Archive for the ‘Anti-Defamation League’ Category

Anti-Defamation League: Trump Not Directly Addressing Anti-Semitism Is ‘Mind-Boggling’ – Mediaite

For the second day in a row, President Trump addressed anti-Semitism during a press conference and also for the second day in a row, the Anti-Defamation League was stunned by the way he handled it.

Yesterday, Trump started off his answer to a question about anti-Semitism by invoking his electoral college win. The ADL responded in a tweet that it was troubling he didnt condemn the real issue of anti-Semitism in America today.

Well, today Trump got another question on the matter. The reporter brought up recent bomb threats against Jewish centers across the country and other anti-Semitic acts going on. Trump immediately scolded the reporter, told him to sit down and said, I am the least anti-Semitic person that youve ever seen in your entire life.

ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt and ADL National Chair Marvin Nathan issued the following statement in response:

On two separate occasions over the past two days, President Trump has refused to say what he is going to do about rising anti-Semitism or to even condemn it. It is mind-boggling why President Trump prefers to shout down a reporter or brush this off as a political distraction. This is not a partisan issue. Its a potentially lethal problem and its growing.

In light of the bomb scares, online harassment, physical vandalism, death threats and other hate crimes, there is a simple question at hand that Americans of all faiths deserve an answer to what is the Trump Administration going to do about the recent surge of anti-Semitism? What concrete steps will the White House take to address intolerance?

We are going to keep asking these questions and urge others in the press and public to do so as well until we get a clear answer from our President.

[image via screengrab]

Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Continue reading here:
Anti-Defamation League: Trump Not Directly Addressing Anti-Semitism Is ‘Mind-Boggling’ – Mediaite

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Outdoors: Join the ‘winter anti-defamation league’ – Albany Times Union

A child takes a ride on Napa Kiikku at Lapland Lake Nordic Center in Northville. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

A child takes a ride on Napa Kiikku at Lapland Lake Nordic Center in Northville. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Little Wren makes a point to Gillian Scott, likely about cookies, while snowshoeing in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Little Wren makes a point to Gillian Scott, likely about cookies, while snowshoeing in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Mike tracks in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Mike tracks in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Mike tracks enter a stream at the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Mike tracks enter a stream at the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union)

Outdoors: Join the ‘winter anti-defamation league’

My wife, Gillian, and 7-year-old foster daughter, Little Wren, ate pieces of warm zucchini bread as the first flakes came. I sipped coffee and watched through our big kitchen window as the snow fell faster.

Sunday, the day of rest, enforced by winter. It’s been a long time since we’ve had a storm like that, with the building anticipation that feels like an event, a spontaneous nature-created holiday. We stocked up on soup, hot chocolate and movies for a day of hibernation, but Gillian, still able to save her soul, made it to church.

The Sunday before the storm, the three of us skied in Northville. Little Wren was caught up in the children’s program at Lapland Lake, so for a while I skied alone through silent woods. I returned to find her and the other kids on a Napa Kiikku, the Finnish phrase for a sled attached to a long wooden pole that slides kids across a small icy pond at surprisingly high speed. The year was 2017, but if it weren’t for their clothing, just looking at them sliding around on the ice, it could have been 1917 or 1817.

On cold, winter days when I was Little Wren’s age, I remember my grandfather getting weather reports from our relatives in different towns. On days it was below zero, he would compare the temperature of our little Catskill Mountain town with their temperatures. On snowy days, he would compare snowfall totals. He was disappointed if someone else had colder temperatures or more snow. This is where I come from.

A quarter of our calendar is winter, a quarter of our lives. Too much of our time to wish away.

I won’t try to sell winter, because I know not many would buy. We tend to forget the cold, clear, star-filled nights and the snow-covered trees. But we remember the frozen windshields and cold feet.

Hollywood doesn’t help. Happy life is California sunshine, and screenwriters only reach for our weather to illustrate desperation: The white walkers of “Game of Thrones” or Leonardo DiCaprio in the cold, Canadian wilderness in “The Revenant.” Most of the scenes in “Fargo,” all of the scenes in “Affliction” … the list goes on.

There’s no joy in snowville.

The frozen tide might be turning, however, going by the pogie index. (Pogies are those handwarmers you attach to your bike handlebars to keep your hands warm in the cold.) Fat-tire bikes, originally spawned in Alaska, are becoming more popular.

Gear is on our side, too. Winter clothing, skis, boots and snowshoes are all lighter, better and cheaper than ever.

Gillian, Little Wren and I have joined the cause and formed our own little “winter anti-defamation league”. Before last weekend’s snow, we enlisted Gillian’s father for a snowshoe through Schenectady County’s Plotterkill Preserve.

I’ve climbed the 46 highest Adirondack peaks in winter, but keeping a 7-year-old moving might be a bigger challenge. I consider mentioning Sisu, a Finnish word that roughly translates as a combination of courage, perseverance and fighting spirit. Instead, we just made promises about cookies.

The Plotterkill snow told stories. Footprints showed where a mink had jumped from the cold, fast water of the stream into the snow without the benefit of a towel or hair dryer. A fox climbed under a pile of downed logs. Some snowshoers tried to climb a bank that was too steep and fell down, sliding on their behinds like oversized otters.

We moved together through the forest, three generations of winter anti-defamation leaguers. The trees were draped with snow, the air cold and fresh as only winter air can be. The year was 2017, but except for our clothes, it could have been 1917 or 1817.

Back at home the next day, we built competing snow forts in the backyard. Gillian escaped for a peaceful ski on the unplowed streets while Little Wren and I heaved fluffy snowballs at each other from behind the snow walls.

The winter anti-defamation league reconvened back in the kitchen. We sipped hot chocolate and looked out the same kitchen window as winter continued decorating the landscape on the other side of the glass. We accepted this quarter of our lives for what it was; snowpants, Sorrell boots and wet gloves drying on the chair. We didn’t wish for anything else.

hterns@timesunion.com

Read the original here:
Outdoors: Join the ‘winter anti-defamation league’ – Albany Times Union

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Honors New Yorker Who Led Fellow Passengers to Scrub Swastikas from Subway Car – PEOPLE.com


PEOPLE.com
AntiDefamation League Honors New Yorker Who Led Fellow Passengers to Scrub Swastikas from Subway Car
PEOPLE.com
Manhattan sous-chef Jared Nied was honored by the AntiDefamation League on Wednesday for leading a group of New Yorkers in removing anti-Semitic graffiti on a subway car. Nied boarded an uptown subway on Feb. 4 when he noticed swastikas drawn …
NY commuter who led cleanup of anti-Semitic graffiti receives ADL awardJvhri

all 2 news articles »

Go here to see the original:
Anti-Defamation League Honors New Yorker Who Led Fellow Passengers to Scrub Swastikas from Subway Car – PEOPLE.com

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

The Anti-Defamation League Has Responded to Trump’s ‘Troubling’ Comments on Anti-Semitism – Mediaite

During a joint press conference withIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahuearlier today,Donald Trump responded to a question about rising anti-Semitism through his campaign and under his administration by talking about how he won the election. Yeah, once again, he responded to a question by bragging about his Electoral College votes from three months ago.

Obviously, his maneuvering of the topic from a rise in religiously-motivated hatred and attacks to his own successes set off a firestorm on cable news and Twitter. Now, the Anti-Defamation League, which has been working to counter the rise in hate directed at Jews and other minorities in recent months, has released a statement.

Following a string of tweets praising Trump for strengthening the bond between the United States and Israel and pointing out the importance of the two-state solution, they said this:

The incident is reminiscent of the White Houses refusal to acknowledge Jews during the presidents speech to honor Holocaust Remembrance Day a few weeks ago.

Further, this is not the first time the ADL has had to publicly express displeasure with the way Trump references or, in this case, doesnt reference Jewish people.

[image via screengrab]

Lindsey: Twitter. Facebook.

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Read the original post:
The Anti-Defamation League Has Responded to Trump’s ‘Troubling’ Comments on Anti-Semitism – Mediaite

Fair Usage Law

February 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

ADL to honor commuter who cleaned anti-Semitic subway graffiti – Arutz Sheva

The New York commuter who led several others on a Manhattan subway to clean away anti-Semitic graffiti with hand sanitizer is being honored by the Anti-Defamation League.

Jared Nied, 37, will receive ADLs Stand Up New Yorker Award, which recognizes city residents for taking immediate action to help those being singled out for bigotry, or initiating efforts to denounce hate. Evan Bernstein, director of the ADL New York region, will present Nied with the award on Wednesday.

Nied’s actions went viral after one of the commuters described the scene from the night of Feb. 4 on Facebook.

The train was silent as everyone stared at each other, uncomfortable and unsure what to do, Gregory Locke wrote in his post. One guy got up and said, Hand sanitizer gets rid of Sharpie. We need alcohol. He found some tissues and got to work.

Nied, who works as a sous chef in New York, also posted about the incident on Facebook that night.

“Sitting across from this … stay classy, New York,” read the post, which included a photo of some of the graffiti. It read “Destroy Israel Heil Hitler” and included a swastika.

The post continued: “VERY IMPORTANT EDIT – hand sanitizer and tissues will totally erase sharpie graffiti. Share and spread the word!”

The following day Nied posted: “Bewildered, confused and pleasantly shocked doesn’t even begin to describe this … never in a million years did I think anybody would record my moment, let alone that it would explode like this. I’m honestly not sure what to say other than that I was just doing the right thing, the thing that needed to be done.”

Here is the original post:
ADL to honor commuter who cleaned anti-Semitic subway graffiti – Arutz Sheva

Fair Usage Law

February 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

NY commuter who led cleanup of anti-Semitic subway graffiti to … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

(JTA) The New York commuter who led several others on a Manhattan subway to clean away anti-Semitic graffiti with hand sanitizer is beinghonored by the Anti-Defamation League.

Jared Nied, 37, will receive ADLs Stand Up New Yorker Award, which recognizes city residents for taking immediate action to help those being singled out for bigotry, or initiating efforts to denounce hate. Evan Bernstein, director of the ADL New York region, will present Nied with the award on Wednesday.

Nieds actions went viral after one of the commuters described the scene from the night of Feb. 4 on Facebook.

The train was silent as everyone stared at each other, uncomfortable and unsure what to do, Gregory Locke wrote in his post. One guy got up and said, Hand sanitizer gets rid of Sharpie. We need alcohol. He found some tissues and got to work.

Nied, who works as a sous chef in New York, also posted about the incident on Facebook that night.

Sitting across from this stay classy, New York, read the post, which included a photo of some of the graffiti. It read Destroy Israel Heil Hitler and included a swastika.

The post continued: VERY IMPORTANT EDIT hand sanitizer and tissues will totally erase sharpie graffiti. Share and spread the word!

The following day Niedposted: Bewildered, confused and pleasantly shocked doesnt even begin to describe this never in a million years did I think anybody would record my moment, let alone that it would explode like this. Im honestly not sure what to say other than that I was just doing the right thing, the thing that needed to be done.

Follow this link:
NY commuter who led cleanup of anti-Semitic subway graffiti to … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

Fair Usage Law

February 14, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Va. ACLU opposes bill to protect businesses that deny service to same sex couples – WRIC

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) The Anti-Defamation League, Jewish Community Relations Council and Americans United for Separation of Church and State, along with the ACLU of Virginia, are trying to block a religious protection bill from passing. HB2025 would protect faith leaders from punishment if they deny services to same-sex couples.

This would allow any religious based organization to discriminate on someone based on the moral or religious belief that same-sex marriage is wrong, said Bill Farrar with Virginias ACLU. That is clearly unconstitutional and discrimination; you cant deny a service to someone just because of that.

The bill passed the House of Delegates last week and is headed for the Senate. Some activists interpret the bill to include church-operated schools or hospitals, allowing them to cut off hospital visitation rights for same-sex couples, or to deny school enrollment for children of same-sex parents.

According to the letter, the bill would sanction discrimination against LGBT Virginiansincluding by government contractors, grantees in performing publicly funded services and in places of public accommodation, and interfere with their fundamental right to marry. Freedom of religion is a core American value.

Those in support of the legislation say its a matter of following deeply held religious beliefs.

This bill ensures religious charities can continue their services and not be punished by the government because their faith happens to teach a definition of marriage that differs from the governments, said Chris Freund, a spokesman for the Family Foundation. What they dont want is to be forced to violate their conscience.

The bill is set to be heard Monday, during the senate Committee on General Laws and Technology.

Never miss another Facebook post from 8News

Find 8News onTwitter,Facebook, andInstagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.

Go here to see the original:
Va. ACLU opposes bill to protect businesses that deny service to same sex couples – WRIC

Fair Usage Law

February 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League welcomes Pope’s condemnation of anti-Semitism – Catholic Culture

Catholic World News

February 10, 2017

Following a February 9 audience with Pope Francis, the Anti-Defamation League welcomed the Popes denunciation of anti-Semitism.

We know you understand and share our concern about the resurgence of anti-Semitism, especially in Europe, said Jonathan Greenblatt, the organizations CEO.

We share your concern about the horrendous persecution of ethnic and cultural minorities, many of them Christians, he added. Indeed, we are troubled that the world seems not to pay enough attention to this tragic situation.

Greenblatt also praised the Pope for his advocacy on behalf of refugees.

References:

Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in.

All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off!

There are no comments yet for this item.

View post:
Anti-Defamation League welcomes Pope’s condemnation of anti-Semitism – Catholic Culture

Fair Usage Law

February 10, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 6 a.m.

Swastikas spray-painted on fences and signs in Sienna Plantation. Students saluting Adolf Hitler during Cypress-Ranch High School’s senior class picture day. Racist and anti-Semitic fliers distributed at universities and in neighborhoods across Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties. All of that happened in just one week, leading the Anti-Defamation League’s Houston branch to issue a statement Friday about the uptick since the start of the year.

According to ADL’s Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross, the Southwest Region usually sees 30 to 40 hate-related incidents per year. So far, the ADL has counted 25 since the start of the year.

There has been a disturbing uptick in the number of apparent hate incidents since the Presidential election, Gross said in a statement. We are working hard to respond to these incidents, and we hope they are not part of a growing trend.”

Gross told the Houston Press via email that the ADL tracks the incidents as they are reported in news media or when they receive tips and investigate the incidents on their own accord. “Generally if hate symbols, signs or language are involved, these incidents are classified as hateful incidents,” he said of the ADL’s criteria.

While the ADL doesn’t speculate about the cause of such a drastic increase, Gross said the perpetrators used Trump signage or identified themselves as Trump supporters.

Last week, the Press talked to the group behind the distribution of white nationalist flyers at Rice University, called American Vanguard, whose Texas leader told us that Trump was helping their cause, no matter how he may try to distance himself from white supremacist groups. The fliers, which the ADL cited in its release, encouraged people to defend the white race, which American Vanguard believes is undergoing a slow and steady genocide (let us clarify for the record: “Genocide” is their word, not ours). The recruitment fliers said things like “We have a right to exist” and “Defending your people is a social duty.” Others at Texas universities appeared Trump-inspired:”What Made America Great? Blood and soil. Keep it that way, join the Vanguard.”

“Trump is a representation of white America whether he likes it or whether he knows it or not,” said the leader of American Vanguard’s Texas chapter, who said it’s the Vanguard’s policy to always be anonymous for safety purposes. “I think what he’s doing is… uh… he’s kind of defending it. Not explicitly, but he’s doing things that are helpful for it.”

In a Sienna Plantation neighborhood in Fort Bend County, multiple homeowners found swastikas spray-painted on their fences and garages. One homeowner found a Trump-Pence campaign sign, with a swastika painted over it, tacked onto his fence as well. As KTRK reported, the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident as a hate crime.

That same week, a seemingly large group of students at Cypress-Ranch High School reportedly yelled “Heil Hitler!” and “Heil Trump” during a senior photo, throwing up the Nazi salute. One student emailed photos to KPRC, telling the news station that it appeared that roughly 70 students participated. Cy-Ranch administrators said those students would be disciplined, and addressed the student body and parents in lengthy statements.

“This inappropriate gesture is symbol of a horrible time in the world, in which countless human atrocities occurred,” Principal Bob Hull said in a statement, which you can view in full here.”This gesture invokes strong emotion and symbolizes hate that crosses all genders, races and cultural lines. …I am disheartened that this group are members of our senior class.”

Gross said that ADL has offered assistance to law enforcement, educators and victims in the areas where these hate-related incidents occurred, offering educational materials or training wherever needed.

“We continue to do what we always have done, which is to educate against the dangers of hatred and promote diversity and respect. Our staff has stepped up efforts to prevent and to respond acts of hate and will continue to do so as needed.”

Read more here:
Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

Fair Usage Law

February 7, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League: Trump Not Directly Addressing Anti-Semitism Is ‘Mind-Boggling’ – Mediaite

For the second day in a row, President Trump addressed anti-Semitism during a press conference and also for the second day in a row, the Anti-Defamation League was stunned by the way he handled it. Yesterday, Trump started off his answer to a question about anti-Semitism by invoking his electoral college win. The ADL responded in a tweet that it was troubling he didnt condemn the real issue of anti-Semitism in America today. Well, today Trump got another question on the matter. The reporter brought up recent bomb threats against Jewish centers across the country and other anti-Semitic acts going on. Trump immediately scolded the reporter, told him to sit down and said, I am the least anti-Semitic person that youve ever seen in your entire life. ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt and ADL National Chair Marvin Nathan issued the following statement in response: On two separate occasions over the past two days, President Trump has refused to say what he is going to do about rising anti-Semitism or to even condemn it. It is mind-boggling why President Trump prefers to shout down a reporter or brush this off as a political distraction. This is not a partisan issue. Its a potentially lethal problem and its growing. In light of the bomb scares, online harassment, physical vandalism, death threats and other hate crimes, there is a simple question at hand that Americans of all faiths deserve an answer to what is the Trump Administration going to do about the recent surge of anti-Semitism? What concrete steps will the White House take to address intolerance? We are going to keep asking these questions and urge others in the press and public to do so as well until we get a clear answer from our President. [image via screengrab] Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Outdoors: Join the ‘winter anti-defamation league’ – Albany Times Union

A child takes a ride on Napa Kiikku at Lapland Lake Nordic Center in Northville. (Herb Terns / Times Union) A child takes a ride on Napa Kiikku at Lapland Lake Nordic Center in Northville. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Little Wren makes a point to Gillian Scott, likely about cookies, while snowshoeing in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Little Wren makes a point to Gillian Scott, likely about cookies, while snowshoeing in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Mike tracks in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Mike tracks in the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Mike tracks enter a stream at the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Mike tracks enter a stream at the Plotterkill Preserve. (Herb Terns / Times Union) Outdoors: Join the ‘winter anti-defamation league’ My wife, Gillian, and 7-year-old foster daughter, Little Wren, ate pieces of warm zucchini bread as the first flakes came. I sipped coffee and watched through our big kitchen window as the snow fell faster. Sunday, the day of rest, enforced by winter. It’s been a long time since we’ve had a storm like that, with the building anticipation that feels like an event, a spontaneous nature-created holiday. We stocked up on soup, hot chocolate and movies for a day of hibernation, but Gillian, still able to save her soul, made it to church. The Sunday before the storm, the three of us skied in Northville. Little Wren was caught up in the children’s program at Lapland Lake, so for a while I skied alone through silent woods. I returned to find her and the other kids on a Napa Kiikku, the Finnish phrase for a sled attached to a long wooden pole that slides kids across a small icy pond at surprisingly high speed. The year was 2017, but if it weren’t for their clothing, just looking at them sliding around on the ice, it could have been 1917 or 1817. On cold, winter days when I was Little Wren’s age, I remember my grandfather getting weather reports from our relatives in different towns. On days it was below zero, he would compare the temperature of our little Catskill Mountain town with their temperatures. On snowy days, he would compare snowfall totals. He was disappointed if someone else had colder temperatures or more snow. This is where I come from. A quarter of our calendar is winter, a quarter of our lives. Too much of our time to wish away. I won’t try to sell winter, because I know not many would buy. We tend to forget the cold, clear, star-filled nights and the snow-covered trees. But we remember the frozen windshields and cold feet. Hollywood doesn’t help. Happy life is California sunshine, and screenwriters only reach for our weather to illustrate desperation: The white walkers of “Game of Thrones” or Leonardo DiCaprio in the cold, Canadian wilderness in “The Revenant.” Most of the scenes in “Fargo,” all of the scenes in “Affliction” … the list goes on. There’s no joy in snowville. The frozen tide might be turning, however, going by the pogie index. (Pogies are those handwarmers you attach to your bike handlebars to keep your hands warm in the cold.) Fat-tire bikes, originally spawned in Alaska, are becoming more popular. Gear is on our side, too. Winter clothing, skis, boots and snowshoes are all lighter, better and cheaper than ever. Gillian, Little Wren and I have joined the cause and formed our own little “winter anti-defamation league”. Before last weekend’s snow, we enlisted Gillian’s father for a snowshoe through Schenectady County’s Plotterkill Preserve. I’ve climbed the 46 highest Adirondack peaks in winter, but keeping a 7-year-old moving might be a bigger challenge. I consider mentioning Sisu, a Finnish word that roughly translates as a combination of courage, perseverance and fighting spirit. Instead, we just made promises about cookies. The Plotterkill snow told stories. Footprints showed where a mink had jumped from the cold, fast water of the stream into the snow without the benefit of a towel or hair dryer. A fox climbed under a pile of downed logs. Some snowshoers tried to climb a bank that was too steep and fell down, sliding on their behinds like oversized otters. We moved together through the forest, three generations of winter anti-defamation leaguers. The trees were draped with snow, the air cold and fresh as only winter air can be. The year was 2017, but except for our clothes, it could have been 1917 or 1817. Back at home the next day, we built competing snow forts in the backyard. Gillian escaped for a peaceful ski on the unplowed streets while Little Wren and I heaved fluffy snowballs at each other from behind the snow walls. The winter anti-defamation league reconvened back in the kitchen. We sipped hot chocolate and looked out the same kitchen window as winter continued decorating the landscape on the other side of the glass. We accepted this quarter of our lives for what it was; snowpants, Sorrell boots and wet gloves drying on the chair. We didn’t wish for anything else. hterns@timesunion.com

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Honors New Yorker Who Led Fellow Passengers to Scrub Swastikas from Subway Car – PEOPLE.com

PEOPLE.com Anti – Defamation League Honors New Yorker Who Led Fellow Passengers to Scrub Swastikas from Subway Car PEOPLE.com Manhattan sous-chef Jared Nied was honored by the Anti – Defamation League on Wednesday for leading a group of New Yorkers in removing anti-Semitic graffiti on a subway car. Nied boarded an uptown subway on Feb. 4 when he noticed swastikas drawn … NY commuter who led cleanup of anti-Semitic graffiti receives ADL award Jvhri all 2 news articles »

Fair Usage Law

February 16, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

The Anti-Defamation League Has Responded to Trump’s ‘Troubling’ Comments on Anti-Semitism – Mediaite

During a joint press conference withIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahuearlier today,Donald Trump responded to a question about rising anti-Semitism through his campaign and under his administration by talking about how he won the election. Yeah, once again, he responded to a question by bragging about his Electoral College votes from three months ago. Obviously, his maneuvering of the topic from a rise in religiously-motivated hatred and attacks to his own successes set off a firestorm on cable news and Twitter. Now, the Anti-Defamation League, which has been working to counter the rise in hate directed at Jews and other minorities in recent months, has released a statement. Following a string of tweets praising Trump for strengthening the bond between the United States and Israel and pointing out the importance of the two-state solution, they said this: The incident is reminiscent of the White Houses refusal to acknowledge Jews during the presidents speech to honor Holocaust Remembrance Day a few weeks ago. Further, this is not the first time the ADL has had to publicly express displeasure with the way Trump references or, in this case, doesnt reference Jewish people. [image via screengrab] Lindsey: Twitter. Facebook. Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Fair Usage Law

February 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

ADL to honor commuter who cleaned anti-Semitic subway graffiti – Arutz Sheva

The New York commuter who led several others on a Manhattan subway to clean away anti-Semitic graffiti with hand sanitizer is being honored by the Anti-Defamation League. Jared Nied, 37, will receive ADLs Stand Up New Yorker Award, which recognizes city residents for taking immediate action to help those being singled out for bigotry, or initiating efforts to denounce hate. Evan Bernstein, director of the ADL New York region, will present Nied with the award on Wednesday. Nied’s actions went viral after one of the commuters described the scene from the night of Feb. 4 on Facebook. The train was silent as everyone stared at each other, uncomfortable and unsure what to do, Gregory Locke wrote in his post. One guy got up and said, Hand sanitizer gets rid of Sharpie. We need alcohol. He found some tissues and got to work. Nied, who works as a sous chef in New York, also posted about the incident on Facebook that night. “Sitting across from this … stay classy, New York,” read the post, which included a photo of some of the graffiti. It read “Destroy Israel Heil Hitler” and included a swastika. The post continued: “VERY IMPORTANT EDIT – hand sanitizer and tissues will totally erase sharpie graffiti. Share and spread the word!” The following day Nied posted: “Bewildered, confused and pleasantly shocked doesn’t even begin to describe this … never in a million years did I think anybody would record my moment, let alone that it would explode like this. I’m honestly not sure what to say other than that I was just doing the right thing, the thing that needed to be done.”

Fair Usage Law

February 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

NY commuter who led cleanup of anti-Semitic subway graffiti to … – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

(JTA) The New York commuter who led several others on a Manhattan subway to clean away anti-Semitic graffiti with hand sanitizer is beinghonored by the Anti-Defamation League. Jared Nied, 37, will receive ADLs Stand Up New Yorker Award, which recognizes city residents for taking immediate action to help those being singled out for bigotry, or initiating efforts to denounce hate. Evan Bernstein, director of the ADL New York region, will present Nied with the award on Wednesday. Nieds actions went viral after one of the commuters described the scene from the night of Feb. 4 on Facebook. The train was silent as everyone stared at each other, uncomfortable and unsure what to do, Gregory Locke wrote in his post. One guy got up and said, Hand sanitizer gets rid of Sharpie. We need alcohol. He found some tissues and got to work. Nied, who works as a sous chef in New York, also posted about the incident on Facebook that night. Sitting across from this stay classy, New York, read the post, which included a photo of some of the graffiti. It read Destroy Israel Heil Hitler and included a swastika. The post continued: VERY IMPORTANT EDIT hand sanitizer and tissues will totally erase sharpie graffiti. Share and spread the word! The following day Niedposted: Bewildered, confused and pleasantly shocked doesnt even begin to describe this never in a million years did I think anybody would record my moment, let alone that it would explode like this. Im honestly not sure what to say other than that I was just doing the right thing, the thing that needed to be done.

Fair Usage Law

February 14, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Va. ACLU opposes bill to protect businesses that deny service to same sex couples – WRIC

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) The Anti-Defamation League, Jewish Community Relations Council and Americans United for Separation of Church and State, along with the ACLU of Virginia, are trying to block a religious protection bill from passing. HB2025 would protect faith leaders from punishment if they deny services to same-sex couples. This would allow any religious based organization to discriminate on someone based on the moral or religious belief that same-sex marriage is wrong, said Bill Farrar with Virginias ACLU. That is clearly unconstitutional and discrimination; you cant deny a service to someone just because of that. The bill passed the House of Delegates last week and is headed for the Senate. Some activists interpret the bill to include church-operated schools or hospitals, allowing them to cut off hospital visitation rights for same-sex couples, or to deny school enrollment for children of same-sex parents. According to the letter, the bill would sanction discrimination against LGBT Virginiansincluding by government contractors, grantees in performing publicly funded services and in places of public accommodation, and interfere with their fundamental right to marry. Freedom of religion is a core American value. Those in support of the legislation say its a matter of following deeply held religious beliefs. This bill ensures religious charities can continue their services and not be punished by the government because their faith happens to teach a definition of marriage that differs from the governments, said Chris Freund, a spokesman for the Family Foundation. What they dont want is to be forced to violate their conscience. The bill is set to be heard Monday, during the senate Committee on General Laws and Technology. Never miss another Facebook post from 8News Find 8News onTwitter,Facebook, andInstagram; send your news tips to iReport8@wric.com.

Fair Usage Law

February 11, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League welcomes Pope’s condemnation of anti-Semitism – Catholic Culture

Catholic World News February 10, 2017 Following a February 9 audience with Pope Francis, the Anti-Defamation League welcomed the Popes denunciation of anti-Semitism. We know you understand and share our concern about the resurgence of anti-Semitism, especially in Europe, said Jonathan Greenblatt, the organizations CEO. We share your concern about the horrendous persecution of ethnic and cultural minorities, many of them Christians, he added. Indeed, we are troubled that the world seems not to pay enough attention to this tragic situation. Greenblatt also praised the Pope for his advocacy on behalf of refugees. References: Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in. All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off! There are no comments yet for this item.

Fair Usage Law

February 10, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed

Anti-Defamation League Reports Striking Uptick in "Hate-Related Incidents" in Houston – Houston Press

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 6 a.m. Swastikas spray-painted on fences and signs in Sienna Plantation. Students saluting Adolf Hitler during Cypress-Ranch High School’s senior class picture day. Racist and anti-Semitic fliers distributed at universities and in neighborhoods across Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties. All of that happened in just one week, leading the Anti-Defamation League’s Houston branch to issue a statement Friday about the uptick since the start of the year. According to ADL’s Southwest Regional Director Dayan Gross, the Southwest Region usually sees 30 to 40 hate-related incidents per year. So far, the ADL has counted 25 since the start of the year. There has been a disturbing uptick in the number of apparent hate incidents since the Presidential election, Gross said in a statement. We are working hard to respond to these incidents, and we hope they are not part of a growing trend.” Gross told the Houston Press via email that the ADL tracks the incidents as they are reported in news media or when they receive tips and investigate the incidents on their own accord. “Generally if hate symbols, signs or language are involved, these incidents are classified as hateful incidents,” he said of the ADL’s criteria. While the ADL doesn’t speculate about the cause of such a drastic increase, Gross said the perpetrators used Trump signage or identified themselves as Trump supporters. Last week, the Press talked to the group behind the distribution of white nationalist flyers at Rice University, called American Vanguard, whose Texas leader told us that Trump was helping their cause, no matter how he may try to distance himself from white supremacist groups. The fliers, which the ADL cited in its release, encouraged people to defend the white race, which American Vanguard believes is undergoing a slow and steady genocide (let us clarify for the record: “Genocide” is their word, not ours). The recruitment fliers said things like “We have a right to exist” and “Defending your people is a social duty.” Others at Texas universities appeared Trump-inspired:”What Made America Great? Blood and soil. Keep it that way, join the Vanguard.” “Trump is a representation of white America whether he likes it or whether he knows it or not,” said the leader of American Vanguard’s Texas chapter, who said it’s the Vanguard’s policy to always be anonymous for safety purposes. “I think what he’s doing is… uh… he’s kind of defending it. Not explicitly, but he’s doing things that are helpful for it.” In a Sienna Plantation neighborhood in Fort Bend County, multiple homeowners found swastikas spray-painted on their fences and garages. One homeowner found a Trump-Pence campaign sign, with a swastika painted over it, tacked onto his fence as well. As KTRK reported, the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident as a hate crime. That same week, a seemingly large group of students at Cypress-Ranch High School reportedly yelled “Heil Hitler!” and “Heil Trump” during a senior photo, throwing up the Nazi salute. One student emailed photos to KPRC, telling the news station that it appeared that roughly 70 students participated. Cy-Ranch administrators said those students would be disciplined, and addressed the student body and parents in lengthy statements. “This inappropriate gesture is symbol of a horrible time in the world, in which countless human atrocities occurred,” Principal Bob Hull said in a statement, which you can view in full here.”This gesture invokes strong emotion and symbolizes hate that crosses all genders, races and cultural lines. …I am disheartened that this group are members of our senior class.” Gross said that ADL has offered assistance to law enforcement, educators and victims in the areas where these hate-related incidents occurred, offering educational materials or training wherever needed. “We continue to do what we always have done, which is to educate against the dangers of hatred and promote diversity and respect. Our staff has stepped up efforts to prevent and to respond acts of hate and will continue to do so as needed.”

Fair Usage Law

February 7, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."