

In one passage Israeli, citing American internment camps for Japanese immigrants during World War II, wonders that here, despite the Arabs openly identifying with the enemy, no harm will come to them. Not only are they not put into camps, they have permission to stand at our podiums.

Whoever heard of such a thing, other than in feeble Israel which has lost it will to exist as a Jewish state?

Following the Haaretz report on the book and the event, the ADL tweeted on Friday: This is dangerous and inhumane. All of us, including Israeli leaders, have a duty to reject this hateful rhetoric.

Katz, speaking at the event, praised the tome as one filled with very profound, very unequivocal insights. Though he noted that not everyone will agree with everything or every word, it is deserving of discussion, serious discussion.

He later said he took issue with some of the books contents.

Hazan told Haaretz he regretted attending the event, saying he did not support the book or its blanket statements against Arabs.

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ADL blasts Likud MKs for attending launch of anti-Arab book – The Times of Israel

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June 10, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

ADL JOINS GROUPS CALLING ON MAYORS TO DISAVOW ANTI-MUSLIM MARCHES – Highland Community News (subscription)

New York, NY, June 9, 2017 The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) today expressed concern over coordinated anti-Muslim marches that are slated to take place in at least twenty states across the country on Saturday, June 10.

ADL joined more than 100 groups to urge Mayors where the rallies are taking place to disavow these marches.

The series of bigoted events titled the March Against Sharia are being organized by an anti-Muslim organization called ACT for America!, one of the largest anti-Muslim extremist groups in the United States that aggressively promotes stereotypes about Islam and believes that Muslim immigration to the U.S. must end.

These marches perpetuate harmful stereotypes about Muslims and could potentially lead to acts of harassment and violence, said Jonathan A. Greenblatt, ADL CEO. The ideas furthered by these anti-Muslim groups only serve to weaken our communities. We call on the elected officials, community and religious leaders and public figures where these abhorrent events are taking place to disavow them and stand up against hate.

In a recent poll, ADL found for the first time that a majority of Americans (52 percent) say they are concerned about violence in the U.S. directed at Jews, and an even a higher percentage (76 percent) are concerned about violence directed at Muslims.

According to ADLs Center on Extremism, right-wing extremists are likely to participate in some of the rallies across the country.

The League has also actively challenged President Trumps executive order on immigration and refugees, calling the Muslim ban an appeal to xenophobia and fear that is reminiscent of historical anti-immigrant mistakes of our nations past.

The Anti-Defamation League, founded in 1913, is the worlds leading organization fighting anti-Semitism through programs and services that counteract hatred, prejudice and bigotry. Follow us on Twitter: @ADL_National

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ADL JOINS GROUPS CALLING ON MAYORS TO DISAVOW ANTI-MUSLIM MARCHES – Highland Community News (subscription)

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Honors Local Schools For Anti-Bullying Efforts – CBS Philly

June 6, 2017 1:29 PM By MikeDeNardo

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) The Anti-Defamation League is honoring schools around the region for their efforts to tackle bias and bullying.

The ceremony at the Walnut Street Theater brought together students from dozens of schools participating in the ADLs No Place for Hate program.

Cherry Hill West High School was singled out for piloting a program to reduce bias and bullying.

Right after the bomb threat at the Katz JCC a lot of people saw the need to really kind of put their foot down and say, No. Hate has no home in Cherry Hill,’ said teacher Sherri Adamson.

Freshman Vincent Gollotto says students produced a multi-ethnic video.

Hate has no home in Cherry Hill really went to the community and really did make a difference in our community, saidGollotto.

The ADLs education director for No Place for Hate, Lisa Friedlander, says schools are becoming more responsive.

In some cases, theyve heard more reports of bullying which is actually a good thing, said Friedlander. Because that means students are learning to feel safe to report it because they know that administrators are taking it seriously.

She says the ADL has been called to help with an increasing number of hate and bias incidents, even at the middle school level.

Mike DeNardo, a veteran of KYW Newsradio for more than 30 years, covers a broad array of news stories for KYW. He specializes in stories about education and the schools. DeNardo has won the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award three times in 2008…

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Anti-Defamation League Honors Local Schools For Anti-Bullying Efforts – CBS Philly

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June 6, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

What’s Happened to the Anti-Defamation League? – Algemeiner

Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt. Photo: ADL.

Where is theAnti-DefamationLeague (ADL)?

As a new antisemitism caststhe Jewish stateas the cruelest of nations,and her Jewish supporters as racists, the ADL has been largely silent.The lies are spreadinnewspapers,churchesand college classrooms. On campuses,Jewish students are harassed and intimidated.Eventhe curriculain many public high schools and middle schoolsisbiased against Israel.Yet theADL, once the Jewishpeoplesdefense agency,seems unable or unwilling toeffectively fight back.

Case in point: LindaSarsour,a virulently anti-Israel Islamistwhois asupporterofterrorists,andadefenderof Sharia law,wasa featured speaker at the City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Healths graduation onJune 1.

June 7, 2017 4:18 pm

Yet it was only after weeks of silence,andonlywhenupbraidedfor that despicablesilence,thattheADLfinallyissueda statementcriticizingSarsour. (Ms. Sarsour is an antisemite whofightsto bar Jewish women from the feministmovement unless they renounce Israel, and has tweeted that,Nothing is creepier than Zionism.

And even theADLsbelatedcriticism ofSarsour, penned by its CEO, JonathanGreenblatt, was weak.The ADL statementrejectedSarsourssupport of BDS,butit supported CUNYsdecision toinvite her, citing her right to free speech.But, as former CUNY trustee JeffreyWeisenfeld haspointed out,allowing someone to speak and giving them one of the most honored platforms that a university can provideare twodifferent things. EvenAbe Foxman himself, the legendary ADL leader whoreportedlyselected Greenblatt as his heir, unblinkingly told reporters that CUNY should not have invited Sarsour.

The ADLs problem is that ithas never figured out what to do about the new antisemitism which is exactly whatSarsourrepresents.

When the enemies of the Jewish people were onlyNazis,neo-Nazis, Christian antisemites and skinheads, the ADL did just fine. They exposed, they warned, they scolded and they sued. In every city with a sizable Jewish population, the ADL functioned as the Jewish Civil Defense Department.

But sometime during the late 1960s,the virus ofantisemitismbegan to morph. Age-old accusations against the Jews and their religion were re-directed toward the Jewish state, and its Jewish supporters. Antisemitic smears were used to paintIsrael as the Jew among nationsan art that the United Nations has perfected. And much of this hate comes from liberals and leftists, along with the traditional antisemites (white supremacists, neo-Nazis, etc.)

But the ADL and its donorsstuck in the past, like old generals fighting the last war cannot or will not adjust.

The ADLwas born on the progressive side of politics, fighting right-wing Jew-hatred, and supporting social justice. The group haschosen to stay there, even when in my view the threats from the left now eclipse those of the right in their intensity and reach.And so the ADL keptsending those (fundraising) postcards with swastikas found inbathroom stalls in Iowa, and campaignedagainst Pat Robertson, whom itpainted as thesamesort of right-wing threat that we all once kneweven though many people now believe that Robertson and Christian evangelicals areIsraels, and the Jews, best allies.

And asit ignores antisemitism from the left,the ADL hassimilarlyshrunk from confronting Islamic Jew-hatredthe biggest threat to Jewish life on the planetfor fear of being labelled Islamophobic by its left-wing allies.Some scholars now describe the new antisemitism as being propelled by a Red-Green Alliance of radical leftists and radical Islamists. The ADL hesitates to defend the Jews against either threat.

Morton Klein, of the Zionist Organization of America, and others like him who pressured the ADL to condemn Sarsour were right, and they deserve creditfor shining a light on the Sarsour/ADL scandal. ADLsweakness on this controversyis emblematic of its failure to adopt to the new antisemitism. And it is a timely reminder to American Jewry of the need for a new, and bold, leadershipthat is up to the challenge of confrontingthese dangerous times.

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What’s Happened to the Anti-Defamation League? – Algemeiner

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June 4, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Welcomes EU Support for Self-Regulation … – eNews Park Forest

New York, NY(ENEWSPF)June 2, 2017. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) welcomes EU Commissioner for Justice, Vera Jourovas statements in support of a self-regulatory approach to online hate speech. Following yesterdays release of an EU evaluation of industry responses to online hate speech, Commissioner Jourova called the self-regulatory approach a success. The evaluation and her statements came a year after the EU and major internet companies announced a voluntary Code of Conduct.

Jonathan Greenblatt, ADL CEO, released the following statement:

Back in 2014 ADL developed cyber hate best practices with the companies that worked with the EU and its our view that self-regulation, involving industry and civil society, is the best approach to combatting online hate speech. Optimizing the removal of hate speech while protecting freedom of speech requires continuous improvements in technology and education of platform providers and users. Legislation and lawsuits will only hold back the work of companies and civil society working together in good faith.

We welcome Commissioner Jourovas comments that the EU evaluation shows that a self-regulatory approach can work, if all actors do their part. She rightly emphasized that the self-regulatory approach of the voluntary Code of Conduct agreement between the EU and Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Microsoft brought much quicker results than a legislative approach, which could take many years, and that the self-regulatory approach, which involves the companies and civil society, emphasizes the rejection of hate speech by all of society, not just governments.

We hope the Justice Ministers of the EU member states will support Commissioner Jourovas recommendations when they meet next week to discuss online hate speech.

ADL has repeatedly championed the self-regulatory approach, including in our Best Practices for Responding to Cyberhate, which ADL produced in 2014 after discussions with Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter to help prevent the spread of online hate speech. These companies and others publicly endorsed the document. The best practices document was an outgrowth of a working group on cyberhate that ADL has convened for years with tech companies, academics, and other leaders who evaluate current practices and develop new strategies for responding to hate online.

ADL recently announced plans to open a state-of-the-art center in Silicon Valley that will combine cutting-edge analysis, education, and new strategies and partnerships to combat online hate and protect civil rights.

Source: http://adl.org

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Anti-Defamation League Welcomes EU Support for Self-Regulation … – eNews Park Forest

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June 2, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

This Day in Jewish-Gentile Relations in American History: The Murder of Mary Phagan Transformed Into an Audiobook on the 118th Birthday of Little Mary Phagan (June 1st 1899)

On the 118th birthday of Little Mary Phagan (June 1st, 1899 – April 26, 1913) Alex Linder, Director of the VNN Learning College has independently transformed an insightful book, ‘The Murder of Little Mary Phagan’ — that was written 30+ years ago by Mary Phagan Kean (namesake of the victim) — into an audiobook.

Source: https://archive.org/details/10PhaganTMOLMPCh12AfterwordEND

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June 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Wil Wheaton Honors ‘Big Bang Theory’ Co-Creator Bill Prady’s Commitment to Justice – Variety

For those who have always wanted to know, apparently The Big Bang Theory co-creator and executive producer Bill Prady wears a size 38 pant.

At least, that was the running joke Wednesday evening at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where Prady was awarded The Anti-Defamation Leagues Entertainment Industry Award.

As the featured entertainment and highlight of the evening, late 90s alt-rock group and creator of The Big Bang Theory theme song,Barenaked Ladies, cut up the audience with anoriginal rap song thatcentered around an anecdote from lead singer Ed Robertson. The singer claimed thatPrady lent him a pair of size 36 pants just before a show a few years back at San Diego Comic-Con.

Hes got pants! I went up to Bill Pradys room/and he gave me the pants off his own ass. Thats right, I got Bills pants for one performance, Robertson sang. Anti-defamation, thats his game/ you know, anti-defamation is his middle name.

The band also playedtheir hits One Week, If I Had $1,000,000, Pinch Me, and, of course, the full version of The Big Bang Theory theme song.

Additional impactful moments duringthe evening came fromBig Bang Theory actor Wil Wheatonsspeech. In his introductory speech for Prady, Wheaton spoke about the necessity of taking action when faced with injustice, and received supportivewhoops and claps from the audience.

Our grandchildren will ask us, What did you do? What did you do when they tried to take healthcare away from the poor to give even more money to the rich? What did you do when those who had so much took everything they could from those who had so little?’ Wheaton said. What did you do with your wealth and your privilege? We are here tonight to honor a man who will be able to to hold his head high and answer, I did everything I could.’

The cast of The Big Bang Theory, while not present at the function, sent their regards via video, which played at the end of Wheatons speech. Jim Parsons, Mayim Bialik, Kaley Cuoco, Johnny Galecki, Melissa Rauch, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, and Kevin Sussman, all in costume for the show, waved and clapped for Prady from set.

Prady did not disappoint with his humor during his speech. At one point, he mentioned that the pants he leant Roberts were actually a size 34. Someone in the audience yelled Theyre 38 now! to which Prady paused for a second and then answered, Yes, thats true.

Also present at the event were Big Bang Theoryco-creatorChuck Lorre, MGM CEO Gary Barber, CBS Corp. CEOLeslie Moonves, and Warner Bros. TV president Peter Roth allHonorary Host committee members. EmceeJoshua Malinakept the event on track. The gala also functioned as a fundraiser for the group, with Tennis Channel President and last years recipient of the award Ken Solomon egging on the audience to donate. This year, the gala resulted in nearly $500,000 raised to combat anti-Semitism and bigotry.

Founded in 1913, The Anti-Defamation League is a non-governmental organization and civil rights group dedicated to educating the public as well as law enforcement about Anti-Semitism, bigotry, and hate.

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Wil Wheaton Honors ‘Big Bang Theory’ Co-Creator Bill Prady’s Commitment to Justice – Variety

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Were two people responsible for virtually all anti-Semitic incidents after the election? – PolitiFact

The Anti-Defamation League says there has been a large increase in anti-Semitic behavior in Florida.

A segment hosted by CNNs Don Lemon on May 18, 2017, got a little heated. Lemon and one of his guests, conservative radio host Dennis Prager, sparred over an apparent increase in anti-Semitic incidents after the 2016 presidential election, and who was to blame.

Prager said there was no rise in anti-Semitic incidents, and the incidents that did occur didnt have anything to do with Donald Trump.

“It was a 100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism,” Prager said. “Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.”

Is he correct? We found that Prager has a point about the bomb threats to Jewish community centers largely being the work of two suspects who have since been arrested. However, there is evidence that the number of anti-Semitic incidents other than bomb threats did increase after the election. (Prager did not respond to email inquiries.)

The suspects

To date, the FBI announced two arrests related to the bomb threats. (We should note that the two individuals cited below have not been tried yet.)

The first came on March 3, when the U.S. Attorneys office for the Southern District of New York announced a charge of cyberstalking against a St. Louis man, Juan Thompson. Thompson was charged with “allegedly stalking a former romantic interest by, among other things, making bomb threats in her name to Jewish Community Centers and to the Anti-Defamation League.”

The Justice Department said that Thompson appeared to have made “at least eight of the JCC threats as part of a sustained campaign to harass and intimidate” his victim.

Prager was wrong that Thompson tried to impress a girlfriend; he is charged with trying to implicate an ex-girlfriend in crimes she didnt commit.

As for calling him a “black radical,” thats a somewhat subjective. The Riverfront Times, a St. Louis newspaper, said that as a black journalist, Thompson had filed “searing dispatches about injustices in Baltimore, Mississippi and Chicago. He relished the opportunity to strike back at what he calls an oppressive, anti-black, racial supremacist, capitalist system that kneecaps all but the country’s rich and white in the pursuit of basic civil rights and opportunities.”

Then, on April 21, the Justice Department announced that charges had been filed against Michael Ron David Kadar, an 18-year-old resident of Israel with dual citizenship in the United States and Israel. The charges in question were for making telephone bomb threats against Jewish facilities in central Florida and for providing false information to police in Georgia.

Then-FBI director James Comey said in a statement that “this kind of behavior is not a prank, and it isn’t harmless. Its a federal crime. It scares innocent people, disrupts entire communities, and expends limited law enforcement resources.”

So Pragers on target when he cites Thompson and Kadar as the two individuals charged so far with making Jewish community center bomb threats.

The bomb threats

Somewhat less certain is the total number of threats called in to Jewish community centers.

As we noted, officials have tied Thompson to eight calls. Meanwhile, the criminal complaint against Kadar alleged that between Jan. 4 and March 7, Kadar made “at least 245 telephone calls involving bomb threats and active shooter threats. A significant portion of the threats targeted Jewish community centers and other historically Jewish institutions such as Jewish schools and Anti-Defamation League offices.”

The FBI declined to comment further to PolitiFact, citing the ongoing investigation. So the exact number of threats the two individuals made — once duplicate calls and calls made to non-Jewish targets are set aside — is hard to nail down.

However, the number of calls they made appears to be in the ballpark of the number of reported bomb threats. Its not certain that threats numbered in the “hundreds,” as Prager said, but if not, they werent far off.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a group that tracks hate crimes, has tracked upwards of 170 such threats made internationally and domestically. And the Anti-Defamation League — another group that tracks hate crimes, and which was a target of a number of the calls in question — has identified 167 such threats in the United States in Canada. (The ADLs tally did not count other countries, as the SPLC did.)

Given this data, Prager has a point that most of the bomb threats are traceable to the two individuals who have been charged so far, and hes also correct that Kadar has been charged with making many more than Thompson.

Aryeh Tuchman, associate director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, said that there are probably a modest number of bomb threats not traceable to either of these two suspects. “The two individuals that Prager mentioned accounted for the vast majority of the bomb threats, but not all of them,” Tuchman said.

That said, Tuchman added one further piece of evidence that Thompson and Kadar account for the vast bulk of threats: “Thankfully, there have been no further bomb threats recently,” he said.

Anti-Semitic incidents more broadly

But if Prager has described the situation with the Jewish community center bomb threats with reasonable accuracy, he has engaged in a bit of cherry-picking by ignoring other signs of increased anti-Semitism after the election.

“Even if the bomb threats are discounted, we still saw an increase in anti-Semitic incidents in the first quarter of 2017,” Tuchman said. “Not including the bomb threats, there were 380 total incidents in the first quarter of 2017, up from 291 incidents in the first quarter of 2016. Thats an increase of 31 percent.”

Incidents in 2016 cited by ADL include instances of harassment (such as voice mails or social media attacks), vandalism (such as graffiti) and assault (including one incident in which two shots were fired at a victims vehicle).

Tuchman added that the number of incidents in December 2016 were almost 70 percent higher than the number of incidents in December 2015.

Tuchman cautioned that ADL “believes that the presidential campaign was a factor in the increase in anti-Semitic incidents, but only one factor.”

But even if the election was only one factor among many, the rise in anti-Semitic incidents overall call into question Pragers assertion that its a “100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism.”

Our ruling

Prager said, “It was a 100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism. Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.”

Hes close to the mark in describing the overwhelming role of two suspects in making bomb threats against Jewish targets earlier this year. However, Prager ignores a documented rise in anti-Semitic incidents beyond bomb threats. We rate his statement Half True.

Share the Facts

2017-05-22 20:46:29 UTC

3

1

7

Half True

“It was a 100 percent lie that (Donald Trumps) election unleashed anti-Semitism. Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.”

Dennis Prager

conservative radio host

an interview on CNN

Thursday, May 18, 2017

2017-05-18

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Were two people responsible for virtually all anti-Semitic incidents after the election? – PolitiFact

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti Defamation League calls right-wing terrorism ‘a real threat’ – NJ TODAY

A Dark and Constant Rage: 25 Years of Right-Wing Terrorism in the United States is a comprehensive new report from the Anti-Defamation League,an international Jewish non-governmental organization that combats hate crimes.

In March 2017, a white supremacist from Maryland, James Harris Jackson, traveled to New York City with the alleged intention of launching a series of violent attacks on black men to discourage white women from having relationships with black men. After several days, Jackson chose his first victim, a 66-year old black homeless man, Timothy Caughman. Jackson later allegedly admitted that he had stabbed Caughman with a small sword he had brought with him, describing the murder as a practice run.

However, after the killing, Jacksons angry energy dissipated and he turned himself over to the authorities. A week later, New York prosecutors announced that they were charging him with second-degree murder as a hate crime and also with a state charge of terrorism.

Jacksons aborted killing spree was a shocking example of right-wing terror in the United States but it was unfortunately far from an isolated example.

For over a century and a half, since burning Kansas of the 1850s and the Ku Klux Klan of the 1860s, right-wing terrorism has been an unwelcome feature of the American landscape. Yet today, many people are barely aware that it exists and most people dont recognize its frequency or scope.

Far more attention in recent years has been given to the threat of homegrown radical Islamic terrora danger that has generated such horrific acts as the Orlando and San Bernardino shooting sprees. Yet the very real specter of radical Islamic terror in the United States has existed alongside an equally serious threat of terror from right-wing extremist groups and individuals.

Both movements have generated shooting sprees, bombings, and a wide variety of plots and conspiracies. Both pose threats so significant that to ignore either would be to invite tragedy.

To illustrate the threat of right-wing terrorism in the United States, the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism has compiled a list of 150 right-wing terrorist acts, attempted acts, plots and conspiracies from the past 25 years (1993-2017). These include terrorist incidents from a wide variety of white supremacists, from neo-Nazis to Klansmen to racist skinheads, as well as incidents connected to anti-government extremists such as militia groups, sovereign citizens and tax protesters. The list also includes incidents of anti-abortion terror as well as from other, smaller right-wing extremist movements.

ADLs Center on Extremism defines terrorism as a pre-planned act or attempted act of significant violence by one or more non-state actors in order to further an ideological, social or religious cause, or to harm perceived opponents of such causes. Significant violent acts can include bombings or use of other weapons of mass destruction, assassinations and targeted killings, shooting sprees, arsons and firebombings, kidnappings and hostage situations and, in some cases, armed robberies. Domestic terrorism consists of acts or attempted acts of terrorism in which the perpetrators are citizens or permanent residents of the country in which the act takes place.

The right-wing terrorist incidents in ADLs list include those that best fit the above criteria. They are drawn from the much larger pool of violent and criminal acts that American right-wing extremists engage in every year, from hate crimes to deadly encounters with law enforcement. Right-wing extremists annually murder a number of Americans, but only some of those murders occur in connection with terrorist acts. There are, after all, hundreds of thousands of adherents of right-wing extremist movements in the United States and all such movements have some degree of association with criminal activity. No one should think, therefore, that the incidents listed here represent the breadth of right-wing violence in the U.S. But, as acts of terrorism, they do show right-wing movements at their most vicious and ambitious.

The people who committed or attempted the terrorist acts listed here came from a variety of right-wing extremist movements. In a few cases, extremists connected to terror incidents here even adhered to more than one right-wing extremist movement; in such cases, the seemingly dominant ideology was selected for statistical purposes. Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, for example, was primarily an anti-government extremist but also had white supremacist leanings. Richard Poplawski, who gunned down three police officers in Pittsburgh, was a white supremacist who also had leanings towards the anti-government movement.

Most right-wing extremists in the United States fall into one of two broad umbrella movements or spheres: white supremacists and anti-government extremists. An overwhelming majority of the terror incidents listed here (85%) were committed by adherents of one of these two spheres. Moreover, the number of acts attributed to each sphere is almost identical: 64 terror incidents are related to white supremacists, while 63 are related to anti-government extremists. Many people, when picturing right-wing terrorism, tend to think of white supremacists, but anti-government extremists such as militia groups and sovereign citizens pose just as much of a threat.

White supremacists involved in right-wing terror incidents include adherents of every major segment of the white supremacist movement, including neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, traditional white supremacists (such as Ku Klux Klan groups), white supremacist prison gangs, the religious sect Christian Identity, and the Alt Right. Leaving aside dual-movement extremists such as Timothy McVeigh, the worst white supremacist terrorist was Dylann Roof, a traditional white supremacist who embarked upon a deadly shooting spree at the Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015, killing nine.

The anti-government extremists, who are often collectively termed the Patriot movement, consist primarily of adherents of the tax protest movement, the sovereign citizen movement, and the militia movement (with the latter including Oath Keepers and Three Percenters). Though the Patriot movement goes back to the mid-1960s, it was in the mid-1990s that it really came into its own in terms of becoming a major domestic terrorist threat, one that equaled the threat posed by white supremacists. Oklahoma City bombers Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were dedicated adherents of the Patriot movement and their 1995 attack on the Murrah Federal Building gave notice that anti-government extremists now posed a major threat.

It is common for the media and others to assume that anti-government extremists are also mostly white supremacists, but this is not the case. Though there is some overlap between the two spheres, the main anti-government extremist movements direct their anger at the government and there have always been people of color in these movements.

Indeed, the sovereign citizen movement in particular has unfortunately seen particularly strong growth within the African-American community in recent years. Two of the sovereign-citizen related incidents on this list, the LaPlace, Louisiana, shootings in 2012 and the Columbus, Ohio, bomb-making attempt in 2016, involved African-Americans. Two incidents not included on this list involved extremists who were primarily black nationalists but who had secondary sovereign citizen affiliations: the 2014 plot by two men to blow up the Gateway Arch and kill law enforcement officials in St. Louis, Missouri, and the 2016 deadly ambush killings of three police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The militia movement has spent much of its history trying to distance itself from accusations of racism or white supremacy but in recent years much of the movement has willingly embraced a particular type of bigotry: anti-Muslim hatred. This Islamophobia has taken numerous forms, from armed protests in front of mosques to a major terrorist plot in October 2016 in Garden City, Kansas, where three militia members were arrested in connection with an alleged plot to blow up an apartment complex that primarily housed Muslim Somali-American residents. The militia movement could produce more such terror attempts aimed at Muslims in the future.

Anti-abortion extremists are responsible for 11% of the terror incidents collected here. Compared to the incidents connected to white supremacists or anti-government extremists, the number of abortion related terror attacks and attempts is low. However, given the small number of anti-abortion extremists relative to adherents of the other, much larger movements, the consistent stream of terror incidents that flow from this movement is worrisome.

Anti-abortion extremists are an example of what is called single-issue extremism. Single-issue extremists are typically the extreme wing of a broader, more mainstream movement dedicated to a single cause or issue. While most people in those movements would not think of committing acts of violence, adherents of the extreme wing of those movements are more likely to consider violent activity, operating under a sense of extreme urgency and with a conviction that the ends justify the means. A few other right-wing single issue extremists, such as anti-Muslim extremists and anti-immigration extremists, have also committed violent acts included among the 150 listed here.

All of the perpetrators and alleged perpetrators listed in this report have ties to extremist ideologies, but not all of them actually have had connections to specific extremist groups. Indeed, terrorist groups as suchi.e., groups that form and exist largely for the purpose of committing terrorist actsare rare in the United States, where the rule of law is strong and such groups have great difficulties in finding purchase. Even when extremists are connected to specific groups, they rarely commit their actions at the direction of the group. Rather, extremist groups in the United States tend to serve a purpose of radicalization more than anything else, whether of their own members or, as in the case of Dylann Roof, of non-members who may be influenced by their propaganda.

The perpetrators of some of the incidents on this list were part of formal groups, while others were essentially involved in cellsinformal associations of extremists banding together to commit an act. But just as common as these two types were lone offendersthe lone wolf terrorists responsible for a large number of Americas terror incidents. Indeed, approximately half of the 150 incidents listed in this report involved lone wolf offenders. Today, thanks to the Internet, it is easier than ever for someone to become steeped in extremist ideologies, even to the point of being willing to commit acts of great violence, without ever being involved in an organized extremist group.

The Incidents

The list in this report includes 150 incidents involving acts, attempted acts, and plots of right-wing terrorism from 1993 through part of 2017. A few of these terror acts are well-known, such as the bombings conducted by Timothy McVeigh and Eric Rudolph, while many other incidents garnered little more than local media coverage and are unknown to most Americans. Such lists always involve some value judgments on the margins and there are some incidents on the list that some people might think dont belong on such a list, while there are items missing from the list that some people might think should be included, such as the armed standoffs involving members of the Bundy family and others in Nevada in 2014 and Oregon in 2016.

In many cases where a possible incident was not included, it was for one of several reasons. First, for some reported incidents, an extremist connection has never been satisfactorily established or has in fact been disproved. For example, in 2014 Dennis Marx attempted to use firearms and explosives to attack an Atlanta courthouse; some media outlets reported or speculated that Marx was a sovereign citizen. However, no evidence confirming this ever emerged and the police eventually acknowledged he had not been involved in the movement. Similarly, some media speculated that Jared Lee Loughner, who shot Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and 18 others in a 2011 shooting spree in Arizona, was a sovereign citizen, but this also turned out to be untrue.

An additional group of incidents did not make the list because, while an extremist definitely committed an act of significant violence, the act was a spontaneous act of violence without noticeable premeditation; such acts are usually not included here. Finally, some incidentsusually discoveries of extremists with major illegal arsenals of weapons and/or explosiveswere not included because there was insufficient evidence of any target or intent to use the weapons for an act of terrorism. The incidents in these two categories are serious criminal violations but not really incidents of terrorism.

Those omissions still leave 150 terror incidents from the last quarter-century. This lengthy string of dangerous attacks and plots illustrates how deeply seated the threat of right-wing terrorism is in the United States.

A look at these 150 incidents over time reveals that two specific surges of right-wing terrorism have occurred over the past 25 years. The first was the surge of the mid-to-late 1990s, a result of a great increase in right-wing extremism as a result of a variety of factors that include the election of Bill Clinton, the passage of NAFTA, the passage of gun control measures such as the Brady Law and the Assault Weapons Ban, and the deadly standoffs at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, in 1992 and Waco, Texas, in 1993, which energized white supremacists and anti-government extremists, respectively.

The 1990s surge had died down by the turn of the century and right-wing terrorism occurred less frequently in the early-to-mid 2000s. Events ranging from the non-event of a Y2K-related disaster to the replacement of Bill Clinton with George W. Bush to the 9/11 terror attacks all played a role in dampening right-wing furor.

Unfortunately, this state of affairs did not last. Near the end of Bushs second term, right-wing terror incidents began to increase again and this trend accelerated by 2009, thanks in part to the election of Barack Obama, whom both white supremacists and anti-government extremists hated, and to the major economic disasters of the Great Recession and the foreclosure crisis. The latter two in particular allowed the sovereign citizen movement to greatly expand. The result was a second surge of right-wing extremism, one that was accompanied by a surge of right-wing terror incidents. This increased level of terror-related activity remains high today, though whether or not it will sustain itself during a Trump administration remains to be seen.

The worst right-wing terror attack, the Oklahoma City bombing, killed 168 people and injured hundreds more. Thankfully, none of the other incidents achieved anywhere near that level of lethality and destructiveness. In large part, this has been due to effective law enforcement, at both the federal and state/local levels, who have uncovered and prevented many attempts at terrorist acts. Indeed, only a minority of the incidents recorded here65 out of 150could be considered successful acts, by which is meant that the terrorist(s) succeeded in carrying out part or all of their plan or were able to wreak some sort of damage (such as shooting someone) while attempting to carry out their plan. This does not include bombs that were successfully planted but which failed to go off.

Some of the attempted acts never had a good chance of success, while others could easily have been deadly. Even though most terror incidents were not successes, the minority that did succeed resulted in 255 deaths and approximately 603 people injured (not all injury counts are consistent). Were it not for the efforts of law enforcement to detect and prevent right-wing acts of terror, that deadly toll would be far higher still.

It is worth nothing that, although bombs were used or considered by extremists just as often as firearms, their successful use rate was much lower. This is largely due to the fact that explosives are far more difficult to obtain and to use in the United States than are firearms, which are abundant, easy to use, and very deadly. There is far better regulation of explosives than firearms in the United States.

In a minority of cases, right-wing extremists attempted arsons or incendiary devices such as Molotov cocktails; abortion clinics were a frequent target of such violence. And, from time to time, extremists would select more exotic means of murder, such as using the deadly toxin ricin or poisoning a water supply or trying to build a radiological weapon.

Whatever weapon they planned to use against their targets, right-wing extremists have had no shortage of targets. Indeed, some ambitious plots have contained an entire array of targets slated for death and destruction.

Of the various targets of right-wing anger, it is governmental and law enforcement institutions that are most often threatened. Of the incidents examined here, 66 involved some sort of government-related target. This is largely due to the fact that white supremacists and anti-government extremists alike, as well as most of the lesser right-wing movements, hate government and law enforcement. This category includes federal, state and local branches of government and law enforcement.

White supremacists are responsible for most of the racial and religious targeting. Virtually any person or institution associated with a non-white race can be a potential target for white supremacists, but African-Americans, Hispanics, and multi-racial couples/families have been the most common groups victimized. The most frequent religious targets were, not surprisingly, Jews and Muslims (including non-Muslims perceived as Muslims). Actual or perceived immigrants, as well as LGBT targets, were also subject to victimization.

Abortion-related targets, typically clinics that provide abortion services as well as the people who work at such places, were also common. While anti-abortion extremists were the extremists most likely to attack abortion-related targets, other right-wing extremists, most noticeably white supremacists, also occasionally attempted such attacks.

Right-wing extremist have also taken aim at a variety of other targets. Commercial targets have included various businesses and, in particular, financial institutions. Infrastructure targets include a wide range of installations, from refineries to dams to water supplies. In some cases, extremists have simply targeted crowded public areas, hoping to cause significant human casualties.

The Present and Future of Right-Wing Terrorism

Over the past 25 years, right-wing terrorism has exhibited a considerable amount of stability. Part of this is due to the fact that most of it comes from two mature and well-established movements: the white supremacist movement and the anti-government Patriot movement. They have specific goals and specific enemies and can be expected to produce a steady stream of extremists willing to use violence to achieve those goals or harm those enemies. Moreover, though fringe movements, they nevertheless have deep roots in American society and cannot simply be rooted out or eliminated. Right-wing terrorism is not going away anytime soon.

On the plus side, law enforcement is collectively far more familiar with right-wing extremist movements than it may be with newer types of extremist movements, which enables it to utilize informants and undercover officers to a much fuller extent than might otherwise be the case. It is no coincidence that a number of the prevented acts recounted in this study were prevented thanks to sting operations, which are one of the most consistently successful law enforcement tools against terrorismas long as law enforcement is sufficiently familiar with the relevant movement(s).

Most of the 25 years examined here for right-wing terrorism have occurred in what can be deemed the Internet era. However, the Internet of the mid-1990s was very different than that of ten years later or todays on-line world. Overall, right-wing terrorism has remained pretty consistent throughout this era, but the evolution of the Internet has resulted in some changes.

In particular, the social networking revolution that occurred during the period 2006-2009 has made it easier for extremist ideas and tactics to spread very far, very fast. This can allow new extremist movements, such as the white supremacist Alt Right, to quickly gain purchase, and can allow established movement, such as the sovereign citizen movement, to rapidly resurge. Social networking has also allowed extremists to meet each other and even to plot on-line. The October 2008 school attack plot in Tennessee and the Georgia militia plot of February 2014 are two examples where extremists who met on-line later joined up in the real world to plot terrorist acts.

The Internet may also have made lone wolf terrorismterrorism committed by a lone perpetrator not acting at the behest of any organized groupa more common phenomenon, because one can now self-radicalize using on-line resources with little need to engage with other extremists in the real world. The shooting sprees of Keith Luke in 2009 and Dylann Roof in 2015 are examples of terrorist acts committed by lone extremists who radicalized on-line with little or no real interaction with other extremists. Lone wolves have long existed within Americas radical right, but could be even more likely in the future.

Finally, for the past quarter of a century, right-wing terrorism has been a consistent feature in the landscape of American violence, but it has garnered far less notice than some other forms of terrorism, most notably Islamic terrorism. Though a few incidents, such as the Oklahoma City bombing, or the bombings of Eric Rudoph, received extensive media coverage, many of the incidents collected here received scant media attention, particularly from major national media sources.

One reason for this under-coverage may be very simple: a surprising number of the terrorist acts and plots listed here originated away from major media centers. While some incidents took place in locations such as New York City, Chicago, or Los Angeles, many others occurred in out-of-the-way places such as Garden City, Kansas; Fairbanks, Alaska; or Lenoir, Tennessee. As a result, such incidents are less likely to get national media attention and, if they get any, less likely to get sustained coverage.

Whatever the reasons for the lack of coverage, one of its consequences has been an inadequate awareness among policy-makers and the public alike of the threat posed by violent right-wing extremists. Today, the United States still does not even have a federal domestic terrorism statute. Federal spending on training law enforcement on issues such as right-wing violence and terrorism is extremely low.

One thing is certain: if the United States does not treat right-wing terrorism as a real threat and react appropriately, there is no chance of lessening the danger posed by violent right-wing extremists and the 150 terror incidents described in this report will be joined by still more.

Continue reading here:
Anti Defamation League calls right-wing terrorism ‘a real threat’ – NJ TODAY

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ADL blasts Likud MKs for attending launch of anti-Arab book – The Times of Israel

The Anti-Defamation League has lambasted top Likud Knesset members for attending a launch event for a book that calls Israeli Arabs parasites and posits that they should be held in camps. Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz, Coalition Chairman David Bitan and MKs Miki Zohar and Oren Hazan all participated in the event in Ramat Gan Wednesday, leading the ADL to condemn the affair Friday as dangerous and inhumane. The book, The Arab Minority in Israel: Open and Hidden Processes by historian Raphael Israeli, describes Arabs as a danger to the Jewish states future, Haaretz reported. It calls them parasites who suckle at the teat of the state and a fifth column due to their support for the Palestinians. In one passage Israeli, citing American internment camps for Japanese immigrants during World War II, wonders that here, despite the Arabs openly identifying with the enemy, no harm will come to them. Not only are they not put into camps, they have permission to stand at our podiums. Whoever heard of such a thing, other than in feeble Israel which has lost it will to exist as a Jewish state? Following the Haaretz report on the book and the event, the ADL tweeted on Friday: This is dangerous and inhumane. All of us, including Israeli leaders, have a duty to reject this hateful rhetoric. Katz, speaking at the event, praised the tome as one filled with very profound, very unequivocal insights. Though he noted that not everyone will agree with everything or every word, it is deserving of discussion, serious discussion. He later said he took issue with some of the books contents. Hazan told Haaretz he regretted attending the event, saying he did not support the book or its blanket statements against Arabs.

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ADL JOINS GROUPS CALLING ON MAYORS TO DISAVOW ANTI-MUSLIM MARCHES – Highland Community News (subscription)

New York, NY, June 9, 2017 The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) today expressed concern over coordinated anti-Muslim marches that are slated to take place in at least twenty states across the country on Saturday, June 10. ADL joined more than 100 groups to urge Mayors where the rallies are taking place to disavow these marches. The series of bigoted events titled the March Against Sharia are being organized by an anti-Muslim organization called ACT for America!, one of the largest anti-Muslim extremist groups in the United States that aggressively promotes stereotypes about Islam and believes that Muslim immigration to the U.S. must end. These marches perpetuate harmful stereotypes about Muslims and could potentially lead to acts of harassment and violence, said Jonathan A. Greenblatt, ADL CEO. The ideas furthered by these anti-Muslim groups only serve to weaken our communities. We call on the elected officials, community and religious leaders and public figures where these abhorrent events are taking place to disavow them and stand up against hate. In a recent poll, ADL found for the first time that a majority of Americans (52 percent) say they are concerned about violence in the U.S. directed at Jews, and an even a higher percentage (76 percent) are concerned about violence directed at Muslims. According to ADLs Center on Extremism, right-wing extremists are likely to participate in some of the rallies across the country. The League has also actively challenged President Trumps executive order on immigration and refugees, calling the Muslim ban an appeal to xenophobia and fear that is reminiscent of historical anti-immigrant mistakes of our nations past. The Anti-Defamation League, founded in 1913, is the worlds leading organization fighting anti-Semitism through programs and services that counteract hatred, prejudice and bigotry. Follow us on Twitter: @ADL_National

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Anti-Defamation League Honors Local Schools For Anti-Bullying Efforts – CBS Philly

June 6, 2017 1:29 PM By MikeDeNardo PHILADELPHIA (CBS) The Anti-Defamation League is honoring schools around the region for their efforts to tackle bias and bullying. The ceremony at the Walnut Street Theater brought together students from dozens of schools participating in the ADLs No Place for Hate program. Cherry Hill West High School was singled out for piloting a program to reduce bias and bullying. Right after the bomb threat at the Katz JCC a lot of people saw the need to really kind of put their foot down and say, No. Hate has no home in Cherry Hill,’ said teacher Sherri Adamson. Freshman Vincent Gollotto says students produced a multi-ethnic video. Hate has no home in Cherry Hill really went to the community and really did make a difference in our community, saidGollotto. The ADLs education director for No Place for Hate, Lisa Friedlander, says schools are becoming more responsive. In some cases, theyve heard more reports of bullying which is actually a good thing, said Friedlander. Because that means students are learning to feel safe to report it because they know that administrators are taking it seriously. She says the ADL has been called to help with an increasing number of hate and bias incidents, even at the middle school level. Mike DeNardo, a veteran of KYW Newsradio for more than 30 years, covers a broad array of news stories for KYW. He specializes in stories about education and the schools. DeNardo has won the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award three times in 2008… About Us Advertise Business Development Contact Mobile Connect CBS Television Public File CBS Radio Public File

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What’s Happened to the Anti-Defamation League? – Algemeiner

Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt. Photo: ADL. Where is theAnti-DefamationLeague (ADL)? As a new antisemitism caststhe Jewish stateas the cruelest of nations,and her Jewish supporters as racists, the ADL has been largely silent.The lies are spreadinnewspapers,churchesand college classrooms. On campuses,Jewish students are harassed and intimidated.Eventhe curriculain many public high schools and middle schoolsisbiased against Israel.Yet theADL, once the Jewishpeoplesdefense agency,seems unable or unwilling toeffectively fight back. Case in point: LindaSarsour,a virulently anti-Israel Islamistwhois asupporterofterrorists,andadefenderof Sharia law,wasa featured speaker at the City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Healths graduation onJune 1. June 7, 2017 4:18 pm Yet it was only after weeks of silence,andonlywhenupbraidedfor that despicablesilence,thattheADLfinallyissueda statementcriticizingSarsour. (Ms. Sarsour is an antisemite whofightsto bar Jewish women from the feministmovement unless they renounce Israel, and has tweeted that,Nothing is creepier than Zionism. And even theADLsbelatedcriticism ofSarsour, penned by its CEO, JonathanGreenblatt, was weak.The ADL statementrejectedSarsourssupport of BDS,butit supported CUNYsdecision toinvite her, citing her right to free speech.But, as former CUNY trustee JeffreyWeisenfeld haspointed out,allowing someone to speak and giving them one of the most honored platforms that a university can provideare twodifferent things. EvenAbe Foxman himself, the legendary ADL leader whoreportedlyselected Greenblatt as his heir, unblinkingly told reporters that CUNY should not have invited Sarsour. The ADLs problem is that ithas never figured out what to do about the new antisemitism which is exactly whatSarsourrepresents. When the enemies of the Jewish people were onlyNazis,neo-Nazis, Christian antisemites and skinheads, the ADL did just fine. They exposed, they warned, they scolded and they sued. In every city with a sizable Jewish population, the ADL functioned as the Jewish Civil Defense Department. But sometime during the late 1960s,the virus ofantisemitismbegan to morph. Age-old accusations against the Jews and their religion were re-directed toward the Jewish state, and its Jewish supporters. Antisemitic smears were used to paintIsrael as the Jew among nationsan art that the United Nations has perfected. And much of this hate comes from liberals and leftists, along with the traditional antisemites (white supremacists, neo-Nazis, etc.) But the ADL and its donorsstuck in the past, like old generals fighting the last war cannot or will not adjust. The ADLwas born on the progressive side of politics, fighting right-wing Jew-hatred, and supporting social justice. The group haschosen to stay there, even when in my view the threats from the left now eclipse those of the right in their intensity and reach.And so the ADL keptsending those (fundraising) postcards with swastikas found inbathroom stalls in Iowa, and campaignedagainst Pat Robertson, whom itpainted as thesamesort of right-wing threat that we all once kneweven though many people now believe that Robertson and Christian evangelicals areIsraels, and the Jews, best allies. And asit ignores antisemitism from the left,the ADL hassimilarlyshrunk from confronting Islamic Jew-hatredthe biggest threat to Jewish life on the planetfor fear of being labelled Islamophobic by its left-wing allies.Some scholars now describe the new antisemitism as being propelled by a Red-Green Alliance of radical leftists and radical Islamists. The ADL hesitates to defend the Jews against either threat. Morton Klein, of the Zionist Organization of America, and others like him who pressured the ADL to condemn Sarsour were right, and they deserve creditfor shining a light on the Sarsour/ADL scandal. ADLsweakness on this controversyis emblematic of its failure to adopt to the new antisemitism. And it is a timely reminder to American Jewry of the need for a new, and bold, leadershipthat is up to the challenge of confrontingthese dangerous times.

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Anti-Defamation League Welcomes EU Support for Self-Regulation … – eNews Park Forest

New York, NY(ENEWSPF)June 2, 2017. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) welcomes EU Commissioner for Justice, Vera Jourovas statements in support of a self-regulatory approach to online hate speech. Following yesterdays release of an EU evaluation of industry responses to online hate speech, Commissioner Jourova called the self-regulatory approach a success. The evaluation and her statements came a year after the EU and major internet companies announced a voluntary Code of Conduct. Jonathan Greenblatt, ADL CEO, released the following statement: Back in 2014 ADL developed cyber hate best practices with the companies that worked with the EU and its our view that self-regulation, involving industry and civil society, is the best approach to combatting online hate speech. Optimizing the removal of hate speech while protecting freedom of speech requires continuous improvements in technology and education of platform providers and users. Legislation and lawsuits will only hold back the work of companies and civil society working together in good faith. We welcome Commissioner Jourovas comments that the EU evaluation shows that a self-regulatory approach can work, if all actors do their part. She rightly emphasized that the self-regulatory approach of the voluntary Code of Conduct agreement between the EU and Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Microsoft brought much quicker results than a legislative approach, which could take many years, and that the self-regulatory approach, which involves the companies and civil society, emphasizes the rejection of hate speech by all of society, not just governments. We hope the Justice Ministers of the EU member states will support Commissioner Jourovas recommendations when they meet next week to discuss online hate speech. ADL has repeatedly championed the self-regulatory approach, including in our Best Practices for Responding to Cyberhate, which ADL produced in 2014 after discussions with Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter to help prevent the spread of online hate speech. These companies and others publicly endorsed the document. The best practices document was an outgrowth of a working group on cyberhate that ADL has convened for years with tech companies, academics, and other leaders who evaluate current practices and develop new strategies for responding to hate online. ADL recently announced plans to open a state-of-the-art center in Silicon Valley that will combine cutting-edge analysis, education, and new strategies and partnerships to combat online hate and protect civil rights. Source: http://adl.org

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This Day in Jewish-Gentile Relations in American History: The Murder of Mary Phagan Transformed Into an Audiobook on the 118th Birthday of Little Mary Phagan (June 1st 1899)

On the 118th birthday of Little Mary Phagan (June 1st, 1899 – April 26, 1913) Alex Linder, Director of the VNN Learning College has independently transformed an insightful book, ‘The Murder of Little Mary Phagan’ — that was written 30+ years ago by Mary Phagan Kean (namesake of the victim) — into an audiobook.Source: https://archive.org/details/10PhaganTMOLMPCh12AfterwordEND

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Wil Wheaton Honors ‘Big Bang Theory’ Co-Creator Bill Prady’s Commitment to Justice – Variety

For those who have always wanted to know, apparently The Big Bang Theory co-creator and executive producer Bill Prady wears a size 38 pant. At least, that was the running joke Wednesday evening at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where Prady was awarded The Anti-Defamation Leagues Entertainment Industry Award. As the featured entertainment and highlight of the evening, late 90s alt-rock group and creator of The Big Bang Theory theme song,Barenaked Ladies, cut up the audience with anoriginal rap song thatcentered around an anecdote from lead singer Ed Robertson. The singer claimed thatPrady lent him a pair of size 36 pants just before a show a few years back at San Diego Comic-Con. Hes got pants! I went up to Bill Pradys room/and he gave me the pants off his own ass. Thats right, I got Bills pants for one performance, Robertson sang. Anti-defamation, thats his game/ you know, anti-defamation is his middle name. The band also playedtheir hits One Week, If I Had $1,000,000, Pinch Me, and, of course, the full version of The Big Bang Theory theme song. Additional impactful moments duringthe evening came fromBig Bang Theory actor Wil Wheatonsspeech. In his introductory speech for Prady, Wheaton spoke about the necessity of taking action when faced with injustice, and received supportivewhoops and claps from the audience. Our grandchildren will ask us, What did you do? What did you do when they tried to take healthcare away from the poor to give even more money to the rich? What did you do when those who had so much took everything they could from those who had so little?’ Wheaton said. What did you do with your wealth and your privilege? We are here tonight to honor a man who will be able to to hold his head high and answer, I did everything I could.’ The cast of The Big Bang Theory, while not present at the function, sent their regards via video, which played at the end of Wheatons speech. Jim Parsons, Mayim Bialik, Kaley Cuoco, Johnny Galecki, Melissa Rauch, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, and Kevin Sussman, all in costume for the show, waved and clapped for Prady from set. Prady did not disappoint with his humor during his speech. At one point, he mentioned that the pants he leant Roberts were actually a size 34. Someone in the audience yelled Theyre 38 now! to which Prady paused for a second and then answered, Yes, thats true. Also present at the event were Big Bang Theoryco-creatorChuck Lorre, MGM CEO Gary Barber, CBS Corp. CEOLeslie Moonves, and Warner Bros. TV president Peter Roth allHonorary Host committee members. EmceeJoshua Malinakept the event on track. The gala also functioned as a fundraiser for the group, with Tennis Channel President and last years recipient of the award Ken Solomon egging on the audience to donate. This year, the gala resulted in nearly $500,000 raised to combat anti-Semitism and bigotry. Founded in 1913, The Anti-Defamation League is a non-governmental organization and civil rights group dedicated to educating the public as well as law enforcement about Anti-Semitism, bigotry, and hate.

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Were two people responsible for virtually all anti-Semitic incidents after the election? – PolitiFact

The Anti-Defamation League says there has been a large increase in anti-Semitic behavior in Florida. A segment hosted by CNNs Don Lemon on May 18, 2017, got a little heated. Lemon and one of his guests, conservative radio host Dennis Prager, sparred over an apparent increase in anti-Semitic incidents after the 2016 presidential election, and who was to blame. Prager said there was no rise in anti-Semitic incidents, and the incidents that did occur didnt have anything to do with Donald Trump. “It was a 100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism,” Prager said. “Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.” Is he correct? We found that Prager has a point about the bomb threats to Jewish community centers largely being the work of two suspects who have since been arrested. However, there is evidence that the number of anti-Semitic incidents other than bomb threats did increase after the election. (Prager did not respond to email inquiries.) The suspects To date, the FBI announced two arrests related to the bomb threats. (We should note that the two individuals cited below have not been tried yet.) The first came on March 3, when the U.S. Attorneys office for the Southern District of New York announced a charge of cyberstalking against a St. Louis man, Juan Thompson. Thompson was charged with “allegedly stalking a former romantic interest by, among other things, making bomb threats in her name to Jewish Community Centers and to the Anti-Defamation League.” The Justice Department said that Thompson appeared to have made “at least eight of the JCC threats as part of a sustained campaign to harass and intimidate” his victim. Prager was wrong that Thompson tried to impress a girlfriend; he is charged with trying to implicate an ex-girlfriend in crimes she didnt commit. As for calling him a “black radical,” thats a somewhat subjective. The Riverfront Times, a St. Louis newspaper, said that as a black journalist, Thompson had filed “searing dispatches about injustices in Baltimore, Mississippi and Chicago. He relished the opportunity to strike back at what he calls an oppressive, anti-black, racial supremacist, capitalist system that kneecaps all but the country’s rich and white in the pursuit of basic civil rights and opportunities.” Then, on April 21, the Justice Department announced that charges had been filed against Michael Ron David Kadar, an 18-year-old resident of Israel with dual citizenship in the United States and Israel. The charges in question were for making telephone bomb threats against Jewish facilities in central Florida and for providing false information to police in Georgia. Then-FBI director James Comey said in a statement that “this kind of behavior is not a prank, and it isn’t harmless. Its a federal crime. It scares innocent people, disrupts entire communities, and expends limited law enforcement resources.” So Pragers on target when he cites Thompson and Kadar as the two individuals charged so far with making Jewish community center bomb threats. The bomb threats Somewhat less certain is the total number of threats called in to Jewish community centers. As we noted, officials have tied Thompson to eight calls. Meanwhile, the criminal complaint against Kadar alleged that between Jan. 4 and March 7, Kadar made “at least 245 telephone calls involving bomb threats and active shooter threats. A significant portion of the threats targeted Jewish community centers and other historically Jewish institutions such as Jewish schools and Anti-Defamation League offices.” The FBI declined to comment further to PolitiFact, citing the ongoing investigation. So the exact number of threats the two individuals made — once duplicate calls and calls made to non-Jewish targets are set aside — is hard to nail down. However, the number of calls they made appears to be in the ballpark of the number of reported bomb threats. Its not certain that threats numbered in the “hundreds,” as Prager said, but if not, they werent far off. The Southern Poverty Law Center, a group that tracks hate crimes, has tracked upwards of 170 such threats made internationally and domestically. And the Anti-Defamation League — another group that tracks hate crimes, and which was a target of a number of the calls in question — has identified 167 such threats in the United States in Canada. (The ADLs tally did not count other countries, as the SPLC did.) Given this data, Prager has a point that most of the bomb threats are traceable to the two individuals who have been charged so far, and hes also correct that Kadar has been charged with making many more than Thompson. Aryeh Tuchman, associate director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, said that there are probably a modest number of bomb threats not traceable to either of these two suspects. “The two individuals that Prager mentioned accounted for the vast majority of the bomb threats, but not all of them,” Tuchman said. That said, Tuchman added one further piece of evidence that Thompson and Kadar account for the vast bulk of threats: “Thankfully, there have been no further bomb threats recently,” he said. Anti-Semitic incidents more broadly But if Prager has described the situation with the Jewish community center bomb threats with reasonable accuracy, he has engaged in a bit of cherry-picking by ignoring other signs of increased anti-Semitism after the election. “Even if the bomb threats are discounted, we still saw an increase in anti-Semitic incidents in the first quarter of 2017,” Tuchman said. “Not including the bomb threats, there were 380 total incidents in the first quarter of 2017, up from 291 incidents in the first quarter of 2016. Thats an increase of 31 percent.” Incidents in 2016 cited by ADL include instances of harassment (such as voice mails or social media attacks), vandalism (such as graffiti) and assault (including one incident in which two shots were fired at a victims vehicle). Tuchman added that the number of incidents in December 2016 were almost 70 percent higher than the number of incidents in December 2015. Tuchman cautioned that ADL “believes that the presidential campaign was a factor in the increase in anti-Semitic incidents, but only one factor.” But even if the election was only one factor among many, the rise in anti-Semitic incidents overall call into question Pragers assertion that its a “100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism.” Our ruling Prager said, “It was a 100 percent lie that his election unleashed anti-Semitism. Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.” Hes close to the mark in describing the overwhelming role of two suspects in making bomb threats against Jewish targets earlier this year. However, Prager ignores a documented rise in anti-Semitic incidents beyond bomb threats. We rate his statement Half True. Share the Facts 2017-05-22 20:46:29 UTC 3 1 7 Half True “It was a 100 percent lie that (Donald Trumps) election unleashed anti-Semitism. Hundreds of Jewish community centers had bomb threats called in. To the best of our knowledge to this day, 90 percent of them were called in by an American Jewish kid living in Israel, and the other 10 percent were a black radical who was trying to impress his girlfriend.” Dennis Prager conservative radio host an interview on CNN Thursday, May 18, 2017 2017-05-18

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti Defamation League calls right-wing terrorism ‘a real threat’ – NJ TODAY

A Dark and Constant Rage: 25 Years of Right-Wing Terrorism in the United States is a comprehensive new report from the Anti-Defamation League,an international Jewish non-governmental organization that combats hate crimes. In March 2017, a white supremacist from Maryland, James Harris Jackson, traveled to New York City with the alleged intention of launching a series of violent attacks on black men to discourage white women from having relationships with black men. After several days, Jackson chose his first victim, a 66-year old black homeless man, Timothy Caughman. Jackson later allegedly admitted that he had stabbed Caughman with a small sword he had brought with him, describing the murder as a practice run. However, after the killing, Jacksons angry energy dissipated and he turned himself over to the authorities. A week later, New York prosecutors announced that they were charging him with second-degree murder as a hate crime and also with a state charge of terrorism. Jacksons aborted killing spree was a shocking example of right-wing terror in the United States but it was unfortunately far from an isolated example. For over a century and a half, since burning Kansas of the 1850s and the Ku Klux Klan of the 1860s, right-wing terrorism has been an unwelcome feature of the American landscape. Yet today, many people are barely aware that it exists and most people dont recognize its frequency or scope. Far more attention in recent years has been given to the threat of homegrown radical Islamic terrora danger that has generated such horrific acts as the Orlando and San Bernardino shooting sprees. Yet the very real specter of radical Islamic terror in the United States has existed alongside an equally serious threat of terror from right-wing extremist groups and individuals. Both movements have generated shooting sprees, bombings, and a wide variety of plots and conspiracies. Both pose threats so significant that to ignore either would be to invite tragedy. To illustrate the threat of right-wing terrorism in the United States, the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism has compiled a list of 150 right-wing terrorist acts, attempted acts, plots and conspiracies from the past 25 years (1993-2017). These include terrorist incidents from a wide variety of white supremacists, from neo-Nazis to Klansmen to racist skinheads, as well as incidents connected to anti-government extremists such as militia groups, sovereign citizens and tax protesters. The list also includes incidents of anti-abortion terror as well as from other, smaller right-wing extremist movements. ADLs Center on Extremism defines terrorism as a pre-planned act or attempted act of significant violence by one or more non-state actors in order to further an ideological, social or religious cause, or to harm perceived opponents of such causes. Significant violent acts can include bombings or use of other weapons of mass destruction, assassinations and targeted killings, shooting sprees, arsons and firebombings, kidnappings and hostage situations and, in some cases, armed robberies. Domestic terrorism consists of acts or attempted acts of terrorism in which the perpetrators are citizens or permanent residents of the country in which the act takes place. The right-wing terrorist incidents in ADLs list include those that best fit the above criteria. They are drawn from the much larger pool of violent and criminal acts that American right-wing extremists engage in every year, from hate crimes to deadly encounters with law enforcement. Right-wing extremists annually murder a number of Americans, but only some of those murders occur in connection with terrorist acts. There are, after all, hundreds of thousands of adherents of right-wing extremist movements in the United States and all such movements have some degree of association with criminal activity. No one should think, therefore, that the incidents listed here represent the breadth of right-wing violence in the U.S. But, as acts of terrorism, they do show right-wing movements at their most vicious and ambitious. The people who committed or attempted the terrorist acts listed here came from a variety of right-wing extremist movements. In a few cases, extremists connected to terror incidents here even adhered to more than one right-wing extremist movement; in such cases, the seemingly dominant ideology was selected for statistical purposes. Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, for example, was primarily an anti-government extremist but also had white supremacist leanings. Richard Poplawski, who gunned down three police officers in Pittsburgh, was a white supremacist who also had leanings towards the anti-government movement. Most right-wing extremists in the United States fall into one of two broad umbrella movements or spheres: white supremacists and anti-government extremists. An overwhelming majority of the terror incidents listed here (85%) were committed by adherents of one of these two spheres. Moreover, the number of acts attributed to each sphere is almost identical: 64 terror incidents are related to white supremacists, while 63 are related to anti-government extremists. Many people, when picturing right-wing terrorism, tend to think of white supremacists, but anti-government extremists such as militia groups and sovereign citizens pose just as much of a threat. White supremacists involved in right-wing terror incidents include adherents of every major segment of the white supremacist movement, including neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, traditional white supremacists (such as Ku Klux Klan groups), white supremacist prison gangs, the religious sect Christian Identity, and the Alt Right. Leaving aside dual-movement extremists such as Timothy McVeigh, the worst white supremacist terrorist was Dylann Roof, a traditional white supremacist who embarked upon a deadly shooting spree at the Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015, killing nine. The anti-government extremists, who are often collectively termed the Patriot movement, consist primarily of adherents of the tax protest movement, the sovereign citizen movement, and the militia movement (with the latter including Oath Keepers and Three Percenters). Though the Patriot movement goes back to the mid-1960s, it was in the mid-1990s that it really came into its own in terms of becoming a major domestic terrorist threat, one that equaled the threat posed by white supremacists. Oklahoma City bombers Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were dedicated adherents of the Patriot movement and their 1995 attack on the Murrah Federal Building gave notice that anti-government extremists now posed a major threat. It is common for the media and others to assume that anti-government extremists are also mostly white supremacists, but this is not the case. Though there is some overlap between the two spheres, the main anti-government extremist movements direct their anger at the government and there have always been people of color in these movements. Indeed, the sovereign citizen movement in particular has unfortunately seen particularly strong growth within the African-American community in recent years. Two of the sovereign-citizen related incidents on this list, the LaPlace, Louisiana, shootings in 2012 and the Columbus, Ohio, bomb-making attempt in 2016, involved African-Americans. Two incidents not included on this list involved extremists who were primarily black nationalists but who had secondary sovereign citizen affiliations: the 2014 plot by two men to blow up the Gateway Arch and kill law enforcement officials in St. Louis, Missouri, and the 2016 deadly ambush killings of three police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The militia movement has spent much of its history trying to distance itself from accusations of racism or white supremacy but in recent years much of the movement has willingly embraced a particular type of bigotry: anti-Muslim hatred. This Islamophobia has taken numerous forms, from armed protests in front of mosques to a major terrorist plot in October 2016 in Garden City, Kansas, where three militia members were arrested in connection with an alleged plot to blow up an apartment complex that primarily housed Muslim Somali-American residents. The militia movement could produce more such terror attempts aimed at Muslims in the future. Anti-abortion extremists are responsible for 11% of the terror incidents collected here. Compared to the incidents connected to white supremacists or anti-government extremists, the number of abortion related terror attacks and attempts is low. However, given the small number of anti-abortion extremists relative to adherents of the other, much larger movements, the consistent stream of terror incidents that flow from this movement is worrisome. Anti-abortion extremists are an example of what is called single-issue extremism. Single-issue extremists are typically the extreme wing of a broader, more mainstream movement dedicated to a single cause or issue. While most people in those movements would not think of committing acts of violence, adherents of the extreme wing of those movements are more likely to consider violent activity, operating under a sense of extreme urgency and with a conviction that the ends justify the means. A few other right-wing single issue extremists, such as anti-Muslim extremists and anti-immigration extremists, have also committed violent acts included among the 150 listed here. All of the perpetrators and alleged perpetrators listed in this report have ties to extremist ideologies, but not all of them actually have had connections to specific extremist groups. Indeed, terrorist groups as suchi.e., groups that form and exist largely for the purpose of committing terrorist actsare rare in the United States, where the rule of law is strong and such groups have great difficulties in finding purchase. Even when extremists are connected to specific groups, they rarely commit their actions at the direction of the group. Rather, extremist groups in the United States tend to serve a purpose of radicalization more than anything else, whether of their own members or, as in the case of Dylann Roof, of non-members who may be influenced by their propaganda. The perpetrators of some of the incidents on this list were part of formal groups, while others were essentially involved in cellsinformal associations of extremists banding together to commit an act. But just as common as these two types were lone offendersthe lone wolf terrorists responsible for a large number of Americas terror incidents. Indeed, approximately half of the 150 incidents listed in this report involved lone wolf offenders. Today, thanks to the Internet, it is easier than ever for someone to become steeped in extremist ideologies, even to the point of being willing to commit acts of great violence, without ever being involved in an organized extremist group. The Incidents The list in this report includes 150 incidents involving acts, attempted acts, and plots of right-wing terrorism from 1993 through part of 2017. A few of these terror acts are well-known, such as the bombings conducted by Timothy McVeigh and Eric Rudolph, while many other incidents garnered little more than local media coverage and are unknown to most Americans. Such lists always involve some value judgments on the margins and there are some incidents on the list that some people might think dont belong on such a list, while there are items missing from the list that some people might think should be included, such as the armed standoffs involving members of the Bundy family and others in Nevada in 2014 and Oregon in 2016. In many cases where a possible incident was not included, it was for one of several reasons. First, for some reported incidents, an extremist connection has never been satisfactorily established or has in fact been disproved. For example, in 2014 Dennis Marx attempted to use firearms and explosives to attack an Atlanta courthouse; some media outlets reported or speculated that Marx was a sovereign citizen. However, no evidence confirming this ever emerged and the police eventually acknowledged he had not been involved in the movement. Similarly, some media speculated that Jared Lee Loughner, who shot Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and 18 others in a 2011 shooting spree in Arizona, was a sovereign citizen, but this also turned out to be untrue. An additional group of incidents did not make the list because, while an extremist definitely committed an act of significant violence, the act was a spontaneous act of violence without noticeable premeditation; such acts are usually not included here. Finally, some incidentsusually discoveries of extremists with major illegal arsenals of weapons and/or explosiveswere not included because there was insufficient evidence of any target or intent to use the weapons for an act of terrorism. The incidents in these two categories are serious criminal violations but not really incidents of terrorism. Those omissions still leave 150 terror incidents from the last quarter-century. This lengthy string of dangerous attacks and plots illustrates how deeply seated the threat of right-wing terrorism is in the United States. A look at these 150 incidents over time reveals that two specific surges of right-wing terrorism have occurred over the past 25 years. The first was the surge of the mid-to-late 1990s, a result of a great increase in right-wing extremism as a result of a variety of factors that include the election of Bill Clinton, the passage of NAFTA, the passage of gun control measures such as the Brady Law and the Assault Weapons Ban, and the deadly standoffs at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, in 1992 and Waco, Texas, in 1993, which energized white supremacists and anti-government extremists, respectively. The 1990s surge had died down by the turn of the century and right-wing terrorism occurred less frequently in the early-to-mid 2000s. Events ranging from the non-event of a Y2K-related disaster to the replacement of Bill Clinton with George W. Bush to the 9/11 terror attacks all played a role in dampening right-wing furor. Unfortunately, this state of affairs did not last. Near the end of Bushs second term, right-wing terror incidents began to increase again and this trend accelerated by 2009, thanks in part to the election of Barack Obama, whom both white supremacists and anti-government extremists hated, and to the major economic disasters of the Great Recession and the foreclosure crisis. The latter two in particular allowed the sovereign citizen movement to greatly expand. The result was a second surge of right-wing extremism, one that was accompanied by a surge of right-wing terror incidents. This increased level of terror-related activity remains high today, though whether or not it will sustain itself during a Trump administration remains to be seen. The worst right-wing terror attack, the Oklahoma City bombing, killed 168 people and injured hundreds more. Thankfully, none of the other incidents achieved anywhere near that level of lethality and destructiveness. In large part, this has been due to effective law enforcement, at both the federal and state/local levels, who have uncovered and prevented many attempts at terrorist acts. Indeed, only a minority of the incidents recorded here65 out of 150could be considered successful acts, by which is meant that the terrorist(s) succeeded in carrying out part or all of their plan or were able to wreak some sort of damage (such as shooting someone) while attempting to carry out their plan. This does not include bombs that were successfully planted but which failed to go off. Some of the attempted acts never had a good chance of success, while others could easily have been deadly. Even though most terror incidents were not successes, the minority that did succeed resulted in 255 deaths and approximately 603 people injured (not all injury counts are consistent). Were it not for the efforts of law enforcement to detect and prevent right-wing acts of terror, that deadly toll would be far higher still. It is worth nothing that, although bombs were used or considered by extremists just as often as firearms, their successful use rate was much lower. This is largely due to the fact that explosives are far more difficult to obtain and to use in the United States than are firearms, which are abundant, easy to use, and very deadly. There is far better regulation of explosives than firearms in the United States. In a minority of cases, right-wing extremists attempted arsons or incendiary devices such as Molotov cocktails; abortion clinics were a frequent target of such violence. And, from time to time, extremists would select more exotic means of murder, such as using the deadly toxin ricin or poisoning a water supply or trying to build a radiological weapon. Whatever weapon they planned to use against their targets, right-wing extremists have had no shortage of targets. Indeed, some ambitious plots have contained an entire array of targets slated for death and destruction. Of the various targets of right-wing anger, it is governmental and law enforcement institutions that are most often threatened. Of the incidents examined here, 66 involved some sort of government-related target. This is largely due to the fact that white supremacists and anti-government extremists alike, as well as most of the lesser right-wing movements, hate government and law enforcement. This category includes federal, state and local branches of government and law enforcement. White supremacists are responsible for most of the racial and religious targeting. Virtually any person or institution associated with a non-white race can be a potential target for white supremacists, but African-Americans, Hispanics, and multi-racial couples/families have been the most common groups victimized. The most frequent religious targets were, not surprisingly, Jews and Muslims (including non-Muslims perceived as Muslims). Actual or perceived immigrants, as well as LGBT targets, were also subject to victimization. Abortion-related targets, typically clinics that provide abortion services as well as the people who work at such places, were also common. While anti-abortion extremists were the extremists most likely to attack abortion-related targets, other right-wing extremists, most noticeably white supremacists, also occasionally attempted such attacks. Right-wing extremist have also taken aim at a variety of other targets. Commercial targets have included various businesses and, in particular, financial institutions. Infrastructure targets include a wide range of installations, from refineries to dams to water supplies. In some cases, extremists have simply targeted crowded public areas, hoping to cause significant human casualties. The Present and Future of Right-Wing Terrorism Over the past 25 years, right-wing terrorism has exhibited a considerable amount of stability. Part of this is due to the fact that most of it comes from two mature and well-established movements: the white supremacist movement and the anti-government Patriot movement. They have specific goals and specific enemies and can be expected to produce a steady stream of extremists willing to use violence to achieve those goals or harm those enemies. Moreover, though fringe movements, they nevertheless have deep roots in American society and cannot simply be rooted out or eliminated. Right-wing terrorism is not going away anytime soon. On the plus side, law enforcement is collectively far more familiar with right-wing extremist movements than it may be with newer types of extremist movements, which enables it to utilize informants and undercover officers to a much fuller extent than might otherwise be the case. It is no coincidence that a number of the prevented acts recounted in this study were prevented thanks to sting operations, which are one of the most consistently successful law enforcement tools against terrorismas long as law enforcement is sufficiently familiar with the relevant movement(s). Most of the 25 years examined here for right-wing terrorism have occurred in what can be deemed the Internet era. However, the Internet of the mid-1990s was very different than that of ten years later or todays on-line world. Overall, right-wing terrorism has remained pretty consistent throughout this era, but the evolution of the Internet has resulted in some changes. In particular, the social networking revolution that occurred during the period 2006-2009 has made it easier for extremist ideas and tactics to spread very far, very fast. This can allow new extremist movements, such as the white supremacist Alt Right, to quickly gain purchase, and can allow established movement, such as the sovereign citizen movement, to rapidly resurge. Social networking has also allowed extremists to meet each other and even to plot on-line. The October 2008 school attack plot in Tennessee and the Georgia militia plot of February 2014 are two examples where extremists who met on-line later joined up in the real world to plot terrorist acts. The Internet may also have made lone wolf terrorismterrorism committed by a lone perpetrator not acting at the behest of any organized groupa more common phenomenon, because one can now self-radicalize using on-line resources with little need to engage with other extremists in the real world. The shooting sprees of Keith Luke in 2009 and Dylann Roof in 2015 are examples of terrorist acts committed by lone extremists who radicalized on-line with little or no real interaction with other extremists. Lone wolves have long existed within Americas radical right, but could be even more likely in the future. Finally, for the past quarter of a century, right-wing terrorism has been a consistent feature in the landscape of American violence, but it has garnered far less notice than some other forms of terrorism, most notably Islamic terrorism. Though a few incidents, such as the Oklahoma City bombing, or the bombings of Eric Rudoph, received extensive media coverage, many of the incidents collected here received scant media attention, particularly from major national media sources. One reason for this under-coverage may be very simple: a surprising number of the terrorist acts and plots listed here originated away from major media centers. While some incidents took place in locations such as New York City, Chicago, or Los Angeles, many others occurred in out-of-the-way places such as Garden City, Kansas; Fairbanks, Alaska; or Lenoir, Tennessee. As a result, such incidents are less likely to get national media attention and, if they get any, less likely to get sustained coverage. Whatever the reasons for the lack of coverage, one of its consequences has been an inadequate awareness among policy-makers and the public alike of the threat posed by violent right-wing extremists. Today, the United States still does not even have a federal domestic terrorism statute. Federal spending on training law enforcement on issues such as right-wing violence and terrorism is extremely low. One thing is certain: if the United States does not treat right-wing terrorism as a real threat and react appropriately, there is no chance of lessening the danger posed by violent right-wing extremists and the 150 terror incidents described in this report will be joined by still more.

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May 22, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed


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