Archive for the ‘Antifa’ Category

Antifa violence in Portland: The police just let it happen – Conservative Review

Antifa violence in Portland: The police just let it happen
Conservative Review
Over the weekend, a Freedom March hosted by free-speech protesters and counter-rallies by leftist Antifa radicals turned violent, then bloody, and police reportedly just stood by. The event took place Sunday afternoon in Tom McCall Park in downtown …

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How Patreon stepped into a war between Antifa and the alt-right – The Daily Dot

Avoiding politics online is nearly impossible. But what happens when your quest to remain neutral draws you deep into a firestorm between two of the most aggressive political factions of the Trump era?

Late last month, fundraising platform Patreon found out.

Patreon markets itself as the prime way for independent creators to come get paid, as its website reads. Its users span the full gamut of disciplines, from video makers to educators to podcasters and everyone in between. If you like a certain writer, for example, Patreon enables you to kick her a few bucks for her efforts. For some successful Patreon users, the platform provides a substantial income.

The concept of Patreon is noncontroversial in the era of crowdfunding. But that all changes when you mix money and take-no-prisoners politics.

The company found itself in the middle of a hyperpartisan showdown between warring entities in thealt-right and the far left anti-fascist movement known as Antifa. However, it wasPatreons efforts to remain outside the fray of politics that brought the fighting to a head.

The events that followed serve as either a warning to any company that attempts to navigate the murky, shark-filled waters of internet politicsor a model for how to use transparency as a weapon.

On July 20, without explanation, the company banned conservative provocateur Lauren Southern from the platform, cutting off valuable monthly donations from supporters and sparking a fierce backlash from mainly right-wing circles and alternative media outlets.

Hundreds of patrons and several creators abandoned the platform as a result, including scientist and podcaster Sam Harris, one of the most popular creators on the service.

One week later, on July 28, the company abruptly shut down the account offar-left news website Its Going Down (IGD). The outlet, which has become loosely associated with the re-emergent Antifa movement since PresidentDonald Trumps inauguration, had publishedarticlescovering Southerns activities amid its usual content, which is regularly re-posted anonymously from a range of anarchist and anti-capitalist groups.

In a 10-minute long video, published just hours after IGD was notified of its ban, Patreons chief executive defended Southerns account shutdownover which there had already been considerable falloutand explained the companys evaluation method called manifest observable behavior.

The purpose of using manifest observable behavior is to remove personal values and beliefs when the team is reviewing content. Its a review method thats based entirely on observable facts, Jack Conte, Patreons CEO, said.

Southerns ban, Conte said, came through her involvement with right-wing youth organization Gnration Identitaires Defend Europe project. Defend Europe was a crowdfunded mission to intercept boats filled with migrants journeying across the Mediterranean to Europe and to transport migrants back to their home countries in North Africa.

We removed [Southern and Defend Europes] pages because they directly obstructed a search-and-rescue ship in the Mediterranean, and they made a variety of statements and outlined plans to obstruct similar rescue ships in the future, Conte said, reasoning that this could endanger the lives.

Following the ban, Southern denied she was personally involved in the mission. In his response video above, Conte listed the observable facts that his evaluation team had cited. These included using some of Southerns own footage, in which she can be heard directing the Defend Europe boat operator to block the NGO rescue ship, and quoted statements Southern made in which she appears to speak and identify as part of the Defend Europe team.

None of these details were apparent in Southerns original response to Patreon banning her. Conte, in other words, decided to call her out.

You cant use manifest observable behavior to say who someone is you can use manifest observable behavior to say what someone did or didnt do and whether or not those things are or are not against your content policy, Conte concluded, reiterating that it was Southerns observable actions, not her politics, that had landed her in trouble with the platform.

Conte then broke the news that, hours earlier, Patreon had taken the same action against IGD, an organization at the opposite end of the political spectrum from Southernone that has also been actively critical of her work and politics.

Again, Conte pointed to observable and available content as violations of the companys content policy. The evidence against IGD consisted of two articles that were reposted on the leftist website, which unapologetically states its mission is the promotion of both revolutionary theory and action. One article featured an instance of doxxingthe publishing of an individuals personally identifiable informationand another instructed readers on how to sabotage a railway line.

Likely anticipating accusations of cutting off IGD as a way to appear politically neutral, Conte said the website had been flagged for review before Patreon banned Southern.

We dont batch pages together and take down opposing pages at exactly the same time to proactively seem like were being fair, Conte said. He added: When we removed Southerns page, IGDs page had already come to our attention from a number of inbound reports and was already in our queue.

Contes attempts to pull Patreon out of the snake pit of politics failed. After IGDs ban, some on the far left, who cheered at Southerns banning, accused Patreon of pandering to and working with the alt-right.

IGD was banned as an act of appeasement to the alt-right, IGDs editors asserted in a comprehensive post, which points to a sustained and coordinated call by alt-right media outlets and personalities to have its funding cut off. Behind the gimmicks and wonky terms about manifest observable behavior, the entirety of Contes video is an attempt to pacify the trolls.

On the right, disgruntled Southern supporters had taken to calling out Patreon on social media and blogs for what they believed to be a politically biased judgment.

To Southerns supporters, Patreon had stifled free speech in the name of the left; to IGD supporters, the company had sought to placate angry alt-right trolls in banning their outlet.

Although motivated by transparency over its decisions and ethical boundaries, the company had become a villain to both the extreme left and right. In fact, parties on both sides made Patreon a political battleground for its attempts to remain politically neutral.

Both Southern and IGD came to Patreons attention because of a number of inbound reports, according to Conte, which activists on both left and right utilized as a way of attacking one another. While left-wing activists ran a#DefundDefendEuropecampaign targeting Southern, alt-right activists were pushing a #DefundAntifa campaign aimed at IGD.

Self-described Antifa organization Hope Not Hate celebrated the closure of Southerns account as its own victory. In ablog articleonits websitedated July 21, theorganization states that it lobbied forSoutherns account to be removed from the platform.

The banning, it said, came after several weeks of lobbying by Hope Not Hate, which contacted Patreon to raise concerns about far-right activists making money via the service. Hope Not Hate also claimed that the sustained and effective#DefundDefendEuropecampaign resulted in the shutdown of Defend Europes bank and PayPal accounts.

Southerna 22-year-old Canadian who regularlycovers or discusses issues like the nightmare of mass immigration and condemns liberal versions of feminismseems an obvious target for her political opponents on the left.When Conte was asked on a recent episode of theRubin Reportabout Hope Not Hate taking creditfor Southern beingkicked out, however, heexplained that the only lobbying process was via the reporting system.

We dont actively policethecommunity, Conte said. The reason that a page gets taken down is becausewe get reports through an official reporting system If they sent in a report, then we evaluated that report.

Hate Not Hope did not respond to the Daily Dots request to clarify whether it used this reporting process tobring Southern to Patreons attention.

Just as Hate Not Hope was gunning for Southern, however, an undergroundalt-rightcampaign to have IGDs account shutdown began in earnest.

The anti-IGD effort appears to have started back in June, onemonth afterthe outletjoined the platform.

Alt-right activists on social aggregator Voat, a Reddit alternative offering no moderation and unbridled free speech, were called upon to bombard Patreonin a coordinated mass reporting of the IGD profile page.

Amysterious Voat user, a87d7sasa97h9, laid out in detail the plan in Voats Antifa subverse.

Explain that Its Going Down is an Antifa website, the instigating userwrote at the time. Include evidence of Antifas violent crimes to convince Patreon that Antifa is a terrorist organization. If enough people report this page, Patreon may shut it down and cut off some of Antifas funding. Every bit helps.

An email template that would-be participants could simply copy and submit to Patreon pitsIGD content against specific creator obligations stipulated in the Patreon content policy. Their most substantial weapon against IGD wasFox News negative coverage of IGD, which it said calls for violence against Trump supporters.

Fox News has exposed Its Going Down, a87d7sasa97h9 wrote in an update, use this as your primary evidence when reporting the Patreon page.

The account behind the effort, which was used exclusively to push other users to participate, has since fallen inactive. Its impossible to tell who was behind the seemingly random string of letters and numbers, whose mostimpassioned and lengthy postis suitably on the topic of maintaining online anonymity and security.

As the narrative consolidated in the Voat post was parroted byalt-right media outlets, alt-right activists were hard at work stacking up complaints and reports against IGD with Patreon when Contes video went live on July 28.

On discovery of the campaign, the Daily Dot contacted Patreon to request data relating to how and when the company was made aware of the IGD content, but a spokesperson refused to share the information.

The team at Patreon strongly believes in building a platform that prioritizes free speech and celebrates diverse viewpoints, a spokesperson told the Daily Dot. We do not take the possibility of removing creators lightly. We have a thorough content policy and evaluation process, and removing a creator is something we only consider after very careful review.

In the end, Patreon stands by its assessment in both cases, judging that the content of each creator had clearly fallen outside its boundary of mainstream acceptability. So, while its unclear just how much impact the spamming had, the subversive tactics employed by each group to quell the other ended in both being banished back to the fringes.

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As Portland Police Stand By, Alt-Right and Antifa Protesters Beat Each Other Bloody – Willamette Week

The latest far-right march in Portland quickly staked a claim as the most violent.

The gathering of alt-right and white nationalist groups in Tom McCall Waterfront Park today immediately descended into brawling with antifascist counter-protesters that left several men bleeding and soaked in pepper spray.

Brawls at Tom McCall WAterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

Joey Gibson, the Vancouver, Wash. video blogger who has led the far-right movement’s forays into Portland, told his crew that the antifa attention showed how serious and powerful his movement remains.

“You have the right of free speech, the right of assembly,” Gibson said in a speech. “When they show up beating their drums and yelling, do you know what that means? It means we’re winning.”

Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

Oath Keepers, members of a militia group that often attends right-wing protests, attacked antifa with pepper spray. Left-wing counter-protesters burned flags. Several frequent participants in Patriot Prayer protests, including a man named Tusitala “Tiny” Toese, were bloodied in the fight that kicked off the march.

Tiny later offered to give a counter-protesters wounds of their own. Flashing the thick silver rings adorning his fist, he pointed to his bloody nose. “Do you want one to match?” he asked. “I can give you one.”

Portland police allowed the melee to go largely unchecked, belatedly threatening over loudspeaker to arrest brawlers. By then, the fights had mostly stopped.

Brawls at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

Police announced that any illegal activity would get the protesters kicked out of the park. But officers didn’t intervene when antifa members started throwing small projectiles at protesters wearing Make America Great Again hats.

Counterprotesters sprayed the far-right activists with silly string and threw glitter in their faces. The ultra-conservative group waved a flag of Pepe the Frog, a symbol of the national “alt-right” movement.

After more than half a year of squaring off, an air of familiarity runs between these groups. But a current of rage still feels fresh.

“Trump is burning this country to the ground,” one masked antifa protester screamed at the marchers, “and you’re letting it happen.”

Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

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New York Times Helps Antifa Soften Up Harmful Violent Stereotypes – NewsBusters (press release) (blog)


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New York Times Helps Antifa Soften Up Harmful Violent Stereotypes
NewsBusters (press release) (blog)
The New York Times special Education section Sunday soft-pedaled the authoritarian left-wing movements afoot on many college campuses, including the …

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New York Times Helps Antifa Soften Up Harmful Violent Stereotypes – NewsBusters (press release) (blog)

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antifa | Fox News Insider

What’s on

Sen. Orrin Hatch lays out the Senate agenda on Sunday Morning Futures.

Howard Kurtz exposes the press’ double standard on MediaBuzz.

Enough is enough! Fox News Sunday takes an exclusive look with the Deputy AG Rod Rosensteinat the plan to stamp out White House leaks.

Why is the mainstream media manic over Trump’s immigration plan? The Next Revolution breaks it down.

There are new questions about the future of National Security Adviser H. R. McMaster, as President Donald Trump is reportedly growing more frustrated with the lack of progress in Afghanistan.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday threw his support behind legislation that aims to significantly cut the number of legal immigrants admitted to the U.S. over the next decade.

Bush speechwriter Bill McGurn said President Trump is not using the best resource he has available to him to get his message out.

An Asian American legal group is supporting the Department of Justice’s reported plans to investigate and potentially sue universities that intentionally discriminate against certain applicants based…

Tucker Carlson sat down with Sessions during a trip to El Salvador, the birthplace of MS-13, to discuss what steps we should take in our anti-MS-13 efforts.

Judicial Watch president Tom Fitton says newly-released emails show Huma Abedin sent classified information over unsecured networks and Clinton Foundation donors receiving special treatment from the…

On the heels of his latest fiery clash with a White House spokesperson, CNN correspondent Jim Acosta accused the Trump administration of continually targeting the “three M’s.”

Greg Gutfeld discussed the case of a 20-time deportee who is now accused of assaulting at least one person in Oregon.

In an interview with National Public Radio, Democratic National Committee Deputy Chair Keith Ellison said President Trump’s style of Twitter usage draws parallels to King George III.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says that some in the mainstream media are doing the American people a disservice by focusing on Russia and White House staffing changes, as opposed…

Eric Trump said the mainstream media is engaged in a “race to the bottom these days” when it comes to covering his father and the rest of the news of the day.

In his Opening Monologue, Sean Hannity took aim at Republicans and Democrats who are preventing the repeal and replacement of ObamaCare.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. 2017 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved.

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The Rise of the Violent Left – The Atlantic

Since 1907, Portland, Oregon, has hosted an annual Rose Festival. Since 2007, the festival had included a parade down 82nd Avenue. Since 2013, the Republican Party of Multnomah County, which includes Portland, had taken part. This April, all of that changed.

In the days leading up to the planned parade, a group called the Direct Action Alliance declared, Fascists plan to march through the streets, and warned, Nazis will not march through Portland unopposed. The alliance said it didnt object to the Multnomah GOP itself, but to fascists who planned to infiltrate its ranks. Yet it also denounced marchers with Trump flags and red maga hats who could normalize support for an orange man who bragged about sexually harassing women and who is waging a war of hate, racism and prejudice. A second group, Oregon Students Empowered, created a Facebook page called Shut down fascism! No nazis in Portland!

Next, the parades organizers received an anonymous email warning that if Trump supporters and others who promote hateful rhetoric marched, we will have two hundred or more people rush into the parade and drag and push those people out. When Portland police said they lacked the resources to provide adequate security, the organizers canceled the parade. It was a sign of things to come.

For progressives, Donald Trump is not just another Republican president. Seventy-six percent of Democrats, according to a Suffolk poll from last September, consider him a racist. Last March, according to a YouGov survey, 71 percent of Democrats agreed that his campaign contained fascist undertones. All of which raises a question that is likely to bedevil progressives for years to come: If you believe the president of the United States is leading a racist, fascist movement that threatens the rights, if not the lives, of vulnerable minorities, how far are you willing to go to stop it?

In Washington, D.C., the response to that question centers on how members of Congress can oppose Trumps agenda, on how Democrats can retake the House of Representatives, and on how and when to push for impeachment. But in the country at large, some militant leftists are offering a very different answer. On Inauguration Day, a masked activist punched the white-supremacist leader Richard Spencer. In February, protesters violently disrupted UC Berkeleys plans to host a speech by Milo Yiannopoulos, a former Breitbart.com editor. In March, protesters pushed and shoved the controversial conservative political scientist Charles Murray when he spoke at Middlebury College, in Vermont.

As far-flung as these incidents were, they have something crucial in common. Like the organizations that opposed the Multnomah County Republican Partys participation in the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, these activists appear to be linked to a movement called antifa, which is short for antifascist or Anti-Fascist Action. The movements secrecy makes definitively cataloging its activities difficult, but this much is certain: Antifas power is growing. And how the rest of the activist left responds will help define its moral character in the Trump age.

Antifa traces its roots to the 1920s and 30s, when militant leftists battled fascists in the streets of Germany, Italy, and Spain. When fascism withered after World War II, antifa did too. But in the 70s and 80s, neo-Nazi skinheads began to infiltrate Britains punk scene. After the Berlin Wall fell, neo-Nazism also gained prominence in Germany. In response, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists and punk fans, revived the tradition of street-level antifascism.

In the late 80s, left-wing punk fans in the United States began following suit, though they initially called their groups Anti-Racist Action, on the theory that Americans would be more familiar with fighting racism than fascism. According to Mark Bray, the author of the forthcoming Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, these activists toured with popular alternative bands in the 90s, trying to ensure that neo-Nazis did not recruit their fans. In 2002, they disrupted a speech by the head of the World Church of the Creator, a white-supremacist group in Pennsylvania; 25 people were arrested in the resulting brawl.

By the 2000s, as the internet facilitated more transatlantic dialogue, some American activists had adopted the name antifa. But even on the militant left, the movement didnt occupy the spotlight. To most left-wing activists during the Clinton, Bush, and Obama years, deregulated global capitalism seemed like a greater threat than fascism.

Trump has changed that. For antifa, the result has been explosive growth. According to NYC Antifa, the groups Twitter following nearly quadrupled in the first three weeks of January alone. (By summer, it exceeded 15,000.) Trumps rise has also bred a new sympathy for antifa among some on the mainstream left. Suddenly, noted the antifa-aligned journal Its Going Down, anarchists and antifa, who have been demonized and sidelined by the wider Left have been hearing from liberals and Leftists, youve been right all along. An article in The Nation argued that to call Trumpism fascist is to realize that it is not well combated or contained by standard liberal appeals to reason. The radical left, it said, offers practical and serious responses in this political moment.

Those responses sometimes spill blood. Since antifa is heavily composed of anarchists, its activists place little faith in the state, which they consider complicit in fascism and racism. They prefer direct action: They pressure venues to deny white supremacists space to meet. They pressure employers to fire them and landlords to evict them. And when people they deem racists and fascists manage to assemble, antifas partisans try to break up their gatherings, including by force.

Such tactics have elicited substantial support from the mainstream left. When the masked antifa activist was filmed assaulting Spencer on Inauguration Day, another piece in The Nation described his punch as an act of kinetic beauty. Slate ran an approving article about a humorous piano ballad that glorified the assault. Twitter was inundated with viral versions of the video set to different songs, prompting the former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau to tweet, I dont care how many different songs you set Richard Spencer being punched to, Ill laugh at every one.

The violence is not directed only at avowed racists like Spencer: In June of last year, demonstratorsat least some of whom were associated with antifapunched and threw eggs at people exiting a Trump rally in San Jose, California. An article in Its Going Down celebrated the righteous beatings.

Antifascists call such actions defensive. Hate speech against vulnerable minorities, they argue, leads to violence against vulnerable minorities. But Trump supporters and white nationalists see antifas attacks as an assault on their right to freely assemble, which they in turn seek to reassert. The result is a level of sustained political street warfare not seen in the U.S. since the 1960s. A few weeks after the attacks in San Jose, for instance, a white-supremacist leader announced that he would host a march in Sacramento to protest the attacks at Trump rallies. Anti-Fascist Action Sacramento called for a counterdemonstration; in the end, at least 10 people were stabbed.

A similar cycle has played out at UC Berkeley. In February, masked antifascists broke store windows and hurled Molotov cocktails and rocks at police during a rally against the planned speech by Yiannopoulos. After the university canceled the speech out of what it called concern for public safety, white nationalists announced a March on Berkeley in support of free speech. At that rally, a 41-year-old man named Kyle Chapman, who was wearing a baseball helmet, ski goggles, shin guards, and a mask, smashed an antifa activist over the head with a wooden post. Suddenly, Trump supporters had a viral video of their own. A far-right crowdfunding site soon raised more than $80,000 for Chapmans legal defense. (In January, the same site had offered a substantial reward for the identity of the antifascist who had punched Spencer.) A politicized fight culture is emerging, fueled by cheerleaders on both sides. As James Anderson, an editor at Its Going Down, told Vice, This shit is fun.

Portland offers perhaps the clearest glimpse of where all of this can lead. The Pacific Northwest has long attracted white supremacists, who have seen it as a haven from Americas multiracial East and South. In 1857, Oregon (then a federal territory) banned African Americans from living there. By the 1920s, it boasted the highest Ku Klux Klan membership rate of any state.

In 1988, neo-Nazis in Portland killed an Ethiopian immigrant with a baseball bat. Shortly thereafter, notes Alex Reid Ross, a lecturer at Portland State University and the author of Against the Fascist Creep, anti-Nazi skinheads formed a chapter of Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice. Before long, the city also had an Anti-Racist Action group.

Now, in the Trump era, Portland has become a bastion of antifascist militancy. Masked protesters smashed store windows during multiday demonstrations following Trumps election. In early April, antifa activists threw smoke bombs into a Rally for Trump and Freedom in the Portland suburb of Vancouver, Washington. A local paper said the ensuing melee resembled a mosh pit.

When antifascists forced the cancellation of the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, Trump supporters responded with a March for Free Speech. Among those who attended was Jeremy Christian, a burly ex-con draped in an American flag, who uttered racial slurs and made Nazi salutes. A few weeks later, on May 25, a man believed to be Christian was filmed calling antifa a bunch of punk bitches.

The next day, Christian boarded a light-rail train and began yelling that colored people were ruining the city. He fixed his attention on two teenage girls, one African American and the other wearing a hijab, and told them to go back to Saudi Arabia or kill themselves. As the girls retreated to the back of the train, three men interposed themselves between Christian and his targets. Please, one said, get off this train. Christian stabbed all three. One bled to death on the train. One was declared dead at a local hospital. One survived.

The cycle continued. Nine days after the attack, on June 4, Trump supporters hosted another Portland rally, this one featuring Chapman, who had gained fame with his assault on the antifascist in Berkeley. Antifa activists threw bricks until the police dispersed them with stun grenades and tear gas.

Whats eroding in Portland is the quality Max Weber considered essential to a functioning state: a monopoly on legitimate violence. As members of a largely anarchist movement, antifascists dont want the government to stop white supremacists from gathering. They want to do so themselves, rendering the government impotent. With help from other left-wing activists, theyre already having some success at disrupting government. Demonstrators have interrupted so many city-council meetings that in February, the council met behind locked doors. In February and March, activists protesting police violence and the citys investments in the Dakota Access Pipeline hounded Mayor Ted Wheeler so persistently at his home that he took refuge in a hotel. The fateful email to parade organizers warned, The police cannot stop us from shutting down roads.

All of this fuels the fears of Trump supporters, who suspect that liberal bastions are refusing to protect their right to free speech. Joey Gibson, a Trump supporter who organized the June 4 Portland rally, told me that his biggest pet peeve is when mayors have police stand down They dont want conservatives to be coming together and speaking. To provide security at the rally, Gibson brought in a far-right militia called the Oath Keepers. In late June, James Buchal, the chair of the Multnomah County Republican Party, announced that it too would use militia members for security, because volunteers dont feel safe on the streets of Portland.

Antifa believes it is pursuing the opposite of authoritarianism. Many of its activists oppose the very notion of a centralized state. But in the name of protecting the vulnerable, antifascists have granted themselves the authority to decide which Americans may publicly assemble and which may not. That authority rests on no democratic foundation. Unlike the politicians they revile, the men and women of antifa cannot be voted out of office. Generally, they dont even disclose their names.

Antifas perceived legitimacy is inversely correlated with the governments. Which is why, in the Trump era, the movement is growing like never before. As the president derides and subverts liberal-democratic norms, progressives face a choice. They can recommit to the rules of fair play, and try to limit the presidents corrosive effect, though they will often fail. Or they can, in revulsion or fear or righteous rage, try to deny racists and Trump supporters their political rights. From Middlebury to Berkeley to Portland, the latter approach is on the rise, especially among young people.

Revulsion, fear, and rage are understandable. But one thing is clear. The people preventing Republicans from safely assembling on the streets of Portland may consider themselves fierce opponents of the authoritarianism growing on the American right. In truth, however, they are its unlikeliest allies.

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Dinesh D’Souza: Antifa Protesters Are Closest Thing Today to Nazi Brownshirts – Fox News Insider

Maxine Waters Applauds Anti-Trump Leaks on ‘The View’

AuthorDinesh D’Souza drew a parallel between the anti-Trump Antifa protesters and the brownshirts, an early Nazi army.

“The main difference I think is that the old fascists were proud to call themselves fascists, but the new fascists march under the banner of anti-fascism,” D’Souza told “Fox & Friends” Saturday.

The Antifa group, short for “anti-fascist,” holds anti-Trump protests across the country where protesters destroy property and injure police. The group has encouraged violence in their protests, saying it is the only way to fight the Trump administration.

Hitler’s Brownshirts were known for riots and violence against Jewish people and their property.

“Fascism has been somehow wrongly been portrayed as something on the right, but the right is for individual rights and limited government, and nothing could be more anti-fascist than that,” D’Souza said.

The meaning of fascism is “collective state power” sounds more like what the left stands for, D’Souza concluded.

Maxine Waters Applauds Anti-Trump Leaks on ‘The View’

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Behind Berkeley’s Semester of Hate – The New York Times – New York Times

Black bloc protesting against Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley.CreditElijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Neil Lawrence, Antifa member and linguistics major, University of California, Berkeley.CreditSonner Kehrt When the nonviolent tactics have been exhausted what is left? Dan, Antifa member and political science major, University of San Francisco.CreditAndrew Beale People need to understand this whole thing, this whole conflict isnt about free speech. Nathan Damigo, Identity Evropa founder and social science major, California State University, Stanislaus.CreditMax Whittaker for The New York Times Diversity is the result of differences, and the more differences there are in a society between people, the more polarized things become.

Andrew Beale and Sonner Kehrt are graduate journalism students at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Berkeley’s Semester of Hate – New York Times

Black bloc protesting against Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley.CreditElijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Neil Lawrence, Antifa member and linguistics major, University of California, Berkeley.CreditSonner Kehrt When the nonviolent tactics have been exhausted what is left? Dan, Antifa member and political science major, University of San Francisco.CreditAndrew Beale People need to understand this whole thing, this whole conflict isnt about free speech. Diversity is the result of differences, and the more differences there are in a society between people, the more polarized things become.

Andrew Beale and Sonner Kehrt are graduate journalism students at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Antifa violence in Portland: The police just let it happen – Conservative Review

Antifa violence in Portland: The police just let it happen Conservative Review Over the weekend, a Freedom March hosted by free-speech protesters and counter-rallies by leftist Antifa radicals turned violent, then bloody, and police reportedly just stood by. The event took place Sunday afternoon in Tom McCall Park in downtown …

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How Patreon stepped into a war between Antifa and the alt-right – The Daily Dot

Avoiding politics online is nearly impossible. But what happens when your quest to remain neutral draws you deep into a firestorm between two of the most aggressive political factions of the Trump era? Late last month, fundraising platform Patreon found out. Patreon markets itself as the prime way for independent creators to come get paid, as its website reads. Its users span the full gamut of disciplines, from video makers to educators to podcasters and everyone in between. If you like a certain writer, for example, Patreon enables you to kick her a few bucks for her efforts. For some successful Patreon users, the platform provides a substantial income. The concept of Patreon is noncontroversial in the era of crowdfunding. But that all changes when you mix money and take-no-prisoners politics. The company found itself in the middle of a hyperpartisan showdown between warring entities in thealt-right and the far left anti-fascist movement known as Antifa. However, it wasPatreons efforts to remain outside the fray of politics that brought the fighting to a head. The events that followed serve as either a warning to any company that attempts to navigate the murky, shark-filled waters of internet politicsor a model for how to use transparency as a weapon. On July 20, without explanation, the company banned conservative provocateur Lauren Southern from the platform, cutting off valuable monthly donations from supporters and sparking a fierce backlash from mainly right-wing circles and alternative media outlets. Hundreds of patrons and several creators abandoned the platform as a result, including scientist and podcaster Sam Harris, one of the most popular creators on the service. One week later, on July 28, the company abruptly shut down the account offar-left news website Its Going Down (IGD). The outlet, which has become loosely associated with the re-emergent Antifa movement since PresidentDonald Trumps inauguration, had publishedarticlescovering Southerns activities amid its usual content, which is regularly re-posted anonymously from a range of anarchist and anti-capitalist groups. In a 10-minute long video, published just hours after IGD was notified of its ban, Patreons chief executive defended Southerns account shutdownover which there had already been considerable falloutand explained the companys evaluation method called manifest observable behavior. The purpose of using manifest observable behavior is to remove personal values and beliefs when the team is reviewing content. Its a review method thats based entirely on observable facts, Jack Conte, Patreons CEO, said. Southerns ban, Conte said, came through her involvement with right-wing youth organization Gnration Identitaires Defend Europe project. Defend Europe was a crowdfunded mission to intercept boats filled with migrants journeying across the Mediterranean to Europe and to transport migrants back to their home countries in North Africa. We removed [Southern and Defend Europes] pages because they directly obstructed a search-and-rescue ship in the Mediterranean, and they made a variety of statements and outlined plans to obstruct similar rescue ships in the future, Conte said, reasoning that this could endanger the lives. Following the ban, Southern denied she was personally involved in the mission. In his response video above, Conte listed the observable facts that his evaluation team had cited. These included using some of Southerns own footage, in which she can be heard directing the Defend Europe boat operator to block the NGO rescue ship, and quoted statements Southern made in which she appears to speak and identify as part of the Defend Europe team. None of these details were apparent in Southerns original response to Patreon banning her. Conte, in other words, decided to call her out. You cant use manifest observable behavior to say who someone is you can use manifest observable behavior to say what someone did or didnt do and whether or not those things are or are not against your content policy, Conte concluded, reiterating that it was Southerns observable actions, not her politics, that had landed her in trouble with the platform. Conte then broke the news that, hours earlier, Patreon had taken the same action against IGD, an organization at the opposite end of the political spectrum from Southernone that has also been actively critical of her work and politics. Again, Conte pointed to observable and available content as violations of the companys content policy. The evidence against IGD consisted of two articles that were reposted on the leftist website, which unapologetically states its mission is the promotion of both revolutionary theory and action. One article featured an instance of doxxingthe publishing of an individuals personally identifiable informationand another instructed readers on how to sabotage a railway line. Likely anticipating accusations of cutting off IGD as a way to appear politically neutral, Conte said the website had been flagged for review before Patreon banned Southern. We dont batch pages together and take down opposing pages at exactly the same time to proactively seem like were being fair, Conte said. He added: When we removed Southerns page, IGDs page had already come to our attention from a number of inbound reports and was already in our queue. Contes attempts to pull Patreon out of the snake pit of politics failed. After IGDs ban, some on the far left, who cheered at Southerns banning, accused Patreon of pandering to and working with the alt-right. IGD was banned as an act of appeasement to the alt-right, IGDs editors asserted in a comprehensive post, which points to a sustained and coordinated call by alt-right media outlets and personalities to have its funding cut off. Behind the gimmicks and wonky terms about manifest observable behavior, the entirety of Contes video is an attempt to pacify the trolls. On the right, disgruntled Southern supporters had taken to calling out Patreon on social media and blogs for what they believed to be a politically biased judgment. To Southerns supporters, Patreon had stifled free speech in the name of the left; to IGD supporters, the company had sought to placate angry alt-right trolls in banning their outlet. Although motivated by transparency over its decisions and ethical boundaries, the company had become a villain to both the extreme left and right. In fact, parties on both sides made Patreon a political battleground for its attempts to remain politically neutral. Both Southern and IGD came to Patreons attention because of a number of inbound reports, according to Conte, which activists on both left and right utilized as a way of attacking one another. While left-wing activists ran a#DefundDefendEuropecampaign targeting Southern, alt-right activists were pushing a #DefundAntifa campaign aimed at IGD. Self-described Antifa organization Hope Not Hate celebrated the closure of Southerns account as its own victory. In ablog articleonits websitedated July 21, theorganization states that it lobbied forSoutherns account to be removed from the platform. The banning, it said, came after several weeks of lobbying by Hope Not Hate, which contacted Patreon to raise concerns about far-right activists making money via the service. Hope Not Hate also claimed that the sustained and effective#DefundDefendEuropecampaign resulted in the shutdown of Defend Europes bank and PayPal accounts. Southerna 22-year-old Canadian who regularlycovers or discusses issues like the nightmare of mass immigration and condemns liberal versions of feminismseems an obvious target for her political opponents on the left.When Conte was asked on a recent episode of theRubin Reportabout Hope Not Hate taking creditfor Southern beingkicked out, however, heexplained that the only lobbying process was via the reporting system. We dont actively policethecommunity, Conte said. The reason that a page gets taken down is becausewe get reports through an official reporting system If they sent in a report, then we evaluated that report. Hate Not Hope did not respond to the Daily Dots request to clarify whether it used this reporting process tobring Southern to Patreons attention. Just as Hate Not Hope was gunning for Southern, however, an undergroundalt-rightcampaign to have IGDs account shutdown began in earnest. The anti-IGD effort appears to have started back in June, onemonth afterthe outletjoined the platform. Alt-right activists on social aggregator Voat, a Reddit alternative offering no moderation and unbridled free speech, were called upon to bombard Patreonin a coordinated mass reporting of the IGD profile page. Amysterious Voat user, a87d7sasa97h9, laid out in detail the plan in Voats Antifa subverse. Explain that Its Going Down is an Antifa website, the instigating userwrote at the time. Include evidence of Antifas violent crimes to convince Patreon that Antifa is a terrorist organization. If enough people report this page, Patreon may shut it down and cut off some of Antifas funding. Every bit helps. An email template that would-be participants could simply copy and submit to Patreon pitsIGD content against specific creator obligations stipulated in the Patreon content policy. Their most substantial weapon against IGD wasFox News negative coverage of IGD, which it said calls for violence against Trump supporters. Fox News has exposed Its Going Down, a87d7sasa97h9 wrote in an update, use this as your primary evidence when reporting the Patreon page. The account behind the effort, which was used exclusively to push other users to participate, has since fallen inactive. Its impossible to tell who was behind the seemingly random string of letters and numbers, whose mostimpassioned and lengthy postis suitably on the topic of maintaining online anonymity and security. As the narrative consolidated in the Voat post was parroted byalt-right media outlets, alt-right activists were hard at work stacking up complaints and reports against IGD with Patreon when Contes video went live on July 28. On discovery of the campaign, the Daily Dot contacted Patreon to request data relating to how and when the company was made aware of the IGD content, but a spokesperson refused to share the information. The team at Patreon strongly believes in building a platform that prioritizes free speech and celebrates diverse viewpoints, a spokesperson told the Daily Dot. We do not take the possibility of removing creators lightly. We have a thorough content policy and evaluation process, and removing a creator is something we only consider after very careful review. In the end, Patreon stands by its assessment in both cases, judging that the content of each creator had clearly fallen outside its boundary of mainstream acceptability. So, while its unclear just how much impact the spamming had, the subversive tactics employed by each group to quell the other ended in both being banished back to the fringes.

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August 8, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

As Portland Police Stand By, Alt-Right and Antifa Protesters Beat Each Other Bloody – Willamette Week

The latest far-right march in Portland quickly staked a claim as the most violent. The gathering of alt-right and white nationalist groups in Tom McCall Waterfront Park today immediately descended into brawling with antifascist counter-protesters that left several men bleeding and soaked in pepper spray. Brawls at Tom McCall WAterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt) Joey Gibson, the Vancouver, Wash. video blogger who has led the far-right movement’s forays into Portland, told his crew that the antifa attention showed how serious and powerful his movement remains. “You have the right of free speech, the right of assembly,” Gibson said in a speech. “When they show up beating their drums and yelling, do you know what that means? It means we’re winning.” Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt) Oath Keepers, members of a militia group that often attends right-wing protests, attacked antifa with pepper spray. Left-wing counter-protesters burned flags. Several frequent participants in Patriot Prayer protests, including a man named Tusitala “Tiny” Toese, were bloodied in the fight that kicked off the march. Tiny later offered to give a counter-protesters wounds of their own. Flashing the thick silver rings adorning his fist, he pointed to his bloody nose. “Do you want one to match?” he asked. “I can give you one.” Portland police allowed the melee to go largely unchecked, belatedly threatening over loudspeaker to arrest brawlers. By then, the fights had mostly stopped. Brawls at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt) Police announced that any illegal activity would get the protesters kicked out of the park. But officers didn’t intervene when antifa members started throwing small projectiles at protesters wearing Make America Great Again hats. Counterprotesters sprayed the far-right activists with silly string and threw glitter in their faces. The ultra-conservative group waved a flag of Pepe the Frog, a symbol of the national “alt-right” movement. After more than half a year of squaring off, an air of familiarity runs between these groups. But a current of rage still feels fresh. “Trump is burning this country to the ground,” one masked antifa protester screamed at the marchers, “and you’re letting it happen.” Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt) Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt) Protests at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on Aug. 6, 2017. (Daniel Stindt)

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New York Times Helps Antifa Soften Up Harmful Violent Stereotypes – NewsBusters (press release) (blog)

NewsBusters (press release) (blog) New York Times Helps Antifa Soften Up Harmful Violent Stereotypes NewsBusters (press release) (blog) The New York Times special Education section Sunday soft-pedaled the authoritarian left-wing movements afoot on many college campuses, including the … and more »

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antifa | Fox News Insider

What’s on Sen. Orrin Hatch lays out the Senate agenda on Sunday Morning Futures. Howard Kurtz exposes the press’ double standard on MediaBuzz. Enough is enough! Fox News Sunday takes an exclusive look with the Deputy AG Rod Rosensteinat the plan to stamp out White House leaks. Why is the mainstream media manic over Trump’s immigration plan? The Next Revolution breaks it down. There are new questions about the future of National Security Adviser H. R. McMaster, as President Donald Trump is reportedly growing more frustrated with the lack of progress in Afghanistan. President Donald Trump on Wednesday threw his support behind legislation that aims to significantly cut the number of legal immigrants admitted to the U.S. over the next decade. Bush speechwriter Bill McGurn said President Trump is not using the best resource he has available to him to get his message out. An Asian American legal group is supporting the Department of Justice’s reported plans to investigate and potentially sue universities that intentionally discriminate against certain applicants based… Tucker Carlson sat down with Sessions during a trip to El Salvador, the birthplace of MS-13, to discuss what steps we should take in our anti-MS-13 efforts. Judicial Watch president Tom Fitton says newly-released emails show Huma Abedin sent classified information over unsecured networks and Clinton Foundation donors receiving special treatment from the… On the heels of his latest fiery clash with a White House spokesperson, CNN correspondent Jim Acosta accused the Trump administration of continually targeting the “three M’s.” Greg Gutfeld discussed the case of a 20-time deportee who is now accused of assaulting at least one person in Oregon. In an interview with National Public Radio, Democratic National Committee Deputy Chair Keith Ellison said President Trump’s style of Twitter usage draws parallels to King George III. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says that some in the mainstream media are doing the American people a disservice by focusing on Russia and White House staffing changes, as opposed… Eric Trump said the mainstream media is engaged in a “race to the bottom these days” when it comes to covering his father and the rest of the news of the day. In his Opening Monologue, Sean Hannity took aim at Republicans and Democrats who are preventing the repeal and replacement of ObamaCare. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. 2017 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved.

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The Rise of the Violent Left – The Atlantic

Since 1907, Portland, Oregon, has hosted an annual Rose Festival. Since 2007, the festival had included a parade down 82nd Avenue. Since 2013, the Republican Party of Multnomah County, which includes Portland, had taken part. This April, all of that changed. In the days leading up to the planned parade, a group called the Direct Action Alliance declared, Fascists plan to march through the streets, and warned, Nazis will not march through Portland unopposed. The alliance said it didnt object to the Multnomah GOP itself, but to fascists who planned to infiltrate its ranks. Yet it also denounced marchers with Trump flags and red maga hats who could normalize support for an orange man who bragged about sexually harassing women and who is waging a war of hate, racism and prejudice. A second group, Oregon Students Empowered, created a Facebook page called Shut down fascism! No nazis in Portland! Next, the parades organizers received an anonymous email warning that if Trump supporters and others who promote hateful rhetoric marched, we will have two hundred or more people rush into the parade and drag and push those people out. When Portland police said they lacked the resources to provide adequate security, the organizers canceled the parade. It was a sign of things to come. For progressives, Donald Trump is not just another Republican president. Seventy-six percent of Democrats, according to a Suffolk poll from last September, consider him a racist. Last March, according to a YouGov survey, 71 percent of Democrats agreed that his campaign contained fascist undertones. All of which raises a question that is likely to bedevil progressives for years to come: If you believe the president of the United States is leading a racist, fascist movement that threatens the rights, if not the lives, of vulnerable minorities, how far are you willing to go to stop it? In Washington, D.C., the response to that question centers on how members of Congress can oppose Trumps agenda, on how Democrats can retake the House of Representatives, and on how and when to push for impeachment. But in the country at large, some militant leftists are offering a very different answer. On Inauguration Day, a masked activist punched the white-supremacist leader Richard Spencer. In February, protesters violently disrupted UC Berkeleys plans to host a speech by Milo Yiannopoulos, a former Breitbart.com editor. In March, protesters pushed and shoved the controversial conservative political scientist Charles Murray when he spoke at Middlebury College, in Vermont. As far-flung as these incidents were, they have something crucial in common. Like the organizations that opposed the Multnomah County Republican Partys participation in the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, these activists appear to be linked to a movement called antifa, which is short for antifascist or Anti-Fascist Action. The movements secrecy makes definitively cataloging its activities difficult, but this much is certain: Antifas power is growing. And how the rest of the activist left responds will help define its moral character in the Trump age. Antifa traces its roots to the 1920s and 30s, when militant leftists battled fascists in the streets of Germany, Italy, and Spain. When fascism withered after World War II, antifa did too. But in the 70s and 80s, neo-Nazi skinheads began to infiltrate Britains punk scene. After the Berlin Wall fell, neo-Nazism also gained prominence in Germany. In response, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists and punk fans, revived the tradition of street-level antifascism. In the late 80s, left-wing punk fans in the United States began following suit, though they initially called their groups Anti-Racist Action, on the theory that Americans would be more familiar with fighting racism than fascism. According to Mark Bray, the author of the forthcoming Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, these activists toured with popular alternative bands in the 90s, trying to ensure that neo-Nazis did not recruit their fans. In 2002, they disrupted a speech by the head of the World Church of the Creator, a white-supremacist group in Pennsylvania; 25 people were arrested in the resulting brawl. By the 2000s, as the internet facilitated more transatlantic dialogue, some American activists had adopted the name antifa. But even on the militant left, the movement didnt occupy the spotlight. To most left-wing activists during the Clinton, Bush, and Obama years, deregulated global capitalism seemed like a greater threat than fascism. Trump has changed that. For antifa, the result has been explosive growth. According to NYC Antifa, the groups Twitter following nearly quadrupled in the first three weeks of January alone. (By summer, it exceeded 15,000.) Trumps rise has also bred a new sympathy for antifa among some on the mainstream left. Suddenly, noted the antifa-aligned journal Its Going Down, anarchists and antifa, who have been demonized and sidelined by the wider Left have been hearing from liberals and Leftists, youve been right all along. An article in The Nation argued that to call Trumpism fascist is to realize that it is not well combated or contained by standard liberal appeals to reason. The radical left, it said, offers practical and serious responses in this political moment. Those responses sometimes spill blood. Since antifa is heavily composed of anarchists, its activists place little faith in the state, which they consider complicit in fascism and racism. They prefer direct action: They pressure venues to deny white supremacists space to meet. They pressure employers to fire them and landlords to evict them. And when people they deem racists and fascists manage to assemble, antifas partisans try to break up their gatherings, including by force. Such tactics have elicited substantial support from the mainstream left. When the masked antifa activist was filmed assaulting Spencer on Inauguration Day, another piece in The Nation described his punch as an act of kinetic beauty. Slate ran an approving article about a humorous piano ballad that glorified the assault. Twitter was inundated with viral versions of the video set to different songs, prompting the former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau to tweet, I dont care how many different songs you set Richard Spencer being punched to, Ill laugh at every one. The violence is not directed only at avowed racists like Spencer: In June of last year, demonstratorsat least some of whom were associated with antifapunched and threw eggs at people exiting a Trump rally in San Jose, California. An article in Its Going Down celebrated the righteous beatings. Antifascists call such actions defensive. Hate speech against vulnerable minorities, they argue, leads to violence against vulnerable minorities. But Trump supporters and white nationalists see antifas attacks as an assault on their right to freely assemble, which they in turn seek to reassert. The result is a level of sustained political street warfare not seen in the U.S. since the 1960s. A few weeks after the attacks in San Jose, for instance, a white-supremacist leader announced that he would host a march in Sacramento to protest the attacks at Trump rallies. Anti-Fascist Action Sacramento called for a counterdemonstration; in the end, at least 10 people were stabbed. A similar cycle has played out at UC Berkeley. In February, masked antifascists broke store windows and hurled Molotov cocktails and rocks at police during a rally against the planned speech by Yiannopoulos. After the university canceled the speech out of what it called concern for public safety, white nationalists announced a March on Berkeley in support of free speech. At that rally, a 41-year-old man named Kyle Chapman, who was wearing a baseball helmet, ski goggles, shin guards, and a mask, smashed an antifa activist over the head with a wooden post. Suddenly, Trump supporters had a viral video of their own. A far-right crowdfunding site soon raised more than $80,000 for Chapmans legal defense. (In January, the same site had offered a substantial reward for the identity of the antifascist who had punched Spencer.) A politicized fight culture is emerging, fueled by cheerleaders on both sides. As James Anderson, an editor at Its Going Down, told Vice, This shit is fun. Portland offers perhaps the clearest glimpse of where all of this can lead. The Pacific Northwest has long attracted white supremacists, who have seen it as a haven from Americas multiracial East and South. In 1857, Oregon (then a federal territory) banned African Americans from living there. By the 1920s, it boasted the highest Ku Klux Klan membership rate of any state. In 1988, neo-Nazis in Portland killed an Ethiopian immigrant with a baseball bat. Shortly thereafter, notes Alex Reid Ross, a lecturer at Portland State University and the author of Against the Fascist Creep, anti-Nazi skinheads formed a chapter of Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice. Before long, the city also had an Anti-Racist Action group. Now, in the Trump era, Portland has become a bastion of antifascist militancy. Masked protesters smashed store windows during multiday demonstrations following Trumps election. In early April, antifa activists threw smoke bombs into a Rally for Trump and Freedom in the Portland suburb of Vancouver, Washington. A local paper said the ensuing melee resembled a mosh pit. When antifascists forced the cancellation of the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, Trump supporters responded with a March for Free Speech. Among those who attended was Jeremy Christian, a burly ex-con draped in an American flag, who uttered racial slurs and made Nazi salutes. A few weeks later, on May 25, a man believed to be Christian was filmed calling antifa a bunch of punk bitches. The next day, Christian boarded a light-rail train and began yelling that colored people were ruining the city. He fixed his attention on two teenage girls, one African American and the other wearing a hijab, and told them to go back to Saudi Arabia or kill themselves. As the girls retreated to the back of the train, three men interposed themselves between Christian and his targets. Please, one said, get off this train. Christian stabbed all three. One bled to death on the train. One was declared dead at a local hospital. One survived. The cycle continued. Nine days after the attack, on June 4, Trump supporters hosted another Portland rally, this one featuring Chapman, who had gained fame with his assault on the antifascist in Berkeley. Antifa activists threw bricks until the police dispersed them with stun grenades and tear gas. Whats eroding in Portland is the quality Max Weber considered essential to a functioning state: a monopoly on legitimate violence. As members of a largely anarchist movement, antifascists dont want the government to stop white supremacists from gathering. They want to do so themselves, rendering the government impotent. With help from other left-wing activists, theyre already having some success at disrupting government. Demonstrators have interrupted so many city-council meetings that in February, the council met behind locked doors. In February and March, activists protesting police violence and the citys investments in the Dakota Access Pipeline hounded Mayor Ted Wheeler so persistently at his home that he took refuge in a hotel. The fateful email to parade organizers warned, The police cannot stop us from shutting down roads. All of this fuels the fears of Trump supporters, who suspect that liberal bastions are refusing to protect their right to free speech. Joey Gibson, a Trump supporter who organized the June 4 Portland rally, told me that his biggest pet peeve is when mayors have police stand down They dont want conservatives to be coming together and speaking. To provide security at the rally, Gibson brought in a far-right militia called the Oath Keepers. In late June, James Buchal, the chair of the Multnomah County Republican Party, announced that it too would use militia members for security, because volunteers dont feel safe on the streets of Portland. Antifa believes it is pursuing the opposite of authoritarianism. Many of its activists oppose the very notion of a centralized state. But in the name of protecting the vulnerable, antifascists have granted themselves the authority to decide which Americans may publicly assemble and which may not. That authority rests on no democratic foundation. Unlike the politicians they revile, the men and women of antifa cannot be voted out of office. Generally, they dont even disclose their names. Antifas perceived legitimacy is inversely correlated with the governments. Which is why, in the Trump era, the movement is growing like never before. As the president derides and subverts liberal-democratic norms, progressives face a choice. They can recommit to the rules of fair play, and try to limit the presidents corrosive effect, though they will often fail. Or they can, in revulsion or fear or righteous rage, try to deny racists and Trump supporters their political rights. From Middlebury to Berkeley to Portland, the latter approach is on the rise, especially among young people. Revulsion, fear, and rage are understandable. But one thing is clear. The people preventing Republicans from safely assembling on the streets of Portland may consider themselves fierce opponents of the authoritarianism growing on the American right. In truth, however, they are its unlikeliest allies.

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Dinesh D’Souza: Antifa Protesters Are Closest Thing Today to Nazi Brownshirts – Fox News Insider

Maxine Waters Applauds Anti-Trump Leaks on ‘The View’ AuthorDinesh D’Souza drew a parallel between the anti-Trump Antifa protesters and the brownshirts, an early Nazi army. “The main difference I think is that the old fascists were proud to call themselves fascists, but the new fascists march under the banner of anti-fascism,” D’Souza told “Fox & Friends” Saturday. The Antifa group, short for “anti-fascist,” holds anti-Trump protests across the country where protesters destroy property and injure police. The group has encouraged violence in their protests, saying it is the only way to fight the Trump administration. Hitler’s Brownshirts were known for riots and violence against Jewish people and their property. “Fascism has been somehow wrongly been portrayed as something on the right, but the right is for individual rights and limited government, and nothing could be more anti-fascist than that,” D’Souza said. The meaning of fascism is “collective state power” sounds more like what the left stands for, D’Souza concluded. Maxine Waters Applauds Anti-Trump Leaks on ‘The View’

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Behind Berkeley’s Semester of Hate – The New York Times – New York Times

Black bloc protesting against Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley.CreditElijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Neil Lawrence, Antifa member and linguistics major, University of California, Berkeley.CreditSonner Kehrt When the nonviolent tactics have been exhausted what is left? Dan, Antifa member and political science major, University of San Francisco.CreditAndrew Beale People need to understand this whole thing, this whole conflict isnt about free speech. Nathan Damigo, Identity Evropa founder and social science major, California State University, Stanislaus.CreditMax Whittaker for The New York Times Diversity is the result of differences, and the more differences there are in a society between people, the more polarized things become. Andrew Beale and Sonner Kehrt are graduate journalism students at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Berkeley’s Semester of Hate – New York Times

Black bloc protesting against Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley.CreditElijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Neil Lawrence, Antifa member and linguistics major, University of California, Berkeley.CreditSonner Kehrt When the nonviolent tactics have been exhausted what is left? Dan, Antifa member and political science major, University of San Francisco.CreditAndrew Beale People need to understand this whole thing, this whole conflict isnt about free speech. Diversity is the result of differences, and the more differences there are in a society between people, the more polarized things become. Andrew Beale and Sonner Kehrt are graduate journalism students at the University of California, Berkeley.

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