Archive for the ‘Apartheid’ Category

How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

In a world where opinion, substantiated or not, is rapidly replacing evidence, a book as thoroughly researched as this is something of a Molotov cocktail.

The vast amount of empirical evidence presented simply cannot be dismissed as mere opinion.

As former Constitutional Court judge Kate ORegan has written: This is an expos of that machinery created in defence of apartheid and the people who made this possible: heads of state, arms dealers, aristocrats, plutocrats, senators, bankers, spies, journalists and members of secret lobby groups.

Van Vuurens book provides a brilliant expos of how an international criminal conspiracy was set up to enable the apartheid state to buy guns and other weapons, including flame-throwers.

This network included bankers, politicians, spies and shady businessmen around the world. And this network was vast.

The book shows that Armscor (the state arms company that later became Denel) had 844 bank accounts in 196 banks in at least 27 countries – the majority in Europe.

The myth that the apartheid state was isolated during the sanctions era was first bust by Sasha Polakow Suranskys important 2010 book, The Unspoken Alliance: Israels Secret Relationship With Apartheid South Africa. The book showed that the apartheid state and Israel collaborated closely on military matters. It is also well known that the apartheid state had links to Taiwan and also Chile, under the fascist dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.

Van Vuurens book shows that bankers, right-wing politicians and spies across Europe, and especially in Switzerland and Belgium, were deeply implicated in working to support the apartheid state. Reading this story is a bit like reading a spy novel. And among the many villains that emerge in the story is one Andr Vlrick, a Flemish banker and professor based in Belgium.

He set up a network of right-wing politicians to support apartheid and, as head of Kredietbank, ran a huge money-laundering system for apartheid. The business school at the University of Ghent is today named the Vlrick Business School. As Van Vuuren argues in his book, staff and students at the university have a moral obligation that the name of this odious, racist and deeply corrupt man is removed.

And some of the actors in this pro-apartheid network are well known organisations in South Africa today. The role of the banks, especially in Belgium and Switzerland, in propping up apartheid is particularly nauseating.

The old Volkskas Bank, now part of Absa, also played a central role. Absa has blood on its hands and must be forced to pay reparations.

Lonmin, the infamous British mining company implicated in the Marikana massacre, was also part of this network, under the name of LonRho. A number of well-known individuals are also part of this story. For instance, Christo Wiese, owner of Shoprite and one of the richest men in South Africa, was a regular donor to the National Party.

Van Vuuren also shows that the international criminal network set up to support apartheid continued to operate after apartheid fell. After apartheid, this criminal network intersected with the corruption that had also festered in the ANC in exile.

The arms deal, which originated the rot of the democratic state, brought both networks into a toxic alliance. It is this toxic alliance that is rotting our democracy and our economy from the inside.

Many commentators have argued that under Jacob Zuma we have collapsed into a kleptocratic or Mafia state. These commentators are correct. But what is often lacking in this analysis is a history of corruption, and, in particular, how the foundation for the present crisis was laid in the 1970s and 1980s.

South Africa cannot progress until all who have been complicit with this rule are removed from public office. We need to have a well- informed and honest conversation about just how deep the rot runs, how long it has run for, and what will be required to finally root it out.

Organisations like Lonmin and Absa all need to be dealt with. Reparations must be paid. We also need to reopen the investigation into the arms deal and to have an honest conversation about corruption in the ANC in exile. There can be no holy cows.

This book is not a quick read; it is 624 pages long. But it is absolutely vital reading for anyone who seriously wants to understand how a society that was born in such a wellspring of hope has collapsed into a kleptrocracy.

Van Vuuren has done his country a great service. If you read one book this year, make it Apartheid, Guns and Money.

* Buccus is senior research associate at the Auwal Socio-Economic Research Institute, research fellow in the School of Social Sciences at UKZN and academic director of a university study abroad programme on political transformation. He promotes #Reading Revolution via [emailprotected] at Antique Caf in Morningside, Durban.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

The Sunday Independent

Read more here:

How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

City of Cape Town accused of apartheid practices – Independent Online

Cape Town – Township residents on Saturday accused the city of continuing apartheid-era spatial planning practices at a Social Justice Commission (SJC) meeting on their new advocacy campaign for better street lighting in Khayelitsha, Nyanga, Harare and other townships.

Last week, the SJC launched a campaign over the inadequate lighting in the townships, which it said was leaving residents vulnerable to crime and contributing to Cape Towns status as the murder capital of Africa.

Khayelitsha and other townships still rely on apartheid-era mast lighting that towers about 30m or more in the air and can cast deep shadows in streets and between structures, creating cover for aggravated assaults and other crimes.

This is what a typical night looks like in the Taiwan informal settlement in Khayelitsha, where residents say inadequate lighting is making them vulnerable to criminals. Picture: Jason Boud/ANA Pictures

The uneven lighting can temporarily blind people who step out of the shadowed areas, SJC researcher Dalli Weyers said, making them easy targets for would-be assailants.

Around the world, mast lighting is primarily used worldwide to illuminate highways. Thats what the apartheid government deemed appropriate for Khayelitsha,” Weyers said.

City guidelines specifically state that high-mast lighting must be avoided because it casts dark shadows. The guidelines state quality lighting is one of the most effective measures to deter crime.

Weyers said that while lighting may not seem directly connected to crime, a large portion of the crime in townships occurs between 6pm and 6am, including the hours when people are going to and coming from work.

Darkness and crime and misdeeds like happening in the dark, Weyers said.

SJC convened the meeting at their headquarters to answer residents questions, hear their concerns and convene a strategy to address their concerns.

A council member and EMS representatives, who have been attacked when responding to emergencies in poorly lit areas, also spoke on the need for better lighting.

The meeting also was to respond to the specific claims the DA made last week about the campaign.

In a statement, mayoral committee member Xanthea Limberg wrote that the city addresses lighting based on the response from the community and that none of Khayelitshas community had raised the issue in meetings from the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry.

At the meeting, residents discussed ways of making their demands known. People proposed passing around petitions and holding a symbolic picket at night in a darkened area.

Mandlenkosi Sitonga, manager of one of two of Khayelitshas sub-councils, said he had been working on improving lighting for his specific district, reaching out to the directors of electricity, city parks and asset management in an effort to get a comprehensive solution.

But others in the room appeared sceptical of the focus SJC was placing on lighting. They agreed it was important, but questioned how the government drew up development plans that didnt include lighting and who approved them.

How do you build houses and parks and streets and sewers and not put in lights?” asked Kagiso Themba, 30, of Khayelitsha.

Khayelitsha has a mall but the mall does not have lights, Themba said.

Is this a continuation of apartheid spatial planning?”

Themba pointed to land reform as the primary issue they should focus on and the occupation of empty, privately-owned land by backpackers in Town Two, Khayelitsha.

Weekend Argus

View post:

City of Cape Town accused of apartheid practices – Independent Online

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

‘Harry Potter’ star Radcliffe in apartheid jail break film – SowetanLIVE

Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe is set to star in the epic story of a white anti-apartheid activist who escaped from one of South Africas toughest jails, the films producers said Friday.

The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkins account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979.

Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress.

But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the countrys death row.

Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee.

Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London.

Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this astonishing true story would be political without being polemical.

Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan, he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival.

Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year.

Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

Go here to see the original:

‘Harry Potter’ star Radcliffe in apartheid jail break film – SowetanLIVE

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Bouwer Bosch is sorry about apartheid, even though he didn’t cause it – Citizen

Is Bouwer Boschs #Versoening the next step toward some form of societal cohesion in South Africa?

The Afrikaans singer-songwriter and TV presenter unleashed a very topical debate this week when he uploaded the first episode of a series he callsVersoening(reconciliation).

In the emotivevideo, Bosch apologises for apartheid to a woman he only met the day before. In it, he explains where he comes from, then hands over the conversation to Phindile Dhlamini who explains her life, how she feels about the apology and South Africa.

What transpires is a valuable piece of conversation.

WatchVersoeninghere:

Bosch explains: The idea of apologising for apartheid is something that has been on my heart for the last two years. People play the apartheid card in the media at private functions, and everywhere I could find myself the word would pop up, rightfully, but nowhere could I find conversations about apartheid where people actually just sit and listen to each other instead of screaming at each other.

So this series of #Versoening videos that Im launching is not even a conversation because I feel, firstly,we need to hear each other out; that is why I asked Phindile to hear me and out and when I finish my apology its her turn to say whats on her heart, and then I just wanted to listen.

Its a small thing, but just to sit and listen to someone is profound, and we dont have enough of that.

Its all noise out there today. So yes, I think it is a very sensitive topic to talk about, but it has to do with healing.

No form of emotional healing can start without someone saying they are sorry, and if you cant agree that apartheid was wrong and what we as a white race have done is wrong, then the video will offend you in so many ways and you wont understand what #Versoening is all about.

Hes not afraid of a dip in his popularity; infact, he jokes hes been losing fans for ages because of his singing.

The fact of the matter is, there will be people whodont agree with me and there will be those whoagree with me. Its like that with everything you do these days. The conversation is the most important thing here, not me, he says.

So far, however, there has been more positive response to the first video than criticism, although there has been a lot of that too.

My neighbour Schalk van Heerden told me one day that the problem with being a bridge is that people walk over you from both sides.

My whole mission was to prove that apologies are very powerful, and you can see that in the haters and you can see that in the positive comments.

The fact that an apology like this one moves and stirs inside people so much should be proof that we need to do it more; healing hurts and its uncomfortable, but wounds dont go away if they dont get healed.

We have tried a lot of things in South Africa to heal wounds; we throw money at the problems, but we never get to the person. I just believe apologising doesnt cost you a thing, so why should it be such a big deal, he asks.

One of the main criticisms of the video so far is that Bosch has no place apologising for apartheid,since he was not part of that generation of white South Africa.

Phindiles first comment to me was that its not my place and its not my fault.

And just that helped me to heal a little bit. Because Im sitting with a lot of the guilt and shame for what the apartheid government had done, so its about healing for everyone.

That is the main criticism at the moment no one taking responsibility, and just throwing your hands in the air got us nowhere for 23 years, so we need to try different things.

Again, this is not a quick-fix-scheme video, we have only approached our past one way and that is Im not gonna say sorry for something I didnt do, and that for me shows no character.

If you want to be right the whole time, there will be no space to grow as a human being.

For us to grow, we need to be vulnerable, we need to put our pride aside sometimes, we need to be truly honest about things and just admit that some things are wrong.

But I apologise in the video for still benefiting today and I know that I have a headstart, and again, that is all symptomatic of 50 years of oppression.

I know I wasnt responsible for apartheid, but I cant justnotacknowledge what it has done.

Bosch has used many of the same approaches to address the gaps left by Christianity in South African society and hes long grappled with his faith.

So firstly, I gave up my Christianity in order to follow Christ. What Ive seen these last few days is that outspoken Christians would crucify me for apologising for apartheid, and that just kind of made me feel again that maybe Jesus and the way He lived is different from how we see and view Christianity today.

The fact that Christians would crucify someone for doing something I feel Jesus would have done is beyond me. But that being said, there is a great conversation in that, which I will definitely explore in the future as well.

I was a youth worker for two years and worked with a few different churches, including one in the USA when I was younger.

I started out in a church band just like 80% of all the other Afrikaans musicians today, so Im fortunate that I have that background so my conversations are with them and not about them.

Churches are run by broken people just like every other company is run by broken people in the world.

Someone once told me that the church is a prostitute but she is still my mother, and that resonates so much with me because they dont have all the answers either, so I cant just throw stones at them because no one ever gets anywhere by throwing stones.

I think personally what hurts me most about the churchs involvement in apartheid is the fact that its so contradicting to what the Bible says.

It shows the total opposite of Jesus love for everyone; its directly saying that Jesus is for everyone, except if youre black.

So that is also why I get upset about the gay debate in churches because they are easy to condemn gay people,but they wont say a word about 50 years of endorsing apartheid.

We choose our own set of rules for Christianity, and thats why I feel Jesus and Christianity are two different things these days.

He also wants to discuss the LGBTQi causes in an upcoming video ofVersoening.

He let slip that Afrikaans rapper Hemelbesem will be part of the next video andhes fitting all of this into his busy schedule.

Ive had the privilege of working with Vito, a rapper from Namakwaland, for a few weeks, where we went to his hometownOukiepjust outside of Springbok to tell his story. I was exposed to such a beautiful but different Afrikaans to mine, so I am definitely getting more involved in young up-and-coming artists to help them find their voice and also just find different and more Afrikaansaccents out there.

Another unlearning I need to to is to understand that Afrikaans is not just spoken by one group. I want to try to live more inclusively with Afrikaans and other peoples Afrikaans, if that makes sense.

Simon Hemelbesem taught me a lot about Afrikaans and that there are beautiful dialects of Afrikaans out there that still need to be explored.

ALSO READ:Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner apartheid apologiser hes a pitiful hypocrite

Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner apartheid apologiser hes a pitiful hypocrite

Visit link:

Bouwer Bosch is sorry about apartheid, even though he didn’t cause it – Citizen

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

In Historic Report, U.N. Agency Says Israel Is Imposing an …

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: For the first time, a United Nations agency has directly accused Israel of imposing an apartheid regime on the Palestinian people. The report also urges governments to, quote, “support boycott, divestment and sanctions activities and respond positively to calls for such initiatives.” The findings come in a new report published by the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, which is comprised of 18 Arab states. This is the head of the U.N. agency, Rima Khalaf.

RIMA KHALAF: [translated] The importance of this report is not only because it is the first of its kind, one that is published by one of the United Nations bodies that clearly and frankly concludes that Israel is a racist state that has established an apartheid system that persecutes the Palestinian people, but also it sheds light on the essence of the Palestinian cause and the conditions needed for accomplishing peace.

AMY GOODMAN: The report met with immediate condemnation from Israel and the United States. U.N. spokesperson Stphane Dujarric told reporters in New York the report was published without any prior consultation with the U.N. Secretariat.

STPHANE DUJARRIC: If we just saw the report today, which, as you say, was published by ESCWA, it was done so without any prior consultations with the Secretariat. And the report, as it stands, does not reflect the views of the secretary-general.

AMY GOODMAN: To talk more about the report, we go, not to The Hague, but to Edinburgh, Scotland, to talk to Richard Falk, co-author of the report thats titled “Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid.” He has written a number of books, including Palestine: The Legitimacy of Hope, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University. He previously served as the U.N. special rapporteur on Palestinian human rights.

Professor Falk, welcome to Democracy Now! Can you talk about the main findings of your report and how unusual this report is within the United Nations?

RICHARD FALK: Yes. As the head of the commission indicated, this is the first time that a comprehensive and systematic inquiry has been carried out into the allegation that Israel is responsible for maintaining an apartheid regime in relation to the Palestinian people. One of the distinctive features of the report is to treat the Palestinians as a whole, and thats quite innovative as far as the discussions of the applicability of apartheid to the Palestinian circumstances is concerned. And that means distinguishing between Palestinians that live under occupation in the West Bank and Gaza or as permanent residents in Jerusalem or as a Palestinian minority in the state of Israel, and, finally, as refugees or involuntary exiles.

What the report argues is that Israel has pursued a policy of fragmenting the Palestinian people in order to maintain the domination of a Jewish state over these different categories of Palestinians, and has done so in a way that is systematically discriminatory and is responsible for deep suffering over a very long period of time, with no end in sight. Unlike other forms of international criminality, this is an ongoing crime, according to the analysis in the report, and there is no end in sight, nor no political process that can adequately challenge this set of policies and structures that have been applied to the Palestinian people.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, Professor Falk, Id like you to say something about the agency that commissioned and published the report, the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. The membership of this agency, there are 18 Arab members, a number of whom dont recognize Israel. So, do you think that that might raise questions about the legitimacy of the report?

RICHARD FALK: Well, all thethese Arab members of ESCWA did was to ask that such a report be prepared. And Virginia Tilley, professor at the University of Southern Illinois, and myself were asked to prepare this report on a contract basis. It doesnt represent a U.N. finding as such. It is a report commissioned by the U.N. that has been received, with approval, but theres been no formal endorsement of it. Its possible that it will be endorsed, or efforts will be made to obtain an endorsement at the General Assembly or in other parts of the U.N. system. But as of now, its a scholarly report undertaken by independent scholars. And there is a kind of disclaimer that the U.N.this U.N. commission made, that the report doesnt necessarily represent even ESCWAs views. It is the views of the two of us who prepared the report.

AMY GOODMAN: So, Israels U.N. Ambassador Danny Danon issued a statement saying, quote, “The attempt to smear and falsely label the only true democracy in the Middle East by creating a false analogy is despicable and constitutes a blatant lie.” The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, the former South Carolina governor, Nikki Haley, said the U.S. is “outraged by the report.” In a written statement, she said, quote, “That such anti-Israel propaganda would come from a body whose membership nearly universally does not recognize Israel is unsurprising. That it was drafted by Richard Falk, a man who has repeatedly made biased and deeply offensive comments about Israel and espoused ridiculous conspiracy theories, including about the 9/11 terrorist attacks, is equally unsurprising.” Can you respond to this? She said that the U.N. should withdraw the report altogether.

RICHARD FALK: Well, this is, of course, nothing new in terms of the way in which Israel and the United States respond to any kind of criticism, no matter how well grounded in fact and careful, reasoned analysis. I would ask that people look at the report, look at the evidence, and then come to a conclusion. Whatever else it is, it isnt an effort to smear Israel or to in any way give aid and comfort to anti-Semitism. In fact, the report makes a clear statement that itthat the authors are unconditionally opposed to anti-Semitism as a form of racism. And it tries to draw a distinction between criticizing Israel as a state, or Zionism as a movement, from any kind of hostility to the Jewish people. But, unfortunately, American diplomacy, including under the Obamaduring the Obama period of leadership, and Israel dont want to deal with the substantive issues that are raised.

AMY GOODMAN: So talk about those substantive issues that you raised in this report, Professor Falk.

RICHARD FALK: Well, the essence of the substantive issues are policies and practices that impose a discriminatorya discriminatory pattern of behavior that has greatlygreatly contributed to Palestinians suffering over the years on a daily basis. It is a situation that appalls most of the governments in the world, and is not something that is in any way dealt with in this report in an emotional way. It looks at the policies and practices. It looks at the structures by which Israel has justified the way in which it addresses the Palestinian presence in these four domains, and generally tries to make an objective appraisal of how these policies and practices stand up against the international definition of apartheid that is in the 1973 International Convention on the Suppression and

AMY GOODMAN: And what did you conclude?

RICHARD FALK: We concluded that there is a integrated regime of apartheid that is victimizing the Palestinian people in a collective manner, and that it should be acted upon by the United Nations and by other institutional mechanisms to bring this crime to an end. Thats the essential

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, Professor Falk, very quickly, before we conclude, can you say, what do you expect to happen? Whats the effect of this report, given that the U.N. has already distanced itself from it?

AMY GOODMAN: We have 10 seconds.

RICHARD FALK: Well, the Secretariat has distanced itself. Other organs of the U.N. havent responded so far as I know. Our hope is that this report will lead to a careful inquiry by appropriate organs of the U.N., and that if our analysis is persuasive, that it will have some political consequences.

AMY GOODMAN: Richard Falk, we want to thank you for being with us, joining us from Edinburgh, Scotland, co-author of the report, “Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid.” Thanks for joining us.

More here:

In Historic Report, U.N. Agency Says Israel Is Imposing an …

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

[WATCH] ‘Apartheid still exists in Coligny’ – EWN – Eyewitness News

[WATCH] ‘Apartheid still exists in Coligny’

ReinartToerien |Some Coligny community members say the police & judiciary in their town discriminate against perpetrators of crimes based on race.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

– Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality) – Sexism – Homophobia – Religious intolerance – Cyber bullying – Hate speech – Derogatory language – Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Go here to read the rest:

[WATCH] ‘Apartheid still exists in Coligny’ – EWN – Eyewitness News

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner ‘apartheid apologiser’ he’s a ‘pitiful hypocrite’ – Citizen

Afrikaner activist and singer Steve Hofmeyr has told fellow Afrikaans musician Bouwer Bosch that he is misguided and has lost sight of reality in apologising for apartheid.

Writing in Afrikaans, Hofmeyr told the 33-year-old singer-songwriter that his apology to black people is a dangerous acknowledgment of guilt.

Writing on Facebook, Hofmeyr wrote: Bouwer Bosch feels whites must (again and still) apologise for apartheid and colonialism. Mmm. I like brand-new ideas. But Bouwer, the moment you apologise for ANYTHING, you acknowledge guilt and THEN you will need to summarily hand over your car keys, your house, your income, your language and the future of your children, OR acknowledge that youre a pitiful hypocrite.

Love wins, yes, but dont write off loves attractive cousin. Her name is Reality. See the photo below.

One of thephotos on HofmeyrsFacebook post showed a photograph of victims of the Church Street bombing, which was organised by the ANC and executed by its operatives on May 20, 1983.

Hofmeyr said he would be attending the annual commemoration at the bombingsite on Saturday at 9.30am to remember the victims.

Its just an hour. Bring a flower, a prayer and a promise

Hofmeyr, still addressing Bosch, wrote: Finally you will see tomorrow morning how it is: not a single black leader will ask for forgiveness for the Church Street bloodbath.

Bosch, who is also aTV presenter, unleashed debate this week when he uploaded the first episode of a series he callsVersoening(Reconciliation).

In the video, Bosch apologises for apartheid to a woman he only met the day before. In it, he explains where he comes from, then hands over the conversation to Phindile Dhlamini, who explains her life, how she feels about the apology and South Africa.

Have a look at the video below. You can also pick up a copy of The Citizen tomorrow to read a full interview with Bosch about his campaign.

For more news your way, follow The Citizen on Facebook and Twitter.

See the rest here:

Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner ‘apartheid apologiser’ he’s a ‘pitiful hypocrite’ – Citizen

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

‘Harry Potter’ to star in apartheid jail break movie – Times LIVE

The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkin’s account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979.

Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress.

But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the country’s death row.

Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee.

Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London.

Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this “astonishing true story” would be “political without being polemical”.

“Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan,” he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival.

Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year.

Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

See more here:

‘Harry Potter’ to star in apartheid jail break movie – Times LIVE

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Atrocities of apartheid explored in Upstream Theater’s latest production – St. Louis American

Eugene de Kock was a commanding officer of the South African government’s death squad stationed at Vlakplaas. He was known simply as Prime Evil for the crimes he committed against blacks in South Africa during the most violent period of apartheid.

His actions were downright sickening as hell broke loose on the countrys majority black population just before the systemic racism imposed by the white minority in power was dismantled. For his crimes, de Kock was given a life sentence plus 212 years.

As part of the process of truth and reconciliation for South Africas next chapter as a nation, psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela made several visits to de Kock in prison to gain understanding. Her interviews became the best-selling book, A Human Being Died That Night which was adapted for the stage by Nicholas Wright. Upstream Theaters production of the play continues through May 28 at The Kranzberg. The play is directed by directed by Patrick Siler and stars Jacqueline Thompson as Gobodo-Madikizela and Christopher Harris as de Kock.

de Kock was a man who had ordered and carried out the torture and murder of dozens of anti-apartheid activists. The racist regime maintained governmental policies and systems that mirrored the pre-Civil Rights Era Jim Crow south and stretched into the early 1990s.

Gobodo-Madikizela was intent on getting to the bottom of how he could live with himself. Her interviews came as part of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission which held tribunals as part of the healing process. Victims and survivors confronted policemen, government officials, and others who injured and killed blacks under apartheid. Victims and survivors had the opportunity to speak of their pain, question de Kock and others, and if they chose to offer forgiveness, something that could be given only once the apartheid of the mind had been broken and the existence of something to forgive had been admitted.

The actions of de Kock and the entire white power regime that was the South African government would be considered unforgivable by any measure. But the late Nelson Mandela, who became the first president of post-apartheid South Africa, considered forgiveness a prerequisite in order to come together and effectively function as a nation.

But how? Blacks in South Africa bore generations of scars because of apartheid. Does one choose forgiveness over justice or can the two co-exist? How do the oppressed quell their righteous anger?

How do people who have been licensed to dehumanize an entire people recondition themselves?

A Human Being Died That Night explores the dilemmas faced by the survivors of South Africas apartheid system as the country attempts to move forward.

The play takes place within the prison walls where de Kock is held, where the two engage in conversations about his crimes. Gobodo-Madikizelas approach is to aim for inquisition and observation over judgment and condemnation. She interrogates him about his actions, but saves her feelings for separate asides that are shared with the audience.

A Human Being Died That Night gives viewers insight on the unlikely and commendable journey of one nations approach at moving beyond its painful legacy. Once rooted in racism that was enforced by unyielding abuse of power South Africa was able to create a new narrative particularly thanks to the grace of the people who lived in a constant state of oppression.

Upstream Theaters production of A Human Being Died That Night continues through May 28 at the Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 N. Grand. For a full schedule and more information, http://www.upstreamtheater.org/

See more here:

Atrocities of apartheid explored in Upstream Theater’s latest production – St. Louis American

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

In a world where opinion, substantiated or not, is rapidly replacing evidence, a book as thoroughly researched as this is something of a Molotov cocktail. The vast amount of empirical evidence presented simply cannot be dismissed as mere opinion. As former Constitutional Court judge Kate ORegan has written: This is an expos of that machinery created in defence of apartheid and the people who made this possible: heads of state, arms dealers, aristocrats, plutocrats, senators, bankers, spies, journalists and members of secret lobby groups. Van Vuurens book provides a brilliant expos of how an international criminal conspiracy was set up to enable the apartheid state to buy guns and other weapons, including flame-throwers. This network included bankers, politicians, spies and shady businessmen around the world. And this network was vast. The book shows that Armscor (the state arms company that later became Denel) had 844 bank accounts in 196 banks in at least 27 countries – the majority in Europe. The myth that the apartheid state was isolated during the sanctions era was first bust by Sasha Polakow Suranskys important 2010 book, The Unspoken Alliance: Israels Secret Relationship With Apartheid South Africa. The book showed that the apartheid state and Israel collaborated closely on military matters. It is also well known that the apartheid state had links to Taiwan and also Chile, under the fascist dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. Van Vuurens book shows that bankers, right-wing politicians and spies across Europe, and especially in Switzerland and Belgium, were deeply implicated in working to support the apartheid state. Reading this story is a bit like reading a spy novel. And among the many villains that emerge in the story is one Andr Vlrick, a Flemish banker and professor based in Belgium. He set up a network of right-wing politicians to support apartheid and, as head of Kredietbank, ran a huge money-laundering system for apartheid. The business school at the University of Ghent is today named the Vlrick Business School. As Van Vuuren argues in his book, staff and students at the university have a moral obligation that the name of this odious, racist and deeply corrupt man is removed. And some of the actors in this pro-apartheid network are well known organisations in South Africa today. The role of the banks, especially in Belgium and Switzerland, in propping up apartheid is particularly nauseating. The old Volkskas Bank, now part of Absa, also played a central role. Absa has blood on its hands and must be forced to pay reparations. Lonmin, the infamous British mining company implicated in the Marikana massacre, was also part of this network, under the name of LonRho. A number of well-known individuals are also part of this story. For instance, Christo Wiese, owner of Shoprite and one of the richest men in South Africa, was a regular donor to the National Party. Van Vuuren also shows that the international criminal network set up to support apartheid continued to operate after apartheid fell. After apartheid, this criminal network intersected with the corruption that had also festered in the ANC in exile. The arms deal, which originated the rot of the democratic state, brought both networks into a toxic alliance. It is this toxic alliance that is rotting our democracy and our economy from the inside. Many commentators have argued that under Jacob Zuma we have collapsed into a kleptocratic or Mafia state. These commentators are correct. But what is often lacking in this analysis is a history of corruption, and, in particular, how the foundation for the present crisis was laid in the 1970s and 1980s. South Africa cannot progress until all who have been complicit with this rule are removed from public office. We need to have a well- informed and honest conversation about just how deep the rot runs, how long it has run for, and what will be required to finally root it out. Organisations like Lonmin and Absa all need to be dealt with. Reparations must be paid. We also need to reopen the investigation into the arms deal and to have an honest conversation about corruption in the ANC in exile. There can be no holy cows. This book is not a quick read; it is 624 pages long. But it is absolutely vital reading for anyone who seriously wants to understand how a society that was born in such a wellspring of hope has collapsed into a kleptrocracy. Van Vuuren has done his country a great service. If you read one book this year, make it Apartheid, Guns and Money. * Buccus is senior research associate at the Auwal Socio-Economic Research Institute, research fellow in the School of Social Sciences at UKZN and academic director of a university study abroad programme on political transformation. He promotes #Reading Revolution via [emailprotected] at Antique Caf in Morningside, Durban. ** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media. The Sunday Independent

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

City of Cape Town accused of apartheid practices – Independent Online

Cape Town – Township residents on Saturday accused the city of continuing apartheid-era spatial planning practices at a Social Justice Commission (SJC) meeting on their new advocacy campaign for better street lighting in Khayelitsha, Nyanga, Harare and other townships. Last week, the SJC launched a campaign over the inadequate lighting in the townships, which it said was leaving residents vulnerable to crime and contributing to Cape Towns status as the murder capital of Africa. Khayelitsha and other townships still rely on apartheid-era mast lighting that towers about 30m or more in the air and can cast deep shadows in streets and between structures, creating cover for aggravated assaults and other crimes. This is what a typical night looks like in the Taiwan informal settlement in Khayelitsha, where residents say inadequate lighting is making them vulnerable to criminals. Picture: Jason Boud/ANA Pictures The uneven lighting can temporarily blind people who step out of the shadowed areas, SJC researcher Dalli Weyers said, making them easy targets for would-be assailants. Around the world, mast lighting is primarily used worldwide to illuminate highways. Thats what the apartheid government deemed appropriate for Khayelitsha,” Weyers said. City guidelines specifically state that high-mast lighting must be avoided because it casts dark shadows. The guidelines state quality lighting is one of the most effective measures to deter crime. Weyers said that while lighting may not seem directly connected to crime, a large portion of the crime in townships occurs between 6pm and 6am, including the hours when people are going to and coming from work. Darkness and crime and misdeeds like happening in the dark, Weyers said. SJC convened the meeting at their headquarters to answer residents questions, hear their concerns and convene a strategy to address their concerns. A council member and EMS representatives, who have been attacked when responding to emergencies in poorly lit areas, also spoke on the need for better lighting. The meeting also was to respond to the specific claims the DA made last week about the campaign. In a statement, mayoral committee member Xanthea Limberg wrote that the city addresses lighting based on the response from the community and that none of Khayelitshas community had raised the issue in meetings from the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry. At the meeting, residents discussed ways of making their demands known. People proposed passing around petitions and holding a symbolic picket at night in a darkened area. Mandlenkosi Sitonga, manager of one of two of Khayelitshas sub-councils, said he had been working on improving lighting for his specific district, reaching out to the directors of electricity, city parks and asset management in an effort to get a comprehensive solution. But others in the room appeared sceptical of the focus SJC was placing on lighting. They agreed it was important, but questioned how the government drew up development plans that didnt include lighting and who approved them. How do you build houses and parks and streets and sewers and not put in lights?” asked Kagiso Themba, 30, of Khayelitsha. Khayelitsha has a mall but the mall does not have lights, Themba said. Is this a continuation of apartheid spatial planning?” Themba pointed to land reform as the primary issue they should focus on and the occupation of empty, privately-owned land by backpackers in Town Two, Khayelitsha. Weekend Argus

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

‘Harry Potter’ star Radcliffe in apartheid jail break film – SowetanLIVE

Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe is set to star in the epic story of a white anti-apartheid activist who escaped from one of South Africas toughest jails, the films producers said Friday. The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkins account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979. Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress. But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the countrys death row. Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee. Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London. Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this astonishing true story would be political without being polemical. Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan, he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival. Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year. Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Bouwer Bosch is sorry about apartheid, even though he didn’t cause it – Citizen

Is Bouwer Boschs #Versoening the next step toward some form of societal cohesion in South Africa? The Afrikaans singer-songwriter and TV presenter unleashed a very topical debate this week when he uploaded the first episode of a series he callsVersoening(reconciliation). In the emotivevideo, Bosch apologises for apartheid to a woman he only met the day before. In it, he explains where he comes from, then hands over the conversation to Phindile Dhlamini who explains her life, how she feels about the apology and South Africa. What transpires is a valuable piece of conversation. WatchVersoeninghere: Bosch explains: The idea of apologising for apartheid is something that has been on my heart for the last two years. People play the apartheid card in the media at private functions, and everywhere I could find myself the word would pop up, rightfully, but nowhere could I find conversations about apartheid where people actually just sit and listen to each other instead of screaming at each other. So this series of #Versoening videos that Im launching is not even a conversation because I feel, firstly,we need to hear each other out; that is why I asked Phindile to hear me and out and when I finish my apology its her turn to say whats on her heart, and then I just wanted to listen. Its a small thing, but just to sit and listen to someone is profound, and we dont have enough of that. Its all noise out there today. So yes, I think it is a very sensitive topic to talk about, but it has to do with healing. No form of emotional healing can start without someone saying they are sorry, and if you cant agree that apartheid was wrong and what we as a white race have done is wrong, then the video will offend you in so many ways and you wont understand what #Versoening is all about. Hes not afraid of a dip in his popularity; infact, he jokes hes been losing fans for ages because of his singing. The fact of the matter is, there will be people whodont agree with me and there will be those whoagree with me. Its like that with everything you do these days. The conversation is the most important thing here, not me, he says. So far, however, there has been more positive response to the first video than criticism, although there has been a lot of that too. My neighbour Schalk van Heerden told me one day that the problem with being a bridge is that people walk over you from both sides. My whole mission was to prove that apologies are very powerful, and you can see that in the haters and you can see that in the positive comments. The fact that an apology like this one moves and stirs inside people so much should be proof that we need to do it more; healing hurts and its uncomfortable, but wounds dont go away if they dont get healed. We have tried a lot of things in South Africa to heal wounds; we throw money at the problems, but we never get to the person. I just believe apologising doesnt cost you a thing, so why should it be such a big deal, he asks. One of the main criticisms of the video so far is that Bosch has no place apologising for apartheid,since he was not part of that generation of white South Africa. Phindiles first comment to me was that its not my place and its not my fault. And just that helped me to heal a little bit. Because Im sitting with a lot of the guilt and shame for what the apartheid government had done, so its about healing for everyone. That is the main criticism at the moment no one taking responsibility, and just throwing your hands in the air got us nowhere for 23 years, so we need to try different things. Again, this is not a quick-fix-scheme video, we have only approached our past one way and that is Im not gonna say sorry for something I didnt do, and that for me shows no character. If you want to be right the whole time, there will be no space to grow as a human being. For us to grow, we need to be vulnerable, we need to put our pride aside sometimes, we need to be truly honest about things and just admit that some things are wrong. But I apologise in the video for still benefiting today and I know that I have a headstart, and again, that is all symptomatic of 50 years of oppression. I know I wasnt responsible for apartheid, but I cant justnotacknowledge what it has done. Bosch has used many of the same approaches to address the gaps left by Christianity in South African society and hes long grappled with his faith. So firstly, I gave up my Christianity in order to follow Christ. What Ive seen these last few days is that outspoken Christians would crucify me for apologising for apartheid, and that just kind of made me feel again that maybe Jesus and the way He lived is different from how we see and view Christianity today. The fact that Christians would crucify someone for doing something I feel Jesus would have done is beyond me. But that being said, there is a great conversation in that, which I will definitely explore in the future as well. I was a youth worker for two years and worked with a few different churches, including one in the USA when I was younger. I started out in a church band just like 80% of all the other Afrikaans musicians today, so Im fortunate that I have that background so my conversations are with them and not about them. Churches are run by broken people just like every other company is run by broken people in the world. Someone once told me that the church is a prostitute but she is still my mother, and that resonates so much with me because they dont have all the answers either, so I cant just throw stones at them because no one ever gets anywhere by throwing stones. I think personally what hurts me most about the churchs involvement in apartheid is the fact that its so contradicting to what the Bible says. It shows the total opposite of Jesus love for everyone; its directly saying that Jesus is for everyone, except if youre black. So that is also why I get upset about the gay debate in churches because they are easy to condemn gay people,but they wont say a word about 50 years of endorsing apartheid. We choose our own set of rules for Christianity, and thats why I feel Jesus and Christianity are two different things these days. He also wants to discuss the LGBTQi causes in an upcoming video ofVersoening. He let slip that Afrikaans rapper Hemelbesem will be part of the next video andhes fitting all of this into his busy schedule. Ive had the privilege of working with Vito, a rapper from Namakwaland, for a few weeks, where we went to his hometownOukiepjust outside of Springbok to tell his story. I was exposed to such a beautiful but different Afrikaans to mine, so I am definitely getting more involved in young up-and-coming artists to help them find their voice and also just find different and more Afrikaansaccents out there. Another unlearning I need to to is to understand that Afrikaans is not just spoken by one group. I want to try to live more inclusively with Afrikaans and other peoples Afrikaans, if that makes sense. Simon Hemelbesem taught me a lot about Afrikaans and that there are beautiful dialects of Afrikaans out there that still need to be explored. ALSO READ:Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner apartheid apologiser hes a pitiful hypocrite Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner apartheid apologiser hes a pitiful hypocrite

Fair Usage Law

May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

In Historic Report, U.N. Agency Says Israel Is Imposing an …

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. NERMEEN SHAIKH: For the first time, a United Nations agency has directly accused Israel of imposing an apartheid regime on the Palestinian people. The report also urges governments to, quote, “support boycott, divestment and sanctions activities and respond positively to calls for such initiatives.” The findings come in a new report published by the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, which is comprised of 18 Arab states. This is the head of the U.N. agency, Rima Khalaf. RIMA KHALAF: [translated] The importance of this report is not only because it is the first of its kind, one that is published by one of the United Nations bodies that clearly and frankly concludes that Israel is a racist state that has established an apartheid system that persecutes the Palestinian people, but also it sheds light on the essence of the Palestinian cause and the conditions needed for accomplishing peace. AMY GOODMAN: The report met with immediate condemnation from Israel and the United States. U.N. spokesperson Stphane Dujarric told reporters in New York the report was published without any prior consultation with the U.N. Secretariat. STPHANE DUJARRIC: If we just saw the report today, which, as you say, was published by ESCWA, it was done so without any prior consultations with the Secretariat. And the report, as it stands, does not reflect the views of the secretary-general. AMY GOODMAN: To talk more about the report, we go, not to The Hague, but to Edinburgh, Scotland, to talk to Richard Falk, co-author of the report thats titled “Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid.” He has written a number of books, including Palestine: The Legitimacy of Hope, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University. He previously served as the U.N. special rapporteur on Palestinian human rights. Professor Falk, welcome to Democracy Now! Can you talk about the main findings of your report and how unusual this report is within the United Nations? RICHARD FALK: Yes. As the head of the commission indicated, this is the first time that a comprehensive and systematic inquiry has been carried out into the allegation that Israel is responsible for maintaining an apartheid regime in relation to the Palestinian people. One of the distinctive features of the report is to treat the Palestinians as a whole, and thats quite innovative as far as the discussions of the applicability of apartheid to the Palestinian circumstances is concerned. And that means distinguishing between Palestinians that live under occupation in the West Bank and Gaza or as permanent residents in Jerusalem or as a Palestinian minority in the state of Israel, and, finally, as refugees or involuntary exiles. What the report argues is that Israel has pursued a policy of fragmenting the Palestinian people in order to maintain the domination of a Jewish state over these different categories of Palestinians, and has done so in a way that is systematically discriminatory and is responsible for deep suffering over a very long period of time, with no end in sight. Unlike other forms of international criminality, this is an ongoing crime, according to the analysis in the report, and there is no end in sight, nor no political process that can adequately challenge this set of policies and structures that have been applied to the Palestinian people. NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, Professor Falk, Id like you to say something about the agency that commissioned and published the report, the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. The membership of this agency, there are 18 Arab members, a number of whom dont recognize Israel. So, do you think that that might raise questions about the legitimacy of the report? RICHARD FALK: Well, all thethese Arab members of ESCWA did was to ask that such a report be prepared. And Virginia Tilley, professor at the University of Southern Illinois, and myself were asked to prepare this report on a contract basis. It doesnt represent a U.N. finding as such. It is a report commissioned by the U.N. that has been received, with approval, but theres been no formal endorsement of it. Its possible that it will be endorsed, or efforts will be made to obtain an endorsement at the General Assembly or in other parts of the U.N. system. But as of now, its a scholarly report undertaken by independent scholars. And there is a kind of disclaimer that the U.N.this U.N. commission made, that the report doesnt necessarily represent even ESCWAs views. It is the views of the two of us who prepared the report. AMY GOODMAN: So, Israels U.N. Ambassador Danny Danon issued a statement saying, quote, “The attempt to smear and falsely label the only true democracy in the Middle East by creating a false analogy is despicable and constitutes a blatant lie.” The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, the former South Carolina governor, Nikki Haley, said the U.S. is “outraged by the report.” In a written statement, she said, quote, “That such anti-Israel propaganda would come from a body whose membership nearly universally does not recognize Israel is unsurprising. That it was drafted by Richard Falk, a man who has repeatedly made biased and deeply offensive comments about Israel and espoused ridiculous conspiracy theories, including about the 9/11 terrorist attacks, is equally unsurprising.” Can you respond to this? She said that the U.N. should withdraw the report altogether. RICHARD FALK: Well, this is, of course, nothing new in terms of the way in which Israel and the United States respond to any kind of criticism, no matter how well grounded in fact and careful, reasoned analysis. I would ask that people look at the report, look at the evidence, and then come to a conclusion. Whatever else it is, it isnt an effort to smear Israel or to in any way give aid and comfort to anti-Semitism. In fact, the report makes a clear statement that itthat the authors are unconditionally opposed to anti-Semitism as a form of racism. And it tries to draw a distinction between criticizing Israel as a state, or Zionism as a movement, from any kind of hostility to the Jewish people. But, unfortunately, American diplomacy, including under the Obamaduring the Obama period of leadership, and Israel dont want to deal with the substantive issues that are raised. AMY GOODMAN: So talk about those substantive issues that you raised in this report, Professor Falk. RICHARD FALK: Well, the essence of the substantive issues are policies and practices that impose a discriminatorya discriminatory pattern of behavior that has greatlygreatly contributed to Palestinians suffering over the years on a daily basis. It is a situation that appalls most of the governments in the world, and is not something that is in any way dealt with in this report in an emotional way. It looks at the policies and practices. It looks at the structures by which Israel has justified the way in which it addresses the Palestinian presence in these four domains, and generally tries to make an objective appraisal of how these policies and practices stand up against the international definition of apartheid that is in the 1973 International Convention on the Suppression and AMY GOODMAN: And what did you conclude? RICHARD FALK: We concluded that there is a integrated regime of apartheid that is victimizing the Palestinian people in a collective manner, and that it should be acted upon by the United Nations and by other institutional mechanisms to bring this crime to an end. Thats the essential NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, Professor Falk, very quickly, before we conclude, can you say, what do you expect to happen? Whats the effect of this report, given that the U.N. has already distanced itself from it? AMY GOODMAN: We have 10 seconds. RICHARD FALK: Well, the Secretariat has distanced itself. Other organs of the U.N. havent responded so far as I know. Our hope is that this report will lead to a careful inquiry by appropriate organs of the U.N., and that if our analysis is persuasive, that it will have some political consequences. AMY GOODMAN: Richard Falk, we want to thank you for being with us, joining us from Edinburgh, Scotland, co-author of the report, “Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid.” Thanks for joining us.

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

[WATCH] ‘Apartheid still exists in Coligny’ – EWN – Eyewitness News

[WATCH] ‘Apartheid still exists in Coligny’ ReinartToerien |Some Coligny community members say the police & judiciary in their town discriminate against perpetrators of crimes based on race. However, we will NOT condone the following: – Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality) – Sexism – Homophobia – Religious intolerance – Cyber bullying – Hate speech – Derogatory language – Comments inciting violence. We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section. We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all. EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules. Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines. EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Hofmeyr tells Afrikaner ‘apartheid apologiser’ he’s a ‘pitiful hypocrite’ – Citizen

Afrikaner activist and singer Steve Hofmeyr has told fellow Afrikaans musician Bouwer Bosch that he is misguided and has lost sight of reality in apologising for apartheid. Writing in Afrikaans, Hofmeyr told the 33-year-old singer-songwriter that his apology to black people is a dangerous acknowledgment of guilt. Writing on Facebook, Hofmeyr wrote: Bouwer Bosch feels whites must (again and still) apologise for apartheid and colonialism. Mmm. I like brand-new ideas. But Bouwer, the moment you apologise for ANYTHING, you acknowledge guilt and THEN you will need to summarily hand over your car keys, your house, your income, your language and the future of your children, OR acknowledge that youre a pitiful hypocrite. Love wins, yes, but dont write off loves attractive cousin. Her name is Reality. See the photo below. One of thephotos on HofmeyrsFacebook post showed a photograph of victims of the Church Street bombing, which was organised by the ANC and executed by its operatives on May 20, 1983. Hofmeyr said he would be attending the annual commemoration at the bombingsite on Saturday at 9.30am to remember the victims. Its just an hour. Bring a flower, a prayer and a promise Hofmeyr, still addressing Bosch, wrote: Finally you will see tomorrow morning how it is: not a single black leader will ask for forgiveness for the Church Street bloodbath. Bosch, who is also aTV presenter, unleashed debate this week when he uploaded the first episode of a series he callsVersoening(Reconciliation). In the video, Bosch apologises for apartheid to a woman he only met the day before. In it, he explains where he comes from, then hands over the conversation to Phindile Dhlamini, who explains her life, how she feels about the apology and South Africa. Have a look at the video below. You can also pick up a copy of The Citizen tomorrow to read a full interview with Bosch about his campaign. For more news your way, follow The Citizen on Facebook and Twitter.

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

‘Harry Potter’ to star in apartheid jail break movie – Times LIVE

The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkin’s account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979. Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress. But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the country’s death row. Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee. Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London. Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this “astonishing true story” would be “political without being polemical”. “Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan,” he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival. Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year. Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

Atrocities of apartheid explored in Upstream Theater’s latest production – St. Louis American

Eugene de Kock was a commanding officer of the South African government’s death squad stationed at Vlakplaas. He was known simply as Prime Evil for the crimes he committed against blacks in South Africa during the most violent period of apartheid. His actions were downright sickening as hell broke loose on the countrys majority black population just before the systemic racism imposed by the white minority in power was dismantled. For his crimes, de Kock was given a life sentence plus 212 years. As part of the process of truth and reconciliation for South Africas next chapter as a nation, psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela made several visits to de Kock in prison to gain understanding. Her interviews became the best-selling book, A Human Being Died That Night which was adapted for the stage by Nicholas Wright. Upstream Theaters production of the play continues through May 28 at The Kranzberg. The play is directed by directed by Patrick Siler and stars Jacqueline Thompson as Gobodo-Madikizela and Christopher Harris as de Kock. de Kock was a man who had ordered and carried out the torture and murder of dozens of anti-apartheid activists. The racist regime maintained governmental policies and systems that mirrored the pre-Civil Rights Era Jim Crow south and stretched into the early 1990s. Gobodo-Madikizela was intent on getting to the bottom of how he could live with himself. Her interviews came as part of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission which held tribunals as part of the healing process. Victims and survivors confronted policemen, government officials, and others who injured and killed blacks under apartheid. Victims and survivors had the opportunity to speak of their pain, question de Kock and others, and if they chose to offer forgiveness, something that could be given only once the apartheid of the mind had been broken and the existence of something to forgive had been admitted. The actions of de Kock and the entire white power regime that was the South African government would be considered unforgivable by any measure. But the late Nelson Mandela, who became the first president of post-apartheid South Africa, considered forgiveness a prerequisite in order to come together and effectively function as a nation. But how? Blacks in South Africa bore generations of scars because of apartheid. Does one choose forgiveness over justice or can the two co-exist? How do the oppressed quell their righteous anger? How do people who have been licensed to dehumanize an entire people recondition themselves? A Human Being Died That Night explores the dilemmas faced by the survivors of South Africas apartheid system as the country attempts to move forward. The play takes place within the prison walls where de Kock is held, where the two engage in conversations about his crimes. Gobodo-Madikizelas approach is to aim for inquisition and observation over judgment and condemnation. She interrogates him about his actions, but saves her feelings for separate asides that are shared with the audience. A Human Being Died That Night gives viewers insight on the unlikely and commendable journey of one nations approach at moving beyond its painful legacy. Once rooted in racism that was enforced by unyielding abuse of power South Africa was able to create a new narrative particularly thanks to the grace of the people who lived in a constant state of oppression. Upstream Theaters production of A Human Being Died That Night continues through May 28 at the Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 N. Grand. For a full schedule and more information, http://www.upstreamtheater.org/

Fair Usage Law

May 19, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."