Archive for the ‘Antifa’ Category

UC Berkeley conservative student sues Antifa member over …

The former president of the Berkeley College Republicans at the University of California, Berkeley said Wednesday he is suing a prominent member of an Antifa group for allegedly threatening and harassing him and others on campus.

Mark Meuser, one of the lawyers representing Troy Worden, announced the lawsuit seeking more than $100,000 of damages against Yvette Felarca in a press release,The Washington Examiner reported.

Felarca is the leader of By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), an Antifa, or anti-fascist, group.

Felarca filed a frivolous restraining order that restricted Worden’s First and Second Amendment rights and made it difficult for him to move around the campus to attend classes. The restraining order was dismissed on Oct. 27, 2017,” Meuser said.

In a previous interview with Fox News, Worden he’s had to face months of “talking, harassment and even violence,” along with other UC Berkeley College Republicans (BCR).

I have to look behind my shoulder whenever I am on campus and especially when I am engaged in political activism, Worden said.

The No. 1 public university in the world and the so-called birthplace of the free speech movement is anything but. It is the place where Americas conservative youth are daily under threat of violence, lacking the support of the university administration, police, or city,” he added. “The Free Speech Movement is dead, and the left has killed it.

ANTIFA STALKING UC BERKELEYS CONSERVATIVE STUDENTS, GROUP SAYS

BCR members told Fox News they are being targeted by Antifa, including Twitter “doxxing,” a practice of publishing personal information online.

Felarca was charged this summer by the Sacramento County District Attorneys Office with assault and inciting and participating in a riot for an incident in 2016 where she was filmed hitting a man at a protest,the East Bay Times reported.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday also targets her attorney, Shanta Driver, who is the National Chair and founder of the organization BAMN.

“Felarca and her attorney attempted to make free speech expensive, and it is time that they pay for their misuse of the court system,” said Meuser.

The attorney representing Felarca in the latest legal action told the East Bay Times the motion filed by Worden was frivolous.

Troy Worden is a stalker, Ronald Cruz of Oakland-based United for Equality and Affirmative Action Legal Defense Fund told the newspaper. This motion is his attempt to use the courts to continue stalking Ms. Felarca. He stalked Yvette Felarca and its all on the record. The First Amendment does not give Worden the right to stalk people, or to violate a restraining order and be in Felarcas face and take video of her for 30 minutes, which Worden did after the court commanded him to stay away.

Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

Originally posted here:

UC Berkeley conservative student sues Antifa member over …

Fair Usage Law

November 25, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa’s Berkeley Violence Ought to Frighten the Left …

If 2016 is the year when our political parties failed, inflicting on America arguably its worst presidential choice in our nations history, then 2017 is when our broader institutions began to lose their collective minds. This is the year when reasonable men surrendered to unreason when political tribalism trumped human decency.

The primary tragedy of Charlottesville was the loss of a young womans life. The secondary tragedy was the distortion of our political culture. The president of the United States actually declared some portion of a collection of neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and alt-right white nationalists to be very fine people. He just couldnt bring himself to completely disavow men and women whod supported him since the day he descended down the escalator at Trump Tower.

Yet rather than doing the easiest and most sensible thing in the world condemning white supremacy while also condemning political violence on the far left some portion of the left-wing intelligentsia actually decided to embrace their own thugs. They supported Antifa. They decided to lionize some of the worst people in American life. And in so doing, they actually compared them to the American heroes who stormed Omaha Beach. The tweets below, as the saying goes, did not age well.

First, heres Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, one of the best and most respected political journals in American life:

In fact, this comparison of the alt-left with the warriors of the Greatest Generation was hardly unique to Goldberg. Heres CNNs Chris Cuomo:

And heres CNN contributor and former Hillary Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon:

Indeed, for a time the very notion that a person could and should condemn both Antifa and the alt-right generated extreme rage online. How dare you equate fascists and anti-fascists! Outlets such as the Washington Post and CNN published fawning apologetics and romanticized profiles of the far lefts vigilante thugs. Antifa had its pop-culture moment.

It was disgraceful. All of it. And this weekend Antifa struck again. A small group of peaceful right-wing protesters gathered in Berkeley. Black-clad Antifa thugs attacked. The Washington Post has the story:

Their faces hidden behind black bandannas and hoodies, about 100 anarchists and antifa anti-fascist members barreled into a protest Sunday afternoon in Berkeleys Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park.

Jumping over plastic and concrete barriers, the group melted into a larger crowd of around 2,000 that had marched peacefully throughout the sunny afternoon for a Rally Against Hate gathering.

Shortly after, violence began to flare. A pepper-spray-wielding Trump supporter was smacked to the ground with homemade shields. Another was attacked by five black-clad antifa members, each windmilling kicks and punches into a man desperately trying to protect himself. A conservative group leader retreated for safety behind a line of riot police as marchers chucked water bottles, shot off pepper spray and screamed, Fascist go home!

Even worse, the police literally stood aside and let Antifa take over a public park. It allowed mob rule and then justified abdicating its responsibility to protect the liberty and safety of Berkeleys citizens by claiming that it wanted people to freely assemble. This is a sad joke. It gave control to Antifa. It empowered the hecklers veto.

The video evidence of violence is appalling. Antifa isnt heroic. Its brutal:

As vicious as they are, in a functioning constitutional republic, Antifa is a manageable, short-term problem. A vigorous police presence followed by a wave of arrests and aggressive prosecutions would largely end the threat. The men and women of Antifa arent insurgents; theyre little more than a cowardly gang of left-wing thugs.

Far more serious is their effect on the rule of law and political discourse. Has hatred for Trump so blinded Americas liberal elite that its willing to romanticize violence? Is their respect for the First Amendment so fragile that the thrill of watching alleged members of the alt-right get punched in the face is worth more than preserving core constitutional liberties? Have the police forgotten their role as guardians of American liberty?

This isnt #resistance, its lawlessness. Its not anti-fascism, its violent repression. Is the rule now that any gathering of Trump supporters alt-right or not in any blue enclave risks a violent response? Have authorities, through a combination of cowardice and political correctness, ceded control of the streets in key American towns to a Marxist/anarchist mob?

Antifa and its elite apologists are sending a clear message of hate and loathing to millions of Americans who dont have a fascist bone in their bodies to the millions of good people who voted for Donald Trump. Antifa doesnt occupy the moral high ground. Its apologists have no grounds to sneer at anyone. Instead, theyre competing with the alt-right for control of the political sewer.

Condemn Antifa now. Prosecute its members now. Or watch America continue to tear itself apart. Violent Marxists are evil. Violent fascists are evil. If we cant understand both of those basic truths simultaneously, then we have truly lost our way.

READ MORE:The Roots of Left-Wing ViolenceGangs of Berkeley: Antifas Pathetic DelusionsAntifa and the Alt-Right, Growing in Opposition to One Another

David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and an attorney.

See the rest here:

Antifa’s Berkeley Violence Ought to Frighten the Left …

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

‘Antifa’ violence in Berkeley spurs soul-searching within …

Of the dozens of organizations that turned out for Sundays mass protest against racism here, one group was impossible to miss.

Its members dressed head to toe in black, with masked faces and some bearing pastel-painted riot shields that read no hate. These 100 or so militants billed themselves as a security force for progressive counter-protesters, vowing to protect them from far-right agitators.

But as the protest got underway, some of those in masks would resort to mob violence, attacking a small showing of supporters of President Trump and others they accused, sometimes inaccurately, of being white supremacists or Nazis.

The graphic videos of those attacks have spurred soul-searching within the leftist activist movement in the Bay Area and beyond. Emotions remain raw in the wake of this months white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., which left one woman dead and dozens injured.

Trump received blistering criticism for equating the behavior of Klansmen and neo-Nazis to the actions of those who opposed them. Some fear that Sundays violence would only help advance the idea that the two sides are the same.

This is food for the adversary, said sociologist Todd Gitlin, a founder of Students for a Democratic Society, which organized the first national protests against the Vietnam War. He pointed out that violent acts committed by a few will almost always hijack the narrative of the entire protest, and that it is happening now should be no surprise.

Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times

Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley.

Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Gitlin also described what he sees as a push by the anti-fascist also called antifa movement to put themselves on the map of protest by using violence to intimidate both political opponents and those on the left who promote non-violence. One of the biggest banners at the Berkeley demonstration carried the message Avenge Charlottesville.

Militants who showed up Sunday were part of a multifaceted rally in which church leaders sang gospel and anti-fascists shouted profanities. Berkeley police estimated more than 4,000 people came out to take over a city park where far-right activists had called for an anti-Marxism rally. The organizer canceled the event Friday, citing security concerns, but a small number of far-right activists showed up anyway.

By the end of the day, 13 people had been arrested, one on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon and three on battery charges.

Jeff Conant, a member of an East Bay collective of anti-racist demonstrators known as Showing Up For Racial Justice, said march organizers asked allies in the antifa movement to play a defensive role in the rally not to engage in or start violence.

Those in the black hoods fell in with the marchers, while the lead truck for the march carried stacks of pastel-painted riot shields that anti-fascist demonstrators later raised against police.

Participants further were told not to record the day on their cellphones, and urged to write a legal aid phone number on their arms in case of arrest.

The march reached a park, which police had already cleared of far-right figures. The demonstrators lined up behind their shields against a police barricade and officers armed with riot guns.

Elsewhere, the hooded group would mob, and in some cases kick and beat, a handful of far-right supporters. Several antifa members were seen using their shields to batter opponents, including one who was slammed into the back of a man running out of Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Berkeley police said they were aware of four such incidents during the day.

The images sparked criticism from both conservatives as well as some liberals who had hoped the march would be peaceful after several violent confrontations between left and right extremists in Berkeley earlier this year.

After the crowd began to disperse, Berkeley Police Chief Andrew Greenwood held a tense discussion with a church organizer concerned that peaceful protesters would be lumped in with the militants. Greenwood said his officers had seen antifa and black bloc forces preparing alongside the rest of the demonstrators, at a staging point some four blocks away.

They were practicing with weapons, Greenwood said.

Conant said the drills were defensive, justified by violence at other demonstrations in the past year.

Organizers defended the militant force, saying it was necessary because police do not wade into protest brawls themselves. Far-right activists also criticized police for not better protecting them.

Berkeley police said having officers jump into the crowd would have inflamed already an already volatile situation. However, on Sunday, police several times rescued people chased by the crowd or escorted them out.

Among those appalled by the increasingly militant force are radicals from the 1960s peace movement.

Political scientist Jo Freeman, part of the radical student movement that forced UC Berkeley to permit political speech five decades ago, said she was dismayed at the effort that went into silencing opposition. She drew similarities between those who threatened her and other freedom marchers in the South in the 1960s, and those who bully the far right now.

It is not uncommon for societies to produce a hate squad, Freeman said. People who want to suppress the right to speak they are everywhere.

Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley.

Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Kitty Stryker, a Berkeley activist affiliated with groups like Struggalo Circus, which offer medical aid during protests, said she was heartbroken to see media coverage of Sundays demonstration focus on violence. She said she saw a Trump supporter pepper spray a black bloc member and said it was disingenuous to say anti-fascists alone incited violence.

I do think there was a lot of anger over Charlottesville, as there should be, Stryker said. But I also think there was a sudden realization that many of the instigators in Charlottesville had been coming to Berkeley for months to beat up anti-fascists.

UC Berkeley is reviewing the weekend demonstrations as it plans how to handle a series of conservative political speakers in late September. Campus spokesman Dan Mogulof said student safety is the first priority there is nothing more important.

Read more:

‘Antifa’ violence in Berkeley spurs soul-searching within …

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

Disclaimer

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Go here to read the rest:

ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

What is antifa and what does the movement want? – USA TODAY

“Antifa” is commonly considered to be part of the far-left, a group Trump said was partially responsible for violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Video provided by Newsy Newslook

A counter demonstrator uses a lighted spray can Aug. 12, 2017, against a white nationalist demonstrator at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va(Photo: Steve Helber, AP)

Antifa shortfor”anti-fascist” is the name for loosely affiliated, left-leaninganti-racist groups that monitor and track the activities of local neo-Nazis. The movement has no unified structureor national leadershipbut has emerged in the form of local bodiesnationwide, particularly on theWest Coast.

Some of the groups, such as the 10-year-old Rose City Antifa in Portland, the oldest antifa group in the U.S.,are particularly well-organized andactive online and onFacebook,while its members are individually anonymous.

President Trump has singled out antifa as part of what he calls the alt-left in his initial claim that “many sides” were to blame for violence in Charlottesville the weekend of Aug. 12, not just the neo-Nazis, KKK and white nationalists.

How is it pronounced?

“AN-tifa” with the emphasis on the first syllable, which sounds more like “on” in English than “an.”

Far-left antifa demonstrators link arms at Chapman Square during a protest against President Trump in downtown Portland June 4, 2017, as police attempt to move them away from the square.(Photo: Ariane Kunze, AFP/Getty Images)

When did it start?

Anti-fascist groups, particularly in Europe, have been around for many decades, notably in Italy, against Mussolini, and in Germany, against Hitler. In the postwar period, antifa groups resurgedto fightneo-Nazi groups, particularly in Germany. In the U.S., the anti-fascist movements grew out ofleftist politics of the late ’80s,primarily under theumbrellaof Anti-Racist Action.

What does the movementwant?

Theprimary goal is to stopneo-Nazis and white supremacists fromgaining a platform rather than to promotea specific antifa agenda. The antifa groups aredecidedly anti-racist, anti-sexistand anti-homophobia, but also by and large socially leftistand anti-capitalist.

How do the groupsoperate?

Mark Bray, a lecturer and Dartmouth andauthor of the new book Antifa: The Antifascist Handbook,says the groups “organize educational campaigns, build community coalitions, monitor fascists, pressure venues to cancel their events, organize self-defense trainingsand physically confront the far right when necessary.”

A main goal is to try to deny fascists a public forum, which is why they turn out in numbers to physically confrontneo-Nazis, the KKKand white supremacists atpublic demonstrations. They also step in to protect counter-protesters at such events.

In addition, antifa is particularly active in”doxxing,” or identifying neo-Nazis and like-minded individuals and disseminatingthat private information to the public and employers to discourage people from joining their ranks.

Is antifaviolent?

Memberspointedly do not eschew violencebut rather see themselves as engaging in “self-defense,” protecting other protesters and primarily confronting neo-Nazis and white supremacists to deny them a platform to publicly spread their views.

“We are unapologetic about the reality that fighting fascism at points requires physical militancy, Rose City Antifas Facebook page reads. Anti-fascism is, by nature, a form of self-defense: the goal of fascism is to exterminate the vast majority of human beings.

Political activist and author Cornel West, speaking to Amy Goodman on the program Democracy Now about the clashes in Charlottesville, saidantifa intervened when the “neofascists” move against his group of protesters.”We would havebeen crushed like cockroaches if it were not for the anarchistsand the anti-fascists,” he said.

Bray says the riseof fascism in the 1930s demonstrates that it wasa mistake to allow such groups to air their views in hopes that public opinion would blunt their growth.”We should be wary of those who are more distressed about alleged violations of the speech of fascists than the actual violence they perpetrate,” he says.

Where has the movementdemonstrated?

In addition to Charlottesville, antifa forces, whooften dress inblack and wearmasks, have confronted or clashed with far-right groups in such places as the University of California at Berkeley,where protests by West Coast antifa forces, some of whomsmashedwindows and setfires,forced the cancellation of aspeech by alt-right activistMilo Yiannopoulos in Februaryand another by conservative commentator Ann Coulter in April.

In June, antifa forces turned out to protest a pro-Trump free-speech in Portland. Some antifa counterprotestersbegan throwing objects at police, who responded with flash grenades and pepper balls, according to theThe Oregonian.

Antifa was also out in force in Juneto confrontPatriot Prayer, a free speech groupprotesting political correctness and hatred at Evergreen State Collegein Olympia, Wash.

Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2wyFI9A

More:

What is antifa and what does the movement want? – USA TODAY

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa: An Anti-American, Terrorist Organization – Townhall

|

Posted: Aug 22, 2017 1:29 PM

At least as disturbing as the events in Charlottesville on August 12 is the Big Media coverage of those events.

More specifically, while most peopleand certainly most Americans, some of whose loved ones, like my late grandfather, sacrificed life and limb fighting Hitlers army during World War IIrecognize them for the scumbags that they are, neo-Nazis do not pose any sort of threat to Americans.

And everyone who has been waxing hysterical over the sight of a few swastika-bearing young men in Charlotteville knows this to be true.

In glaring contrast, those who self-style as anti-fascists, the so-called Antifa, do indeed pose a threat.

It isnt because the Antifa is, in reality, anti-American that accounts for its toxicity to our way of life. Nor is it that its members see themselves as justified in repudiating civilization by resorting to violence against those who they regard as fascisti.e. anyone to the slightest right of these far-left losersthat explains why they imperil our country.

What decisively establishes Antifa as a threat to America is that, subsequent to Charlottesville, these self-regarding anarcho-communists now have the sympathies of their ideological brethren in the Establishment, what I call the Big GAME (Government-Academia-Media-Entertainment complex).

Both Republican and Democratic politicians alike have pounced on the president for, quite justly, noting that among the counter-demonstrators at Charlottesville was a very, very violent, not insignificant minority.

To repeat, although he explicitly condemned white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and all who would engage in racial oppression, President Trump has himself been condemned by dishonest moral exhibitionists and political opportunists, both Republican and Democrat alike, for doing what they wouldnt think of doing by telling the truth.

Trump, to his credit, also pointed out that for as repugnant as some of the rally attendees undoubtedly were, they had assembled lawfully. They had respected our Constitution. The mask-wearing counter-demonstrators who came to meet them with baseball bats, clubs, bottles filled with concrete, feces, urine, acid, bear mace, guns, and even a makeshift flame-thrower had no permit to block thoroughfares. They violated the Constitution.

Neither did they have a permit to assault with deadly weapons those whose presence and ideas they resented.

This being said, the president didnt go nearly far enough. He should have called out the Antifa by name. He should have brought to the nations attention that for at least the better part of the last year, and certainly since his inauguration, it has singled out for violent attack his supporters, supplying the same rationale for doing sobash the fashthat is now given for the violence in Charlottesville.

It isnt neo-Nazis upon whom the Antifa has been setting its sights for the last year. It is Deplorables, anyone and everyone who supports, or who openly displays their support, for Trump.

Antifa is an enemy of civilization. Its members regularly march under the banner of the Sickle and Hammer, have long referred to America as a fascist state, and have a habit of burning Americanor AmeriKanflags.

Antifa should be identified for the terrorist organization that it is. And make no mistakes about it: Antifa members are terrorists.

This is no hyperbole. A violent act is a terrorist act, and the perpetrator is a terrorist, if three conditions are satisfied: (1) The perpetrator is a non-state actor; (2) The violence is aimed at civilians; and (3) the violence unleashed upon civilians is designed to affect changes in government policy.

A terrorist need not be successful in his or her aspirations in order to be a terrorist. The members of so-called Antifa meet all three of these criteria.

They are terrorists.

Although it has only been recently that those in Big Media began talking about Antifa, some of us who carefully track movements on the ground, so to speak, the movements of the little people, spotted Antifa for the threat that it is. Well before Charlottesville, concerned citizens via Change.org began making attempts to petition the Trump administration to call it out for the terrorist group that it is.

Members of Antifa are the same guttersnipes who stormed the streets of D.C. on the day of Trumps inauguration and attacked police officers, private citizens, and the property of businesses.

These are the same vermin that rioted on UC Berkeleys campus shattering windows, throwing Molotov cocktails, suppressing free speech, and, once again, macing and assaulting citizens, including a young lesbian woman whose red hat was mistaken for a MAGA hat.

These are the same low lives who have routinely attacked pro-Trump, pro-free speech rally attendees at Berkeley (and other locations) with knives, rocks, sticks of dynamite, flag poles, sticks, bricks, and bike locks.

Last but not least, these are the same anti-American terrorists who allegedly mainstream Democrats not only refuse to disavow, but for whom they now apologize. This is to their eternal shame. They are complicit in the violence, in the terrorism of those who function as the strong-arm wing of their party.

Yet, to be fair, it isnt just Democrats who have blood on their hands. No shortage of Republican and GOP-friendly conservative commentators are culpable as well. Those who condemned the president for drawing the nations attention to the barbarism of the Antifa counter-demonstrators in Charlottesville have chosen to turn a blind eye to anti-American, anti-constitutional thuggery.

What they are either unwilling or unable to recognize is that for all of their virtue-signaling, the Antifa regards themas they regard all normals, as Townhall.coms Kurt Schlicter refers to those tens and tens of millions of garden-variety Americans who simply want to live and let livein the same light as that in which they regard neo-Nazis.

Whether one is white, black, or other; Republican, Democrat, or Independent; conservative, liberal, or libertarianit matters not. If one does not endorse the neo-communism, anarcho-communism, and anti-Americanism of Antifa, one is a white supremacist and fascist.

The rest is here:

Antifa: An Anti-American, Terrorist Organization – Townhall

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Daryle Jenkins has stepped up to explain the shadowy group’s … – Slate Magazine

Aug. 22, 2017 Cover Story

During the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July, the citys central plaza became an ideological Star Wars canteen. Burly Christian fundamentalists hoisted signs denouncing Islam a few feet from a publicity-seeking Muslim with an AR-15slung across his back. Clusters of communists chanted America was never great! while Bikers for Trump paraded around in MAGA hats. Off to one side, Daryle Lamont Jenkins, a longtime activist in the militant left-wing anti-fascist movement, sat on a bench beside me surveying the rabble, pointing out various white supremacists whod come to town to celebrate Donald Trumps ascension.

Hed already seen the Traditionalist Worker Partys Matt Heimbach, who a few months earlier had assaulted a black female protester at a Trump rally in Kentucky. Hed spotted Richard Spencer and Nathan Damigo, who, a year later, would make news for their high-profile roles in the Unite the Right rallyin Charlottesville, Virginia. Looking into the crowd, Jenkins drew my attention to a stocky shaven-headed man in a St. Vincent T-shirtMatt Forney, an internet personality whose work blends racism with mens rights activism. (His oeuvre includes How to Beat Your Girlfriend or Wife and Get Away With It.) A handful of young men hovered around him. Theyre organizing, theyre recruiting, theyre going around talking to people, and theyre trying to basically beef up their numbers, Jenkins said. He was there to watch them. Ive been taking video of every Nazi Ive seen, he told me.

Ive been taking video of every Nazi Ive seen, Jenkinssaid.

Jenkins, 49, is a black man who has devoted his life to fighting white supremacists, sometimes literally. He is the founder of the One Peoples Project, easily the most mainstream and well-known anti-fascist, or antifa, organization. (Its motto is Hate Has Consequences.) Unlike other left-wing groups that track the far right, One Peoples Projectwhich Jenkins runs with the help of a network of about 15 volunteersconfronts its enemies, whether that means getting in their faces at protests, doxing them, or contacting their employers. A volunteer named Laura, a granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, described her work with OPP as antifa CIA.

After the riot in Charlottesvillewhere Jenkins was pepper-sprayedantifa is suddenly making headlines. The term antifa refers to a loose network of militant left-wing activists who physically square off against the far right, and often try to prevent those they deem fascists from speaking publicly. Antifa is sometimes used as a synonym for black bloc anarchiststhe scruffy kids in black bandanas or balaclavas known for smashing Starbucks windowsbut while the movements overlap, theyre not identical. Jenkins doesnt wear a mask, and Laura is an upper-middle-class suburban woman with grown children. The movement appears to be growing rapidly under Trump, though its impossible to put hard numbers to it; there are no membership rolls.

As antifa becomes more prominent, Jenkins has been called on to explain its strain of left-wing militancy to a fascinated but deeply wary wider world. The last time I saw him, on Thursday, he had just finished an interview on Sirius XM and said he would soon be appearing on 20/20. Hed been frustrated with mainstream coverage of antifa, which tends to paint it as mindlessly reckless, though he also said the movement bears some blame for failing to speak to media on its own behalf. If you want to know what antifa is about, talk to antifaif you can find people in antifa that will talk, he said. Hell talk, and has become the public face for a diffuse, nonhierarchical movement. Daryles important because hes an elder in our community, said James Anderson, part of the editorial collective that produces the anarchist website Its Going Down. He added: Daryles very brave.

Many on the right have tried to paint antifa as the moral equivalent of violent white supremacists. Antifa: The Other Evil Political Force, says a headline on an essay in the American Conservative that ran last week. Trump, at his notorious Aug. 15 press conference, seemed to refer to antifa when he placed part of the blame for Charlottesville on the alt-left which he called very, very violent. Liberals, in general, dont like antifa much more. They see their tactics as counterproductive at best, and worry that theyre ceding the moral high ground to the right. In The Rise of the Violent Left, a recent Atlantic piece, Peter Beinart wrote about how antifa threatened to disrupt an annual parade in Portland, Oregon, if it included a contingent of Trump supporters; the parade ended up being canceled. The people preventing Republicans from safely assembling on the streets of Portland may consider themselves fierce opponents of the authoritarianism growing on the American right, wrote Beinart. In truth, however, they are its unlikeliest allies.

Its certainly true that antifa refuses to eschew violence. According to CNNs Jake Tapper, left-wing counterprotesters assaulted at least two journalists in Charlottesville. The riot is our version of the strike, said Anderson, even as he acknowledges a disconnect between some of antifas tactics and its goals. Step one, broken window. Step two, we dont know. Step three, classless and stateless society, he said wryly. I dont think it works like that.

But at a moment when Trumps violence on many sides rhetoric has installed a one-dimensional image of antifa in the wider imagination, Jenkins insists that large-scale standoffs are only part of what the movement doesand not the most important part. Antifa also aims to shame white supremacists, heightening the social cost of involvement with racist organizations. Youve got to be proactive against them when theyre not rolling 500 deep, he said. Thats where doxing comes in. In the wake of Charlottesville, he points out, Unite the Right rallygoers are being identified online, with lasting consequences. One has left college, another has been fired from his job at a Berkeley, California, hot dog stand. These are kids who thought it was funny hassling people online and think they can get away with it in real life, said Jenkins. And then they learn the hard way: Real life is different than online.

Daryle Jenkins roots lay in the punk scene, which was the crucible of antifa organizing in America. In 1983, a multiracial skinhead crew called the Baldies formed in Minneapolis to oppose racist skinhead gangs. Five years later, members of the Baldies joined with other groups nationwide to form Anti-Racist Action, an anarchist network that set out to expose, oppose, and confront white supremacists. Central to ARAs mission was no-platforminga concept borrowed from Europes Anti-Fascist Actionwhich meant denying racists the opportunity to speak publicly. The whole thing about defending the Nazis freedom of speech before even recognizing that theyre trying to take ours away has always been a problem for me, Jenkins said.

Members of Anti-Racist Action march to protest the National Socialist Movement Rally held at the Yorktown Battlefield on June 25, 2005, in Yorktown, Virginia .

Lisa F. Mizelle/Getty Images

After spending the late 1980s serving in the Air Force, Jenkins hooked up with antifa in the 1990s. Our mission in life was to chase every neo-Nazi out of whatever music scene we were in, he said. We used to fight all the time. In 1995, while living in Cleveland, he started a chapter of ARA. Five years later, hed returned to New Jersey, where he worked with several progressives groups to coordinate a response to a July Fourth rally organized by the white supremacist Richard Barrett. Jenkins and his allies called their effort the One Peoples Coalition. Back then the internet was still fairly new, and Jenkins set up the groups GeoCities website to publicize demonstrations against Barretts group. After the rally he kept the site going, eventually renaming it the One Peoples Project.

One Peoples Project is run on a shoestring. Though Jenkins has a few donors, he supports himself by working as a truck driver. He and his volunteers attend as many right-wing events as possible, from the Conservative Political Action Conference to hardcore Nazi gatherings. When white supremacists are arrested, Jenkins tries to sit in on their trials. You actually have to go out there and do the legwork, he said. One of his prouder moments was exposing an act of racist violence by the anti-immigrant activist Marcus Epstein. One day in 2009, Jenkins was bored and on a whim ran Epsteins name through a criminal database. He found out that Epstein had been arrested two years earlier, though no information about the arrest was available online. So Jenkins went to D.C. Superior Court and pulled his records. It turned out that in 2007, a drunk Epstein had called a passing black woman a nigger, then tried to hit her with a karate chop to the head. A Secret Service officer who witnessed the attack took Epstein into custody, and Epstein eventually pleaded guilty to simple assault.

When Jenkins discovered Epsteins arrest, it was in the middle of the contentious confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Epstein was working as executive director of a political action committee co-founded by former Rep. Tom Tancredo, who called Sotomayor a racist and compared her to members of the KKK. The revelation of Epsteins racist assault made national news, helping to undermine the opposition to Sotomayor.

Much of what OPP does is this sort of individual exposure, a precursor to the crowdsourced doxing campaigns currently being run against white supremacists who were photographed in Charlottesville. Both Jenkins and Laura maintain white nationalist sock-puppet accounts on social media, which they use to communicate with the members of the movement online, and they monitor far-right message boards. Laura described how she got a Virginia white supremacist named Wendy fired. Laura said that Wendy, a psychiatric nurse, posted on the far-right racist site Stormfront about how when she gives out medication to people who are Jewish or black, that she wishes she could give them all cyanide. Though Wendy had been posting under an online pseudonym, Laura told me she figured out her real name and contacted her employer.

Though violence on many sides rhetoric has defined antifa in the public imagination, Jenkins insists such standoffs are only part of what the movement doesand not the most importantpart.

But Jenkins and his crew arent simply out to ruin the lives of their opponents; hes also helped shepherd people out of racist movements. Though hell fight white supremacists, hell also talk to them whenever he sees an opening. He can cut an intimidating figurehes a tall, broad mountain of a manbut hes also warm and, given his lifes work, surprisingly nonjudgmental. Jenkins father was a drug treatment counselor, and his mother is a Pentecostal missionary. He credits his parents for instilling in him an impulse to reach out to people. Im my fathers son, Im my mothers son, Jenkins said. Ill talk. Sometimes, when white supremacists start nurturing doubts, he said, Im the only person that will talk to them, really talk to them like theyre a human being.

When Bryon Widner, who was once an ultraviolent Nazi skinhead, and his wife, Julie, wanted to leave the movement, Julie turned to Jenkins for help. They knew me because of how everybody used to complain about the work I do among their circle, Jenkins said. He would spend hours on the phone with Bryon, bonding with him over their shared love of punk rock. After the couple made a decisive break from their racist past, the Southern Poverty Law Center paid for Bryon to undergo a series of 25 excruciating laser surgeries to remove his Nazi facial tattoos, procedures that were chronicled in the 2011 documentary Erasing Hate.

In the film, Julie tells Jenkins what hes meant to them: Just being able to talk to you about what we went through, and getting out, and all the death threats, and giving us the hope that were doing the right thing, she says. Jenkins responds, I appreciate that, but listen. Its not me. Its you.

None of this, of course, is what most people think of when they think of antifa. The popular image of antifa is of black-masked anarchists spoiling for a fight, and its an image rooted in reality. Jenkins makes no apologies for antifas aggressive stance, which he describes in conservative-sounding terms of community self-reliance. It is apparent that Donald Trump is not going to do anything to keep these groups from flourishing, so we have to. It is our job as citizens of this country, he said. If we care about it, were the ones who need to go out there and do what needs to be done. He carries a gun, though hes never had to use it. More and more to the hard left, you start seeing people willing to bear arms, said Jenkins. I dont run with people who dont care for guns all that much.

For many liberalsa category in which I include myselfantifas willingness to use violence and eagerness to shut down right-wing speech seem both morally wrong and strategically obtuse. Shortly before he was fired, Steve Bannon said that racial unrest is good for the administration: If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats. Trump appears to be making the same calculation, sowing discord to shore up his base.

Some progressive groups that work to stem the growth of the far right worry that antifa plays into their enemies hands. Earlier this year, the Southern Poverty Law Center released a guide for college students about how to deal with alt-right figures on campus. It urges students to avoid confrontation with visiting right-wing speakers, and to instead hold separate, alternative events. When an alt-right personality is scheduled to speak on campus, the most effective course of action is to deprive the speaker of the thing he or she wants mosta spectacle, says the guide. Alt-right personalities know their cause is helped by news footage of large jeering crowds, heated confrontations and outright violence at their events.

But from the perspective of people inside antifa, Charlottesville proves that confrontational tactics are necessary. The weekend of the rally, the swaggering white nationalist Christopher Cantwell was showing off his weapons to a Vice reporter. A few days later, he posted a video of himself choking back tears after hearing that there was a warrant out for his arrest. I dont know what to do, he said, adding, We have used every peaceful and lawful means by which to redress our grievances, and our enemies just will not stop! Thats the sort of thing Jenkins loves to hear. When you get Christopher Cantwell crying, you know that they did not want this, he said.

Anderson, the anarchist website editor, is audibly exasperated when I ask him to respond to those who say that facing off against white supremacists only gives them the publicity they crave. Those people got their wish on Friday night, he said, pointing out that, in the absence of antifa, torch-wielding marchers on the University of Virginia campus attacked a group of students and other activists holding a small, quiet counterdemonstration. (According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, a UVA employee who was injured while trying to protect students had a stroke shortly after the clashand ended up in the ICU.) They beat the shit out of them, Anderson said. They called them niggers and hit them with torches. Nobody came to their defense. There was actually a church full of people singing songs with Cornel West not that far away. Thats what happens when you ignore them.

On Saturday in Charlottesville, when antifa did turn out, many of the peaceful progressive protesters credit it with defending them. West, who was demonstrating with a group of clergy, told Democracy Now!s Amy Goodman, [W]e would have been crushed like cockroaches if it were not for the anarchists and the anti-fascists. Charlottesville pastor Seth Wispelwey, who was standing next to West at Saturdays demonstration, told me that at one point the clergy were charged by a battalion of armed white supremacists, with the police nowhere to be seen. The clergy regrouped, linking arms and preparing to risk being assaulted, but more than 200 antifa activists massed between them and 100 or so Nazis. Without antifa, said Wispelwey, We would have just been trampled and beaten.

An antifa counterprotester hurls a newspaper box toward Unite the Right rally attendees outside Emancipation Park on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Wispelwey, who is committed to nonviolent civil disobedience, has philosophical and strategic differences with antifa, but he doesnt condemn it. I have different tactics, but overall I say, as a clergy person, its dangerous to wait for the perfect at the expense of the good when actual bodily safety is on the line, he said.

In Charlottesville, the police stood down in part because of the presence of armed right-wing militias. Their presence as a private security force for an increasingly public coalition of white nationalist factionsKu Klux Klan followers, neo-Nazis, and alt-right supportershas transformed a movement that has already demonstrated a willingness to threaten violence, reported Politico. Trump has made it clear he has little interest in defending those who would stand up to violent racists. So no matter how much hectoring there is from the right for progressives to denounce the alt-left, theres no reason to believe that antifa will stop gaining ground anytime soon. If people believe that their government hates them and established institutions are incapable of staving off fascism, they will inevitably take matters into their own hands, whether that means exposing people online or fighting with them offline.

For Jenkins, the lesson of Charlottesville is clear: Antifa needs to redouble its efforts. Weve got to be a little bit more forceful, he said. And that doesnt mean we go out there and get even more physically aggressive with these guys. It means that we really try to put the pressure on so that they are marginalized, as they were a couple of years ago. Because whats going on right now, they dont feel marginalized. They feel like nothings going to get in their way. Hes going to get in their way.

Top image: Daryle Lamont Jenkins, center, argues with supporters of President Trump as Rutgers University students and supporters gather to express their discontent with Trumps executive order halting some immigrants from entering the U.S., on Jan. 31 in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Photo by Mel Evans/AP.

Link:

Daryle Jenkins has stepped up to explain the shadowy group’s … – Slate Magazine

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa: the Anti-fascist Handbook ‘What Trump said made the book seem even more urgent’ – The Guardian

Anti-fascist counter-protesters seen outside Lee Park in Charlottesville, Virginia on 12 August. White nationalists and neo-Nazis were forced to leave the park when their Unite the Right rally was declared an unlawful gathering. Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

When US president Donald Trump drew a parallel between the far-right protestors in Charlottesville and counter demonstrators last week, saying that, You had people that were very fine people on both sides. Not all those people were neo-Nazis, not all those people were white supremacists, Melville House rushed into action.

The independent publisher worked around the clock to get a new book printed following Trumps remarks, and one week later, Antifa: the Anti-fascist Handbook is on bookshop shelves. A history of and guide to the anti-fascism movement, Antifa had originally been scheduled for September, but everything in Charlottesville, and Trumps odd behaviour around it, meant we tried to accelerate it even more, said Melville House co-founder Dennis Johnson. When the president said what he said, it made the book seem even more urgent.

After an initial print run of 10,000 copies, Melville House has already printed another 20,000. Its day by day and developing, said Johnson. Its really taking off very fast.

Johnson had signed up author Mark Bray, a political movement scholar and Occupy Wall Street organiser, after hearing him speak on the radio about the masked, black-clad antifa activists who prevented rightwing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos from appearing in Berkeley, California earlier this year. Activists told the Guardian at the time that its absolutely acceptable to use violence. They are 100% certain to use it against us.

It was a programme about whether or not that was censorship, and then Mark Bray came on and said we have to fight fascism differently, said Johnson. I thought it was fascinating, and I had an agreement with him to write a book by that evening. The word antifa is in the air, and it hadnt been before. Americans dont have the first-hand experience of fascism that Europeans have.

Brays book Antifa covers the history of the anti-fascism movement, from its origins in Europe in the 1920s to its exponential growth in the US over the last year. As well as interviews with antifa activists, it also details the tactics of the movement and the philosophy behind it. Bray describes his book as an unabashedly partisan call to arms that aims to equip a new generation of anti-fascists with the history and theory necessary to defeat the resurgent far right.

It argues that militant anti-fascism is a reasonable, historically informed response to the fascist threat that persisted after 1945 and that has become especially menacing in recent years. You may not walk away from this book a convinced anti-fascist, but at least you will understand that anti-fascism is a legitimate political tradition growing out of a century of global struggle, he writes. I hope Antifa will aid and inspire those who will take up the fight against fascism in the years to come so that someday there will be no need for this book.

Johnson said that people are very puzzled by the presidents support of Nazis in America. Most of us have someone who fought the Nazis, and people dont know how to respond, he said. People are puzzled by how to react should they stand up to violence with violence, or should they not?

One classic anti-fascist situation was seen in Charlottesville, he said, when a group of antifa activists protected a group of clergy. One of them, Reverend Seth Wispelwey told ThinkProgress after: A group of white supremacists broke through our line with shields. Some of them were screaming and spitting slurs [as they] physically shoved clergy aside with their shields. Thats when antifa saved our lives.

One of the most fundamental principles of antifa is no platform for fascism, Bray argues, and is a rejection of the liberal notion that fascism is a school of thought worthy of open debate and consideration. Their activities include educational campaigns, working with communities, monitoring fascist individuals and being prepared to physically confront the far right when necessary.

Though this last facet of anti-fascism gets the most attention, it is actually only a small fraction of the thankless drudgery that is committing oneself to tracking the scum of the earth, Bray said.

Antifa is the first in what Johnson said will be a series on the current political climate in the US. The next book, which is not by Bray, will cover impeachment. The word Trump never appears in the book, but it is a history of impeachment, and what the rules are, Johnson said. Its something weve concocted on how to deal with the political situation in the US. It is just all-consuming, and were trying to put out books to help deal with it.

View original post here:

Antifa: the Anti-fascist Handbook ‘What Trump said made the book seem even more urgent’ – The Guardian

Fair Usage Law

August 22, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

The Right Is Falling for Its Own Fake Antifa Accounts – Gizmodo

Will a time come when the right doesnt actively try to deceive its own base? Perhaps. But this weekend wasnt it.

Antifashort for anti-fascist actionhas grown in notoriety since the election of Donald Trump. Supporters see it as the front line in street-level protests against racism. But in the minds of the far-right, antifa are painted in cartoonishly broad strokes, either as the caricature of the entitled millennial liberal or as a dangerous, violent alt-left. Both of these deeply incomplete understandings of antifa come largely from the far-right itselfand are amplified by fake antifa accounts on Twitter which credulous idiots lap up and regurgitate.

Former Buzzfeed plagiarist and current Independent Journal Review Chief Content Officer Benny Johnson did just that this weekend with a piece titled Alleged Boston Antifa Thanks Hillary Clinton, Democrats for Their Support as They Burn American Flag. The listicle attributes such damning actions as burning a flag, burning a sign that says free speech, and thanking Hillary Democrats, to the Twitter account @AntifaBoston. The lead image, which is implied to be antifa members burning an American flag, is actually from a 2015 protest in Denver following the mass killing committed by Dylann Roof. Likewise, the address listed on the Boston antifa Facebook page correlates to a Harvard staffer.

Johnsons post was later updated with the following editors note:

After people questioned the legitimacy of the Twitter account, Independent Journal Review reached out for verification of the authenticity of the group. In an automated response, the group said: Thank you for contacting the official page for the Antifa organization in the Boston area. We will update this article as needed.

A cursory scroll trough the timeline of @AntifaBoston raises alarm bells, particularly with its willingness to retweet known fakes and winkingly promote right-wing personalities like Proud Boys founder Gavic McInness.

AntifaCheckera project which seeks to verify real antifa groups and out fake ones (of which there are many)claims that as far as we know, there are zero legitimate organized Antifa groups in Boston, and told Gizmodo over Twitter DM that fake accounts arent ever really effective to anyone with a modicum of awareness, but theyve mostly been effective at stirring up shit with people who already hate antifa. Back in March, the duo behind the fake @AntifaBoston account were identified as trolls living in Eugene, Oregon by Eugene antifa.

Johnson, it seems, was hoaxed. Unfortunately, hes not alone

The same account fooled a columnist from the conservative Toronto Sun yesterdaywho called the presumed antifa members rich white kids of draft dodgers. Hes also the author of a book titled The Jew is Not My Enemy.

Someone posing as a Boston antifa member (which again, doesnt seem to exist in any publicly organized way) appeared on Fox News Watters World, baiting the host into asking immensely dumb questions like What about when an antifa member stabbed a police horse in the neck with a knife. Was the horse a racist Trump supporter? The troll alluded to right-wingers posing as antifa during the interview, and Watters was none the wiser.

Earlier this summer, a similar fake Facebook account claiming to represent antifa in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania sent right-wingersincluding alt-lite figure and former Navy urine analyzer Jack Posobiecinto a frenzy when it made reference to a (fake) rally planned for Gettysburg. Right-wing counter protestors showed up and found no one to protest. Somehow, one of those fooled into traveling to Gettysburg managed to literally shoot himself in the foot.

Keep in mind, any of these accounts are blatantly fraudulent to anyone with a passing familiarity with right-wing talking points. But for people looking for a new strawman, the bare minimum of research doesnt enter into the equation.

Read the original post:

The Right Is Falling for Its Own Fake Antifa Accounts – Gizmodo

Fair Usage Law

August 22, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

UC Berkeley conservative student sues Antifa member over …

The former president of the Berkeley College Republicans at the University of California, Berkeley said Wednesday he is suing a prominent member of an Antifa group for allegedly threatening and harassing him and others on campus. Mark Meuser, one of the lawyers representing Troy Worden, announced the lawsuit seeking more than $100,000 of damages against Yvette Felarca in a press release,The Washington Examiner reported. Felarca is the leader of By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), an Antifa, or anti-fascist, group. Felarca filed a frivolous restraining order that restricted Worden’s First and Second Amendment rights and made it difficult for him to move around the campus to attend classes. The restraining order was dismissed on Oct. 27, 2017,” Meuser said. In a previous interview with Fox News, Worden he’s had to face months of “talking, harassment and even violence,” along with other UC Berkeley College Republicans (BCR). I have to look behind my shoulder whenever I am on campus and especially when I am engaged in political activism, Worden said. The No. 1 public university in the world and the so-called birthplace of the free speech movement is anything but. It is the place where Americas conservative youth are daily under threat of violence, lacking the support of the university administration, police, or city,” he added. “The Free Speech Movement is dead, and the left has killed it. ANTIFA STALKING UC BERKELEYS CONSERVATIVE STUDENTS, GROUP SAYS BCR members told Fox News they are being targeted by Antifa, including Twitter “doxxing,” a practice of publishing personal information online. Felarca was charged this summer by the Sacramento County District Attorneys Office with assault and inciting and participating in a riot for an incident in 2016 where she was filmed hitting a man at a protest,the East Bay Times reported. The lawsuit filed Wednesday also targets her attorney, Shanta Driver, who is the National Chair and founder of the organization BAMN. “Felarca and her attorney attempted to make free speech expensive, and it is time that they pay for their misuse of the court system,” said Meuser. The attorney representing Felarca in the latest legal action told the East Bay Times the motion filed by Worden was frivolous. Troy Worden is a stalker, Ronald Cruz of Oakland-based United for Equality and Affirmative Action Legal Defense Fund told the newspaper. This motion is his attempt to use the courts to continue stalking Ms. Felarca. He stalked Yvette Felarca and its all on the record. The First Amendment does not give Worden the right to stalk people, or to violate a restraining order and be in Felarcas face and take video of her for 30 minutes, which Worden did after the court commanded him to stay away. Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

Fair Usage Law

November 25, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa’s Berkeley Violence Ought to Frighten the Left …

If 2016 is the year when our political parties failed, inflicting on America arguably its worst presidential choice in our nations history, then 2017 is when our broader institutions began to lose their collective minds. This is the year when reasonable men surrendered to unreason when political tribalism trumped human decency. The primary tragedy of Charlottesville was the loss of a young womans life. The secondary tragedy was the distortion of our political culture. The president of the United States actually declared some portion of a collection of neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and alt-right white nationalists to be very fine people. He just couldnt bring himself to completely disavow men and women whod supported him since the day he descended down the escalator at Trump Tower. Yet rather than doing the easiest and most sensible thing in the world condemning white supremacy while also condemning political violence on the far left some portion of the left-wing intelligentsia actually decided to embrace their own thugs. They supported Antifa. They decided to lionize some of the worst people in American life. And in so doing, they actually compared them to the American heroes who stormed Omaha Beach. The tweets below, as the saying goes, did not age well. First, heres Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, one of the best and most respected political journals in American life: In fact, this comparison of the alt-left with the warriors of the Greatest Generation was hardly unique to Goldberg. Heres CNNs Chris Cuomo: And heres CNN contributor and former Hillary Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon: Indeed, for a time the very notion that a person could and should condemn both Antifa and the alt-right generated extreme rage online. How dare you equate fascists and anti-fascists! Outlets such as the Washington Post and CNN published fawning apologetics and romanticized profiles of the far lefts vigilante thugs. Antifa had its pop-culture moment. It was disgraceful. All of it. And this weekend Antifa struck again. A small group of peaceful right-wing protesters gathered in Berkeley. Black-clad Antifa thugs attacked. The Washington Post has the story: Their faces hidden behind black bandannas and hoodies, about 100 anarchists and antifa anti-fascist members barreled into a protest Sunday afternoon in Berkeleys Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Jumping over plastic and concrete barriers, the group melted into a larger crowd of around 2,000 that had marched peacefully throughout the sunny afternoon for a Rally Against Hate gathering. Shortly after, violence began to flare. A pepper-spray-wielding Trump supporter was smacked to the ground with homemade shields. Another was attacked by five black-clad antifa members, each windmilling kicks and punches into a man desperately trying to protect himself. A conservative group leader retreated for safety behind a line of riot police as marchers chucked water bottles, shot off pepper spray and screamed, Fascist go home! Even worse, the police literally stood aside and let Antifa take over a public park. It allowed mob rule and then justified abdicating its responsibility to protect the liberty and safety of Berkeleys citizens by claiming that it wanted people to freely assemble. This is a sad joke. It gave control to Antifa. It empowered the hecklers veto. The video evidence of violence is appalling. Antifa isnt heroic. Its brutal: As vicious as they are, in a functioning constitutional republic, Antifa is a manageable, short-term problem. A vigorous police presence followed by a wave of arrests and aggressive prosecutions would largely end the threat. The men and women of Antifa arent insurgents; theyre little more than a cowardly gang of left-wing thugs. Far more serious is their effect on the rule of law and political discourse. Has hatred for Trump so blinded Americas liberal elite that its willing to romanticize violence? Is their respect for the First Amendment so fragile that the thrill of watching alleged members of the alt-right get punched in the face is worth more than preserving core constitutional liberties? Have the police forgotten their role as guardians of American liberty? This isnt #resistance, its lawlessness. Its not anti-fascism, its violent repression. Is the rule now that any gathering of Trump supporters alt-right or not in any blue enclave risks a violent response? Have authorities, through a combination of cowardice and political correctness, ceded control of the streets in key American towns to a Marxist/anarchist mob? Antifa and its elite apologists are sending a clear message of hate and loathing to millions of Americans who dont have a fascist bone in their bodies to the millions of good people who voted for Donald Trump. Antifa doesnt occupy the moral high ground. Its apologists have no grounds to sneer at anyone. Instead, theyre competing with the alt-right for control of the political sewer. Condemn Antifa now. Prosecute its members now. Or watch America continue to tear itself apart. Violent Marxists are evil. Violent fascists are evil. If we cant understand both of those basic truths simultaneously, then we have truly lost our way. READ MORE:The Roots of Left-Wing ViolenceGangs of Berkeley: Antifas Pathetic DelusionsAntifa and the Alt-Right, Growing in Opposition to One Another David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and an attorney.

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

‘Antifa’ violence in Berkeley spurs soul-searching within …

Of the dozens of organizations that turned out for Sundays mass protest against racism here, one group was impossible to miss. Its members dressed head to toe in black, with masked faces and some bearing pastel-painted riot shields that read no hate. These 100 or so militants billed themselves as a security force for progressive counter-protesters, vowing to protect them from far-right agitators. But as the protest got underway, some of those in masks would resort to mob violence, attacking a small showing of supporters of President Trump and others they accused, sometimes inaccurately, of being white supremacists or Nazis. The graphic videos of those attacks have spurred soul-searching within the leftist activist movement in the Bay Area and beyond. Emotions remain raw in the wake of this months white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., which left one woman dead and dozens injured. Trump received blistering criticism for equating the behavior of Klansmen and neo-Nazis to the actions of those who opposed them. Some fear that Sundays violence would only help advance the idea that the two sides are the same. This is food for the adversary, said sociologist Todd Gitlin, a founder of Students for a Democratic Society, which organized the first national protests against the Vietnam War. He pointed out that violent acts committed by a few will almost always hijack the narrative of the entire protest, and that it is happening now should be no surprise. Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. Police watch demonstrators tackle a man Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times) Gitlin also described what he sees as a push by the anti-fascist also called antifa movement to put themselves on the map of protest by using violence to intimidate both political opponents and those on the left who promote non-violence. One of the biggest banners at the Berkeley demonstration carried the message Avenge Charlottesville. Militants who showed up Sunday were part of a multifaceted rally in which church leaders sang gospel and anti-fascists shouted profanities. Berkeley police estimated more than 4,000 people came out to take over a city park where far-right activists had called for an anti-Marxism rally. The organizer canceled the event Friday, citing security concerns, but a small number of far-right activists showed up anyway. By the end of the day, 13 people had been arrested, one on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon and three on battery charges. Jeff Conant, a member of an East Bay collective of anti-racist demonstrators known as Showing Up For Racial Justice, said march organizers asked allies in the antifa movement to play a defensive role in the rally not to engage in or start violence. Those in the black hoods fell in with the marchers, while the lead truck for the march carried stacks of pastel-painted riot shields that anti-fascist demonstrators later raised against police. Participants further were told not to record the day on their cellphones, and urged to write a legal aid phone number on their arms in case of arrest. The march reached a park, which police had already cleared of far-right figures. The demonstrators lined up behind their shields against a police barricade and officers armed with riot guns. Elsewhere, the hooded group would mob, and in some cases kick and beat, a handful of far-right supporters. Several antifa members were seen using their shields to batter opponents, including one who was slammed into the back of a man running out of Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. Berkeley police said they were aware of four such incidents during the day. The images sparked criticism from both conservatives as well as some liberals who had hoped the march would be peaceful after several violent confrontations between left and right extremists in Berkeley earlier this year. After the crowd began to disperse, Berkeley Police Chief Andrew Greenwood held a tense discussion with a church organizer concerned that peaceful protesters would be lumped in with the militants. Greenwood said his officers had seen antifa and black bloc forces preparing alongside the rest of the demonstrators, at a staging point some four blocks away. They were practicing with weapons, Greenwood said. Conant said the drills were defensive, justified by violence at other demonstrations in the past year. Organizers defended the militant force, saying it was necessary because police do not wade into protest brawls themselves. Far-right activists also criticized police for not better protecting them. Berkeley police said having officers jump into the crowd would have inflamed already an already volatile situation. However, on Sunday, police several times rescued people chased by the crowd or escorted them out. Among those appalled by the increasingly militant force are radicals from the 1960s peace movement. Political scientist Jo Freeman, part of the radical student movement that forced UC Berkeley to permit political speech five decades ago, said she was dismayed at the effort that went into silencing opposition. She drew similarities between those who threatened her and other freedom marchers in the South in the 1960s, and those who bully the far right now. It is not uncommon for societies to produce a hate squad, Freeman said. People who want to suppress the right to speak they are everywhere. Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. Demonstrators clash Sunday at Civic Center Park in Berkeley. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times) Kitty Stryker, a Berkeley activist affiliated with groups like Struggalo Circus, which offer medical aid during protests, said she was heartbroken to see media coverage of Sundays demonstration focus on violence. She said she saw a Trump supporter pepper spray a black bloc member and said it was disingenuous to say anti-fascists alone incited violence. I do think there was a lot of anger over Charlottesville, as there should be, Stryker said. But I also think there was a sudden realization that many of the instigators in Charlottesville had been coming to Berkeley for months to beat up anti-fascists. UC Berkeley is reviewing the weekend demonstrations as it plans how to handle a series of conservative political speakers in late September. Campus spokesman Dan Mogulof said student safety is the first priority there is nothing more important.

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

ANTIFA – What does ANTIFA stand for? The Free Dictionary

Disclaimer All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Fair Usage Law

October 17, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

What is antifa and what does the movement want? – USA TODAY

“Antifa” is commonly considered to be part of the far-left, a group Trump said was partially responsible for violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Video provided by Newsy Newslook A counter demonstrator uses a lighted spray can Aug. 12, 2017, against a white nationalist demonstrator at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va(Photo: Steve Helber, AP) Antifa shortfor”anti-fascist” is the name for loosely affiliated, left-leaninganti-racist groups that monitor and track the activities of local neo-Nazis. The movement has no unified structureor national leadershipbut has emerged in the form of local bodiesnationwide, particularly on theWest Coast. Some of the groups, such as the 10-year-old Rose City Antifa in Portland, the oldest antifa group in the U.S.,are particularly well-organized andactive online and onFacebook,while its members are individually anonymous. President Trump has singled out antifa as part of what he calls the alt-left in his initial claim that “many sides” were to blame for violence in Charlottesville the weekend of Aug. 12, not just the neo-Nazis, KKK and white nationalists. How is it pronounced? “AN-tifa” with the emphasis on the first syllable, which sounds more like “on” in English than “an.” Far-left antifa demonstrators link arms at Chapman Square during a protest against President Trump in downtown Portland June 4, 2017, as police attempt to move them away from the square.(Photo: Ariane Kunze, AFP/Getty Images) When did it start? Anti-fascist groups, particularly in Europe, have been around for many decades, notably in Italy, against Mussolini, and in Germany, against Hitler. In the postwar period, antifa groups resurgedto fightneo-Nazi groups, particularly in Germany. In the U.S., the anti-fascist movements grew out ofleftist politics of the late ’80s,primarily under theumbrellaof Anti-Racist Action. What does the movementwant? Theprimary goal is to stopneo-Nazis and white supremacists fromgaining a platform rather than to promotea specific antifa agenda. The antifa groups aredecidedly anti-racist, anti-sexistand anti-homophobia, but also by and large socially leftistand anti-capitalist. How do the groupsoperate? Mark Bray, a lecturer and Dartmouth andauthor of the new book Antifa: The Antifascist Handbook,says the groups “organize educational campaigns, build community coalitions, monitor fascists, pressure venues to cancel their events, organize self-defense trainingsand physically confront the far right when necessary.” A main goal is to try to deny fascists a public forum, which is why they turn out in numbers to physically confrontneo-Nazis, the KKKand white supremacists atpublic demonstrations. They also step in to protect counter-protesters at such events. In addition, antifa is particularly active in”doxxing,” or identifying neo-Nazis and like-minded individuals and disseminatingthat private information to the public and employers to discourage people from joining their ranks. Is antifaviolent? Memberspointedly do not eschew violencebut rather see themselves as engaging in “self-defense,” protecting other protesters and primarily confronting neo-Nazis and white supremacists to deny them a platform to publicly spread their views. “We are unapologetic about the reality that fighting fascism at points requires physical militancy, Rose City Antifas Facebook page reads. Anti-fascism is, by nature, a form of self-defense: the goal of fascism is to exterminate the vast majority of human beings. Political activist and author Cornel West, speaking to Amy Goodman on the program Democracy Now about the clashes in Charlottesville, saidantifa intervened when the “neofascists” move against his group of protesters.”We would havebeen crushed like cockroaches if it were not for the anarchistsand the anti-fascists,” he said. Bray says the riseof fascism in the 1930s demonstrates that it wasa mistake to allow such groups to air their views in hopes that public opinion would blunt their growth.”We should be wary of those who are more distressed about alleged violations of the speech of fascists than the actual violence they perpetrate,” he says. Where has the movementdemonstrated? In addition to Charlottesville, antifa forces, whooften dress inblack and wearmasks, have confronted or clashed with far-right groups in such places as the University of California at Berkeley,where protests by West Coast antifa forces, some of whomsmashedwindows and setfires,forced the cancellation of aspeech by alt-right activistMilo Yiannopoulos in Februaryand another by conservative commentator Ann Coulter in April. In June, antifa forces turned out to protest a pro-Trump free-speech in Portland. Some antifa counterprotestersbegan throwing objects at police, who responded with flash grenades and pepper balls, according to theThe Oregonian. Antifa was also out in force in Juneto confrontPatriot Prayer, a free speech groupprotesting political correctness and hatred at Evergreen State Collegein Olympia, Wash. Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2wyFI9A

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa: An Anti-American, Terrorist Organization – Townhall

| Posted: Aug 22, 2017 1:29 PM At least as disturbing as the events in Charlottesville on August 12 is the Big Media coverage of those events. More specifically, while most peopleand certainly most Americans, some of whose loved ones, like my late grandfather, sacrificed life and limb fighting Hitlers army during World War IIrecognize them for the scumbags that they are, neo-Nazis do not pose any sort of threat to Americans. And everyone who has been waxing hysterical over the sight of a few swastika-bearing young men in Charlotteville knows this to be true. In glaring contrast, those who self-style as anti-fascists, the so-called Antifa, do indeed pose a threat. It isnt because the Antifa is, in reality, anti-American that accounts for its toxicity to our way of life. Nor is it that its members see themselves as justified in repudiating civilization by resorting to violence against those who they regard as fascisti.e. anyone to the slightest right of these far-left losersthat explains why they imperil our country. What decisively establishes Antifa as a threat to America is that, subsequent to Charlottesville, these self-regarding anarcho-communists now have the sympathies of their ideological brethren in the Establishment, what I call the Big GAME (Government-Academia-Media-Entertainment complex). Both Republican and Democratic politicians alike have pounced on the president for, quite justly, noting that among the counter-demonstrators at Charlottesville was a very, very violent, not insignificant minority. To repeat, although he explicitly condemned white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and all who would engage in racial oppression, President Trump has himself been condemned by dishonest moral exhibitionists and political opportunists, both Republican and Democrat alike, for doing what they wouldnt think of doing by telling the truth. Trump, to his credit, also pointed out that for as repugnant as some of the rally attendees undoubtedly were, they had assembled lawfully. They had respected our Constitution. The mask-wearing counter-demonstrators who came to meet them with baseball bats, clubs, bottles filled with concrete, feces, urine, acid, bear mace, guns, and even a makeshift flame-thrower had no permit to block thoroughfares. They violated the Constitution. Neither did they have a permit to assault with deadly weapons those whose presence and ideas they resented. This being said, the president didnt go nearly far enough. He should have called out the Antifa by name. He should have brought to the nations attention that for at least the better part of the last year, and certainly since his inauguration, it has singled out for violent attack his supporters, supplying the same rationale for doing sobash the fashthat is now given for the violence in Charlottesville. It isnt neo-Nazis upon whom the Antifa has been setting its sights for the last year. It is Deplorables, anyone and everyone who supports, or who openly displays their support, for Trump. Antifa is an enemy of civilization. Its members regularly march under the banner of the Sickle and Hammer, have long referred to America as a fascist state, and have a habit of burning Americanor AmeriKanflags. Antifa should be identified for the terrorist organization that it is. And make no mistakes about it: Antifa members are terrorists. This is no hyperbole. A violent act is a terrorist act, and the perpetrator is a terrorist, if three conditions are satisfied: (1) The perpetrator is a non-state actor; (2) The violence is aimed at civilians; and (3) the violence unleashed upon civilians is designed to affect changes in government policy. A terrorist need not be successful in his or her aspirations in order to be a terrorist. The members of so-called Antifa meet all three of these criteria. They are terrorists. Although it has only been recently that those in Big Media began talking about Antifa, some of us who carefully track movements on the ground, so to speak, the movements of the little people, spotted Antifa for the threat that it is. Well before Charlottesville, concerned citizens via Change.org began making attempts to petition the Trump administration to call it out for the terrorist group that it is. Members of Antifa are the same guttersnipes who stormed the streets of D.C. on the day of Trumps inauguration and attacked police officers, private citizens, and the property of businesses. These are the same vermin that rioted on UC Berkeleys campus shattering windows, throwing Molotov cocktails, suppressing free speech, and, once again, macing and assaulting citizens, including a young lesbian woman whose red hat was mistaken for a MAGA hat. These are the same low lives who have routinely attacked pro-Trump, pro-free speech rally attendees at Berkeley (and other locations) with knives, rocks, sticks of dynamite, flag poles, sticks, bricks, and bike locks. Last but not least, these are the same anti-American terrorists who allegedly mainstream Democrats not only refuse to disavow, but for whom they now apologize. This is to their eternal shame. They are complicit in the violence, in the terrorism of those who function as the strong-arm wing of their party. Yet, to be fair, it isnt just Democrats who have blood on their hands. No shortage of Republican and GOP-friendly conservative commentators are culpable as well. Those who condemned the president for drawing the nations attention to the barbarism of the Antifa counter-demonstrators in Charlottesville have chosen to turn a blind eye to anti-American, anti-constitutional thuggery. What they are either unwilling or unable to recognize is that for all of their virtue-signaling, the Antifa regards themas they regard all normals, as Townhall.coms Kurt Schlicter refers to those tens and tens of millions of garden-variety Americans who simply want to live and let livein the same light as that in which they regard neo-Nazis. Whether one is white, black, or other; Republican, Democrat, or Independent; conservative, liberal, or libertarianit matters not. If one does not endorse the neo-communism, anarcho-communism, and anti-Americanism of Antifa, one is a white supremacist and fascist.

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Daryle Jenkins has stepped up to explain the shadowy group’s … – Slate Magazine

Aug. 22, 2017 Cover Story During the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July, the citys central plaza became an ideological Star Wars canteen. Burly Christian fundamentalists hoisted signs denouncing Islam a few feet from a publicity-seeking Muslim with an AR-15slung across his back. Clusters of communists chanted America was never great! while Bikers for Trump paraded around in MAGA hats. Off to one side, Daryle Lamont Jenkins, a longtime activist in the militant left-wing anti-fascist movement, sat on a bench beside me surveying the rabble, pointing out various white supremacists whod come to town to celebrate Donald Trumps ascension. Hed already seen the Traditionalist Worker Partys Matt Heimbach, who a few months earlier had assaulted a black female protester at a Trump rally in Kentucky. Hed spotted Richard Spencer and Nathan Damigo, who, a year later, would make news for their high-profile roles in the Unite the Right rallyin Charlottesville, Virginia. Looking into the crowd, Jenkins drew my attention to a stocky shaven-headed man in a St. Vincent T-shirtMatt Forney, an internet personality whose work blends racism with mens rights activism. (His oeuvre includes How to Beat Your Girlfriend or Wife and Get Away With It.) A handful of young men hovered around him. Theyre organizing, theyre recruiting, theyre going around talking to people, and theyre trying to basically beef up their numbers, Jenkins said. He was there to watch them. Ive been taking video of every Nazi Ive seen, he told me. Ive been taking video of every Nazi Ive seen, Jenkinssaid. Jenkins, 49, is a black man who has devoted his life to fighting white supremacists, sometimes literally. He is the founder of the One Peoples Project, easily the most mainstream and well-known anti-fascist, or antifa, organization. (Its motto is Hate Has Consequences.) Unlike other left-wing groups that track the far right, One Peoples Projectwhich Jenkins runs with the help of a network of about 15 volunteersconfronts its enemies, whether that means getting in their faces at protests, doxing them, or contacting their employers. A volunteer named Laura, a granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, described her work with OPP as antifa CIA. After the riot in Charlottesvillewhere Jenkins was pepper-sprayedantifa is suddenly making headlines. The term antifa refers to a loose network of militant left-wing activists who physically square off against the far right, and often try to prevent those they deem fascists from speaking publicly. Antifa is sometimes used as a synonym for black bloc anarchiststhe scruffy kids in black bandanas or balaclavas known for smashing Starbucks windowsbut while the movements overlap, theyre not identical. Jenkins doesnt wear a mask, and Laura is an upper-middle-class suburban woman with grown children. The movement appears to be growing rapidly under Trump, though its impossible to put hard numbers to it; there are no membership rolls. As antifa becomes more prominent, Jenkins has been called on to explain its strain of left-wing militancy to a fascinated but deeply wary wider world. The last time I saw him, on Thursday, he had just finished an interview on Sirius XM and said he would soon be appearing on 20/20. Hed been frustrated with mainstream coverage of antifa, which tends to paint it as mindlessly reckless, though he also said the movement bears some blame for failing to speak to media on its own behalf. If you want to know what antifa is about, talk to antifaif you can find people in antifa that will talk, he said. Hell talk, and has become the public face for a diffuse, nonhierarchical movement. Daryles important because hes an elder in our community, said James Anderson, part of the editorial collective that produces the anarchist website Its Going Down. He added: Daryles very brave. Many on the right have tried to paint antifa as the moral equivalent of violent white supremacists. Antifa: The Other Evil Political Force, says a headline on an essay in the American Conservative that ran last week. Trump, at his notorious Aug. 15 press conference, seemed to refer to antifa when he placed part of the blame for Charlottesville on the alt-left which he called very, very violent. Liberals, in general, dont like antifa much more. They see their tactics as counterproductive at best, and worry that theyre ceding the moral high ground to the right. In The Rise of the Violent Left, a recent Atlantic piece, Peter Beinart wrote about how antifa threatened to disrupt an annual parade in Portland, Oregon, if it included a contingent of Trump supporters; the parade ended up being canceled. The people preventing Republicans from safely assembling on the streets of Portland may consider themselves fierce opponents of the authoritarianism growing on the American right, wrote Beinart. In truth, however, they are its unlikeliest allies. Its certainly true that antifa refuses to eschew violence. According to CNNs Jake Tapper, left-wing counterprotesters assaulted at least two journalists in Charlottesville. The riot is our version of the strike, said Anderson, even as he acknowledges a disconnect between some of antifas tactics and its goals. Step one, broken window. Step two, we dont know. Step three, classless and stateless society, he said wryly. I dont think it works like that. But at a moment when Trumps violence on many sides rhetoric has installed a one-dimensional image of antifa in the wider imagination, Jenkins insists that large-scale standoffs are only part of what the movement doesand not the most important part. Antifa also aims to shame white supremacists, heightening the social cost of involvement with racist organizations. Youve got to be proactive against them when theyre not rolling 500 deep, he said. Thats where doxing comes in. In the wake of Charlottesville, he points out, Unite the Right rallygoers are being identified online, with lasting consequences. One has left college, another has been fired from his job at a Berkeley, California, hot dog stand. These are kids who thought it was funny hassling people online and think they can get away with it in real life, said Jenkins. And then they learn the hard way: Real life is different than online. Daryle Jenkins roots lay in the punk scene, which was the crucible of antifa organizing in America. In 1983, a multiracial skinhead crew called the Baldies formed in Minneapolis to oppose racist skinhead gangs. Five years later, members of the Baldies joined with other groups nationwide to form Anti-Racist Action, an anarchist network that set out to expose, oppose, and confront white supremacists. Central to ARAs mission was no-platforminga concept borrowed from Europes Anti-Fascist Actionwhich meant denying racists the opportunity to speak publicly. The whole thing about defending the Nazis freedom of speech before even recognizing that theyre trying to take ours away has always been a problem for me, Jenkins said. Members of Anti-Racist Action march to protest the National Socialist Movement Rally held at the Yorktown Battlefield on June 25, 2005, in Yorktown, Virginia . Lisa F. Mizelle/Getty Images After spending the late 1980s serving in the Air Force, Jenkins hooked up with antifa in the 1990s. Our mission in life was to chase every neo-Nazi out of whatever music scene we were in, he said. We used to fight all the time. In 1995, while living in Cleveland, he started a chapter of ARA. Five years later, hed returned to New Jersey, where he worked with several progressives groups to coordinate a response to a July Fourth rally organized by the white supremacist Richard Barrett. Jenkins and his allies called their effort the One Peoples Coalition. Back then the internet was still fairly new, and Jenkins set up the groups GeoCities website to publicize demonstrations against Barretts group. After the rally he kept the site going, eventually renaming it the One Peoples Project. One Peoples Project is run on a shoestring. Though Jenkins has a few donors, he supports himself by working as a truck driver. He and his volunteers attend as many right-wing events as possible, from the Conservative Political Action Conference to hardcore Nazi gatherings. When white supremacists are arrested, Jenkins tries to sit in on their trials. You actually have to go out there and do the legwork, he said. One of his prouder moments was exposing an act of racist violence by the anti-immigrant activist Marcus Epstein. One day in 2009, Jenkins was bored and on a whim ran Epsteins name through a criminal database. He found out that Epstein had been arrested two years earlier, though no information about the arrest was available online. So Jenkins went to D.C. Superior Court and pulled his records. It turned out that in 2007, a drunk Epstein had called a passing black woman a nigger, then tried to hit her with a karate chop to the head. A Secret Service officer who witnessed the attack took Epstein into custody, and Epstein eventually pleaded guilty to simple assault. When Jenkins discovered Epsteins arrest, it was in the middle of the contentious confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Epstein was working as executive director of a political action committee co-founded by former Rep. Tom Tancredo, who called Sotomayor a racist and compared her to members of the KKK. The revelation of Epsteins racist assault made national news, helping to undermine the opposition to Sotomayor. Much of what OPP does is this sort of individual exposure, a precursor to the crowdsourced doxing campaigns currently being run against white supremacists who were photographed in Charlottesville. Both Jenkins and Laura maintain white nationalist sock-puppet accounts on social media, which they use to communicate with the members of the movement online, and they monitor far-right message boards. Laura described how she got a Virginia white supremacist named Wendy fired. Laura said that Wendy, a psychiatric nurse, posted on the far-right racist site Stormfront about how when she gives out medication to people who are Jewish or black, that she wishes she could give them all cyanide. Though Wendy had been posting under an online pseudonym, Laura told me she figured out her real name and contacted her employer. Though violence on many sides rhetoric has defined antifa in the public imagination, Jenkins insists such standoffs are only part of what the movement doesand not the most importantpart. But Jenkins and his crew arent simply out to ruin the lives of their opponents; hes also helped shepherd people out of racist movements. Though hell fight white supremacists, hell also talk to them whenever he sees an opening. He can cut an intimidating figurehes a tall, broad mountain of a manbut hes also warm and, given his lifes work, surprisingly nonjudgmental. Jenkins father was a drug treatment counselor, and his mother is a Pentecostal missionary. He credits his parents for instilling in him an impulse to reach out to people. Im my fathers son, Im my mothers son, Jenkins said. Ill talk. Sometimes, when white supremacists start nurturing doubts, he said, Im the only person that will talk to them, really talk to them like theyre a human being. When Bryon Widner, who was once an ultraviolent Nazi skinhead, and his wife, Julie, wanted to leave the movement, Julie turned to Jenkins for help. They knew me because of how everybody used to complain about the work I do among their circle, Jenkins said. He would spend hours on the phone with Bryon, bonding with him over their shared love of punk rock. After the couple made a decisive break from their racist past, the Southern Poverty Law Center paid for Bryon to undergo a series of 25 excruciating laser surgeries to remove his Nazi facial tattoos, procedures that were chronicled in the 2011 documentary Erasing Hate. In the film, Julie tells Jenkins what hes meant to them: Just being able to talk to you about what we went through, and getting out, and all the death threats, and giving us the hope that were doing the right thing, she says. Jenkins responds, I appreciate that, but listen. Its not me. Its you. None of this, of course, is what most people think of when they think of antifa. The popular image of antifa is of black-masked anarchists spoiling for a fight, and its an image rooted in reality. Jenkins makes no apologies for antifas aggressive stance, which he describes in conservative-sounding terms of community self-reliance. It is apparent that Donald Trump is not going to do anything to keep these groups from flourishing, so we have to. It is our job as citizens of this country, he said. If we care about it, were the ones who need to go out there and do what needs to be done. He carries a gun, though hes never had to use it. More and more to the hard left, you start seeing people willing to bear arms, said Jenkins. I dont run with people who dont care for guns all that much. For many liberalsa category in which I include myselfantifas willingness to use violence and eagerness to shut down right-wing speech seem both morally wrong and strategically obtuse. Shortly before he was fired, Steve Bannon said that racial unrest is good for the administration: If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats. Trump appears to be making the same calculation, sowing discord to shore up his base. Some progressive groups that work to stem the growth of the far right worry that antifa plays into their enemies hands. Earlier this year, the Southern Poverty Law Center released a guide for college students about how to deal with alt-right figures on campus. It urges students to avoid confrontation with visiting right-wing speakers, and to instead hold separate, alternative events. When an alt-right personality is scheduled to speak on campus, the most effective course of action is to deprive the speaker of the thing he or she wants mosta spectacle, says the guide. Alt-right personalities know their cause is helped by news footage of large jeering crowds, heated confrontations and outright violence at their events. But from the perspective of people inside antifa, Charlottesville proves that confrontational tactics are necessary. The weekend of the rally, the swaggering white nationalist Christopher Cantwell was showing off his weapons to a Vice reporter. A few days later, he posted a video of himself choking back tears after hearing that there was a warrant out for his arrest. I dont know what to do, he said, adding, We have used every peaceful and lawful means by which to redress our grievances, and our enemies just will not stop! Thats the sort of thing Jenkins loves to hear. When you get Christopher Cantwell crying, you know that they did not want this, he said. Anderson, the anarchist website editor, is audibly exasperated when I ask him to respond to those who say that facing off against white supremacists only gives them the publicity they crave. Those people got their wish on Friday night, he said, pointing out that, in the absence of antifa, torch-wielding marchers on the University of Virginia campus attacked a group of students and other activists holding a small, quiet counterdemonstration. (According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, a UVA employee who was injured while trying to protect students had a stroke shortly after the clashand ended up in the ICU.) They beat the shit out of them, Anderson said. They called them niggers and hit them with torches. Nobody came to their defense. There was actually a church full of people singing songs with Cornel West not that far away. Thats what happens when you ignore them. On Saturday in Charlottesville, when antifa did turn out, many of the peaceful progressive protesters credit it with defending them. West, who was demonstrating with a group of clergy, told Democracy Now!s Amy Goodman, [W]e would have been crushed like cockroaches if it were not for the anarchists and the anti-fascists. Charlottesville pastor Seth Wispelwey, who was standing next to West at Saturdays demonstration, told me that at one point the clergy were charged by a battalion of armed white supremacists, with the police nowhere to be seen. The clergy regrouped, linking arms and preparing to risk being assaulted, but more than 200 antifa activists massed between them and 100 or so Nazis. Without antifa, said Wispelwey, We would have just been trampled and beaten. An antifa counterprotester hurls a newspaper box toward Unite the Right rally attendees outside Emancipation Park on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Wispelwey, who is committed to nonviolent civil disobedience, has philosophical and strategic differences with antifa, but he doesnt condemn it. I have different tactics, but overall I say, as a clergy person, its dangerous to wait for the perfect at the expense of the good when actual bodily safety is on the line, he said. In Charlottesville, the police stood down in part because of the presence of armed right-wing militias. Their presence as a private security force for an increasingly public coalition of white nationalist factionsKu Klux Klan followers, neo-Nazis, and alt-right supportershas transformed a movement that has already demonstrated a willingness to threaten violence, reported Politico. Trump has made it clear he has little interest in defending those who would stand up to violent racists. So no matter how much hectoring there is from the right for progressives to denounce the alt-left, theres no reason to believe that antifa will stop gaining ground anytime soon. If people believe that their government hates them and established institutions are incapable of staving off fascism, they will inevitably take matters into their own hands, whether that means exposing people online or fighting with them offline. For Jenkins, the lesson of Charlottesville is clear: Antifa needs to redouble its efforts. Weve got to be a little bit more forceful, he said. And that doesnt mean we go out there and get even more physically aggressive with these guys. It means that we really try to put the pressure on so that they are marginalized, as they were a couple of years ago. Because whats going on right now, they dont feel marginalized. They feel like nothings going to get in their way. Hes going to get in their way. Top image: Daryle Lamont Jenkins, center, argues with supporters of President Trump as Rutgers University students and supporters gather to express their discontent with Trumps executive order halting some immigrants from entering the U.S., on Jan. 31 in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Photo by Mel Evans/AP.

Fair Usage Law

August 23, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

Antifa: the Anti-fascist Handbook ‘What Trump said made the book seem even more urgent’ – The Guardian

Anti-fascist counter-protesters seen outside Lee Park in Charlottesville, Virginia on 12 August. White nationalists and neo-Nazis were forced to leave the park when their Unite the Right rally was declared an unlawful gathering. Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images When US president Donald Trump drew a parallel between the far-right protestors in Charlottesville and counter demonstrators last week, saying that, You had people that were very fine people on both sides. Not all those people were neo-Nazis, not all those people were white supremacists, Melville House rushed into action. The independent publisher worked around the clock to get a new book printed following Trumps remarks, and one week later, Antifa: the Anti-fascist Handbook is on bookshop shelves. A history of and guide to the anti-fascism movement, Antifa had originally been scheduled for September, but everything in Charlottesville, and Trumps odd behaviour around it, meant we tried to accelerate it even more, said Melville House co-founder Dennis Johnson. When the president said what he said, it made the book seem even more urgent. After an initial print run of 10,000 copies, Melville House has already printed another 20,000. Its day by day and developing, said Johnson. Its really taking off very fast. Johnson had signed up author Mark Bray, a political movement scholar and Occupy Wall Street organiser, after hearing him speak on the radio about the masked, black-clad antifa activists who prevented rightwing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos from appearing in Berkeley, California earlier this year. Activists told the Guardian at the time that its absolutely acceptable to use violence. They are 100% certain to use it against us. It was a programme about whether or not that was censorship, and then Mark Bray came on and said we have to fight fascism differently, said Johnson. I thought it was fascinating, and I had an agreement with him to write a book by that evening. The word antifa is in the air, and it hadnt been before. Americans dont have the first-hand experience of fascism that Europeans have. Brays book Antifa covers the history of the anti-fascism movement, from its origins in Europe in the 1920s to its exponential growth in the US over the last year. As well as interviews with antifa activists, it also details the tactics of the movement and the philosophy behind it. Bray describes his book as an unabashedly partisan call to arms that aims to equip a new generation of anti-fascists with the history and theory necessary to defeat the resurgent far right. It argues that militant anti-fascism is a reasonable, historically informed response to the fascist threat that persisted after 1945 and that has become especially menacing in recent years. You may not walk away from this book a convinced anti-fascist, but at least you will understand that anti-fascism is a legitimate political tradition growing out of a century of global struggle, he writes. I hope Antifa will aid and inspire those who will take up the fight against fascism in the years to come so that someday there will be no need for this book. Johnson said that people are very puzzled by the presidents support of Nazis in America. Most of us have someone who fought the Nazis, and people dont know how to respond, he said. People are puzzled by how to react should they stand up to violence with violence, or should they not? One classic anti-fascist situation was seen in Charlottesville, he said, when a group of antifa activists protected a group of clergy. One of them, Reverend Seth Wispelwey told ThinkProgress after: A group of white supremacists broke through our line with shields. Some of them were screaming and spitting slurs [as they] physically shoved clergy aside with their shields. Thats when antifa saved our lives. One of the most fundamental principles of antifa is no platform for fascism, Bray argues, and is a rejection of the liberal notion that fascism is a school of thought worthy of open debate and consideration. Their activities include educational campaigns, working with communities, monitoring fascist individuals and being prepared to physically confront the far right when necessary. Though this last facet of anti-fascism gets the most attention, it is actually only a small fraction of the thankless drudgery that is committing oneself to tracking the scum of the earth, Bray said. Antifa is the first in what Johnson said will be a series on the current political climate in the US. The next book, which is not by Bray, will cover impeachment. The word Trump never appears in the book, but it is a history of impeachment, and what the rules are, Johnson said. Its something weve concocted on how to deal with the political situation in the US. It is just all-consuming, and were trying to put out books to help deal with it.

Fair Usage Law

August 22, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed

The Right Is Falling for Its Own Fake Antifa Accounts – Gizmodo

Will a time come when the right doesnt actively try to deceive its own base? Perhaps. But this weekend wasnt it. Antifashort for anti-fascist actionhas grown in notoriety since the election of Donald Trump. Supporters see it as the front line in street-level protests against racism. But in the minds of the far-right, antifa are painted in cartoonishly broad strokes, either as the caricature of the entitled millennial liberal or as a dangerous, violent alt-left. Both of these deeply incomplete understandings of antifa come largely from the far-right itselfand are amplified by fake antifa accounts on Twitter which credulous idiots lap up and regurgitate. Former Buzzfeed plagiarist and current Independent Journal Review Chief Content Officer Benny Johnson did just that this weekend with a piece titled Alleged Boston Antifa Thanks Hillary Clinton, Democrats for Their Support as They Burn American Flag. The listicle attributes such damning actions as burning a flag, burning a sign that says free speech, and thanking Hillary Democrats, to the Twitter account @AntifaBoston. The lead image, which is implied to be antifa members burning an American flag, is actually from a 2015 protest in Denver following the mass killing committed by Dylann Roof. Likewise, the address listed on the Boston antifa Facebook page correlates to a Harvard staffer. Johnsons post was later updated with the following editors note: After people questioned the legitimacy of the Twitter account, Independent Journal Review reached out for verification of the authenticity of the group. In an automated response, the group said: Thank you for contacting the official page for the Antifa organization in the Boston area. We will update this article as needed. A cursory scroll trough the timeline of @AntifaBoston raises alarm bells, particularly with its willingness to retweet known fakes and winkingly promote right-wing personalities like Proud Boys founder Gavic McInness. AntifaCheckera project which seeks to verify real antifa groups and out fake ones (of which there are many)claims that as far as we know, there are zero legitimate organized Antifa groups in Boston, and told Gizmodo over Twitter DM that fake accounts arent ever really effective to anyone with a modicum of awareness, but theyve mostly been effective at stirring up shit with people who already hate antifa. Back in March, the duo behind the fake @AntifaBoston account were identified as trolls living in Eugene, Oregon by Eugene antifa. Johnson, it seems, was hoaxed. Unfortunately, hes not alone The same account fooled a columnist from the conservative Toronto Sun yesterdaywho called the presumed antifa members rich white kids of draft dodgers. Hes also the author of a book titled The Jew is Not My Enemy. Someone posing as a Boston antifa member (which again, doesnt seem to exist in any publicly organized way) appeared on Fox News Watters World, baiting the host into asking immensely dumb questions like What about when an antifa member stabbed a police horse in the neck with a knife. Was the horse a racist Trump supporter? The troll alluded to right-wingers posing as antifa during the interview, and Watters was none the wiser. Earlier this summer, a similar fake Facebook account claiming to represent antifa in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania sent right-wingersincluding alt-lite figure and former Navy urine analyzer Jack Posobiecinto a frenzy when it made reference to a (fake) rally planned for Gettysburg. Right-wing counter protestors showed up and found no one to protest. Somehow, one of those fooled into traveling to Gettysburg managed to literally shoot himself in the foot. Keep in mind, any of these accounts are blatantly fraudulent to anyone with a passing familiarity with right-wing talking points. But for people looking for a new strawman, the bare minimum of research doesnt enter into the equation.

Fair Usage Law

August 22, 2017   Posted in: Antifa  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."