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Antifa (United States) – Wikipedia

This article is about the U.S. political movement. For other groups with similar names in other languages, see Antifa.

The Antifa (English: or )[1] movement is a conglomeration of autonomous, self-styled anti-fascist groups in the United States.[2][3][4] The principal feature of antifa groups is their opposition to fascism through the use of direct action.[5] They engage in militant protest tactics, which has included property damage and physical violence.[2][6][7][8] They tend to be anti-government and anti-capitalist[9] and they are predominantly far-left and militant left,[10][5] which includes anarchists, communists and socialists.[11][12][13][14] Their stated focus is on fighting far-right and white supremacist ideologies directly, rather than on encouraging pro-left policy.[5]

The antifa movement is a new force in American politics since the election of Donald Trump. It draws in part from a tradition of anti-fascism in the United States which stretches back a century, tracing its roots to the 1920s and 1930s, when militant leftists were involved in battles against American pro-Nazi organizations such as theFriends of New Germany.[15] Although there is no organizational connection, the lineage of antifa in America can be traced to Weimar Germany,[16] where the first group described as “antifa” was Antifaschistische Aktion, formed in 1932 with the involvement of the Communist Party of Germany.[17]

After World War II, but prior to the development of the modern antifa movement, violent confrontations with Fascist elements continued sporadically. In 1958 over 500 Lumbee men armed with rocks, sticks and firearms attacked and disrupted a Ku Klux Klan rally, wounding several Klansmen in an event known as the Battle of Hayes Pond. In 1979 the Communist Workers’ Party confronted a local Ku Klux Klan chapter, first by disrupting a screening of The Birth of a Nation in China Grove, North Carolina and later organizing a rally and a march against the Klan on November 3 called the “Death to the Klan March” by the CWP.[18] The Maoists distributed flyers that “called for radical, even violent opposition to the Klan”[19], suggesting the Klan should be physically beaten and chased out of town.”[20] In response, as the marchers collected, a caravan of ten cars (and a van) filled with an estimated 40 KKK and American Nazi Party members confronted the protesters, culminating in a shootout known as the Greensboro Massacre.

Modern antifa politics can be traced to resistance to waves of xenophobia, the emergence of white power culture and the infiltration of neo-Nazi skinheads in Britain’s punk scene in the 1970s and 1980s.In response to neo-Nazism gaining prominence in Germany, after the fall of the Berlin Wall unleashed a violent backlash, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists, punk fans, revolutionaries and migrants, organized self-defence groups and revived the tradition of street-level anti-fascist demonstration.[10] Liberal columnist Peter Beinart writes that “in the late ’80s, left-wing punk fans in the United States began following suit, though they initially called their groups Anti-Racist Action, on the theory that Americans would be more familiar with fighting racism than they would be with fighting fascism. According to Mark Bray, the author of the forthcoming Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, these activists toured with popular alternative bands in the ’90s, trying to ensure that neo-Nazis did not recruit their fans. In 2002, they disrupted a speech by the head of the World Church of the Creator, a white-supremacist group in Pennsylvania; 25 people were arrested in the resulting brawl”.[10]

In the United States and Canada, activists ofAnti-Racist Action Network (ARA) the direct precursor of many contemporary US antifa groups whose growth was spurred by the punk rock[21] and skinhead scene of the late 1980s,[10][22] doggedly pursued Klansmen, neo-Nazis and other assorted white supremacists into the 2000s. Their motto was simple but bold: “We go where they go”. If Nazi skinheads handed out leaflets at a punk show in Indiana about how “Hitler was right”, ARA was there to show them the door. If fascists plastered downtown Alberta’s Edmonton with racist posters, ARA tore them down and replaced them with anti-racist slogans.[23] Other antifa groups in the U.S. have other genealogies, see for example in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where a group called the Baldies formed in 1987 with the intent to fight neo-Nazi groups directly.[9]

The antifa movement is composed of autonomous groups and thus has no formal organization.[10][24] Antifa groups either form loose support networks, such as NYC Antifa, or operate independently.[25] Activists typically organize protests via social media and through websites and email lists.[10][24] Some activists have built peer-to-peer networks, or use encrypted-texting services like Signal.[26] According to Salon, it is an organizing strategy, not a group of people.[27] While its numbers cannot be estimated accurately, the movement has grown since the 2016 presidential election and approximately 200 groups currently exist in the US, of varying sizes and levels of engagement.[16] The activists involved subscribe to a range of ideologies, typically on the left and they include anarchists, socialists and communists along with some liberals and social democrats.[28][29][30]

According to Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at the California State University, San Bernardino, Antifa activists participate in violent actions because “they believe that elites are controlling the government and the media. So they need to make a statement head-on against the people who they regard as racist”.[2] According to Mark Bray, a historian at Dartmouth College sympathetic to the antifa movement’s goals, the adherents “reject turning to the police or the state to halt the advance of white supremacy. Instead they advocate popular opposition to fascism as we witnessed in Charlottesville”.[29]

The idea of direct action is central to the antifa movement. Antifa organizer Scott Crow told an interviewer: “The idea in Antifa is that we go where they [right-wingers] go. That hate speech is not free speech. That if you are endangering people with what you say and the actions that are behind them, then you do not have the right to do that. And so we go to cause conflict, to shut them down where they are, because we don’t believe that Nazis or fascists of any stripe should have a mouthpiece”.[2] A manual posted on It’s Going Down, an anarchist website, warns against accepting “people who just want to fight”. It furthermore notes that “physically confronting and defending against fascists is a necessary part of anti-fascist work, but is not the only or even necessarily the most important part”.

According to Beinart, antifa activists “try to publicly identify white supremacists and get them fired from their jobs and evicted from their apartments”, in addition to “disrupt(ing) [sic] white-supremacist rallies, including by force”.[32] According to a Washington Post book review, antifa tactics include “no platforming”, i.e. denying their targets platforms from which to speak; obstructing their events and defacing their propaganda; and when antifa activists deem it necessary, deploying violence to deter them.[30] According to National Public Radio, “people who speak for the Antifa movement acknowledge they sometimes carry clubs and sticks” and their “approach is confrontational”.[33]CNN describes antifa as “known for causing damage to property during protests”.[2] Scott Crow, described by CNN as “a longtime Antifa organizer”, argues that destroying property is not a form of violence.[2] The groups have been associated with physical violence in public against police[34] and against people whose political views its activists deem repugnant.[35] Antifa activists used clubs and dyed liquids against the white supremacists in Charlottesville[36] and caused property damage.[2] In one incident, an apparent antifa supporter punched white supremacist Richard Spencer in the face as he was giving an impromptu street interview[37][38] and on another occasion, in Berkeley, it was reported that some threw Molotov cocktails.[2]

Apart from the other activities, antifa activists engage in mutual aid, such as disaster response in the case of Hurricane Harvey.[39][40] According to Natasha Lennard in The Nation, antifa “collectives are working with interfaith groups and churches in cities around the country to create a New Sanctuary Movement, continuing and expanding a 40-year-old practice of providing spaces for refugees and immigrants, which entails outright refusal to cooperate with ICE”.[41]

In June 2017, the antifa movement was linked to “anarchist extremism” by the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness.[42] In September 2017, an article in Politico stated that the website had obtained confidential documents and interviews indicating that in April 2016, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation believed that “anarchist extremists” were the primary instigators of violence at public rallies against a range of targets. The Department of Homeland Security was said to have classified their activities as domestic terrorism. Politico interviewed law enforcement officials who noted a rise in activity since the beginning of the Trump administration, particularly a rise in recruitment (and on the part of the far right as well) since the Charlottesville Unite the Right rally. Politico stated that one internal assessment acknowledged an inability to penetrate the groups’ “diffuse and decentralized organizational structure”. Politico also reported that the agencies were (as of April 2016) monitoring “conduct deemed potentially suspicious and indicative of terrorist activity”.[43]

Antifa groups, along with black bloc activists, were among those who protested the 2016 election of Donald Trump.[10][41] They also participated in the February 2017 Berkeley protests against alt-right[44][45][46][47] speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, where they gained mainstream attention,[24] with media reporting them “throwing Molotov cocktails and smashing windows”[2] and causing $100,000 worth of damage.[48] Before the talk, there were rumors that he planned to out undocumented students in his speech. Yiannopoulos denied the rumors, saying that he was not planning to target individual students, rather he planned to campaign against “sanctuary campuses”.[49][50][26]

In April 2017, two groups described as “anti-fascist/anarchist”, including the socialist/environmentalist Direct Action Alliance, threatened to disrupt the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade after hearing the Multnomah County Republican Party would participate. The parade organizers also received an anonymous email, saying: “You have seen how much power we have downtown and that the police cannot stop us from shutting down roads so please consider your decision wisely”. The two groups denied having anything to do with the email. The parade was ultimately canceled by the organizers due to safety concerns.[51][52]

On June 15, 2017, some antifa groups joined protestors at Evergreen State College to oppose Patriot Prayer’s event. Patriot Prayer was supporting biology professor Bret Weinstein who became the central figure in a controversy after he criticized changes to one of the college’s events. In addition to the peaceful antifa activists who held up a “community love” sign, USA Today reported that one slashed the tires of right-wing activist Joey Gibson and another was wrestled to the ground by Patriot Prayer activists after being seen with a knife.[53]

Antifa counter-protesters at the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017 “certainly used clubs and dyed liquids against the white supremacists”.[36] Journalist Adele Stan interviewed an antifa protester at the rally who said that the sticks carried by the protesters are a justifiable countermeasure to the fact that “the right has a goon squad”.[54] Some antifa participants at the Charlottesville rally chanted that counter-protesters should “punch a Nazi in the mouth”.[33] Antifa participants also protected Cornel West and various clergy from attack by white supremacists, with West stating he felt that antifa had “saved his life”.[55][56] Another religious leader stated that antifa activists defended the First United Methodist Church, where the Charlottesville Clergy Collective provided refreshments, music and training to the counter-protesters and “chased [the white supremacists] off with sticks”.[55][57]

Groups that had been preparing to protest the Boston Free Speech Rally saw their plans become viral following the violence in Charlottesville. The event drew a largely peaceful crowd of 40,000 counter-protestors. In The Atlantic, McKay Coppins stated that the 33 people arrested for violent incidents were “mostly egged on by the minority of ‘Antifa’ agitators in the crowd”.[58] President Trump described the protestors outside his August 2017 rally in Phoenix, Arizona as “Antifa”.[59]

During a Berkeley protest on August 27, 2017, an estimated one hundred antifa protesters joined a crowd of 2,0004,000 counter-protesters to attack a reported “handful” of alt-right demonstrators and Trump supporters who showed up for a “Say No to Marxism” rally that had been cancelled by organizers due to security concerns. Some antifa activists beat and kicked unarmed demonstrators[48][60] and threatened to smash the cameras of anyone who filmed them.[61]Jesse Arreguin, the mayor of Berkeley, suggested classifying the city’s antifa as a gang.[62] The group Patriot Prayer cancelled an event in San Francisco the same day following counter protests. Joey Gibson, the founder of Patriot Prayer, blamed antifa, along with By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), for breaking up the event.[63]

Antifa actions have been subject to criticism from Republicans, Democrats and political commentators in the U.S. media.[64][65][66]House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi condemned the violence of “Antifa” activists in Berkeley on August 29, 2017.[67] Conservative talk show host and Fox News contributor Laura Ingraham suggested labeling antifa as a terrorist organization.[68]Trevor Noah, host of the popular late-night television program The Daily Show jokingly referred to antifa as “Vegan ISIS”.[69] Several antifa protesters have been arrested for property damage, assault with a deadly weapon as well as for other charges.[70][71]

In August 2017, a petition requesting that “AntiFa” be classified by the Pentagon as a terrorist organization was launched on the White House petitioning system We the People. It gathered more than 100,000 signatures in three days and therefore under policy set by the Obama administration would have received an official review and response from the White House (at over 300,000 signatures, by late August it was the third most-signed submission posted).[72] However, the precedent set by the Obama administration of issuing formal responses to petitions which exceed the 100,000 signature threshold has not been continued by the Trump administration, which has not responded to any petitions on the site.[73] The originator of the “AntiFa” petition, who goes by the pseudonym “Microchip”, remarked to Politico that getting conservatives to share and discuss the petition was the entire point, rather than prompting any concrete action by the government. As of October 2017, the petition has over 350,000 signatures.[74]

In August 2017, a #PunchWhiteWomen photo hoax campaign was started by members of the alt-right in an attempt to discredit the antifa movement.[75] In August 2017, the image of British actress Anna Friel portraying a battered woman in a 2007 Women’s Aid anti-domestic violence campaign was re-purposed using fake antifa Twitter accounts organized by way of 4chan, which was discovered after an investigation by Bellingcat researcher Eliot Higgins. The image is captioned “53% of white women voted for Trump, 53% of white women should look like this” and includes an antifa flag. Another image featuring an injured woman is captioned “She chose to be a Nazi. Choices have consequences” and includes the hashtag #PunchANazi. Eliot Higgins remarked to the BBC that “[t]his was a transparent and quite pathetic attempt, but I wouldn’t be surprised if white nationalist groups try to mount more sophisticated attacks in the future”.[76]

A report by ProPublica said that both overtly and covertly pro-Russian social media accounts were found using the hashtag #Antifa in reference to the events and aftermath of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.[77] Nafeesa Syeed of Bloomberg reported that “[t]he most-tweeted link in the Russian-linked network followed by the researchers was a petition to declare Antifa a terrorist group”.[78]

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December 22, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

‘Antifa’ Falsely Linked to Amtrak Train Derailment by Right …

The anti-fascism movement, “antifa,”which is more of a protesting tactic than a formal group, has been the subject of blamein a growing number of bizarreandfalseconspiracy theories floated by right-wing pundits in recent months.

Take the mass shooting in Las Vegas that claimed scores of lives:Antifa was not involved, despite a theory otherwise. Then, antifawas blamed for a fake civil warplot. It never happenedbecause such a thing was never planned. Antifawas also blamed for a mass shooting in a Texas church. Again, the shooting had nothing to do with anti-fascism, or with left-wing protesters in general.

On Monday, some of the usual conspiracy theory suspectsconservative media personality Mike Cernovich, President Donald Trump mega-fan Jack Posobiec, the far-right website Gateway Punditand Alex Joness InfoWarsall brought up antifain the context ofa fatal train derailment in Washington state, and they did so before investigators had even announced any formalexplanation for the crash.

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What we know about the derailment is that more than a dozencars ofan Amtrak train jumped the tracks, injuring scores of peopleand killing an unknown number of others near Dupont, an area south of Tacoma, Washington. What we dont know is what caused the accident,though right-wing pundits were pushingout insinuations before a death toll couldbe established.

Cernovich, who has pushed several other conspiracies tied to antifa,observed to his fans that ANTIFA has a long and verifiable track record of obstructing train tracks, committing violence. His friend Posobiec, who on Twitter doxed one of the women who accused Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct this November, leaking her work address and a recent photo to his followers, used the forum to tie antifato the deadly derailment. Antifa has targeted trains for weeks very near where the Amtrak derailment tragedy took place today, Posobiec mused. Gateway Pundit pushed the theory as well, falsely accusingIts Going Down, a well-trafficked antifascist website, of covering up its associations with the derailment.PJ Media, another right-wing site, picked up on the conspiracy, as did Jones.

The scene of a portion of the Interstate 5 highway after an Amtrak high-speed train derailed from an overpass early on December 18, near the city of Tacoma, Washington. KATHRYN ELSESSER/AFP/Getty Images

FLASHBACK: ANTIFA ADMITS TRAIN TRACK SABOTAGE NEAR TACOMA TO STOP FRACKING, a headline on InfoWars read. Antifa behind Tacoma train wreck?

The basis of the conspiracy appears to be a post published on a website called Puget Sound Anarchists that was rerunon a number of left-leaning sites and activist blogs earlier this year.

Early in the morning of April 20th we poured concrete on the train tracks that lead out of the Port of Olympia to block any trains from using the tracks, the April 21post read, adding that the groupnotified the train company of its actions. We did this not to avoid damaging a train, nothing would bring bigger grins to our faces, but to avoid the risk of injuring railway workers.

Blocking trains that carry fracking equipmentand other materials related to the production of fossil fuelshas long been a tactic of environmental protesters. In May 2016, for example, 52 activists were cited for trespassing in Washington State after blocking a train that was headed to two refineries. That protest was part of the so-called Break Freeprotests, urging people to disengage with fossil fuels due to issues related to man-made climate change.

People on the right became familiar with the April post onPuget Sound Anarchists because it ran concurrently on the website It’s Going Down, which has gained a widereach by reporting on alleged fascism and left-wing activism from an anti-fascist perspective following Trump’s election. After right-wing provocateurs seized on the post as something meant to incite violence (the post goes out of its way to discourage violence), It’s Going Down denounced the accusations to Newsweek and said it removed the post from its websitemonths before Monday’s train derailment.

Newsweek asked Cernovich why he felt it was important to talk about antifa in the context of this train incident. He wrote in response that ANTIFA groups shouldnt pour concrete on train tracks; however there is no proof they did.He said that the derailment could be an accident, poor infrastructure, antifa or ISIS. (The Islamic State militant grouphas also been blamed for the accident on the imageboard site 8chan, and other sites that traffic in conspiracy theories.) Trump himself cited poor infrastructure as a national issue in the aftermath of the derailment, and declined to name any other potential causes.

Anti-fascist activists have expressed frustration to Newsweek over having to repeatedly push back against a wave of what they call baseless conspiracy theories attached to their protests this year. They argue that the conspiracies are being spun deliberately and in bad faith. One comparedthe trend to the demonization of environmentalists and Black Lives Matter activists.

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December 20, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

What is ‘Antifa’? And why is the media so reluctant to …

Posted April 18, 2017 10:00 PM by Chris Pandolfo

An injured Trump supporter holds a sign during a free speech rally at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley, California, United States of America on April 15, 2017. Emily Molli | NurPhoto

Are all Trump supporters violent white supremacists? Clearly not. But you might not know that based on some of the reporting flying around this week.

The mainstream media are oversimplifying what happened this past weekend when riots broke out in Berkeley, California, during a rally for free speech put on by Trump backers. In doing so, the reporting implies that those supporting the president were prepared for violence while those in opposition are simply opposing fascism.

Twenty-one people were arrested Sunday after fistfights broke out near Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park, where a rally for free speech put on by a pro-Trump group Liberty Revival Alliance was scheduled. Rocks were thrown, and sticks and skateboards were used to beat people. Of course, the MSM reporting is slanted.

The Los Angeles Times report on the fighting, for example, takes pains to show how a member of a citizen militia group originating from Montana who came to the rally to protect Trump supporters mightve been looking for a fight. I dont mind hitting the counter-demonstrators, one man tells the Times. In fact, I would kind of enjoy it.

The paper also interviewed a woman on the Left fed up with the violence, a vendor selling organic produce, and a guy handing out empathy kisses. The message, clearly, is that those on the Right were looking for trouble and those on the Left responded.

What the Times and other outlets dont tell you is this was not simply a clash of Trump supporters and counter-protesters.

Just who are the groups involved?

How do we stop the mainstream media from warping the national narrative? We push back together. With the truth. Be the first to receive CRTVs free weapon against the worst the media has to offer. Introducing WTF MSM!?

As some in the mainstream media tell it, on the one hand you have racist white nationalists in support of Trump. This is true. Alt-Right activists such as Nathan Damigo who founded the white supremacist organization Identity Europa can be seen delivering a vicious right-hook to a woman (who, in turn, was assaulting him). But by no means was every Trump backer at this rally for free speech a violent neo-Nazi.

On the other hand, as SFGate reported, several liberal groups were there to counter protest in opposition to Trump. But these were not just milquetoast liberals there to oppose a president they dont like. Specifically, as the Los Angeles Times notes in a different piece, officials raised concerns about the militant black bloc of anti-fascist (Antifa for short) rioters. But dont take the term anti-fascist on its face, as the mainstream media is wont to do. Understand who these people actually are.

Antifa is made up of self-described anarchists radical left-wing thugs who employ violence and intimidation to advance their beliefs.

Theyve shown up previously at Berkeley to shut down a free speech event hosted by provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, leaving damaged property, fires, and assault victims in their wake. They also violently disrupted a March 4 Trump event in March. But you arent hearing as much about Antifa violence as you are about the Alt-Right.

In fact, some outlets are offering outright praise for Antifa.

Ask Esquire magazine and Antifa rioters are noble, anti-racist counter demonstrators a sort of Justice League vigilante group dedicated to shutting down fascist protests.

But this is a radical movement that traces its roots back to World War II, as Mother Jones recounts in The long history of Nazi punching. They employ so-called righteous violence against what they consider to be the forces of fascism. What fascism is nowadays seems to be a subjective definition belonging to whichever particular Antifa thugs show up en force.

One might say Antifas violent tactics, employed around the world, are fascist.

Here in the contemporary U.S., waves of Antifa-driven riots are on the rise in in an effort to silence President Trump and his supporters by any means necessary. Antifa thugs show up at left-wing demonstrations to breed chaos, destruction, and bloodshed. They blend in with and are sometimes aided by the crowd, as National Reviews David French explained in the aftermath of Yiannopoulos Berkeley event in February:

What youll notice (and what youll experience, if you ever find yourself in the middle of violent left-wing protest) is that the rioters and the peaceful protesters have a symbiotic relationship. The rioters break people and destroy things, then melt back into a crowd that often quickly and purposefully closes behind them. Theyre typically cheered wildly (to be sure, some yell at them to stop) and often treated as heroes by the rest of the mob almost like theyre the SEAL Team Six of left-wing protest.

The Battle of Berkeley, as some are calling it, was a dangerous, violent, bloody mess. Instigators, Antifa and Alt-Right, should be roundly condemned.

But at the moment, the American people are only getting one side of the story from the mainstream media. The majority of the MSMs intense focus is applied to white nationalist groups, while Antifa is being cast in a heroic role opposed to the Alt-Rights violence.

The mainstream media wax poetic on the dangers of the nationalist populist Alt-Right. They ought to be wary of normalizing Antifas brand of radical Alt-Left violence.

Editor’s note: The title to this piece has been updated to correct a grammatical error.

Chris Pandolfo is a staff writer and type-shouter for Conservative Review. He holds a B.A. in Politics and Economics from Hillsdale College. His interests are Conservative Political Philosophy, the American Founding, and Progressive Rock. Follow him on Twitter for doom-saying and great album recommendations@ChrisCPandolfo.

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December 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa – Wiktionary

See also: antifa and antif

Contents

Antifa

anti-fascist movement

Short for Anti-Fascistische Actie.

Antifaf

Short for Antifaschismus and/or Antifaschistische Aktion.

Antifaf (genitive Antifa, plural Antifas)

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December 12, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Did an Antifascist Group Put Up Anti-White Posters in Seattle?

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On 5 December 2016, a photographpurportedly showing a poster warning against the propagation of whites was published to the web site Imgur. A few days later, University of Washingtonscollege newspaperreported that a similar poster had been taped to a pole near the campus bookstore:

This past Monday, Dec. 5, a friend of mine noticed and took a picture of this poster taped up near the UW Book Store. Addressed to those who choose to date white people, it warns that propagation of whites will not be tolerated, and that those who choose to date white people have been warned.

This is a crystal-clear threat against people of color in the Seattle community. I would argue that, implicitly, it is especially a threat against women of color. I know such women who felt shocked and afraid for their safety after seeing its toxic message, a message that is unequivocally a racist and violent threat.

On 6 December 2016, Emerald City Antifa postedto Facebook a message saying that they had nothing to do with either the creation or the distribution of the poster. It also responded to several comments explaining that the message expressed on the poster was not in line with their views:

Another heads up we did not create or distribute this one either. This is not our message. This come across like what white supremacists tell each other about anti-fascists. Not very clever! Still, annoying.

Again, we did not post this sign. This isnt even a thinly disguised political agenda by far right trolls the language could be used as a recruiting technique to convince people that white people are under attack as a group, vs white supremacy is under attack as a systemic oppression.

Because so many people have been asking us again, heres our response to these posters:

We did not make them. We did not put them up. This is not what we believe. The only people aware of what Antifa does and still thinks were anti-white are racists. Period.

We are much more ideologically sound and arty than that KKKrap. Promise.

Read the words of it. Its exactly like their fantasy/nightmare of white genocide and anti-whiteness that the think anyone who hates racism believes in. We dont have any actual evidence they did this, but this is the type of shit they do.

Date whoever you like.

It is unclear who was responsible for creating this poster, but it may have been an attempt to smear this particular group or divert attention from the people who actually put up the posters. Shortly after the image was posted, several messages encouraging people to spread a similar poster were posted to the web site 4chan:

You guys should spread these posters instead of the alt-right and white identity stuff. Go overboard with irony like Yuri described.

Tbf, this is the right way to redpill the population. Theyre too dumb and sheepled to wake up when shown facts, so you have to go so far into fiction that they cant suspend their belief any more. What will save the white race is not a new wave of brownshirts purifying ideology, it is an explosion of Antifa that then eats itself.

I wonder if I can get a printer to print these

I honestly cant tell if this is actually an ANTIFA poster, or an alt-righter who posted this to stop racemixing.

Someone should start a low key effort to spread propaganda to make antifa look even dumber

The domainEmeraldCityAntifa.com does not belong to the anti-fascist group, but instead the is being used to promote a book byMilo Yiannopoulos, Breitbartsformer senior editor, who shared the imageto his Facebook page on 28 March 2017. The Global Antifa page claimed that Yiannopoulos was using fake racist flyers to create buzz for his book:

Milo Yiannopoulos is at it again! This time, he is using fake racist flyers to make Emerald City Antifa in Seattle look like bigots! If you see these flyers in Seattle, rip them down! ECA would never post garbage like this!

He has even created a fake ECA website that links people to his own websites and Breitbart articles. Youre all getting trolled by Milo:

It is unclear if Yiannopoulos created the poster or if he was simply capitalizing on the controversy. According to Who.is, the web site was not created until February 2017, more than two months after the poster started to circulate.

We have reached out to the group for more information.

Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here.

Bruell, Alex. Ridiculous Anti-White Politics Are Threatening People of Color in Seattle. The Daily. 9 December 2016.

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UC Berkeley conservative student sues Antifa member over …

The former president of the Berkeley College Republicans at the University of California, Berkeley said Wednesday he is suing a prominent member of an Antifa group for allegedly threatening and harassing him and others on campus.

Mark Meuser, one of the lawyers representing Troy Worden, announced the lawsuit seeking more than $100,000 of damages against Yvette Felarca in a press release,The Washington Examiner reported.

Felarca is the leader of By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), an Antifa, or anti-fascist, group.

Felarca filed a frivolous restraining order that restricted Worden’s First and Second Amendment rights and made it difficult for him to move around the campus to attend classes. The restraining order was dismissed on Oct. 27, 2017,” Meuser said.

In a previous interview with Fox News, Worden he’s had to face months of “talking, harassment and even violence,” along with other UC Berkeley College Republicans (BCR).

I have to look behind my shoulder whenever I am on campus and especially when I am engaged in political activism, Worden said.

The No. 1 public university in the world and the so-called birthplace of the free speech movement is anything but. It is the place where Americas conservative youth are daily under threat of violence, lacking the support of the university administration, police, or city,” he added. “The Free Speech Movement is dead, and the left has killed it.

ANTIFA STALKING UC BERKELEYS CONSERVATIVE STUDENTS, GROUP SAYS

BCR members told Fox News they are being targeted by Antifa, including Twitter “doxxing,” a practice of publishing personal information online.

Felarca was charged this summer by the Sacramento County District Attorneys Office with assault and inciting and participating in a riot for an incident in 2016 where she was filmed hitting a man at a protest,the East Bay Times reported.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday also targets her attorney, Shanta Driver, who is the National Chair and founder of the organization BAMN.

“Felarca and her attorney attempted to make free speech expensive, and it is time that they pay for their misuse of the court system,” said Meuser.

The attorney representing Felarca in the latest legal action told the East Bay Times the motion filed by Worden was frivolous.

Troy Worden is a stalker, Ronald Cruz of Oakland-based United for Equality and Affirmative Action Legal Defense Fund told the newspaper. This motion is his attempt to use the courts to continue stalking Ms. Felarca. He stalked Yvette Felarca and its all on the record. The First Amendment does not give Worden the right to stalk people, or to violate a restraining order and be in Felarcas face and take video of her for 30 minutes, which Worden did after the court commanded him to stay away.

Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

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Antifa’s Berkeley Violence Ought to Frighten the Left …

If 2016 is the year when our political parties failed, inflicting on America arguably its worst presidential choice in our nations history, then 2017 is when our broader institutions began to lose their collective minds. This is the year when reasonable men surrendered to unreason when political tribalism trumped human decency.

The primary tragedy of Charlottesville was the loss of a young womans life. The secondary tragedy was the distortion of our political culture. The president of the United States actually declared some portion of a collection of neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and alt-right white nationalists to be very fine people. He just couldnt bring himself to completely disavow men and women whod supported him since the day he descended down the escalator at Trump Tower.

Yet rather than doing the easiest and most sensible thing in the world condemning white supremacy while also condemning political violence on the far left some portion of the left-wing intelligentsia actually decided to embrace their own thugs. They supported Antifa. They decided to lionize some of the worst people in American life. And in so doing, they actually compared them to the American heroes who stormed Omaha Beach. The tweets below, as the saying goes, did not age well.

First, heres Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, one of the best and most respected political journals in American life:

In fact, this comparison of the alt-left with the warriors of the Greatest Generation was hardly unique to Goldberg. Heres CNNs Chris Cuomo:

And heres CNN contributor and former Hillary Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon:

Indeed, for a time the very notion that a person could and should condemn both Antifa and the alt-right generated extreme rage online. How dare you equate fascists and anti-fascists! Outlets such as the Washington Post and CNN published fawning apologetics and romanticized profiles of the far lefts vigilante thugs. Antifa had its pop-culture moment.

It was disgraceful. All of it. And this weekend Antifa struck again. A small group of peaceful right-wing protesters gathered in Berkeley. Black-clad Antifa thugs attacked. The Washington Post has the story:

Their faces hidden behind black bandannas and hoodies, about 100 anarchists and antifa anti-fascist members barreled into a protest Sunday afternoon in Berkeleys Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park.

Jumping over plastic and concrete barriers, the group melted into a larger crowd of around 2,000 that had marched peacefully throughout the sunny afternoon for a Rally Against Hate gathering.

Shortly after, violence began to flare. A pepper-spray-wielding Trump supporter was smacked to the ground with homemade shields. Another was attacked by five black-clad antifa members, each windmilling kicks and punches into a man desperately trying to protect himself. A conservative group leader retreated for safety behind a line of riot police as marchers chucked water bottles, shot off pepper spray and screamed, Fascist go home!

Even worse, the police literally stood aside and let Antifa take over a public park. It allowed mob rule and then justified abdicating its responsibility to protect the liberty and safety of Berkeleys citizens by claiming that it wanted people to freely assemble. This is a sad joke. It gave control to Antifa. It empowered the hecklers veto.

The video evidence of violence is appalling. Antifa isnt heroic. Its brutal:

As vicious as they are, in a functioning constitutional republic, Antifa is a manageable, short-term problem. A vigorous police presence followed by a wave of arrests and aggressive prosecutions would largely end the threat. The men and women of Antifa arent insurgents; theyre little more than a cowardly gang of left-wing thugs.

Far more serious is their effect on the rule of law and political discourse. Has hatred for Trump so blinded Americas liberal elite that its willing to romanticize violence? Is their respect for the First Amendment so fragile that the thrill of watching alleged members of the alt-right get punched in the face is worth more than preserving core constitutional liberties? Have the police forgotten their role as guardians of American liberty?

This isnt #resistance, its lawlessness. Its not anti-fascism, its violent repression. Is the rule now that any gathering of Trump supporters alt-right or not in any blue enclave risks a violent response? Have authorities, through a combination of cowardice and political correctness, ceded control of the streets in key American towns to a Marxist/anarchist mob?

Antifa and its elite apologists are sending a clear message of hate and loathing to millions of Americans who dont have a fascist bone in their bodies to the millions of good people who voted for Donald Trump. Antifa doesnt occupy the moral high ground. Its apologists have no grounds to sneer at anyone. Instead, theyre competing with the alt-right for control of the political sewer.

Condemn Antifa now. Prosecute its members now. Or watch America continue to tear itself apart. Violent Marxists are evil. Violent fascists are evil. If we cant understand both of those basic truths simultaneously, then we have truly lost our way.

READ MORE:The Roots of Left-Wing ViolenceGangs of Berkeley: Antifas Pathetic DelusionsAntifa and the Alt-Right, Growing in Opposition to One Another

David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and an attorney.

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‘Antifa’ violence in Berkeley spurs soul-searching within …

Of the dozens of organizations that turned out for Sundays mass protest against racism here, one group was impossible to miss.

Its members dressed head to toe in black, with masked faces and some bearing pastel-painted riot shields that read no hate. These 100 or so militants billed themselves as a security force for progressive counter-protesters, vowing to protect them from far-right agitators.

But as the protest got underway, some of those in masks would resort to mob violence, attacking a small showing of supporters of President Trump and others they accused, sometimes inaccurately, of being white supremacists or Nazis.

The graphic videos of those attacks have spurred soul-searching within the leftist activist movement in the Bay Area and beyond. Emotions remain raw in the wake of this months white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., which left one woman dead and dozens injured.

Trump received blistering criticism for equating the behavior of Klansmen and neo-Nazis to the actions of those who opposed them. Some fear that Sundays violence would only help advance the idea that the two sides are the same.

This is food for the adversary, said sociologist Todd Gitlin, a founder of Students for a Democratic Society, which organized the first national protests against the Vietnam War. He pointed out that violent acts committed by a few will almost always hijack the narrative of the entire protest, and that it is happening now should be no surprise.

Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times

Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley.

Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Gitlin also described what he sees as a push by the anti-fascist also called antifa movement to put themselves on the map of protest by using violence to intimidate both political opponents and those on the left who promote non-violence. One of the biggest banners at the Berkeley demonstration carried the message Avenge Charlottesville.

Militants who showed up Sunday were part of a multifaceted rally in which church leaders sang gospel and anti-fascists shouted profanities. Berkeley police estimated more than 4,000 people came out to take over a city park where far-right activists had called for an anti-Marxism rally. The organizer canceled the event Friday, citing security concerns, but a small number of far-right activists showed up anyway.

By the end of the day, 13 people had been arrested, one on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon and three on battery charges.

Jeff Conant, a member of an East Bay collective of anti-racist demonstrators known as Showing Up For Racial Justice, said march organizers asked allies in the antifa movement to play a defensive role in the rally not to engage in or start violence.

Those in the black hoods fell in with the marchers, while the lead truck for the march carried stacks of pastel-painted riot shields that anti-fascist demonstrators later raised against police.

Participants further were told not to record the day on their cellphones, and urged to write a legal aid phone number on their arms in case of arrest.

The march reached a park, which police had already cleared of far-right figures. The demonstrators lined up behind their shields against a police barricade and officers armed with riot guns.

Elsewhere, the hooded group would mob, and in some cases kick and beat, a handful of far-right supporters. Several antifa members were seen using their shields to batter opponents, including one who was slammed into the back of a man running out of Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Berkeley police said they were aware of four such incidents during the day.

The images sparked criticism from both conservatives as well as some liberals who had hoped the march would be peaceful after several violent confrontations between left and right extremists in Berkeley earlier this year.

After the crowd began to disperse, Berkeley Police Chief Andrew Greenwood held a tense discussion with a church organizer concerned that peaceful protesters would be lumped in with the militants. Greenwood said his officers had seen antifa and black bloc forces preparing alongside the rest of the demonstrators, at a staging point some four blocks away.

They were practicing with weapons, Greenwood said.

Conant said the drills were defensive, justified by violence at other demonstrations in the past year.

Organizers defended the militant force, saying it was necessary because police do not wade into protest brawls themselves. Far-right activists also criticized police for not better protecting them.

Berkeley police said having officers jump into the crowd would have inflamed already an already volatile situation. However, on Sunday, police several times rescued people chased by the crowd or escorted them out.

Among those appalled by the increasingly militant force are radicals from the 1960s peace movement.

Political scientist Jo Freeman, part of the radical student movement that forced UC Berkeley to permit political speech five decades ago, said she was dismayed at the effort that went into silencing opposition. She drew similarities between those who threatened her and other freedom marchers in the South in the 1960s, and those who bully the far right now.

It is not uncommon for societies to produce a hate squad, Freeman said. People who want to suppress the right to speak they are everywhere.

Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley.

Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Kitty Stryker, a Berkeley activist affiliated with groups like Struggalo Circus, which offer medical aid during protests, said she was heartbroken to see media coverage of Sundays demonstration focus on violence. She said she saw a Trump supporter pepper spray a black bloc member and said it was disingenuous to say anti-fascists alone incited violence.

I do think there was a lot of anger over Charlottesville, as there should be, Stryker said. But I also think there was a sudden realization that many of the instigators in Charlottesville had been coming to Berkeley for months to beat up anti-fascists.

UC Berkeley is reviewing the weekend demonstrations as it plans how to handle a series of conservative political speakers in late September. Campus spokesman Dan Mogulof said student safety is the first priority there is nothing more important.

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ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

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ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

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Antifa (United States) – Wikipedia

This article is about the U.S. political movement. For other groups with similar names in other languages, see Antifa. The Antifa (English: or )[1] movement is a conglomeration of autonomous, self-styled anti-fascist groups in the United States.[2][3][4] The principal feature of antifa groups is their opposition to fascism through the use of direct action.[5] They engage in militant protest tactics, which has included property damage and physical violence.[2][6][7][8] They tend to be anti-government and anti-capitalist[9] and they are predominantly far-left and militant left,[10][5] which includes anarchists, communists and socialists.[11][12][13][14] Their stated focus is on fighting far-right and white supremacist ideologies directly, rather than on encouraging pro-left policy.[5] The antifa movement is a new force in American politics since the election of Donald Trump. It draws in part from a tradition of anti-fascism in the United States which stretches back a century, tracing its roots to the 1920s and 1930s, when militant leftists were involved in battles against American pro-Nazi organizations such as theFriends of New Germany.[15] Although there is no organizational connection, the lineage of antifa in America can be traced to Weimar Germany,[16] where the first group described as “antifa” was Antifaschistische Aktion, formed in 1932 with the involvement of the Communist Party of Germany.[17] After World War II, but prior to the development of the modern antifa movement, violent confrontations with Fascist elements continued sporadically. In 1958 over 500 Lumbee men armed with rocks, sticks and firearms attacked and disrupted a Ku Klux Klan rally, wounding several Klansmen in an event known as the Battle of Hayes Pond. In 1979 the Communist Workers’ Party confronted a local Ku Klux Klan chapter, first by disrupting a screening of The Birth of a Nation in China Grove, North Carolina and later organizing a rally and a march against the Klan on November 3 called the “Death to the Klan March” by the CWP.[18] The Maoists distributed flyers that “called for radical, even violent opposition to the Klan”[19], suggesting the Klan should be physically beaten and chased out of town.”[20] In response, as the marchers collected, a caravan of ten cars (and a van) filled with an estimated 40 KKK and American Nazi Party members confronted the protesters, culminating in a shootout known as the Greensboro Massacre. Modern antifa politics can be traced to resistance to waves of xenophobia, the emergence of white power culture and the infiltration of neo-Nazi skinheads in Britain’s punk scene in the 1970s and 1980s.In response to neo-Nazism gaining prominence in Germany, after the fall of the Berlin Wall unleashed a violent backlash, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists, punk fans, revolutionaries and migrants, organized self-defence groups and revived the tradition of street-level anti-fascist demonstration.[10] Liberal columnist Peter Beinart writes that “in the late ’80s, left-wing punk fans in the United States began following suit, though they initially called their groups Anti-Racist Action, on the theory that Americans would be more familiar with fighting racism than they would be with fighting fascism. According to Mark Bray, the author of the forthcoming Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, these activists toured with popular alternative bands in the ’90s, trying to ensure that neo-Nazis did not recruit their fans. In 2002, they disrupted a speech by the head of the World Church of the Creator, a white-supremacist group in Pennsylvania; 25 people were arrested in the resulting brawl”.[10] In the United States and Canada, activists ofAnti-Racist Action Network (ARA) the direct precursor of many contemporary US antifa groups whose growth was spurred by the punk rock[21] and skinhead scene of the late 1980s,[10][22] doggedly pursued Klansmen, neo-Nazis and other assorted white supremacists into the 2000s. Their motto was simple but bold: “We go where they go”. If Nazi skinheads handed out leaflets at a punk show in Indiana about how “Hitler was right”, ARA was there to show them the door. If fascists plastered downtown Alberta’s Edmonton with racist posters, ARA tore them down and replaced them with anti-racist slogans.[23] Other antifa groups in the U.S. have other genealogies, see for example in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where a group called the Baldies formed in 1987 with the intent to fight neo-Nazi groups directly.[9] The antifa movement is composed of autonomous groups and thus has no formal organization.[10][24] Antifa groups either form loose support networks, such as NYC Antifa, or operate independently.[25] Activists typically organize protests via social media and through websites and email lists.[10][24] Some activists have built peer-to-peer networks, or use encrypted-texting services like Signal.[26] According to Salon, it is an organizing strategy, not a group of people.[27] While its numbers cannot be estimated accurately, the movement has grown since the 2016 presidential election and approximately 200 groups currently exist in the US, of varying sizes and levels of engagement.[16] The activists involved subscribe to a range of ideologies, typically on the left and they include anarchists, socialists and communists along with some liberals and social democrats.[28][29][30] According to Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at the California State University, San Bernardino, Antifa activists participate in violent actions because “they believe that elites are controlling the government and the media. So they need to make a statement head-on against the people who they regard as racist”.[2] According to Mark Bray, a historian at Dartmouth College sympathetic to the antifa movement’s goals, the adherents “reject turning to the police or the state to halt the advance of white supremacy. Instead they advocate popular opposition to fascism as we witnessed in Charlottesville”.[29] The idea of direct action is central to the antifa movement. Antifa organizer Scott Crow told an interviewer: “The idea in Antifa is that we go where they [right-wingers] go. That hate speech is not free speech. That if you are endangering people with what you say and the actions that are behind them, then you do not have the right to do that. And so we go to cause conflict, to shut them down where they are, because we don’t believe that Nazis or fascists of any stripe should have a mouthpiece”.[2] A manual posted on It’s Going Down, an anarchist website, warns against accepting “people who just want to fight”. It furthermore notes that “physically confronting and defending against fascists is a necessary part of anti-fascist work, but is not the only or even necessarily the most important part”. According to Beinart, antifa activists “try to publicly identify white supremacists and get them fired from their jobs and evicted from their apartments”, in addition to “disrupt(ing) [sic] white-supremacist rallies, including by force”.[32] According to a Washington Post book review, antifa tactics include “no platforming”, i.e. denying their targets platforms from which to speak; obstructing their events and defacing their propaganda; and when antifa activists deem it necessary, deploying violence to deter them.[30] According to National Public Radio, “people who speak for the Antifa movement acknowledge they sometimes carry clubs and sticks” and their “approach is confrontational”.[33]CNN describes antifa as “known for causing damage to property during protests”.[2] Scott Crow, described by CNN as “a longtime Antifa organizer”, argues that destroying property is not a form of violence.[2] The groups have been associated with physical violence in public against police[34] and against people whose political views its activists deem repugnant.[35] Antifa activists used clubs and dyed liquids against the white supremacists in Charlottesville[36] and caused property damage.[2] In one incident, an apparent antifa supporter punched white supremacist Richard Spencer in the face as he was giving an impromptu street interview[37][38] and on another occasion, in Berkeley, it was reported that some threw Molotov cocktails.[2] Apart from the other activities, antifa activists engage in mutual aid, such as disaster response in the case of Hurricane Harvey.[39][40] According to Natasha Lennard in The Nation, antifa “collectives are working with interfaith groups and churches in cities around the country to create a New Sanctuary Movement, continuing and expanding a 40-year-old practice of providing spaces for refugees and immigrants, which entails outright refusal to cooperate with ICE”.[41] In June 2017, the antifa movement was linked to “anarchist extremism” by the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness.[42] In September 2017, an article in Politico stated that the website had obtained confidential documents and interviews indicating that in April 2016, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation believed that “anarchist extremists” were the primary instigators of violence at public rallies against a range of targets. The Department of Homeland Security was said to have classified their activities as domestic terrorism. Politico interviewed law enforcement officials who noted a rise in activity since the beginning of the Trump administration, particularly a rise in recruitment (and on the part of the far right as well) since the Charlottesville Unite the Right rally. Politico stated that one internal assessment acknowledged an inability to penetrate the groups’ “diffuse and decentralized organizational structure”. Politico also reported that the agencies were (as of April 2016) monitoring “conduct deemed potentially suspicious and indicative of terrorist activity”.[43] Antifa groups, along with black bloc activists, were among those who protested the 2016 election of Donald Trump.[10][41] They also participated in the February 2017 Berkeley protests against alt-right[44][45][46][47] speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, where they gained mainstream attention,[24] with media reporting them “throwing Molotov cocktails and smashing windows”[2] and causing $100,000 worth of damage.[48] Before the talk, there were rumors that he planned to out undocumented students in his speech. Yiannopoulos denied the rumors, saying that he was not planning to target individual students, rather he planned to campaign against “sanctuary campuses”.[49][50][26] In April 2017, two groups described as “anti-fascist/anarchist”, including the socialist/environmentalist Direct Action Alliance, threatened to disrupt the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade after hearing the Multnomah County Republican Party would participate. The parade organizers also received an anonymous email, saying: “You have seen how much power we have downtown and that the police cannot stop us from shutting down roads so please consider your decision wisely”. The two groups denied having anything to do with the email. The parade was ultimately canceled by the organizers due to safety concerns.[51][52] On June 15, 2017, some antifa groups joined protestors at Evergreen State College to oppose Patriot Prayer’s event. Patriot Prayer was supporting biology professor Bret Weinstein who became the central figure in a controversy after he criticized changes to one of the college’s events. In addition to the peaceful antifa activists who held up a “community love” sign, USA Today reported that one slashed the tires of right-wing activist Joey Gibson and another was wrestled to the ground by Patriot Prayer activists after being seen with a knife.[53] Antifa counter-protesters at the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017 “certainly used clubs and dyed liquids against the white supremacists”.[36] Journalist Adele Stan interviewed an antifa protester at the rally who said that the sticks carried by the protesters are a justifiable countermeasure to the fact that “the right has a goon squad”.[54] Some antifa participants at the Charlottesville rally chanted that counter-protesters should “punch a Nazi in the mouth”.[33] Antifa participants also protected Cornel West and various clergy from attack by white supremacists, with West stating he felt that antifa had “saved his life”.[55][56] Another religious leader stated that antifa activists defended the First United Methodist Church, where the Charlottesville Clergy Collective provided refreshments, music and training to the counter-protesters and “chased [the white supremacists] off with sticks”.[55][57] Groups that had been preparing to protest the Boston Free Speech Rally saw their plans become viral following the violence in Charlottesville. The event drew a largely peaceful crowd of 40,000 counter-protestors. In The Atlantic, McKay Coppins stated that the 33 people arrested for violent incidents were “mostly egged on by the minority of ‘Antifa’ agitators in the crowd”.[58] President Trump described the protestors outside his August 2017 rally in Phoenix, Arizona as “Antifa”.[59] During a Berkeley protest on August 27, 2017, an estimated one hundred antifa protesters joined a crowd of 2,0004,000 counter-protesters to attack a reported “handful” of alt-right demonstrators and Trump supporters who showed up for a “Say No to Marxism” rally that had been cancelled by organizers due to security concerns. Some antifa activists beat and kicked unarmed demonstrators[48][60] and threatened to smash the cameras of anyone who filmed them.[61]Jesse Arreguin, the mayor of Berkeley, suggested classifying the city’s antifa as a gang.[62] The group Patriot Prayer cancelled an event in San Francisco the same day following counter protests. Joey Gibson, the founder of Patriot Prayer, blamed antifa, along with By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), for breaking up the event.[63] Antifa actions have been subject to criticism from Republicans, Democrats and political commentators in the U.S. media.[64][65][66]House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi condemned the violence of “Antifa” activists in Berkeley on August 29, 2017.[67] Conservative talk show host and Fox News contributor Laura Ingraham suggested labeling antifa as a terrorist organization.[68]Trevor Noah, host of the popular late-night television program The Daily Show jokingly referred to antifa as “Vegan ISIS”.[69] Several antifa protesters have been arrested for property damage, assault with a deadly weapon as well as for other charges.[70][71] In August 2017, a petition requesting that “AntiFa” be classified by the Pentagon as a terrorist organization was launched on the White House petitioning system We the People. It gathered more than 100,000 signatures in three days and therefore under policy set by the Obama administration would have received an official review and response from the White House (at over 300,000 signatures, by late August it was the third most-signed submission posted).[72] However, the precedent set by the Obama administration of issuing formal responses to petitions which exceed the 100,000 signature threshold has not been continued by the Trump administration, which has not responded to any petitions on the site.[73] The originator of the “AntiFa” petition, who goes by the pseudonym “Microchip”, remarked to Politico that getting conservatives to share and discuss the petition was the entire point, rather than prompting any concrete action by the government. As of October 2017, the petition has over 350,000 signatures.[74] In August 2017, a #PunchWhiteWomen photo hoax campaign was started by members of the alt-right in an attempt to discredit the antifa movement.[75] In August 2017, the image of British actress Anna Friel portraying a battered woman in a 2007 Women’s Aid anti-domestic violence campaign was re-purposed using fake antifa Twitter accounts organized by way of 4chan, which was discovered after an investigation by Bellingcat researcher Eliot Higgins. The image is captioned “53% of white women voted for Trump, 53% of white women should look like this” and includes an antifa flag. Another image featuring an injured woman is captioned “She chose to be a Nazi. Choices have consequences” and includes the hashtag #PunchANazi. Eliot Higgins remarked to the BBC that “[t]his was a transparent and quite pathetic attempt, but I wouldn’t be surprised if white nationalist groups try to mount more sophisticated attacks in the future”.[76] A report by ProPublica said that both overtly and covertly pro-Russian social media accounts were found using the hashtag #Antifa in reference to the events and aftermath of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.[77] Nafeesa Syeed of Bloomberg reported that “[t]he most-tweeted link in the Russian-linked network followed by the researchers was a petition to declare Antifa a terrorist group”.[78]

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‘Antifa’ Falsely Linked to Amtrak Train Derailment by Right …

The anti-fascism movement, “antifa,”which is more of a protesting tactic than a formal group, has been the subject of blamein a growing number of bizarreandfalseconspiracy theories floated by right-wing pundits in recent months. Take the mass shooting in Las Vegas that claimed scores of lives:Antifa was not involved, despite a theory otherwise. Then, antifawas blamed for a fake civil warplot. It never happenedbecause such a thing was never planned. Antifawas also blamed for a mass shooting in a Texas church. Again, the shooting had nothing to do with anti-fascism, or with left-wing protesters in general. On Monday, some of the usual conspiracy theory suspectsconservative media personality Mike Cernovich, President Donald Trump mega-fan Jack Posobiec, the far-right website Gateway Punditand Alex Joness InfoWarsall brought up antifain the context ofa fatal train derailment in Washington state, and they did so before investigators had even announced any formalexplanation for the crash. Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now What we know about the derailment is that more than a dozencars ofan Amtrak train jumped the tracks, injuring scores of peopleand killing an unknown number of others near Dupont, an area south of Tacoma, Washington. What we dont know is what caused the accident,though right-wing pundits were pushingout insinuations before a death toll couldbe established. Cernovich, who has pushed several other conspiracies tied to antifa,observed to his fans that ANTIFA has a long and verifiable track record of obstructing train tracks, committing violence. His friend Posobiec, who on Twitter doxed one of the women who accused Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct this November, leaking her work address and a recent photo to his followers, used the forum to tie antifato the deadly derailment. Antifa has targeted trains for weeks very near where the Amtrak derailment tragedy took place today, Posobiec mused. Gateway Pundit pushed the theory as well, falsely accusingIts Going Down, a well-trafficked antifascist website, of covering up its associations with the derailment.PJ Media, another right-wing site, picked up on the conspiracy, as did Jones. The scene of a portion of the Interstate 5 highway after an Amtrak high-speed train derailed from an overpass early on December 18, near the city of Tacoma, Washington. KATHRYN ELSESSER/AFP/Getty Images FLASHBACK: ANTIFA ADMITS TRAIN TRACK SABOTAGE NEAR TACOMA TO STOP FRACKING, a headline on InfoWars read. Antifa behind Tacoma train wreck? The basis of the conspiracy appears to be a post published on a website called Puget Sound Anarchists that was rerunon a number of left-leaning sites and activist blogs earlier this year. Early in the morning of April 20th we poured concrete on the train tracks that lead out of the Port of Olympia to block any trains from using the tracks, the April 21post read, adding that the groupnotified the train company of its actions. We did this not to avoid damaging a train, nothing would bring bigger grins to our faces, but to avoid the risk of injuring railway workers. Blocking trains that carry fracking equipmentand other materials related to the production of fossil fuelshas long been a tactic of environmental protesters. In May 2016, for example, 52 activists were cited for trespassing in Washington State after blocking a train that was headed to two refineries. That protest was part of the so-called Break Freeprotests, urging people to disengage with fossil fuels due to issues related to man-made climate change. People on the right became familiar with the April post onPuget Sound Anarchists because it ran concurrently on the website It’s Going Down, which has gained a widereach by reporting on alleged fascism and left-wing activism from an anti-fascist perspective following Trump’s election. After right-wing provocateurs seized on the post as something meant to incite violence (the post goes out of its way to discourage violence), It’s Going Down denounced the accusations to Newsweek and said it removed the post from its websitemonths before Monday’s train derailment. Newsweek asked Cernovich why he felt it was important to talk about antifa in the context of this train incident. He wrote in response that ANTIFA groups shouldnt pour concrete on train tracks; however there is no proof they did.He said that the derailment could be an accident, poor infrastructure, antifa or ISIS. (The Islamic State militant grouphas also been blamed for the accident on the imageboard site 8chan, and other sites that traffic in conspiracy theories.) Trump himself cited poor infrastructure as a national issue in the aftermath of the derailment, and declined to name any other potential causes. Anti-fascist activists have expressed frustration to Newsweek over having to repeatedly push back against a wave of what they call baseless conspiracy theories attached to their protests this year. They argue that the conspiracies are being spun deliberately and in bad faith. One comparedthe trend to the demonization of environmentalists and Black Lives Matter activists.

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December 20, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

What is ‘Antifa’? And why is the media so reluctant to …

Posted April 18, 2017 10:00 PM by Chris Pandolfo An injured Trump supporter holds a sign during a free speech rally at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley, California, United States of America on April 15, 2017. Emily Molli | NurPhoto Are all Trump supporters violent white supremacists? Clearly not. But you might not know that based on some of the reporting flying around this week. The mainstream media are oversimplifying what happened this past weekend when riots broke out in Berkeley, California, during a rally for free speech put on by Trump backers. In doing so, the reporting implies that those supporting the president were prepared for violence while those in opposition are simply opposing fascism. Twenty-one people were arrested Sunday after fistfights broke out near Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park, where a rally for free speech put on by a pro-Trump group Liberty Revival Alliance was scheduled. Rocks were thrown, and sticks and skateboards were used to beat people. Of course, the MSM reporting is slanted. The Los Angeles Times report on the fighting, for example, takes pains to show how a member of a citizen militia group originating from Montana who came to the rally to protect Trump supporters mightve been looking for a fight. I dont mind hitting the counter-demonstrators, one man tells the Times. In fact, I would kind of enjoy it. The paper also interviewed a woman on the Left fed up with the violence, a vendor selling organic produce, and a guy handing out empathy kisses. The message, clearly, is that those on the Right were looking for trouble and those on the Left responded. What the Times and other outlets dont tell you is this was not simply a clash of Trump supporters and counter-protesters. Just who are the groups involved? How do we stop the mainstream media from warping the national narrative? We push back together. With the truth. Be the first to receive CRTVs free weapon against the worst the media has to offer. Introducing WTF MSM!? As some in the mainstream media tell it, on the one hand you have racist white nationalists in support of Trump. This is true. Alt-Right activists such as Nathan Damigo who founded the white supremacist organization Identity Europa can be seen delivering a vicious right-hook to a woman (who, in turn, was assaulting him). But by no means was every Trump backer at this rally for free speech a violent neo-Nazi. On the other hand, as SFGate reported, several liberal groups were there to counter protest in opposition to Trump. But these were not just milquetoast liberals there to oppose a president they dont like. Specifically, as the Los Angeles Times notes in a different piece, officials raised concerns about the militant black bloc of anti-fascist (Antifa for short) rioters. But dont take the term anti-fascist on its face, as the mainstream media is wont to do. Understand who these people actually are. Antifa is made up of self-described anarchists radical left-wing thugs who employ violence and intimidation to advance their beliefs. Theyve shown up previously at Berkeley to shut down a free speech event hosted by provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, leaving damaged property, fires, and assault victims in their wake. They also violently disrupted a March 4 Trump event in March. But you arent hearing as much about Antifa violence as you are about the Alt-Right. In fact, some outlets are offering outright praise for Antifa. Ask Esquire magazine and Antifa rioters are noble, anti-racist counter demonstrators a sort of Justice League vigilante group dedicated to shutting down fascist protests. But this is a radical movement that traces its roots back to World War II, as Mother Jones recounts in The long history of Nazi punching. They employ so-called righteous violence against what they consider to be the forces of fascism. What fascism is nowadays seems to be a subjective definition belonging to whichever particular Antifa thugs show up en force. One might say Antifas violent tactics, employed around the world, are fascist. Here in the contemporary U.S., waves of Antifa-driven riots are on the rise in in an effort to silence President Trump and his supporters by any means necessary. Antifa thugs show up at left-wing demonstrations to breed chaos, destruction, and bloodshed. They blend in with and are sometimes aided by the crowd, as National Reviews David French explained in the aftermath of Yiannopoulos Berkeley event in February: What youll notice (and what youll experience, if you ever find yourself in the middle of violent left-wing protest) is that the rioters and the peaceful protesters have a symbiotic relationship. The rioters break people and destroy things, then melt back into a crowd that often quickly and purposefully closes behind them. Theyre typically cheered wildly (to be sure, some yell at them to stop) and often treated as heroes by the rest of the mob almost like theyre the SEAL Team Six of left-wing protest. The Battle of Berkeley, as some are calling it, was a dangerous, violent, bloody mess. Instigators, Antifa and Alt-Right, should be roundly condemned. But at the moment, the American people are only getting one side of the story from the mainstream media. The majority of the MSMs intense focus is applied to white nationalist groups, while Antifa is being cast in a heroic role opposed to the Alt-Rights violence. The mainstream media wax poetic on the dangers of the nationalist populist Alt-Right. They ought to be wary of normalizing Antifas brand of radical Alt-Left violence. Editor’s note: The title to this piece has been updated to correct a grammatical error. Chris Pandolfo is a staff writer and type-shouter for Conservative Review. He holds a B.A. in Politics and Economics from Hillsdale College. His interests are Conservative Political Philosophy, the American Founding, and Progressive Rock. Follow him on Twitter for doom-saying and great album recommendations@ChrisCPandolfo.

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December 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa – Wiktionary

See also: antifa and antif Contents Antifa anti-fascist movement Short for Anti-Fascistische Actie. Antifaf Short for Antifaschismus and/or Antifaschistische Aktion. Antifaf (genitive Antifa, plural Antifas)

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December 12, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Did an Antifascist Group Put Up Anti-White Posters in Seattle?

‘;if (currentUrl.indexOf(‘.asp’) > -1) { jQuery(‘#image-error’).html(errorMarkup);} On 5 December 2016, a photographpurportedly showing a poster warning against the propagation of whites was published to the web site Imgur. A few days later, University of Washingtonscollege newspaperreported that a similar poster had been taped to a pole near the campus bookstore: This past Monday, Dec. 5, a friend of mine noticed and took a picture of this poster taped up near the UW Book Store. Addressed to those who choose to date white people, it warns that propagation of whites will not be tolerated, and that those who choose to date white people have been warned. This is a crystal-clear threat against people of color in the Seattle community. I would argue that, implicitly, it is especially a threat against women of color. I know such women who felt shocked and afraid for their safety after seeing its toxic message, a message that is unequivocally a racist and violent threat. On 6 December 2016, Emerald City Antifa postedto Facebook a message saying that they had nothing to do with either the creation or the distribution of the poster. It also responded to several comments explaining that the message expressed on the poster was not in line with their views: Another heads up we did not create or distribute this one either. This is not our message. This come across like what white supremacists tell each other about anti-fascists. Not very clever! Still, annoying. Again, we did not post this sign. This isnt even a thinly disguised political agenda by far right trolls the language could be used as a recruiting technique to convince people that white people are under attack as a group, vs white supremacy is under attack as a systemic oppression. Because so many people have been asking us again, heres our response to these posters: We did not make them. We did not put them up. This is not what we believe. The only people aware of what Antifa does and still thinks were anti-white are racists. Period. We are much more ideologically sound and arty than that KKKrap. Promise. Read the words of it. Its exactly like their fantasy/nightmare of white genocide and anti-whiteness that the think anyone who hates racism believes in. We dont have any actual evidence they did this, but this is the type of shit they do. Date whoever you like. It is unclear who was responsible for creating this poster, but it may have been an attempt to smear this particular group or divert attention from the people who actually put up the posters. Shortly after the image was posted, several messages encouraging people to spread a similar poster were posted to the web site 4chan: You guys should spread these posters instead of the alt-right and white identity stuff. Go overboard with irony like Yuri described. Tbf, this is the right way to redpill the population. Theyre too dumb and sheepled to wake up when shown facts, so you have to go so far into fiction that they cant suspend their belief any more. What will save the white race is not a new wave of brownshirts purifying ideology, it is an explosion of Antifa that then eats itself. I wonder if I can get a printer to print these I honestly cant tell if this is actually an ANTIFA poster, or an alt-righter who posted this to stop racemixing. Someone should start a low key effort to spread propaganda to make antifa look even dumber The domainEmeraldCityAntifa.com does not belong to the anti-fascist group, but instead the is being used to promote a book byMilo Yiannopoulos, Breitbartsformer senior editor, who shared the imageto his Facebook page on 28 March 2017. The Global Antifa page claimed that Yiannopoulos was using fake racist flyers to create buzz for his book: Milo Yiannopoulos is at it again! This time, he is using fake racist flyers to make Emerald City Antifa in Seattle look like bigots! If you see these flyers in Seattle, rip them down! ECA would never post garbage like this! He has even created a fake ECA website that links people to his own websites and Breitbart articles. Youre all getting trolled by Milo: It is unclear if Yiannopoulos created the poster or if he was simply capitalizing on the controversy. According to Who.is, the web site was not created until February 2017, more than two months after the poster started to circulate. We have reached out to the group for more information. Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here. Bruell, Alex. Ridiculous Anti-White Politics Are Threatening People of Color in Seattle. The Daily. 9 December 2016.

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November 28, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

UC Berkeley conservative student sues Antifa member over …

The former president of the Berkeley College Republicans at the University of California, Berkeley said Wednesday he is suing a prominent member of an Antifa group for allegedly threatening and harassing him and others on campus. Mark Meuser, one of the lawyers representing Troy Worden, announced the lawsuit seeking more than $100,000 of damages against Yvette Felarca in a press release,The Washington Examiner reported. Felarca is the leader of By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), an Antifa, or anti-fascist, group. Felarca filed a frivolous restraining order that restricted Worden’s First and Second Amendment rights and made it difficult for him to move around the campus to attend classes. The restraining order was dismissed on Oct. 27, 2017,” Meuser said. In a previous interview with Fox News, Worden he’s had to face months of “talking, harassment and even violence,” along with other UC Berkeley College Republicans (BCR). I have to look behind my shoulder whenever I am on campus and especially when I am engaged in political activism, Worden said. The No. 1 public university in the world and the so-called birthplace of the free speech movement is anything but. It is the place where Americas conservative youth are daily under threat of violence, lacking the support of the university administration, police, or city,” he added. “The Free Speech Movement is dead, and the left has killed it. ANTIFA STALKING UC BERKELEYS CONSERVATIVE STUDENTS, GROUP SAYS BCR members told Fox News they are being targeted by Antifa, including Twitter “doxxing,” a practice of publishing personal information online. Felarca was charged this summer by the Sacramento County District Attorneys Office with assault and inciting and participating in a riot for an incident in 2016 where she was filmed hitting a man at a protest,the East Bay Times reported. The lawsuit filed Wednesday also targets her attorney, Shanta Driver, who is the National Chair and founder of the organization BAMN. “Felarca and her attorney attempted to make free speech expensive, and it is time that they pay for their misuse of the court system,” said Meuser. The attorney representing Felarca in the latest legal action told the East Bay Times the motion filed by Worden was frivolous. Troy Worden is a stalker, Ronald Cruz of Oakland-based United for Equality and Affirmative Action Legal Defense Fund told the newspaper. This motion is his attempt to use the courts to continue stalking Ms. Felarca. He stalked Yvette Felarca and its all on the record. The First Amendment does not give Worden the right to stalk people, or to violate a restraining order and be in Felarcas face and take video of her for 30 minutes, which Worden did after the court commanded him to stay away. Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa’s Berkeley Violence Ought to Frighten the Left …

If 2016 is the year when our political parties failed, inflicting on America arguably its worst presidential choice in our nations history, then 2017 is when our broader institutions began to lose their collective minds. This is the year when reasonable men surrendered to unreason when political tribalism trumped human decency. The primary tragedy of Charlottesville was the loss of a young womans life. The secondary tragedy was the distortion of our political culture. The president of the United States actually declared some portion of a collection of neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and alt-right white nationalists to be very fine people. He just couldnt bring himself to completely disavow men and women whod supported him since the day he descended down the escalator at Trump Tower. Yet rather than doing the easiest and most sensible thing in the world condemning white supremacy while also condemning political violence on the far left some portion of the left-wing intelligentsia actually decided to embrace their own thugs. They supported Antifa. They decided to lionize some of the worst people in American life. And in so doing, they actually compared them to the American heroes who stormed Omaha Beach. The tweets below, as the saying goes, did not age well. First, heres Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, one of the best and most respected political journals in American life: In fact, this comparison of the alt-left with the warriors of the Greatest Generation was hardly unique to Goldberg. Heres CNNs Chris Cuomo: And heres CNN contributor and former Hillary Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon: Indeed, for a time the very notion that a person could and should condemn both Antifa and the alt-right generated extreme rage online. How dare you equate fascists and anti-fascists! Outlets such as the Washington Post and CNN published fawning apologetics and romanticized profiles of the far lefts vigilante thugs. Antifa had its pop-culture moment. It was disgraceful. All of it. And this weekend Antifa struck again. A small group of peaceful right-wing protesters gathered in Berkeley. Black-clad Antifa thugs attacked. The Washington Post has the story: Their faces hidden behind black bandannas and hoodies, about 100 anarchists and antifa anti-fascist members barreled into a protest Sunday afternoon in Berkeleys Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Jumping over plastic and concrete barriers, the group melted into a larger crowd of around 2,000 that had marched peacefully throughout the sunny afternoon for a Rally Against Hate gathering. Shortly after, violence began to flare. A pepper-spray-wielding Trump supporter was smacked to the ground with homemade shields. Another was attacked by five black-clad antifa members, each windmilling kicks and punches into a man desperately trying to protect himself. A conservative group leader retreated for safety behind a line of riot police as marchers chucked water bottles, shot off pepper spray and screamed, Fascist go home! Even worse, the police literally stood aside and let Antifa take over a public park. It allowed mob rule and then justified abdicating its responsibility to protect the liberty and safety of Berkeleys citizens by claiming that it wanted people to freely assemble. This is a sad joke. It gave control to Antifa. It empowered the hecklers veto. The video evidence of violence is appalling. Antifa isnt heroic. Its brutal: As vicious as they are, in a functioning constitutional republic, Antifa is a manageable, short-term problem. A vigorous police presence followed by a wave of arrests and aggressive prosecutions would largely end the threat. The men and women of Antifa arent insurgents; theyre little more than a cowardly gang of left-wing thugs. Far more serious is their effect on the rule of law and political discourse. Has hatred for Trump so blinded Americas liberal elite that its willing to romanticize violence? Is their respect for the First Amendment so fragile that the thrill of watching alleged members of the alt-right get punched in the face is worth more than preserving core constitutional liberties? Have the police forgotten their role as guardians of American liberty? This isnt #resistance, its lawlessness. Its not anti-fascism, its violent repression. Is the rule now that any gathering of Trump supporters alt-right or not in any blue enclave risks a violent response? Have authorities, through a combination of cowardice and political correctness, ceded control of the streets in key American towns to a Marxist/anarchist mob? Antifa and its elite apologists are sending a clear message of hate and loathing to millions of Americans who dont have a fascist bone in their bodies to the millions of good people who voted for Donald Trump. Antifa doesnt occupy the moral high ground. Its apologists have no grounds to sneer at anyone. Instead, theyre competing with the alt-right for control of the political sewer. Condemn Antifa now. Prosecute its members now. Or watch America continue to tear itself apart. Violent Marxists are evil. Violent fascists are evil. If we cant understand both of those basic truths simultaneously, then we have truly lost our way. READ MORE:The Roots of Left-Wing ViolenceGangs of Berkeley: Antifas Pathetic DelusionsAntifa and the Alt-Right, Growing in Opposition to One Another David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and an attorney.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

‘Antifa’ violence in Berkeley spurs soul-searching within …

Of the dozens of organizations that turned out for Sundays mass protest against racism here, one group was impossible to miss. Its members dressed head to toe in black, with masked faces and some bearing pastel-painted riot shields that read no hate. These 100 or so militants billed themselves as a security force for progressive counter-protesters, vowing to protect them from far-right agitators. But as the protest got underway, some of those in masks would resort to mob violence, attacking a small showing of supporters of President Trump and others they accused, sometimes inaccurately, of being white supremacists or Nazis. The graphic videos of those attacks have spurred soul-searching within the leftist activist movement in the Bay Area and beyond. Emotions remain raw in the wake of this months white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., which left one woman dead and dozens injured. Trump received blistering criticism for equating the behavior of Klansmen and neo-Nazis to the actions of those who opposed them. Some fear that Sundays violence would only help advance the idea that the two sides are the same. This is food for the adversary, said sociologist Todd Gitlin, a founder of Students for a Democratic Society, which organized the first national protests against the Vietnam War. He pointed out that violent acts committed by a few will almost always hijack the narrative of the entire protest, and that it is happening now should be no surprise. Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times) Gitlin also described what he sees as a push by the anti-fascist also called antifa movement to put themselves on the map of protest by using violence to intimidate both political opponents and those on the left who promote non-violence. One of the biggest banners at the Berkeley demonstration carried the message Avenge Charlottesville. Militants who showed up Sunday were part of a multifaceted rally in which church leaders sang gospel and anti-fascists shouted profanities. Berkeley police estimated more than 4,000 people came out to take over a city park where far-right activists had called for an anti-Marxism rally. The organizer canceled the event Friday, citing security concerns, but a small number of far-right activists showed up anyway. By the end of the day, 13 people had been arrested, one on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon and three on battery charges. Jeff Conant, a member of an East Bay collective of anti-racist demonstrators known as Showing Up For Racial Justice, said march organizers asked allies in the antifa movement to play a defensive role in the rally not to engage in or start violence. Those in the black hoods fell in with the marchers, while the lead truck for the march carried stacks of pastel-painted riot shields that anti-fascist demonstrators later raised against police. Participants further were told not to record the day on their cellphones, and urged to write a legal aid phone number on their arms in case of arrest. The march reached a park, which police had already cleared of far-right figures. The demonstrators lined up behind their shields against a police barricade and officers armed with riot guns. Elsewhere, the hooded group would mob, and in some cases kick and beat, a handful of far-right supporters. Several antifa members were seen using their shields to batter opponents, including one who was slammed into the back of a man running out of Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Berkeley police said they were aware of four such incidents during the day. The images sparked criticism from both conservatives as well as some liberals who had hoped the march would be peaceful after several violent confrontations between left and right extremists in Berkeley earlier this year. After the crowd began to disperse, Berkeley Police Chief Andrew Greenwood held a tense discussion with a church organizer concerned that peaceful protesters would be lumped in with the militants. Greenwood said his officers had seen antifa and black bloc forces preparing alongside the rest of the demonstrators, at a staging point some four blocks away. They were practicing with weapons, Greenwood said. Conant said the drills were defensive, justified by violence at other demonstrations in the past year. Organizers defended the militant force, saying it was necessary because police do not wade into protest brawls themselves. Far-right activists also criticized police for not better protecting them. Berkeley police said having officers jump into the crowd would have inflamed already an already volatile situation. However, on Sunday, police several times rescued people chased by the crowd or escorted them out. Among those appalled by the increasingly militant force are radicals from the 1960s peace movement. Political scientist Jo Freeman, part of the radical student movement that forced UC Berkeley to permit political speech five decades ago, said she was dismayed at the effort that went into silencing opposition. She drew similarities between those who threatened her and other freedom marchers in the South in the 1960s, and those who bully the far right now. It is not uncommon for societies to produce a hate squad, Freeman said. People who want to suppress the right to speak they are everywhere. Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times) Kitty Stryker, a Berkeley activist affiliated with groups like Struggalo Circus, which offer medical aid during protests, said she was heartbroken to see media coverage of Sundays demonstration focus on violence. She said she saw a Trump supporter pepper spray a black bloc member and said it was disingenuous to say anti-fascists alone incited violence. I do think there was a lot of anger over Charlottesville, as there should be, Stryker said. But I also think there was a sudden realization that many of the instigators in Charlottesville had been coming to Berkeley for months to beat up anti-fascists. UC Berkeley is reviewing the weekend demonstrations as it plans how to handle a series of conservative political speakers in late September. Campus spokesman Dan Mogulof said student safety is the first priority there is nothing more important.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed


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