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Anti-Defamation League welcomes Pope’s condemnation of anti-Semitism – Catholic Culture

Catholic World News

February 10, 2017

Following a February 9 audience with Pope Francis, the Anti-Defamation League welcomed the Popes denunciation of anti-Semitism.

We know you understand and share our concern about the resurgence of anti-Semitism, especially in Europe, said Jonathan Greenblatt, the organizations CEO.

We share your concern about the horrendous persecution of ethnic and cultural minorities, many of them Christians, he added. Indeed, we are troubled that the world seems not to pay enough attention to this tragic situation.

Greenblatt also praised the Pope for his advocacy on behalf of refugees.

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Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 6 a.m.

Swastikas spray-painted on fences and signs in Sienna Plantation. Students saluting Adolf Hitler during Cypress-Ranch High School’s senior class picture day. Racist and anti-Semitic fliers distributed at universities and in neighborhoods across Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties. All of that happened in just one week, leading the Anti-Defamation League’s Houston branch to issue a statement Friday about the uptick since the start of the year.

According to ADL’s Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross, the Southwest Region usually sees 30 to 40 hate-related incidents per year. So far, the ADL has counted 25 since the start of the year.

There has been a disturbing uptick in the number of apparent hate incidents since the Presidential election, Gross said in a statement. We are working hard to respond to these incidents, and we hope they are not part of a growing trend.”

Gross told the Houston Press via email that the ADL tracks the incidents as they are reported in news media or when they receive tips and investigate the incidents on their own accord. “Generally if hate symbols, signs or language are involved, these incidents are classified as hateful incidents,” he said of the ADL’s criteria.

While the ADL doesn’t speculate about the cause of such a drastic increase, Gross said the perpetrators used Trump signage or identified themselves as Trump supporters.

Last week, the Press talked to the group behind the distribution of white nationalist flyers at Rice University, called American Vanguard, whose Texas leader told us that Trump was helping their cause, no matter how he may try to distance himself from white supremacist groups. The fliers, which the ADL cited in its release, encouraged people to defend the white race, which American Vanguard believes is undergoing a slow and steady genocide (let us clarify for the record: “Genocide” is their word, not ours). The recruitment fliers said things like “We have a right to exist” and “Defending your people is a social duty.” Others at Texas universities appeared Trump-inspired:”What Made America Great? Blood and soil. Keep it that way, join the Vanguard.”

“Trump is a representation of white America whether he likes it or whether he knows it or not,” said the leader of American Vanguard’s Texas chapter, who said it’s the Vanguard’s policy to always be anonymous for safety purposes. “I think what he’s doing is… uh… he’s kind of defending it. Not explicitly, but he’s doing things that are helpful for it.”

In a Sienna Plantation neighborhood in Fort Bend County, multiple homeowners found swastikas spray-painted on their fences and garages. One homeowner found a Trump-Pence campaign sign, with a swastika painted over it, tacked onto his fence as well. As KTRK reported, the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident as a hate crime.

That same week, a seemingly large group of students at Cypress-Ranch High School reportedly yelled “Heil Hitler!” and “Heil Trump” during a senior photo, throwing up the Nazi salute. One student emailed photos to KPRC, telling the news station that it appeared that roughly 70 students participated. Cy-Ranch administrators said those students would be disciplined, and addressed the student body and parents in lengthy statements.

“This inappropriate gesture is symbol of a horrible time in the world, in which countless human atrocities occurred,” Principal Bob Hull said in a statement, which you can view in full here.”This gesture invokes strong emotion and symbolizes hate that crosses all genders, races and cultural lines. …I am disheartened that this group are members of our senior class.”

Gross said that ADL has offered assistance to law enforcement, educators and victims in the areas where these hate-related incidents occurred, offering educational materials or training wherever needed.

“We continue to do what we always have done, which is to educate against the dangers of hatred and promote diversity and respect. Our staff has stepped up efforts to prevent and to respond acts of hate and will continue to do so as needed.”

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Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

ADL files amicus brief supporting challenge to Trump’s immigration order – The Times of Israel

WASHINGTON The Anti-Defamation League filed an amicus brief in federal court Monday supporting the state of Washingtons challenge to President Donald Trumps highly controversial immigration order.

When America has closed its doors and allowed its core values to be compromised, the country later looked back in shame, said the groups CEO Jonathan Greenblatt in a statement.

On Friday evening, a federal judge issued a nationwide restraining order against the ban, which suspended US entry for people from seven Muslim-majority nations for 90 days and froze the entire US refugee program for 120 days.

It also blocked Syrians from entering the country indefinitely.

The ruling by US District Judge James Robart was harshly criticized by the president, who referred to him in a tweet as a so-called judge and suggested the blame would fall on his shoulders if a terrorist attack ensued that cost American lives.

Just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril, Trump posted on Sunday afternoon. If something happens blame him and the court system. People pouring in. Bad!

US President Donald Trump speaks following a visit to the US Central Command and Special Operations Command at MacDill Air Force Base on February 6, 2017 in Tampa, Florida. (AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN)

Trump administration officials have further said they plan to challenge the ruling vigorously, and on Monday evening, the Justice Department urged a federal court to reinstate the ban.

The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is expected to rule at some point this week on the matter, before it is likely go to the Supreme Court in the months ahead.

The ADLs amicus brief a legal document filed by non-litigants in appellate cases who have a stated interest in the ruling pointed to the history of Jewish refugees being denied entry onto Americas shores, including the denial of passengers of the MS St. Louis, a German ship filled with 937 Jewish refugees, who were denied entry into the United States in 1939.

At other times, when prejudice and fear predominate over reason and compassion, we falter, often with devastating consequences, as set forth below in connection with the St. Louis tragedy, the brief said.

The ADL, a Jewish civil rights organization that monitors and combats anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry around the globe, also cited the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II following the attacks on Pearl Harbor

The document closes by saying the current travel ban risks once again sacrificing the nations core values in favor of prejudice and fear a sacrifice that history has repeatedly proven has profound consequences both to the persons who suffer as a result and to the still-vibrant vision of the shining city on the hill.

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February 6, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Pepe the Frog Declared Hate Symbol by Anti-Defamation …

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has declared a popular internet meme depicting a cartoon frog to be a hate symbol.

Pepe the Frog’s beginnings were unoffensive: he is the creation of comic book creator Matt Furie , who featured the frog as a character in the series Boy’s Club beginning in 2005. The character subsequently became a beloved meme, often called the “sad frog meme” and shared with a speech bubble reading “Feels good man” or “Feels bad man.” It was at times posted on social media by the likes of Katy Perry and Nicki Minaj. But recently, as the Daily Beast reported in May, the character has been co-opted by a faction of Internet denizens who decided to reclaim it from the mainstream, and began sharing it in anti-Semitic contexts.

“Images of the frog, variously portrayed with a Hitler-like moustache, wearing a yarmulke or a Klan hood, have proliferated in recent weeks in hateful messages aimed at Jewish and other users on Twitter,” the ADL wrote in a statement . “Once again, racists and haters have taken a popular Internet meme and twisted it for their own purposes of spreading bigotry and harassing users,” wrote ADL CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt.

Earlier this year, the ADL added the (((echo))) symbol to its Hate on Display database, noting that members of the alt-right movement were using it to single out Jewish users, particularly journalists, on social media.

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February 6, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League chief apologises for Holocaust comment – thenews.pl

PR dla Zagranicy

Pawe Kononczuk 05.02.2017 14:38

Polands ambassador to the US has accepted an apology by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) over claims regarding Polands stance on the Holocaust.

Ambassador Piotr Wilczek said on Saturday he was satisfied with a letter of apology sent to him by the Leagues CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, who had reportedly alleged that Poland refuses to publicly acknowledge Adolf Hitler’s attempt to exterminate Jews.

American broadcaster CNN last week published comments attributed to Greenblatt, citing him as saying that many countries Iran, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, for example specifically refuse to acknowledge Hitlers attempt to exterminate Jews.

CNN quoted Greenblatt as saying that those countries opted instead to talk about generic suffering rather than recognising this catastrophic incident for what it was: the intended genocide of the Jewish people.

In the letter to the Polish ambassador, Greenblatt admitted that he had made a mistake by including Poland among such countries.

He said he regretted his remarks and stressed he had not intended to offend the Polish government or society.

He also said that the ADL had given support to the Polish governments campaign to rectify inaccurate expressions such as “Polish death camps”, recurring in Western media outlets.

Both Wilczek and Greenblatt expressed hope for continuing dialogue between Warsaw and the Jewish rights organisation.

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February 5, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

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February 4, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, AIPAC, Anti Racism, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism Lobby, Anti-Semitism News, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Censorship, Discrimination News, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Crimes, Hate Speech, Hitler, Holocaust, Holocaust Denial, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust Revisionism, Hush Crimes, Israel, Israeli Lobby, Jewish, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Judaism, Misc, Multicultural News, Neo Nazi, Race Relations, Racism News, Racist News, Simon Wiesenthal, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC, White Nationalism, White Power, White Privilege, White Racism, White Supremacism, World War II, Zionism  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Tracking Disturbing Uptick In Houston … – Houston Public Media

The group says its been a long time since it has seen this number of hate incidents so close together in the Houston area.

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) says its working with law enforcement to respond to recent hate-related incidents in the greater Houston area.

The group is tracking what it calls a disturbing uptick in displays of hate speech after four incidents in the past week in Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery Counties. Swastikas were found painted on fences, racist flyers appeared at a home and at Rice University, and a group of high school students in Cypress gave an apparent Nazi salute during a class photo.

The ADLs Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross says he hopethis isnt part of a growing trend, but says its been a long time since his groups seen this number of hate incidents so close together.

Within the first two months of 2017, weve already had 25 incidents, he says.

The ADL says it typically deals with about 30-40 such incidents over an entire year.

Gross says its hard to attribute the increase to any one factor, but the ADL believes its at least partlytied to the recent election.

Since the election of President Donald Trump, extremists in this country have felt emboldened, Gross says.

The group is encouraging people to report these kind of acts, while the school district in Cypress says it will discipline some of the students involved in that incident. The Harris County Sheriffs Office says it hasnt seen any trend of local hate incidents, though some have been reported to deputies. Each incident is investigated to determine if there is evidence of a crime, the sheriffs office says.

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Polish ambassador slams Anti-Defamation League claims on Holocaust – thenews.pl

Polands ambassador in Washington has slammed claims that Poland refuses to publicly acknowledge Hitler’s attempt to exterminate Jews in WWII.

On Monday, American broadcaster CNN published comments attributed to Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, an NGO that aims to fight defamation of Jews.

Greenblatt told CNN that so many countries Iran, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, for example specifically refuse to acknowledge Hitlers attempt to exterminate Jews, the broadcaster said on Monday.

CNN quoted Greenblatt as saying that those countries opted instead to talk about generic suffering rather than recognising this catastrophic incident for what it was: the intended genocide of the Jewish people.

On Sunday, The Washington Post daily wrote: Russia and Poland are also known to ignore the Jewish dimension of the Holocaust in public statements.

Polish ambassador to the US, Piotr Wilczek, said: Such statements are not only false but hurtful to the Polish people.

In a statement requesting Greenblatt’s claims be withdrawn, Wilczek said that during World War II, the Polish government-in-exile told the UN that the German authorities aim with systematic deliberation at the total extermination of the Jewish population of Poland.

The dispute comes days after International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which marks on 27 January the liberation of Auschwitz, a German Nazi death camp.

Wilczek added that Polands current administration also acknowledges the Jewish aspect of the Holocaust. During International Holocaust Remembrance Day commemorations, Polish presidential aide Wojciech Kolarski said: In Auschwitz, Germans carried out the mass murder of Jews. Kolarski added that the Germans goal [sic.] was the total extermination of the Jewish nation.

The comments in American media followed US President Donald Trumps statement on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in which he said: It is with a heavy heart and sombre mind that we remember and honour the victims, survivors, heroes of the Holocaust.

Critics pointed that Trump had omitted explicit mention of the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, adding that they had been acknowledged by previous US presidents.

However, White House spokeswoman Hope Hicks said the statement aimed to take into account all of those who suffered, including five million non-Jews, CNN said. Among them were priests, gypsies, people with mental or physical disabilities, communists, trade unionists, Jehovahs Witnesses, anarchists, Poles and other Slavic peoples, and resistance fighters, Hicks said, according to CNN.

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Source: cnn.com, washingtonpost.com, waszyngton.msz.gov.pl

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Anti-Defamation League| Jewish Virtual Library

ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE (ADL). The Anti-Defamation League (originally “The Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith”) was founded in 1913 in reaction to the crude and overt antisemitism of the period, specifically to the Leo *Frank case. The ADL’s goal, as stated in the charter that established the League, is “to end the defamation of the Jewish people to secure justice and fair treatment for all citizens alike.”

Originally headquartered in Chicago, the offices of the League are in New York City. The ADL works out of 31 regional offices located throughout the United States. The ADL has as well a cooperative relationship with the B’nai B’rith Canadian office, an office in Jerusalem, and representation in Rome and Moscow.

The ADL is governed by a National Commission of 700. Unlike the *American Jewish Congress , *American Jewish Committee , and other community relations organizations, the ADL is not a membership organization. It has evolved from being a commission of its parent body to an organization with independent board and fundraising structures, and in reality is fully autonomous. The ADL is staffed by career professionals who are specialists in various disciplines related to community relations: religions, law, communications, promotion, education, labor, foreign affairs (especially Israel and the Middle East), social sciences, politics (national and local), and government.

The ADL recognizes threats to Jewish security coming from an antisemitism that appears in new forms and guises, such as anti-Israel activity and radicalism of the right and left. The League views itself as being an “active” organization, responding in a timely manner to what are perceived to be threats to the rights and security of Jews. It sees itself as taking a pragmatic, rather than an ideological, approach to issues. The ADL, by virtue of its budget and its varied activity, is considered to be a significant voice among the community relations agencies.

The ADL’s initial efforts focused on the blatant antisemitism of the pre- and post-World War I period, which included restricted neighborhoods and resorts, jobs, and schools that rejected Jews. (For example, model legislation drafted by the ADL helped unmask the Ku Klux Klan and drastically diminish its power.) The ADL’s focus, however, in its early decades was not on legal remedies against discrimination but on countering defamation of Jews. For example, the League exposed the vicious antisemitism of the Dearborn Independent, which printed and circularized the infamous Protocols of Zion, and extracted an apology and retraction from its publisher, Henry Ford. Throughout the 1930s the League fought and exposed the many hate groups which sprang up during the Depression and the Hitler period, such as the Christian Front, the Silver Shirts, and the German-American Bund.

Particularly in the post-World War II period, the ADL was successful in advocating on behalf of legislation against such discrimination. It also dealt with vulgar stereotypes and caricatures of Jews on the stage and in communication media and with incidents of antisemitic vandalism, and played a role in strengthening interfaith and interracial relationships.

In the 1960s, the ADL played a role in the successful coalitional effort that resulted in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and of subsequent fair-housing and voting-rights laws. The ADL’s sponsorship of a comprehensive study of the roots of prejudice (the seven-volume University of California Five-Year Study of Antisemitism in the United States the “Berkeley Studies”) helped create a new climate of interreligious understanding and ecumenism, and was a factor in the deliberations of Vatican II that led to the watershed document Nostra Aetate, which re-defined the Catholic Church’s attitude toward Jews.

On the international scene, advocacy on behalf of the State of Israel and other involvement in Middle East issues became, especially after 1967, an ADL priority. The League carries out an education and action program to help mold public opinion and exposes and counteracts Arab propaganda; ADL led the effort which resulted in the passage of anti-boycott legislation and worked within the European Economic Community to counter the boycott. The League is also active in protecting and securing the rights of Jews wherever they are in danger, and played an important role in the Soviet Jewry movement. Interreligious activities as well have been an important part of the ADL agenda.

During the 1970s, in response to what it then characterized as “the new antisemitism,” which derived less from overt expression and more from apathy and insensitivity to Jews and to Jewish concerns and problems, including Israel, the ADL re-contoured its approaches to antisemitism. A major prejudice-reduction program, “A World of Difference,” has been an ADL centerpiece since the early 1990s, as has been Holocaust education. Convinced that preferential treatment will destroy equality of opportunity and selection based upon merit, the League’s position on affirmative action is nuanced in terms of ADL’s opposition to the re-emergence of quotas.

The ADL’s traditional ideology was that aggressive use of litigation and other legal remedies to counter discrimination and church-state violations was too confrontational and would ultimately damage the constructive relationships that Jews had built up with other faith communities over the years. From its earliest years the ADL, unlike its sister “defense” agencies, rejected advocating on behalf of antidiscrimination legislation, and instead focused on combating prejudice and defamation. The League’s national director until 1947, Richard E. Gustadt, articulated the view that held that intergroup negotiation and education programs emphasizing cultural pluralism offered the best chances to remedy societal abuses. Certain societal evils could not, in the view of the ADL, be eliminated, only tempered. This view (shared in large measure by the American Jewish Committee) marked a fundamental ideological difference with the American Jewish Congress, which believed in direct legal action.

From the late 1940s until the late 1970s the ADL was led by a tandem of Benjamin Epstein and Arnold Forster, who together began aggressively prosecuting a civil rights agenda for the League. Beginning in the early 1980s, however, with a marked shift in the national public policy agenda back to church-state and other First Amendment matters, there was again a shift in the priorities of the ADL. During the tenure of national director Nathan Perlmutter additional legal expertise and resources were added to the agency’s staff (the ADL’s litigation capacity dated back to the late 1940s and was a result of the decision by the American Jewish Congress to organize its Commission on Law and Social Action), and the League became an aggressive “player” in the church-state arena. During this period there was a certain degree of de-emphasis of the traditional civil rights agenda, resulting in large measure from antisemitism within some black civil rights groups.

Even with a new emphasis placed on church-state separation and other legal matters, the ADL always viewed church-state concerns to be but one of several major civil rights and liberties issues on its organizational palette, which includes countering racial supremacist organizations, judicial remedies for “hate crimes,” and discrimination and harassment. Changes within the organization arising out of exogenous factors did not mean that the ADL intended to abandon its charter purpose of public response to anti-Jewish defamation.

From the mid-1980s, under the stewardship of Abraham H. *Foxman , the ADL has become one of the most “visible” national Jewish organizations on the American and indeed international scene. Although viewed as increasingly conservative in some areas of activity, the reality is that the ADL has carved a highly nuanced political path, especially on Israel-related issues, threading its way skillfully between agencies such as the rightist Zionist Organization of America and Jewish groups of the left. This “centrist” approach has been evident in a range of domestic public affairs issues as well. Newer areas of activity for the ADL include threats of global antisemitism, “hate” activity on the Internet, working with law-enforcement agencies, a new generation of church-state situations, and balancing traditional civil liberties concerns with those of national and local security. The ADL has commissioned a series of public opinion surveys, both in the United States and in Europe, which have elicited valuable data on antisemitic attitudes and on attitudes toward Israel.

The core mission of the ADL to combat antisemitism remains as it has been. The related mission of the League working for justice for all has in the view of the ADL not only intrinsic value but instrumental value as well, as it assists in the ADL’s core mission.

In terms of institutional considerations, until the early 1980s the leading “defense” agency, in terms of budget and stature, was the American Jewish Committee; the annual budgets of the two agencies were at approximate parity, at around $12 million. The ADL budget ($5.5 million in 1971) began increasing in the 1980s at approximately $3 million per year in that decade, and soon far outstripped the other “defense” agencies, reaching some $30 million by the early 1990s and approximately $60 million by 2005. The League’s staff and programmatic initiatives have increased commensurately.

Also important in terms of institutional dynamics is the ADL’s relationship with *B’nai B’rith . The ADL began life as a commission of B’nai B’rith, but tensions developed between the two agencies as B’nai B’rith was reshaping itself from being primarily a fraternal and service organization to one that addresses community relations issues. In the mid-to-late 1990s the issue with B’nai B’rith came to a head, with B’nai B’rith itself seeking finally to reshape its own identity asserted that its community relations and “defense” agenda would be pursued aggressively. The ADL, maintaining that it was B’nai B’rith’s “defense” arm, in effect severed its ties with its erstwhile parent. (The ADL does retain a de jure legal connection with B’nai B’rith.)

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Anti-Defamation League welcomes Pope’s condemnation of anti-Semitism – Catholic Culture

Catholic World News February 10, 2017 Following a February 9 audience with Pope Francis, the Anti-Defamation League welcomed the Popes denunciation of anti-Semitism. We know you understand and share our concern about the resurgence of anti-Semitism, especially in Europe, said Jonathan Greenblatt, the organizations CEO. We share your concern about the horrendous persecution of ethnic and cultural minorities, many of them Christians, he added. Indeed, we are troubled that the world seems not to pay enough attention to this tragic situation. Greenblatt also praised the Pope for his advocacy on behalf of refugees. References: Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in. All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off! There are no comments yet for this item.

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Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 6 a.m. Swastikas spray-painted on fences and signs in Sienna Plantation. Students saluting Adolf Hitler during Cypress-Ranch High School’s senior class picture day. Racist and anti-Semitic fliers distributed at universities and in neighborhoods across Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties. All of that happened in just one week, leading the Anti-Defamation League’s Houston branch to issue a statement Friday about the uptick since the start of the year. According to ADL’s Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross, the Southwest Region usually sees 30 to 40 hate-related incidents per year. So far, the ADL has counted 25 since the start of the year. There has been a disturbing uptick in the number of apparent hate incidents since the Presidential election, Gross said in a statement. We are working hard to respond to these incidents, and we hope they are not part of a growing trend.” Gross told the Houston Press via email that the ADL tracks the incidents as they are reported in news media or when they receive tips and investigate the incidents on their own accord. “Generally if hate symbols, signs or language are involved, these incidents are classified as hateful incidents,” he said of the ADL’s criteria. While the ADL doesn’t speculate about the cause of such a drastic increase, Gross said the perpetrators used Trump signage or identified themselves as Trump supporters. Last week, the Press talked to the group behind the distribution of white nationalist flyers at Rice University, called American Vanguard, whose Texas leader told us that Trump was helping their cause, no matter how he may try to distance himself from white supremacist groups. The fliers, which the ADL cited in its release, encouraged people to defend the white race, which American Vanguard believes is undergoing a slow and steady genocide (let us clarify for the record: “Genocide” is their word, not ours). The recruitment fliers said things like “We have a right to exist” and “Defending your people is a social duty.” Others at Texas universities appeared Trump-inspired:”What Made America Great? Blood and soil. Keep it that way, join the Vanguard.” “Trump is a representation of white America whether he likes it or whether he knows it or not,” said the leader of American Vanguard’s Texas chapter, who said it’s the Vanguard’s policy to always be anonymous for safety purposes. “I think what he’s doing is… uh… he’s kind of defending it. Not explicitly, but he’s doing things that are helpful for it.” In a Sienna Plantation neighborhood in Fort Bend County, multiple homeowners found swastikas spray-painted on their fences and garages. One homeowner found a Trump-Pence campaign sign, with a swastika painted over it, tacked onto his fence as well. As KTRK reported, the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident as a hate crime. That same week, a seemingly large group of students at Cypress-Ranch High School reportedly yelled “Heil Hitler!” and “Heil Trump” during a senior photo, throwing up the Nazi salute. One student emailed photos to KPRC, telling the news station that it appeared that roughly 70 students participated. Cy-Ranch administrators said those students would be disciplined, and addressed the student body and parents in lengthy statements. “This inappropriate gesture is symbol of a horrible time in the world, in which countless human atrocities occurred,” Principal Bob Hull said in a statement, which you can view in full here.”This gesture invokes strong emotion and symbolizes hate that crosses all genders, races and cultural lines. …I am disheartened that this group are members of our senior class.” Gross said that ADL has offered assistance to law enforcement, educators and victims in the areas where these hate-related incidents occurred, offering educational materials or training wherever needed. “We continue to do what we always have done, which is to educate against the dangers of hatred and promote diversity and respect. Our staff has stepped up efforts to prevent and to respond acts of hate and will continue to do so as needed.”

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ADL files amicus brief supporting challenge to Trump’s immigration order – The Times of Israel

WASHINGTON The Anti-Defamation League filed an amicus brief in federal court Monday supporting the state of Washingtons challenge to President Donald Trumps highly controversial immigration order. When America has closed its doors and allowed its core values to be compromised, the country later looked back in shame, said the groups CEO Jonathan Greenblatt in a statement. On Friday evening, a federal judge issued a nationwide restraining order against the ban, which suspended US entry for people from seven Muslim-majority nations for 90 days and froze the entire US refugee program for 120 days. It also blocked Syrians from entering the country indefinitely. The ruling by US District Judge James Robart was harshly criticized by the president, who referred to him in a tweet as a so-called judge and suggested the blame would fall on his shoulders if a terrorist attack ensued that cost American lives. Just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril, Trump posted on Sunday afternoon. If something happens blame him and the court system. People pouring in. Bad! US President Donald Trump speaks following a visit to the US Central Command and Special Operations Command at MacDill Air Force Base on February 6, 2017 in Tampa, Florida. (AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN) Trump administration officials have further said they plan to challenge the ruling vigorously, and on Monday evening, the Justice Department urged a federal court to reinstate the ban. The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is expected to rule at some point this week on the matter, before it is likely go to the Supreme Court in the months ahead. The ADLs amicus brief a legal document filed by non-litigants in appellate cases who have a stated interest in the ruling pointed to the history of Jewish refugees being denied entry onto Americas shores, including the denial of passengers of the MS St. Louis, a German ship filled with 937 Jewish refugees, who were denied entry into the United States in 1939. At other times, when prejudice and fear predominate over reason and compassion, we falter, often with devastating consequences, as set forth below in connection with the St. Louis tragedy, the brief said. The ADL, a Jewish civil rights organization that monitors and combats anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry around the globe, also cited the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II following the attacks on Pearl Harbor The document closes by saying the current travel ban risks once again sacrificing the nations core values in favor of prejudice and fear a sacrifice that history has repeatedly proven has profound consequences both to the persons who suffer as a result and to the still-vibrant vision of the shining city on the hill.

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February 6, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Pepe the Frog Declared Hate Symbol by Anti-Defamation …

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has declared a popular internet meme depicting a cartoon frog to be a hate symbol. Pepe the Frog’s beginnings were unoffensive: he is the creation of comic book creator Matt Furie , who featured the frog as a character in the series Boy’s Club beginning in 2005. The character subsequently became a beloved meme, often called the “sad frog meme” and shared with a speech bubble reading “Feels good man” or “Feels bad man.” It was at times posted on social media by the likes of Katy Perry and Nicki Minaj. But recently, as the Daily Beast reported in May, the character has been co-opted by a faction of Internet denizens who decided to reclaim it from the mainstream, and began sharing it in anti-Semitic contexts. “Images of the frog, variously portrayed with a Hitler-like moustache, wearing a yarmulke or a Klan hood, have proliferated in recent weeks in hateful messages aimed at Jewish and other users on Twitter,” the ADL wrote in a statement . “Once again, racists and haters have taken a popular Internet meme and twisted it for their own purposes of spreading bigotry and harassing users,” wrote ADL CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt. Earlier this year, the ADL added the (((echo))) symbol to its Hate on Display database, noting that members of the alt-right movement were using it to single out Jewish users, particularly journalists, on social media.

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February 6, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League chief apologises for Holocaust comment – thenews.pl

PR dla Zagranicy Pawe Kononczuk 05.02.2017 14:38 Polands ambassador to the US has accepted an apology by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) over claims regarding Polands stance on the Holocaust. Ambassador Piotr Wilczek said on Saturday he was satisfied with a letter of apology sent to him by the Leagues CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, who had reportedly alleged that Poland refuses to publicly acknowledge Adolf Hitler’s attempt to exterminate Jews. American broadcaster CNN last week published comments attributed to Greenblatt, citing him as saying that many countries Iran, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, for example specifically refuse to acknowledge Hitlers attempt to exterminate Jews. CNN quoted Greenblatt as saying that those countries opted instead to talk about generic suffering rather than recognising this catastrophic incident for what it was: the intended genocide of the Jewish people. In the letter to the Polish ambassador, Greenblatt admitted that he had made a mistake by including Poland among such countries. He said he regretted his remarks and stressed he had not intended to offend the Polish government or society. He also said that the ADL had given support to the Polish governments campaign to rectify inaccurate expressions such as “Polish death camps”, recurring in Western media outlets. Both Wilczek and Greenblatt expressed hope for continuing dialogue between Warsaw and the Jewish rights organisation. (mo/pk)

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February 5, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Hell Storm Documentary Post Hitler Nazi Germany 1945 — Hiter Nazi Revisionism

SHUT IT DOWN, NOW!BIG VICTORY!! We got this video censored in 25% of the world’s countries by relentlessly pressuring YouTube and Governments around the world to Censor and suppress this video. 25% down, 75% to go, help us get this video deleted, blocked and banned everywhere in the world, we have had great success so […]

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February 4, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, AIPAC, Anti Racism, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism Lobby, Anti-Semitism News, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Censorship, Discrimination News, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Crimes, Hate Speech, Hitler, Holocaust, Holocaust Denial, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust Revisionism, Hush Crimes, Israel, Israeli Lobby, Jewish, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Judaism, Misc, Multicultural News, Neo Nazi, Race Relations, Racism News, Racist News, Simon Wiesenthal, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC, White Nationalism, White Power, White Privilege, White Racism, White Supremacism, World War II, Zionism  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Tracking Disturbing Uptick In Houston … – Houston Public Media

The group says its been a long time since it has seen this number of hate incidents so close together in the Houston area. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) says its working with law enforcement to respond to recent hate-related incidents in the greater Houston area. The group is tracking what it calls a disturbing uptick in displays of hate speech after four incidents in the past week in Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery Counties. Swastikas were found painted on fences, racist flyers appeared at a home and at Rice University, and a group of high school students in Cypress gave an apparent Nazi salute during a class photo. The ADLs Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross says he hopethis isnt part of a growing trend, but says its been a long time since his groups seen this number of hate incidents so close together. Within the first two months of 2017, weve already had 25 incidents, he says. The ADL says it typically deals with about 30-40 such incidents over an entire year. Gross says its hard to attribute the increase to any one factor, but the ADL believes its at least partlytied to the recent election. Since the election of President Donald Trump, extremists in this country have felt emboldened, Gross says. The group is encouraging people to report these kind of acts, while the school district in Cypress says it will discipline some of the students involved in that incident. The Harris County Sheriffs Office says it hasnt seen any trend of local hate incidents, though some have been reported to deputies. Each incident is investigated to determine if there is evidence of a crime, the sheriffs office says.

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February 3, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Polish ambassador slams Anti-Defamation League claims on Holocaust – thenews.pl

Polands ambassador in Washington has slammed claims that Poland refuses to publicly acknowledge Hitler’s attempt to exterminate Jews in WWII. On Monday, American broadcaster CNN published comments attributed to Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, an NGO that aims to fight defamation of Jews. Greenblatt told CNN that so many countries Iran, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, for example specifically refuse to acknowledge Hitlers attempt to exterminate Jews, the broadcaster said on Monday. CNN quoted Greenblatt as saying that those countries opted instead to talk about generic suffering rather than recognising this catastrophic incident for what it was: the intended genocide of the Jewish people. On Sunday, The Washington Post daily wrote: Russia and Poland are also known to ignore the Jewish dimension of the Holocaust in public statements. Polish ambassador to the US, Piotr Wilczek, said: Such statements are not only false but hurtful to the Polish people. In a statement requesting Greenblatt’s claims be withdrawn, Wilczek said that during World War II, the Polish government-in-exile told the UN that the German authorities aim with systematic deliberation at the total extermination of the Jewish population of Poland. The dispute comes days after International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which marks on 27 January the liberation of Auschwitz, a German Nazi death camp. Wilczek added that Polands current administration also acknowledges the Jewish aspect of the Holocaust. During International Holocaust Remembrance Day commemorations, Polish presidential aide Wojciech Kolarski said: In Auschwitz, Germans carried out the mass murder of Jews. Kolarski added that the Germans goal [sic.] was the total extermination of the Jewish nation. The comments in American media followed US President Donald Trumps statement on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in which he said: It is with a heavy heart and sombre mind that we remember and honour the victims, survivors, heroes of the Holocaust. Critics pointed that Trump had omitted explicit mention of the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, adding that they had been acknowledged by previous US presidents. However, White House spokeswoman Hope Hicks said the statement aimed to take into account all of those who suffered, including five million non-Jews, CNN said. Among them were priests, gypsies, people with mental or physical disabilities, communists, trade unionists, Jehovahs Witnesses, anarchists, Poles and other Slavic peoples, and resistance fighters, Hicks said, according to CNN. (vb/rg) Source: cnn.com, washingtonpost.com, waszyngton.msz.gov.pl

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February 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League| Jewish Virtual Library

ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE (ADL). The Anti-Defamation League (originally “The Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith”) was founded in 1913 in reaction to the crude and overt antisemitism of the period, specifically to the Leo *Frank case. The ADL’s goal, as stated in the charter that established the League, is “to end the defamation of the Jewish people to secure justice and fair treatment for all citizens alike.” Originally headquartered in Chicago, the offices of the League are in New York City. The ADL works out of 31 regional offices located throughout the United States. The ADL has as well a cooperative relationship with the B’nai B’rith Canadian office, an office in Jerusalem, and representation in Rome and Moscow. The ADL is governed by a National Commission of 700. Unlike the *American Jewish Congress , *American Jewish Committee , and other community relations organizations, the ADL is not a membership organization. It has evolved from being a commission of its parent body to an organization with independent board and fundraising structures, and in reality is fully autonomous. The ADL is staffed by career professionals who are specialists in various disciplines related to community relations: religions, law, communications, promotion, education, labor, foreign affairs (especially Israel and the Middle East), social sciences, politics (national and local), and government. The ADL recognizes threats to Jewish security coming from an antisemitism that appears in new forms and guises, such as anti-Israel activity and radicalism of the right and left. The League views itself as being an “active” organization, responding in a timely manner to what are perceived to be threats to the rights and security of Jews. It sees itself as taking a pragmatic, rather than an ideological, approach to issues. The ADL, by virtue of its budget and its varied activity, is considered to be a significant voice among the community relations agencies. The ADL’s initial efforts focused on the blatant antisemitism of the pre- and post-World War I period, which included restricted neighborhoods and resorts, jobs, and schools that rejected Jews. (For example, model legislation drafted by the ADL helped unmask the Ku Klux Klan and drastically diminish its power.) The ADL’s focus, however, in its early decades was not on legal remedies against discrimination but on countering defamation of Jews. For example, the League exposed the vicious antisemitism of the Dearborn Independent, which printed and circularized the infamous Protocols of Zion, and extracted an apology and retraction from its publisher, Henry Ford. Throughout the 1930s the League fought and exposed the many hate groups which sprang up during the Depression and the Hitler period, such as the Christian Front, the Silver Shirts, and the German-American Bund. Particularly in the post-World War II period, the ADL was successful in advocating on behalf of legislation against such discrimination. It also dealt with vulgar stereotypes and caricatures of Jews on the stage and in communication media and with incidents of antisemitic vandalism, and played a role in strengthening interfaith and interracial relationships. In the 1960s, the ADL played a role in the successful coalitional effort that resulted in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and of subsequent fair-housing and voting-rights laws. The ADL’s sponsorship of a comprehensive study of the roots of prejudice (the seven-volume University of California Five-Year Study of Antisemitism in the United States the “Berkeley Studies”) helped create a new climate of interreligious understanding and ecumenism, and was a factor in the deliberations of Vatican II that led to the watershed document Nostra Aetate, which re-defined the Catholic Church’s attitude toward Jews. On the international scene, advocacy on behalf of the State of Israel and other involvement in Middle East issues became, especially after 1967, an ADL priority. The League carries out an education and action program to help mold public opinion and exposes and counteracts Arab propaganda; ADL led the effort which resulted in the passage of anti-boycott legislation and worked within the European Economic Community to counter the boycott. The League is also active in protecting and securing the rights of Jews wherever they are in danger, and played an important role in the Soviet Jewry movement. Interreligious activities as well have been an important part of the ADL agenda. During the 1970s, in response to what it then characterized as “the new antisemitism,” which derived less from overt expression and more from apathy and insensitivity to Jews and to Jewish concerns and problems, including Israel, the ADL re-contoured its approaches to antisemitism. A major prejudice-reduction program, “A World of Difference,” has been an ADL centerpiece since the early 1990s, as has been Holocaust education. Convinced that preferential treatment will destroy equality of opportunity and selection based upon merit, the League’s position on affirmative action is nuanced in terms of ADL’s opposition to the re-emergence of quotas. The ADL’s traditional ideology was that aggressive use of litigation and other legal remedies to counter discrimination and church-state violations was too confrontational and would ultimately damage the constructive relationships that Jews had built up with other faith communities over the years. From its earliest years the ADL, unlike its sister “defense” agencies, rejected advocating on behalf of antidiscrimination legislation, and instead focused on combating prejudice and defamation. The League’s national director until 1947, Richard E. Gustadt, articulated the view that held that intergroup negotiation and education programs emphasizing cultural pluralism offered the best chances to remedy societal abuses. Certain societal evils could not, in the view of the ADL, be eliminated, only tempered. This view (shared in large measure by the American Jewish Committee) marked a fundamental ideological difference with the American Jewish Congress, which believed in direct legal action. From the late 1940s until the late 1970s the ADL was led by a tandem of Benjamin Epstein and Arnold Forster, who together began aggressively prosecuting a civil rights agenda for the League. Beginning in the early 1980s, however, with a marked shift in the national public policy agenda back to church-state and other First Amendment matters, there was again a shift in the priorities of the ADL. During the tenure of national director Nathan Perlmutter additional legal expertise and resources were added to the agency’s staff (the ADL’s litigation capacity dated back to the late 1940s and was a result of the decision by the American Jewish Congress to organize its Commission on Law and Social Action), and the League became an aggressive “player” in the church-state arena. During this period there was a certain degree of de-emphasis of the traditional civil rights agenda, resulting in large measure from antisemitism within some black civil rights groups. Even with a new emphasis placed on church-state separation and other legal matters, the ADL always viewed church-state concerns to be but one of several major civil rights and liberties issues on its organizational palette, which includes countering racial supremacist organizations, judicial remedies for “hate crimes,” and discrimination and harassment. Changes within the organization arising out of exogenous factors did not mean that the ADL intended to abandon its charter purpose of public response to anti-Jewish defamation. From the mid-1980s, under the stewardship of Abraham H. *Foxman , the ADL has become one of the most “visible” national Jewish organizations on the American and indeed international scene. Although viewed as increasingly conservative in some areas of activity, the reality is that the ADL has carved a highly nuanced political path, especially on Israel-related issues, threading its way skillfully between agencies such as the rightist Zionist Organization of America and Jewish groups of the left. This “centrist” approach has been evident in a range of domestic public affairs issues as well. Newer areas of activity for the ADL include threats of global antisemitism, “hate” activity on the Internet, working with law-enforcement agencies, a new generation of church-state situations, and balancing traditional civil liberties concerns with those of national and local security. The ADL has commissioned a series of public opinion surveys, both in the United States and in Europe, which have elicited valuable data on antisemitic attitudes and on attitudes toward Israel. The core mission of the ADL to combat antisemitism remains as it has been. The related mission of the League working for justice for all has in the view of the ADL not only intrinsic value but instrumental value as well, as it assists in the ADL’s core mission. In terms of institutional considerations, until the early 1980s the leading “defense” agency, in terms of budget and stature, was the American Jewish Committee; the annual budgets of the two agencies were at approximate parity, at around $12 million. The ADL budget ($5.5 million in 1971) began increasing in the 1980s at approximately $3 million per year in that decade, and soon far outstripped the other “defense” agencies, reaching some $30 million by the early 1990s and approximately $60 million by 2005. The League’s staff and programmatic initiatives have increased commensurately. Also important in terms of institutional dynamics is the ADL’s relationship with *B’nai B’rith . The ADL began life as a commission of B’nai B’rith, but tensions developed between the two agencies as B’nai B’rith was reshaping itself from being primarily a fraternal and service organization to one that addresses community relations issues. In the mid-to-late 1990s the issue with B’nai B’rith came to a head, with B’nai B’rith itself seeking finally to reshape its own identity asserted that its community relations and “defense” agenda would be pursued aggressively. The ADL, maintaining that it was B’nai B’rith’s “defense” arm, in effect severed its ties with its erstwhile parent. (The ADL does retain a de jure legal connection with B’nai B’rith.)

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January 31, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed


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