Archive for the ‘Anti-Jewish’ Category

Presidents George Bush and GW Bush issue joint statement condemning racism and anti-Semitism – Vox

Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush, the last two Republican commanders in chief before Trump, just put out a strong joint statement on the violence that took place in Charlottesville over the weekend, condemning hatred in all its forms.

America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all its forms, the statement reads. We are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights, they continued, referencing the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson, who was famously a resident in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The timing of the statement is interesting. After all, just yesterday President Donald Trump answered questions about the violence in Charlottesville during an infrastructure press conference where he defended the alt-right and equated neo-Nazis to leftist activist groups.

What about the fact that [the alt-left] came charging with clubs in their hands swinging clubs? Do they have any problem? Trump said. You had a group on one side that was bad. You had a group on the other side that was also very violent.

Instead of blaming both sides like Trump has the Bushes specifically call out racism and anti-Jewish sentiment. Those feelings were a feature among those rallying to keep Robert E. Lees statue up in Charlottesville rather than those countering their protest.

The Bushes and Trump might be from the same party, but they clearly view what happened in Charlottesville in very different and moral ways. Even other prominent GOPers, like Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Sen. Marco Rubio, put out their own statements calling out white supremacists.

You can read the full, short statement below from the Bushes below:

America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all its forms. As we pray for Charlottesville, we are reminded of the fundamental truths recorded by that citys most prominent citizen in the Declaration of Independence: we are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable right. We know these truths to be everlasting because we have seen the decency and greatness of our country.

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Presidents George Bush and GW Bush issue joint statement condemning racism and anti-Semitism – Vox

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Trump’s stance on Virginia violence shocks America’s allies – Reuters

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Can the Washington Post Google Anti-Jewish Incitement? – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Can the Washington Post Google Anti-Jewish Incitement?” to a friend

The old Washington Post building in Washington, DC. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

A July 27, 2017,Washington Postreportminimized both Palestinian anti-Jewish violence, as well as the Jewish peoples connection to their ancestral homelandofIsrael.

The dispatch, filed by Jerusalem bureau chief William Booth and reporter Ruth Eglash, was ostensibly about Palestinian attacks regardingthe Al-Aqsa Mosque, which sits near the Temple Mount, Judaisms holiest site. Yetperhaps in keeping with Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) mediaguidelines the article failed to inform readers that the Temple Mount is the holiest site in Jewish religion and tradition.

Instead, Booth and Eglash blandly note the esplanade on which al-Aqsa stands is considered holy by both Muslims, who call it the Noble Sanctuary, and by Jews, who refer to it as the Temple Mount. In addition to a false equivocation, this omits an important fact: that the Al-Aqsa Mosque has only in recent years been referred to as the third holiest site in Islam.

As the historian Daniel Pipes highlighted in theMiddle East Quarterly in 2001:

Jerusalem appears in the Jewish Bible 669 times and Zion (which usually means Jerusalem, sometimes the Land of Israel) 154 times, or 823 times in all. The Christian Bible mentions Jerusalem 154 times and Zion 7 times. In contrast, the columnist Moshe Kohn notes, Jerusalem and Zion appear as frequently in the Quran as they do in the Hindu Bhagavad-Gita, the Taoist Tao-Te Ching, the Buddhist Dhamapada and the Zoroastrian Zend Avesta which is to say, not once.

Pipesnotedthat the importance of the Al-Aqsa Mosque in the Islamic faith is largely due to it being located in a city controlled by non-Muslims. In fact, when under Muslim control, Jerusalem was often treated as a backwater by ruling Islamic authorities, according to Pipes.

The scholar also pointed out that the mosques prominence in recent Islamic traditions rests, in part, on the mistaken belief that it is the furthest mosque described in a Koranic passage that was revealed in the year 621. However, at that time according to Pipes furthest mosque was a turn of phrase, not a place and Palestine had not yet been conquered by the Muslims and contained not a single mosque.

The Postreport also contained some selective quotations to match its misleading interpretation of history.

The paper noted that Palestinians celebrated the Israeli authorities decision to remove metal detectors that were installednear the Temple Mount after a July 14 terror attack in which three Arab-Israelis murdered two Israeli policemen with weapons hidden in the mosque.The Postclaimed that, with news of the victory, Muslims flooded the 37-acre holy complex singing victory songs and chanting God is great.

Yet, this was not the only phrase being chanted. As the Jerusalem Postnoted, one of the common Palestinian chants heard in Jerusalem after the metal detectors were removed was Khaybar, Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud. Translated, this means Remember Khaybar, you Jews, the army of Muhammad is returninga reference to a battle and massacre of Jews in the seventh century.

TheWashington Postalso cited Mohammed Hussein, who it identified as Jerusalems Grand Mufti and a spiritual leader and custodian of the mosque. Booth and Eglash stated that Hussein urged Muslims on Thursday to return to their shrine for worship, declaring the crisis over. Yet, the paper neglected to inform its readers about Husseins history of calling for anti-Jewish violence.

As Palestinian Media Watch (PMW) haspointed out, this spiritual leader preached at the Al-Aqsa Mosque in 2010 that Jews are the enemies of Allah. In a January9, 2012, sermon show on official PA TV, Hussein also quoted thehadith(sayings and actions attributed to Muhammad) as follows: The Hour [of Resurrection] will not come until you fight the Jews. The Jew will hide behind stones or trees. Then the stones or trees will call: Oh Muslim, servant of Allah, there is a Jew behind me, come and kill him.

The Postomitted all of this while discussing the custodians comments. By contrast, it identified a democratically elected Israeli politician, Naftali Bennett, as hard-line.

Whats old is wrong again

In its story, the paper also uncritically quoted the father of Omar al-Abed, a Palestinian who murdered three innocent Israeli civilians in Halamish on July 21brutally stabbing them to death as they prepared for a Shabbat dinner. Al-Abeds father claimed that a short video clip on Al Jazeera, which purports to show Israeli police officers kicking a Palestinian kneeling on a prayer rug drove his son to murder.

Butthis is false.

As the Postitself noted in a July 25dispatch(A young Palestinian vowed to die a martyr, then stabbed 3 members of an Israeli family to death), al-Abeds own comments on Facebook prior to the attackwhich included calling Jews pigs and monkeyssuggest that he was committing murder, in part, due to the Palestinian Authoritys (PA) employment of the so-called Al-Aqsa libel. As CAMERA hasstated, this is the lieoften propagated by Palestinian leaders that Jews seek to destroy, defile, or change the status-quo at the Temple Mount. This libel is often seen as a call to violence against Jews and Israelis.

In the PostsJuly 25, report, Jerusalem bureau chief Booth pointed out that al-Abeds Facebook post stated All I have is a sharpened knife and it answers for al-Aqsa, and that al-Abeds father claimed, All of us would die for al-Aqsa and that many Palestinians support his son because what he did was for al-Aqsa. That article also discussedwith skepticismclaims by al-Abeds father that his son purposefully spared children in the July 21, 2017, attack. In that article, thePost wrote that,Survivors of the attack said Abed did no such thing.

This raises the question: Why did thePostdecide to suddenly omit this crucial information about the Al-Aqsa libeland to treat al-Abeds father as a reliable source in its July 27 article? Whatever the reason, its a clear failure of journalistic due diligence.

More snark, less journalism

Similarly, treating Al Jazeera uncritically is another marked failure in the Post story. As CAMERA has documented, Al Jazeera is a tool of the state of Qatar. The Arabic outletfrequently disregards accuracy, incites anti-Jewish violence and, not coincidentally, attacks enemies of the Qatari state. As the analyst and journalist Clifford Maynotedin a July 25, 2017Washington Timesarticle:

Among Al Jazeeras brightest TV stars is Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. He has praised Imad Mughniyah, the Hezbollah terrorist mastermind behind the 1983 suicide bombings in Beirut, in which 241 USMarines were killed. He once issued a fatwa, a religious opinion, calling for the abduction and killing of Americans in Iraq.

Sheikh Qaradawi favors the spread of Islam until it conquers the entire world and includes both the East and West [marking] the beginning of the return of the Islamic Caliphate. Hitler, he has said, deserves praise for having managed to put [Jews] in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hands of the [Muslims].

Yet, instead of highlighting Al Jazeeras documented history of inciting violence and praising terrorism (as noted in US Congressionaltestimony, among elsewhere) or discussing the fact that itsmasterQatar is a state-sponsor of US-designated terror groups,includingHamas thePosttreated Israeli claims that Al Jazeera was used for incitement with unveiled derision.

Citing Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus vow to shut down the Jerusalem office of Al Jazeera, for broadcasting images of what he called incitement, the Postwrote:

Netanyahus [press] bureau declined to give specific examples of the Al Jazeera content that might have stoked tensions. Asked for a specific example, a communications adviser in Netanyahus office suggested that reporters scroll through Google.

This snarkyand unprofessional delivery omits a key reality thatthePostignores: Examples of anti-Jewish incitementby Al Jazeera, Palestinian leaders (spiritual and otherwise) and others are abundant. CAMERA hasdocumentedthem before,including in correspondence sent tothe Post. They are easily found via Google, on websites like CAMERAs,PMWs, and elsewhere.

Yet, many major USnews outlets,thePostforemost among them, neglect or refuse to report this incitement. The papers July 27, report, with all of its lack of self-awareness, is a fine example of the outlets willful blindness.

This article was originally published by CAMERA here.

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Can the Washington Post Google Anti-Jewish Incitement? – Algemeiner

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Why Can’t I Find One High-Profile Celebrity Who Acknowledged The Anti-Semitism In Charlottesville? – Forward

Getty Images

Ku Klux Klan members carrying Confederate flags display anti-Semitic signs

It was a scene from every Jewish American childs personal nightmares men flooding the streets of an American city chanting anti-Jewish threats, flanked by policemen for protection. The President refusing for several days to specifically condemn the people holding torches and chanting Jews will not replace us. People wearing swastikas and doing Nazi salutes in broad daylight. Twitter swelling, even beyond its usual capacity, with the basest of hatred towards Jews.

At times like these, we look to celebrities and public figures as both a comfort and a barometer of public opinion. Celebrities are people we have anointed as human idols and accepted as tastemakers; they also depend entirely on public good will and act as a mirror of our collective desires and tastes.

So why did no major celebrities reference the acts of anti-Jewish terrorism that took place in Charlottesville this weekend?

Make no mistake, the white supremacy movement and the alt-right gathering in Charlottesville were explicit attacks against people of color and specifically black people. The event was designed as a protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, the Confederate general who exemplifies what we often pretend is not true: that racism has long been an American value. The weekend was an explicit attack on black people. Every public figure can and should condemn this violent racism publicly.

But without taking one single thing away from Black, Brown, and queer people, why isnt it possible for celebrities to stand up and say, This anti-Jewish hatred is unacceptable? Why cant they say, I stand with Jews everywhere?

Celebrity remarks on Charlottesville, unsurprisingly, are largely absent of references towards race or religion. Major stars like Lady Gaga tweeted that people should help and be kind, adding, this is not us. Kim Kardashian sent general prayers to those in Charlottesville & every American who is the target of hate and violence. It should shock no one that beloved entertainers erred on the side of banal when confronted with Americas most painful problems.

But many celebrities did address targeted minority groups. They just didnt mention Jews. Demi Lovato tweeted to her 46.9 million followers, Black, Muslim, gay, bisexual, trans, etc. you are perfect the way you are and you ARE LOVED. Jessica Alba Instagrammed an image and the words, Racism and bigotry does not merely exist on the faces of the terrorists marching in Charlottesville. (There are no male celebrities mentioned in this article because the most-followed men on Twitter who are not Barack Obama – Justin Bieber, Justin Timberlake, Cristiano Ronaldo, and Jimmy Fallon – said nothing about Charlottesville at all.) And many celebrities wrote stirring, necessary responses to racism. But nobody mentioned Jews.

Public disavowals of anti-Semitism were hard to find on the internet this week, but there were a few. Angela Merkel, a woman who knows her history, condemned the naked racism, anti-Semitism, and hate on display in Charlottesville. Human rights activist Shaun King, who is known specifically for anti-racist activism, made room to mention threats against Jews in his tweets. And like it or not, one of the highest profile people who condemned hatred against Jews was the activist Linda Sarsour.

Almost more terrifying than the pretense that Jews were not directly threatened and endangered by the events in Charlottesville are the many responses to the event that implicate the Holocaust but erase the Jews. In a piece for Refinery 29, Lily Herman pointed out Olivia Wildes Instagram response, which encouraged support for two groups: immigrants and African Americans. Wilde called for the protection of the potential victims of the alt-right. She called the events unvarnished Naziism. She did everything except mention the word Jew. Bernie Sanders, who perhaps more than Wilde is reasonably expected to call things what they are, tweeted that the events were a provocative effort by Neo-Nazis to foment racism and hatred and create violence. But what about the efforts of Neo-Nazis to foment anti-Semitism? Call it out for what it is, Sanders tweeted, with no hint of irony. Besides, is a person wearing a swastika, doing a Nazi salute, and chanting Jews, Jews, Jews really a neo anything? What is this reticence to name things when it comes to talking about anti-Semitism?

The Holocaust is a staple of pop culture. It is evergreen, inexhaustible tragedy porn. It is a font of entertainment. Americans are aware of and educated about the Holocaust compared to every other tragedy throughout history directly because of its role as a storytelling genre. Americans have been entertained and moved by the Holocaust our entire lives. So why, as Nazis begin to gather publicly, is it so hard for our most beloved pop culture leaders to label them for what they are?

The use of the word Nazi and references to the Holocaust as a comparison for, rather than an explanation for, what is happening right now is a strange trend. Many seem to see the hatred and violence gaining traction now as a new brand of Naziism – one that targets race instead of religion. That interpretation reveals the impoverishment of our cultural understanding of the Nazis. The Nazis always targeted multiple groups. The Nazis always discriminated on the basis of race and ethnicity. Just ask African Germans. Just ask Romani people.

Just ask Jews.

Jenny Singer is a writer for the Forward. You can reach her at Singer@forward.com or on Twitter @jeanvaljenny

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Why Can’t I Find One High-Profile Celebrity Who Acknowledged The Anti-Semitism In Charlottesville? – Forward

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Why am I not surprised by displays of anti-Semitism in Sweden? – Ynetnews

Why am I not surprised by the anti-Jewish protest held last week in the town of Helsingborg in southern Sweden? I wrote “anti-Jewish” and not “anti-Israel” because the main slogans that were shouted theresuch as “the Jews are offspring of apes and pigs”have nothing to do with the Middle East. This is blatant anti-Semitism of the ugliest kind.

Even though one should not generalizeobviously, not all Swedes are anti-Semites or Israel hatersthere is another reason why I’m not surprised by the anti-Semitic displays in Sweden.

During World War II, for a long time, the “neutral” Sweden refused to take in some 7,700 Jews from Denmark, which had been conquered by Hitler’s forces, and save them from being sent to extermination camps. It was only after great efforts by influential figures that Sweden finally agreed, near the end of 1943, to take in Denmark’s Jews.

Denmark was the only conquered country in which almost all of its citizens, including King Christian and the royal family, sought to aid Jews and hide them. After receiving the okay from Sweden, they smuggled some 7,200 Jews and some 700 of their non-Jewish relatives to the neighboring country in an organized operation that lasted for three weeks in ships, motorboats, and smaller boats. Some 500 Jews who were unable to escapemostly the elderly and invalidwere caught and sent to the Theresienstadt concentration camp in German-occupied Czechoslovakia.

Anti-Israel protest in Malm

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Why am I not surprised by displays of anti-Semitism in Sweden? – Ynetnews

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Conservative Street Artist Banned From Facebook For Dropping F-Bomb On Zuckerberg – Forward

The question of what constitutes hate speech on social media platforms is a hot topic du jour. Posting an exposed female nipple on Instagram? Hell no. Using Twitter to threaten nuclear war that would end civilization as we know it? Fair game.

The most recent controversy comes with the banning of conservative street artist, Sabo, from Facebook after he plastered posters that read F*ck Zuck 2020 around California. While Facebook has not confirmed that this specific move is to blame for deactivating Sabos artist fan page, its the last post the artist shared before receiving the news.

Sabo, WHO TWEETS IN ALL CAPS LIKE THIS, put out a call for donations in the aftermath of the ban.

Sabos website, Unsavory Agents, paints a picture of Sabo as a lone wolf conservative, shunned by the radical street artists of the left and disappointed by the milquetoast Republican Party. A description of the artist on his website reads:

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Sabo said of Zuckerberg, Hes not only a thief, hes thin-skinned.

Despite identifying as unapologetically politically incorrect, Sabo has publicly disavowed the alt-right.

Becky Scott is the editor of The Schmooze. Follow her on Twitter, @arr_scott

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Conservative Street Artist Banned From Facebook For Dropping F-Bomb On Zuckerberg – Forward

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Exhibition on Slovak State now online and in English – The Slovak Spectator

Those, who missed the Dream vs. Reality exhibition can view it online.

Art, propaganda and history about Slovakia during the years of 1939 to 1945 can be found online at sen x skutonos (Dream vs. Reality). The project of the Slovak National Gallery (SNG) which accompanied an exhibition of the same name is no longer running its exhibition, but an online version will be available in Slovak and English.

The web site has lots of texts, pictures, photos and audio shows what was happening in the Slovak State that was a satellite of then-Nazi Germany. This era belongs among the most complicated of Slovak history, the introduction of the web site reads.

]We want a wide public to have the possibility to read this story, stated SNG, as quoted by the SITA newswire. SNG believes that people from abroad will also read the texts.

Those who did not visit the exhibition now have a chance to use a service at Web umenia (Web of art). This online catalogue of fine arts from Slovak galleries offers a virtual view of exhibitions with 360-degree panorama and zoom function.

The exhibition lasted from late October to February and was the both the largest and most complicated exhibition SNG has ever held. More than 40 galleries, museums, archives and owners of private collection across Slovakia collaborated to present 1,200 art pieces showing the status, appearance and function of art and propaganda during the Slovak State.

Paintings, sculptures, drawing, graphics, photos, films and design complemented the expert texts. A special 400-page catalogue was published to accompany the exhibition.

The art exhibition also displayed photos from the celebration of the 53rd birthday of Adolf Hitler in front of the national theatre in Bratislava, citizens heiling to the state anthem during Labour Day, anti-Jewish caricatures and drawings made by Jozef Fedor in a concentration camp.

15. Aug 2017 at 6:06 |Compiled by Spectator staff

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Exhibition on Slovak State now online and in English – The Slovak Spectator

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Van Jones: "An American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi … This is not a time to talk about … – Media Matters for America


Media Matters for America
Van Jones: “An American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi … This is not a time to talk about
Media Matters for America
But this is a day in which after an American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi. A Nazi, who the day before had been marching with torches down American streets saying anti-Jewish, anti-black stuff, and then an American — this not a
'An American was assassinated!': Van Jones smacks down ex-Trump adviser defending president's commentsRaw Story
Van Jones powerfully condemns Trump: Both sides are not mowing people down with carsShareblue Media

all 3 news articles »

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Van Jones: "An American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi … This is not a time to talk about … – Media Matters for America

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KING: Charlottesville is an ugly reminder racism thrives in 2017 – NY … – New York Daily News

Dressed in khakis and polos, bearing torches, donning Nazi memorabilia, and chanting anti-black, anti-LGBT, anti-Jewish, anti-Muslim, and anti-immigrant chants, white supremacist bigots have descended on Charlottesville, Va., in droves. (JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS)

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Updated: Saturday, August 12, 2017, 6:12 PM

If you ever wondered what it would be like to live in 1937 or 1957, you don’t have to look far. We are living in it.

America is an ugly place.

Dressed in khakis and polos, bearing torches, donning Nazi memorabilia, and chanting anti-black, anti-LGBT, anti-Jewish, anti-Muslim, and anti-immigrant chants, white supremacist bigots have descended on Charlottesville, Va., in droves in what may very well be the largest public demonstration of its kind in generations.

With almost no resistance from local police, these public bigots have marched and stomped all over town giving Nazi salutes while chanting “f— you, f—-ts.” They have yelled every racial slur imaginable and have done so with the full knowledge that they were being filmed. And that was all before someone used a car like a torpedo to plow into a crowd.

Melania Trump speaks out on Charlottesville before President

They don’t the mind the spotlight.

Why would they? Their President, who they love and adore, was voted into office in a white supremacist surge. They attended his rallies and events.

With every chance to specifically call out this bigotry and white supremacy on Twitter, Trump refused. In his speech he refused. The man is specific when he feels like it. Think of all of the people he has called out across the years, but now he can’t be specific because he knows these men are his base.

If Donald Trump can target and harass women, immigrants, Muslims, the disabled, the poor, and so many others with threats of physical violence and cruel insults and taunts, why can’t they?

White nationalist rally in Virginia triggers state of emergency

All of this hate, all of this ugliness, all of this bigotry and racism, didn’t come out of nowhere.

Yes, hate and bigotry are baked into the cake that is the United States of America, but ever since this nation, after electing 43 white men as President of the United States, opted to elect and re-elect Barack Hussein Obama, public bigotry and hate crimes have been on the rise.

Not only that, but for years now, Donald Trump has been at the center of that hate being the most visible spokesman for the racist birther movement that claimed President Obama was illegitimately elected because he’s not actually an American, but is a secret African or an undercover Muslim who was determined to ruin the nation from the inside.

No more famous American parroted the talking points of this movement than Donald Trump even going so far as to publicly claim he had dispatched private investigators to prove Obama was never born in Hawaii in the first place.

Here’s why Red Wings forced to denouce white nationalist group

Donald Trump has been an immoral, offensive man for decades, but it was not until he put the very humanity of Barack Obama in his crosshairs that he became a cult hero to white supremacists from coast to coast.

48 photos view gallery

Riding the wave of that newfound notoriety into the White House, Trump appointed two of the most bigoted men in the nation, Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, as his Chief Strategist and Chief Policy Advisor. When you choose to appoint men with lengthy, documented histories of bigotry, men so despicable that they probably could not pass through the human resources of a single Fortune 500 company, to some of the highest available positions within the White House, such a public embrace of bigotry has repercussions.

We are living through those repercussions right now.

This year is on pace to be the deadliest year ever measured for people killed by police in American history. The President of the United States casually announces bans on people be it Muslims, immigrants, and refugees from certain countries or transgender service members in the American military.

Tiki torch-wielding white nationalists roasted on Twitter

Every single leader I know and work alongside receives regular death threats. They are regularly called every foul, bigoted name imaginable. They are regularly lied on and subjected to some of the most heinous attack I’ve ever seen. This, too, is my reality.

Whatever you thought about 2017 in America, if ugliness, bigotry, and hatred aren’t at the center of your thoughts, then you should think again.

We are living in a dangerous, unstable time and I’m confident that Charlottesville isn’t an outlier, but an indicator of things to come.

If you ever wondered who you’d be or what’d you do if you were alive during other tumultuous periods in American history, just look at your life right now.

VIDEO: White nationalists march through UVA with torches

If you aren’t fighting back and speaking out right now, then that’s the best indicator of who you would’ve been back in the day. The good news is this: you can join the fight against bigotry and hate in America right now.

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KING: Charlottesville is an ugly reminder racism thrives in 2017 – NY … – New York Daily News

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Presidents George Bush and GW Bush issue joint statement condemning racism and anti-Semitism – Vox

Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush, the last two Republican commanders in chief before Trump, just put out a strong joint statement on the violence that took place in Charlottesville over the weekend, condemning hatred in all its forms. America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all its forms, the statement reads. We are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights, they continued, referencing the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson, who was famously a resident in Charlottesville, Virginia. The timing of the statement is interesting. After all, just yesterday President Donald Trump answered questions about the violence in Charlottesville during an infrastructure press conference where he defended the alt-right and equated neo-Nazis to leftist activist groups. What about the fact that [the alt-left] came charging with clubs in their hands swinging clubs? Do they have any problem? Trump said. You had a group on one side that was bad. You had a group on the other side that was also very violent. Instead of blaming both sides like Trump has the Bushes specifically call out racism and anti-Jewish sentiment. Those feelings were a feature among those rallying to keep Robert E. Lees statue up in Charlottesville rather than those countering their protest. The Bushes and Trump might be from the same party, but they clearly view what happened in Charlottesville in very different and moral ways. Even other prominent GOPers, like Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Sen. Marco Rubio, put out their own statements calling out white supremacists. You can read the full, short statement below from the Bushes below: America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all its forms. As we pray for Charlottesville, we are reminded of the fundamental truths recorded by that citys most prominent citizen in the Declaration of Independence: we are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable right. We know these truths to be everlasting because we have seen the decency and greatness of our country.

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Trump’s stance on Virginia violence shocks America’s allies – Reuters

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Can the Washington Post Google Anti-Jewish Incitement? – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Can the Washington Post Google Anti-Jewish Incitement?” to a friend The old Washington Post building in Washington, DC. Photo: Wikimedia Commons. A July 27, 2017,Washington Postreportminimized both Palestinian anti-Jewish violence, as well as the Jewish peoples connection to their ancestral homelandofIsrael. The dispatch, filed by Jerusalem bureau chief William Booth and reporter Ruth Eglash, was ostensibly about Palestinian attacks regardingthe Al-Aqsa Mosque, which sits near the Temple Mount, Judaisms holiest site. Yetperhaps in keeping with Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) mediaguidelines the article failed to inform readers that the Temple Mount is the holiest site in Jewish religion and tradition. Instead, Booth and Eglash blandly note the esplanade on which al-Aqsa stands is considered holy by both Muslims, who call it the Noble Sanctuary, and by Jews, who refer to it as the Temple Mount. In addition to a false equivocation, this omits an important fact: that the Al-Aqsa Mosque has only in recent years been referred to as the third holiest site in Islam. As the historian Daniel Pipes highlighted in theMiddle East Quarterly in 2001: Jerusalem appears in the Jewish Bible 669 times and Zion (which usually means Jerusalem, sometimes the Land of Israel) 154 times, or 823 times in all. The Christian Bible mentions Jerusalem 154 times and Zion 7 times. In contrast, the columnist Moshe Kohn notes, Jerusalem and Zion appear as frequently in the Quran as they do in the Hindu Bhagavad-Gita, the Taoist Tao-Te Ching, the Buddhist Dhamapada and the Zoroastrian Zend Avesta which is to say, not once. Pipesnotedthat the importance of the Al-Aqsa Mosque in the Islamic faith is largely due to it being located in a city controlled by non-Muslims. In fact, when under Muslim control, Jerusalem was often treated as a backwater by ruling Islamic authorities, according to Pipes. The scholar also pointed out that the mosques prominence in recent Islamic traditions rests, in part, on the mistaken belief that it is the furthest mosque described in a Koranic passage that was revealed in the year 621. However, at that time according to Pipes furthest mosque was a turn of phrase, not a place and Palestine had not yet been conquered by the Muslims and contained not a single mosque. The Postreport also contained some selective quotations to match its misleading interpretation of history. The paper noted that Palestinians celebrated the Israeli authorities decision to remove metal detectors that were installednear the Temple Mount after a July 14 terror attack in which three Arab-Israelis murdered two Israeli policemen with weapons hidden in the mosque.The Postclaimed that, with news of the victory, Muslims flooded the 37-acre holy complex singing victory songs and chanting God is great. Yet, this was not the only phrase being chanted. As the Jerusalem Postnoted, one of the common Palestinian chants heard in Jerusalem after the metal detectors were removed was Khaybar, Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud. Translated, this means Remember Khaybar, you Jews, the army of Muhammad is returninga reference to a battle and massacre of Jews in the seventh century. TheWashington Postalso cited Mohammed Hussein, who it identified as Jerusalems Grand Mufti and a spiritual leader and custodian of the mosque. Booth and Eglash stated that Hussein urged Muslims on Thursday to return to their shrine for worship, declaring the crisis over. Yet, the paper neglected to inform its readers about Husseins history of calling for anti-Jewish violence. As Palestinian Media Watch (PMW) haspointed out, this spiritual leader preached at the Al-Aqsa Mosque in 2010 that Jews are the enemies of Allah. In a January9, 2012, sermon show on official PA TV, Hussein also quoted thehadith(sayings and actions attributed to Muhammad) as follows: The Hour [of Resurrection] will not come until you fight the Jews. The Jew will hide behind stones or trees. Then the stones or trees will call: Oh Muslim, servant of Allah, there is a Jew behind me, come and kill him. The Postomitted all of this while discussing the custodians comments. By contrast, it identified a democratically elected Israeli politician, Naftali Bennett, as hard-line. Whats old is wrong again In its story, the paper also uncritically quoted the father of Omar al-Abed, a Palestinian who murdered three innocent Israeli civilians in Halamish on July 21brutally stabbing them to death as they prepared for a Shabbat dinner. Al-Abeds father claimed that a short video clip on Al Jazeera, which purports to show Israeli police officers kicking a Palestinian kneeling on a prayer rug drove his son to murder. Butthis is false. As the Postitself noted in a July 25dispatch(A young Palestinian vowed to die a martyr, then stabbed 3 members of an Israeli family to death), al-Abeds own comments on Facebook prior to the attackwhich included calling Jews pigs and monkeyssuggest that he was committing murder, in part, due to the Palestinian Authoritys (PA) employment of the so-called Al-Aqsa libel. As CAMERA hasstated, this is the lieoften propagated by Palestinian leaders that Jews seek to destroy, defile, or change the status-quo at the Temple Mount. This libel is often seen as a call to violence against Jews and Israelis. In the PostsJuly 25, report, Jerusalem bureau chief Booth pointed out that al-Abeds Facebook post stated All I have is a sharpened knife and it answers for al-Aqsa, and that al-Abeds father claimed, All of us would die for al-Aqsa and that many Palestinians support his son because what he did was for al-Aqsa. That article also discussedwith skepticismclaims by al-Abeds father that his son purposefully spared children in the July 21, 2017, attack. In that article, thePost wrote that,Survivors of the attack said Abed did no such thing. This raises the question: Why did thePostdecide to suddenly omit this crucial information about the Al-Aqsa libeland to treat al-Abeds father as a reliable source in its July 27 article? Whatever the reason, its a clear failure of journalistic due diligence. More snark, less journalism Similarly, treating Al Jazeera uncritically is another marked failure in the Post story. As CAMERA has documented, Al Jazeera is a tool of the state of Qatar. The Arabic outletfrequently disregards accuracy, incites anti-Jewish violence and, not coincidentally, attacks enemies of the Qatari state. As the analyst and journalist Clifford Maynotedin a July 25, 2017Washington Timesarticle: Among Al Jazeeras brightest TV stars is Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. He has praised Imad Mughniyah, the Hezbollah terrorist mastermind behind the 1983 suicide bombings in Beirut, in which 241 USMarines were killed. He once issued a fatwa, a religious opinion, calling for the abduction and killing of Americans in Iraq. Sheikh Qaradawi favors the spread of Islam until it conquers the entire world and includes both the East and West [marking] the beginning of the return of the Islamic Caliphate. Hitler, he has said, deserves praise for having managed to put [Jews] in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hands of the [Muslims]. Yet, instead of highlighting Al Jazeeras documented history of inciting violence and praising terrorism (as noted in US Congressionaltestimony, among elsewhere) or discussing the fact that itsmasterQatar is a state-sponsor of US-designated terror groups,includingHamas thePosttreated Israeli claims that Al Jazeera was used for incitement with unveiled derision. Citing Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus vow to shut down the Jerusalem office of Al Jazeera, for broadcasting images of what he called incitement, the Postwrote: Netanyahus [press] bureau declined to give specific examples of the Al Jazeera content that might have stoked tensions. Asked for a specific example, a communications adviser in Netanyahus office suggested that reporters scroll through Google. This snarkyand unprofessional delivery omits a key reality thatthePostignores: Examples of anti-Jewish incitementby Al Jazeera, Palestinian leaders (spiritual and otherwise) and others are abundant. CAMERA hasdocumentedthem before,including in correspondence sent tothe Post. They are easily found via Google, on websites like CAMERAs,PMWs, and elsewhere. Yet, many major USnews outlets,thePostforemost among them, neglect or refuse to report this incitement. The papers July 27, report, with all of its lack of self-awareness, is a fine example of the outlets willful blindness. This article was originally published by CAMERA here.

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Why Can’t I Find One High-Profile Celebrity Who Acknowledged The Anti-Semitism In Charlottesville? – Forward

Getty Images Ku Klux Klan members carrying Confederate flags display anti-Semitic signs It was a scene from every Jewish American childs personal nightmares men flooding the streets of an American city chanting anti-Jewish threats, flanked by policemen for protection. The President refusing for several days to specifically condemn the people holding torches and chanting Jews will not replace us. People wearing swastikas and doing Nazi salutes in broad daylight. Twitter swelling, even beyond its usual capacity, with the basest of hatred towards Jews. At times like these, we look to celebrities and public figures as both a comfort and a barometer of public opinion. Celebrities are people we have anointed as human idols and accepted as tastemakers; they also depend entirely on public good will and act as a mirror of our collective desires and tastes. So why did no major celebrities reference the acts of anti-Jewish terrorism that took place in Charlottesville this weekend? Make no mistake, the white supremacy movement and the alt-right gathering in Charlottesville were explicit attacks against people of color and specifically black people. The event was designed as a protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, the Confederate general who exemplifies what we often pretend is not true: that racism has long been an American value. The weekend was an explicit attack on black people. Every public figure can and should condemn this violent racism publicly. But without taking one single thing away from Black, Brown, and queer people, why isnt it possible for celebrities to stand up and say, This anti-Jewish hatred is unacceptable? Why cant they say, I stand with Jews everywhere? Celebrity remarks on Charlottesville, unsurprisingly, are largely absent of references towards race or religion. Major stars like Lady Gaga tweeted that people should help and be kind, adding, this is not us. Kim Kardashian sent general prayers to those in Charlottesville & every American who is the target of hate and violence. It should shock no one that beloved entertainers erred on the side of banal when confronted with Americas most painful problems. But many celebrities did address targeted minority groups. They just didnt mention Jews. Demi Lovato tweeted to her 46.9 million followers, Black, Muslim, gay, bisexual, trans, etc. you are perfect the way you are and you ARE LOVED. Jessica Alba Instagrammed an image and the words, Racism and bigotry does not merely exist on the faces of the terrorists marching in Charlottesville. (There are no male celebrities mentioned in this article because the most-followed men on Twitter who are not Barack Obama – Justin Bieber, Justin Timberlake, Cristiano Ronaldo, and Jimmy Fallon – said nothing about Charlottesville at all.) And many celebrities wrote stirring, necessary responses to racism. But nobody mentioned Jews. Public disavowals of anti-Semitism were hard to find on the internet this week, but there were a few. Angela Merkel, a woman who knows her history, condemned the naked racism, anti-Semitism, and hate on display in Charlottesville. Human rights activist Shaun King, who is known specifically for anti-racist activism, made room to mention threats against Jews in his tweets. And like it or not, one of the highest profile people who condemned hatred against Jews was the activist Linda Sarsour. Almost more terrifying than the pretense that Jews were not directly threatened and endangered by the events in Charlottesville are the many responses to the event that implicate the Holocaust but erase the Jews. In a piece for Refinery 29, Lily Herman pointed out Olivia Wildes Instagram response, which encouraged support for two groups: immigrants and African Americans. Wilde called for the protection of the potential victims of the alt-right. She called the events unvarnished Naziism. She did everything except mention the word Jew. Bernie Sanders, who perhaps more than Wilde is reasonably expected to call things what they are, tweeted that the events were a provocative effort by Neo-Nazis to foment racism and hatred and create violence. But what about the efforts of Neo-Nazis to foment anti-Semitism? Call it out for what it is, Sanders tweeted, with no hint of irony. Besides, is a person wearing a swastika, doing a Nazi salute, and chanting Jews, Jews, Jews really a neo anything? What is this reticence to name things when it comes to talking about anti-Semitism? The Holocaust is a staple of pop culture. It is evergreen, inexhaustible tragedy porn. It is a font of entertainment. Americans are aware of and educated about the Holocaust compared to every other tragedy throughout history directly because of its role as a storytelling genre. Americans have been entertained and moved by the Holocaust our entire lives. So why, as Nazis begin to gather publicly, is it so hard for our most beloved pop culture leaders to label them for what they are? The use of the word Nazi and references to the Holocaust as a comparison for, rather than an explanation for, what is happening right now is a strange trend. Many seem to see the hatred and violence gaining traction now as a new brand of Naziism – one that targets race instead of religion. That interpretation reveals the impoverishment of our cultural understanding of the Nazis. The Nazis always targeted multiple groups. The Nazis always discriminated on the basis of race and ethnicity. Just ask African Germans. Just ask Romani people. Just ask Jews. Jenny Singer is a writer for the Forward. You can reach her at Singer@forward.com or on Twitter @jeanvaljenny

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed

Why am I not surprised by displays of anti-Semitism in Sweden? – Ynetnews

Why am I not surprised by the anti-Jewish protest held last week in the town of Helsingborg in southern Sweden? I wrote “anti-Jewish” and not “anti-Israel” because the main slogans that were shouted theresuch as “the Jews are offspring of apes and pigs”have nothing to do with the Middle East. This is blatant anti-Semitism of the ugliest kind. Even though one should not generalizeobviously, not all Swedes are anti-Semites or Israel hatersthere is another reason why I’m not surprised by the anti-Semitic displays in Sweden. During World War II, for a long time, the “neutral” Sweden refused to take in some 7,700 Jews from Denmark, which had been conquered by Hitler’s forces, and save them from being sent to extermination camps. It was only after great efforts by influential figures that Sweden finally agreed, near the end of 1943, to take in Denmark’s Jews. Denmark was the only conquered country in which almost all of its citizens, including King Christian and the royal family, sought to aid Jews and hide them. After receiving the okay from Sweden, they smuggled some 7,200 Jews and some 700 of their non-Jewish relatives to the neighboring country in an organized operation that lasted for three weeks in ships, motorboats, and smaller boats. Some 500 Jews who were unable to escapemostly the elderly and invalidwere caught and sent to the Theresienstadt concentration camp in German-occupied Czechoslovakia. Anti-Israel protest in Malm

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed

Conservative Street Artist Banned From Facebook For Dropping F-Bomb On Zuckerberg – Forward

The question of what constitutes hate speech on social media platforms is a hot topic du jour. Posting an exposed female nipple on Instagram? Hell no. Using Twitter to threaten nuclear war that would end civilization as we know it? Fair game. The most recent controversy comes with the banning of conservative street artist, Sabo, from Facebook after he plastered posters that read F*ck Zuck 2020 around California. While Facebook has not confirmed that this specific move is to blame for deactivating Sabos artist fan page, its the last post the artist shared before receiving the news. Sabo, WHO TWEETS IN ALL CAPS LIKE THIS, put out a call for donations in the aftermath of the ban. Sabos website, Unsavory Agents, paints a picture of Sabo as a lone wolf conservative, shunned by the radical street artists of the left and disappointed by the milquetoast Republican Party. A description of the artist on his website reads: In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Sabo said of Zuckerberg, Hes not only a thief, hes thin-skinned. Despite identifying as unapologetically politically incorrect, Sabo has publicly disavowed the alt-right. Becky Scott is the editor of The Schmooze. Follow her on Twitter, @arr_scott

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed

Exhibition on Slovak State now online and in English – The Slovak Spectator

Those, who missed the Dream vs. Reality exhibition can view it online. Art, propaganda and history about Slovakia during the years of 1939 to 1945 can be found online at sen x skutonos (Dream vs. Reality). The project of the Slovak National Gallery (SNG) which accompanied an exhibition of the same name is no longer running its exhibition, but an online version will be available in Slovak and English. The web site has lots of texts, pictures, photos and audio shows what was happening in the Slovak State that was a satellite of then-Nazi Germany. This era belongs among the most complicated of Slovak history, the introduction of the web site reads. ]We want a wide public to have the possibility to read this story, stated SNG, as quoted by the SITA newswire. SNG believes that people from abroad will also read the texts. Those who did not visit the exhibition now have a chance to use a service at Web umenia (Web of art). This online catalogue of fine arts from Slovak galleries offers a virtual view of exhibitions with 360-degree panorama and zoom function. The exhibition lasted from late October to February and was the both the largest and most complicated exhibition SNG has ever held. More than 40 galleries, museums, archives and owners of private collection across Slovakia collaborated to present 1,200 art pieces showing the status, appearance and function of art and propaganda during the Slovak State. Paintings, sculptures, drawing, graphics, photos, films and design complemented the expert texts. A special 400-page catalogue was published to accompany the exhibition. The art exhibition also displayed photos from the celebration of the 53rd birthday of Adolf Hitler in front of the national theatre in Bratislava, citizens heiling to the state anthem during Labour Day, anti-Jewish caricatures and drawings made by Jozef Fedor in a concentration camp. 15. Aug 2017 at 6:06 |Compiled by Spectator staff Thank you for singing up. Shortly an email will be sent to the address you provided to verify your e-mail. Error! Please try to register again later, your e-mail was not registered. Your email is not in a correct format.

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed

Van Jones: "An American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi … This is not a time to talk about … – Media Matters for America

Media Matters for America Van Jones: “An American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi … This is not a time to talk about … Media Matters for America But this is a day in which after an American citizen was assassinated in broad daylight by a Nazi. A Nazi, who the day before had been marching with torches down American streets saying anti-Jewish , anti-black stuff, and then an American — this not a … 'An American was assassinated!': Van Jones smacks down ex-Trump adviser defending president's comments Raw Story Van Jones powerfully condemns Trump: Both sides are not mowing people down with cars Shareblue Media all 3 news articles »

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August 13, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed

KING: Charlottesville is an ugly reminder racism thrives in 2017 – NY … – New York Daily News

Dressed in khakis and polos, bearing torches, donning Nazi memorabilia, and chanting anti-black, anti-LGBT, anti-Jewish, anti-Muslim, and anti-immigrant chants, white supremacist bigots have descended on Charlottesville, Va., in droves. (JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS) NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Updated: Saturday, August 12, 2017, 6:12 PM If you ever wondered what it would be like to live in 1937 or 1957, you don’t have to look far. We are living in it. America is an ugly place. Dressed in khakis and polos, bearing torches, donning Nazi memorabilia, and chanting anti-black, anti-LGBT, anti-Jewish, anti-Muslim, and anti-immigrant chants, white supremacist bigots have descended on Charlottesville, Va., in droves in what may very well be the largest public demonstration of its kind in generations. With almost no resistance from local police, these public bigots have marched and stomped all over town giving Nazi salutes while chanting “f— you, f—-ts.” They have yelled every racial slur imaginable and have done so with the full knowledge that they were being filmed. And that was all before someone used a car like a torpedo to plow into a crowd. Melania Trump speaks out on Charlottesville before President They don’t the mind the spotlight. Why would they? Their President, who they love and adore, was voted into office in a white supremacist surge. They attended his rallies and events. With every chance to specifically call out this bigotry and white supremacy on Twitter, Trump refused. In his speech he refused. The man is specific when he feels like it. Think of all of the people he has called out across the years, but now he can’t be specific because he knows these men are his base. If Donald Trump can target and harass women, immigrants, Muslims, the disabled, the poor, and so many others with threats of physical violence and cruel insults and taunts, why can’t they? White nationalist rally in Virginia triggers state of emergency All of this hate, all of this ugliness, all of this bigotry and racism, didn’t come out of nowhere. Yes, hate and bigotry are baked into the cake that is the United States of America, but ever since this nation, after electing 43 white men as President of the United States, opted to elect and re-elect Barack Hussein Obama, public bigotry and hate crimes have been on the rise. Not only that, but for years now, Donald Trump has been at the center of that hate being the most visible spokesman for the racist birther movement that claimed President Obama was illegitimately elected because he’s not actually an American, but is a secret African or an undercover Muslim who was determined to ruin the nation from the inside. No more famous American parroted the talking points of this movement than Donald Trump even going so far as to publicly claim he had dispatched private investigators to prove Obama was never born in Hawaii in the first place. Here’s why Red Wings forced to denouce white nationalist group Donald Trump has been an immoral, offensive man for decades, but it was not until he put the very humanity of Barack Obama in his crosshairs that he became a cult hero to white supremacists from coast to coast. 48 photos view gallery Riding the wave of that newfound notoriety into the White House, Trump appointed two of the most bigoted men in the nation, Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller, as his Chief Strategist and Chief Policy Advisor. When you choose to appoint men with lengthy, documented histories of bigotry, men so despicable that they probably could not pass through the human resources of a single Fortune 500 company, to some of the highest available positions within the White House, such a public embrace of bigotry has repercussions. We are living through those repercussions right now. This year is on pace to be the deadliest year ever measured for people killed by police in American history. The President of the United States casually announces bans on people be it Muslims, immigrants, and refugees from certain countries or transgender service members in the American military. Tiki torch-wielding white nationalists roasted on Twitter Every single leader I know and work alongside receives regular death threats. They are regularly called every foul, bigoted name imaginable. They are regularly lied on and subjected to some of the most heinous attack I’ve ever seen. This, too, is my reality. Whatever you thought about 2017 in America, if ugliness, bigotry, and hatred aren’t at the center of your thoughts, then you should think again. We are living in a dangerous, unstable time and I’m confident that Charlottesville isn’t an outlier, but an indicator of things to come. If you ever wondered who you’d be or what’d you do if you were alive during other tumultuous periods in American history, just look at your life right now. VIDEO: White nationalists march through UVA with torches If you aren’t fighting back and speaking out right now, then that’s the best indicator of who you would’ve been back in the day. The good news is this: you can join the fight against bigotry and hate in America right now.

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August 13, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Jewish  Comments Closed


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