Archive for the ‘Apartheid’ Category

‘Violence against women, children linked to apartheid’ – Independent Online

Cape Town The current wave of abuse, including murder, against women and children has a direct link to the apartheid system which was fundamentally violent, Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa said on Tuesday.

“In recent weeks and days, the scourge of women and child abuse has come to the fore. These are some of the social ills that continuously affect our society,” Mthethwa addressed Parliament while presenting his departmental budget vote speech.

“This violence has a long history. Our country was taken by force and it was ruled by force for more than 350 years. Violence is part of the South African DNA and this need to be combated.”

Minister of Arts and Culture Nathi Mthethwa. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi

Earlier, Mthethwa said the South African government is deeply concerned over the incidents of racism which are often witnessed in different parts of the nation. In recent times, racism has continued to come to the fore at times and rear its ugly head.

Legislation is being tightened and progress made so far in terms of the mooted Prevention and the Combating of Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill, he said. Once accented into law, this Act will criminalise all forms of bigoted crimes and speech.

He said government is currently leading community conversations on the emotive subject, and the country seeks solutions to the scourge of intolerance.

We have had 33 community conversations across all nine provinces in a big to address the scourge of racism and other social ills facing society. Work is continuing apace to conclude these sectoral conversations with the view of crafting and adopting a common compact to unify our people, and strengthen the mental frameworks for complete emancipation, said Mthethwa.

Through our community conversations, we also continue to address racism, language, heritage, patriotism, inequality, unemployment and poverty. The department has presented a report from the 2016 community conversations to various government departments so that they can action some of the recommendations proposed.

He said several community conversations were held to respond to the violent protests in Limpopo that swept through Vhuwani and the surrounding villages in Makhadho and Thulamela municipalities.

These protests saw the burning and vandalism of over 20 million schools. The social cohesion advocates have carried out comprehensive social cohesion community dialogues so far to foster peace, unity and social cohesion in this area, said Mthethwa.

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‘Violence against women, children linked to apartheid’ – Independent Online

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Montclair’s Bnai Keshet To Host Talk About ‘Jewishness’ And Apartheid – Patch.com


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Montclair's Bnai Keshet To Host Talk About 'Jewishness' And Apartheid
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From Bnai Keshet Reconstructionist Synagogue: Steve Ellmann will speak about South Africa's late Chief Justice, Arthur Chaskalson, and what role his Jewishness may have played in his opposition to apartheid at Bnai Keshet's Kaplan Minyan on Saturday …

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Educational Apartheid in Pennsylvania must end, activists say – ABC27


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Educational Apartheid in Pennsylvania must end, activists say
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Or more accurately, according to study after study, the way schools are funded in the commonwealth in inequitable. We are experiencing here in Pennsylvania educational apartheid, said Reverend Gregory Holston, Executive Director of POWER, …

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Educational Apartheid in Pennsylvania must end, activists say – ABC27

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Has Brian Molefe just told the biggest lie in post-apartheid South Africa? – Rand Daily Mail (registration)

Molefe who was made an ANC MP after he resigned from the power utility in November last year returned to his old job at Megawatt Park in Johannesburg last week amid a dispute in which he believed he was entitled to a payment of more than R30-million after his resignation.

He had initially resigned from Eskom “in the interest of good corporate governance” but now he and Brown say he was actually on unpaid leave.

While Brown and the Eskom board is expected to brief Parliament’s portfolio committee on the reappointment of Molefe on Tuesday the two submitted affidavits in response to the DA’s application on Monday.

The Mail and Guardian reported that Molefe in his affidavit said: “It was explained to me that Eskom wanted me to return because of a concern about stabilising leadership and to address operational issues that it was facing.”

Brown said she was unhappy about Molefe’s pension pay-out reported to be R30-million by the Sunday Times and she had in fact asked the board to make another plan.

The plan was to reinstate him in his former position.

“The correct position is that my original contract of employment did not come to an end” Molefe said in his affidavit.

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Has Brian Molefe just told the biggest lie in post-apartheid South Africa? – Rand Daily Mail (registration)

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Angolan apartheid troops battle to survive in South Africa – Times LIVE

Without healthcare, jobs or basic services, some 3,000 Angolan-born men call home the town of Pomfret in a far-flung northern corner of South Africa on the edge of the Kalahari Desert.

Dilapidated buildings crumble by the side of the town’s sun-baked main road, water and power are cut off, and the asbestos factory that once sustained the region was abandoned long ago.

Former soldier Jose Lourenco, 69, a black Angolan, pointed to yellowing photos of “32 Battalion” — his elite and much-feared South African unit — in action in Angola against communist government forces.

“We didn’t fear anyone, we were the best unit in the world,” he said in his shabby home, one of the few still standing in the town.

In the 1980s, while still living in Angola, he joined the apartheid-era unit that had been formed to fight communism across southern Africa, including in Namibia and Zambia.

It was a cause that meant taking up arms against his mother country, but Lourenco remembers that time with pride, saying he fought in a close-knit, professional unit that won great battlefield honours.

Souvenirs of those years cover the walls and a sniper rifle rests on his dining table “to hunt birds”.

A television sits unused in the corner, covered in a white sheet — a reminder that Pomfret is cut off from the rest of the rainbow nation.

“The government should tell us what we did wrong? Why are they punishing us like this?” he said, speaking in Angolan Portuguese.

“There was no apartheid in 32 Battalion. Where the whites drank, we drank, where the whites slept, we slept,” said Lourenco as he gestured to the unit’s uniform patches, emblazoned with a stylised black and white buffalo.

When the Cold War ended and as Pretoria ceased its shadowy regional wars against supposed communist threats, 32 Battalion was relocated to Pomfret with the promise that its members would be integrated into the regular South African army.

Life was initially good in the extreme northern outpost.

The town had its own public swimming pool, tennis courts and a large, well-stocked supermarket. Despite its remote location, the community functioned well.

“Here there was a club where the senior men partied. There was even a ballroom,” said Makamba Tchimoco, the son of a former battalion member, pointing to a derelict complex of buildings.

But the whirlwind political change of the 1990s swept away the white-minority government, brought Nelson Mandela’s ANC to power and shattered the town’s sheltered existence.

The battalion was disbanded in 1993 and a number of the soldiers left Pomfret along with their families.

Many of the men of Angolan heritage waived their right to be incorporated into the reformed army in return for a significant cash handout worth $32,000 (30,000 euros) in today’s terms.

Gradually families who had contributed to the small community began to drift away and the town started its slide into decline.

By the 2000s, the government signalled its intention to close the base in Pomfret and to relocate the remaining families. But a hard core of ex-servicemen refused to budge.

“We arrived here with many promises. Then the new government wanted us to go, leaving us without a future. Why should we leave our homes?” asked Lourenco.

The police service left the town, homes were ransacked and the hospital was trashed.

The modest graveyard, which stood as a reminder to the men of 32 Battalion lost in South Africa’s “border wars”, became overgrown.

Finally in 2014, authorities cut the power to the town. Water is only supplied once a week.

“The biggest challenge for Pomfret is that it’s 200 kilometres (124 miles) from the first city,” said a white South African, who served in 32 Battalion and now helps Pomfret’s remaining residents.

“There’s no economy,” he said, declining to be named. “Most of the shops have closed and buildings have been destroyed to prevent people from staying there.”

Just one school remains open to serve the entire town, educating students up to the age of 18.

Antonio Isaac, an 18-year-old relative of a 32 Battalion fighter, said: “Staying here is useless for me. It’s not a good place; after school, I will go.”

Many of those who opted to remain feel stranded between South Africa, where their service is scorned, and Angola, where they are seen as traitors.

“Angolans say we killed them. The ANC here think that we killed their fighters,” said Alexander Joaquim, a 74-year-old veteran of 32 Battalion. “What are we supposed to do?”

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Angolan apartheid troops battle to survive in South Africa – Times LIVE

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Harry Potter’s Daniel Radcliffe to star in SA anti-apartheid prison … – Times LIVE

Harry Potter’s Daniel Radcliffe to star in SA anti-apartheid prison break movie

TshisaLIVE | 2017-05-22 08:00:00.0

The 27-year-old Harry Potter star will head to South Africa in 2018 to begin the filming of the movie based on white activist Tim Jenkin’s autobiographyInside Out: Escape from Pretoria Prison. Image by: CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP

The 27-year-old Harry Potter star will head to Mzansi in 2018 to begin the filming of the movie, which is based on Tim’s autobiographyInside Out: Escape from Pretoria Prison

The breakout thrillertells the story of how Tim escaped one of the maximum prisons in South Africa using a device made from a broom handle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell.

It narrates how he planned and executed the prison break where he freed himself and his prison mate Stephen Lee. Tim, who is now 68, had been arrested and sentenced to 12 years for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress.

The film titled Escape from Pretoria will be produced by David Barron, who also produced the magical school series Harry Potter.

HDO reported that the film will be directed by Francis Annan and Daniel will play the lead role.

“I am very excited to work with the immensely talented Francis Annan on this astonishing true story.Political without being polemical.

“Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan,” said producer David.

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Harry Potter’s Daniel Radcliffe to star in SA anti-apartheid prison … – Times LIVE

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How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

In a world where opinion, substantiated or not, is rapidly replacing evidence, a book as thoroughly researched as this is something of a Molotov cocktail.

The vast amount of empirical evidence presented simply cannot be dismissed as mere opinion.

As former Constitutional Court judge Kate ORegan has written: This is an expos of that machinery created in defence of apartheid and the people who made this possible: heads of state, arms dealers, aristocrats, plutocrats, senators, bankers, spies, journalists and members of secret lobby groups.

Van Vuurens book provides a brilliant expos of how an international criminal conspiracy was set up to enable the apartheid state to buy guns and other weapons, including flame-throwers.

This network included bankers, politicians, spies and shady businessmen around the world. And this network was vast.

The book shows that Armscor (the state arms company that later became Denel) had 844 bank accounts in 196 banks in at least 27 countries – the majority in Europe.

The myth that the apartheid state was isolated during the sanctions era was first bust by Sasha Polakow Suranskys important 2010 book, The Unspoken Alliance: Israels Secret Relationship With Apartheid South Africa. The book showed that the apartheid state and Israel collaborated closely on military matters. It is also well known that the apartheid state had links to Taiwan and also Chile, under the fascist dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.

Van Vuurens book shows that bankers, right-wing politicians and spies across Europe, and especially in Switzerland and Belgium, were deeply implicated in working to support the apartheid state. Reading this story is a bit like reading a spy novel. And among the many villains that emerge in the story is one Andr Vlrick, a Flemish banker and professor based in Belgium.

He set up a network of right-wing politicians to support apartheid and, as head of Kredietbank, ran a huge money-laundering system for apartheid. The business school at the University of Ghent is today named the Vlrick Business School. As Van Vuuren argues in his book, staff and students at the university have a moral obligation that the name of this odious, racist and deeply corrupt man is removed.

And some of the actors in this pro-apartheid network are well known organisations in South Africa today. The role of the banks, especially in Belgium and Switzerland, in propping up apartheid is particularly nauseating.

The old Volkskas Bank, now part of Absa, also played a central role. Absa has blood on its hands and must be forced to pay reparations.

Lonmin, the infamous British mining company implicated in the Marikana massacre, was also part of this network, under the name of LonRho. A number of well-known individuals are also part of this story. For instance, Christo Wiese, owner of Shoprite and one of the richest men in South Africa, was a regular donor to the National Party.

Van Vuuren also shows that the international criminal network set up to support apartheid continued to operate after apartheid fell. After apartheid, this criminal network intersected with the corruption that had also festered in the ANC in exile.

The arms deal, which originated the rot of the democratic state, brought both networks into a toxic alliance. It is this toxic alliance that is rotting our democracy and our economy from the inside.

Many commentators have argued that under Jacob Zuma we have collapsed into a kleptocratic or Mafia state. These commentators are correct. But what is often lacking in this analysis is a history of corruption, and, in particular, how the foundation for the present crisis was laid in the 1970s and 1980s.

South Africa cannot progress until all who have been complicit with this rule are removed from public office. We need to have a well- informed and honest conversation about just how deep the rot runs, how long it has run for, and what will be required to finally root it out.

Organisations like Lonmin and Absa all need to be dealt with. Reparations must be paid. We also need to reopen the investigation into the arms deal and to have an honest conversation about corruption in the ANC in exile. There can be no holy cows.

This book is not a quick read; it is 624 pages long. But it is absolutely vital reading for anyone who seriously wants to understand how a society that was born in such a wellspring of hope has collapsed into a kleptrocracy.

Van Vuuren has done his country a great service. If you read one book this year, make it Apartheid, Guns and Money.

* Buccus is senior research associate at the Auwal Socio-Economic Research Institute, research fellow in the School of Social Sciences at UKZN and academic director of a university study abroad programme on political transformation. He promotes #Reading Revolution via [emailprotected] at Antique Caf in Morningside, Durban.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

The Sunday Independent

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How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

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City of Cape Town accused of apartheid practices – Independent Online

Cape Town – Township residents on Saturday accused the city of continuing apartheid-era spatial planning practices at a Social Justice Commission (SJC) meeting on their new advocacy campaign for better street lighting in Khayelitsha, Nyanga, Harare and other townships.

Last week, the SJC launched a campaign over the inadequate lighting in the townships, which it said was leaving residents vulnerable to crime and contributing to Cape Towns status as the murder capital of Africa.

Khayelitsha and other townships still rely on apartheid-era mast lighting that towers about 30m or more in the air and can cast deep shadows in streets and between structures, creating cover for aggravated assaults and other crimes.

This is what a typical night looks like in the Taiwan informal settlement in Khayelitsha, where residents say inadequate lighting is making them vulnerable to criminals. Picture: Jason Boud/ANA Pictures

The uneven lighting can temporarily blind people who step out of the shadowed areas, SJC researcher Dalli Weyers said, making them easy targets for would-be assailants.

Around the world, mast lighting is primarily used worldwide to illuminate highways. Thats what the apartheid government deemed appropriate for Khayelitsha,” Weyers said.

City guidelines specifically state that high-mast lighting must be avoided because it casts dark shadows. The guidelines state quality lighting is one of the most effective measures to deter crime.

Weyers said that while lighting may not seem directly connected to crime, a large portion of the crime in townships occurs between 6pm and 6am, including the hours when people are going to and coming from work.

Darkness and crime and misdeeds like happening in the dark, Weyers said.

SJC convened the meeting at their headquarters to answer residents questions, hear their concerns and convene a strategy to address their concerns.

A council member and EMS representatives, who have been attacked when responding to emergencies in poorly lit areas, also spoke on the need for better lighting.

The meeting also was to respond to the specific claims the DA made last week about the campaign.

In a statement, mayoral committee member Xanthea Limberg wrote that the city addresses lighting based on the response from the community and that none of Khayelitshas community had raised the issue in meetings from the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry.

At the meeting, residents discussed ways of making their demands known. People proposed passing around petitions and holding a symbolic picket at night in a darkened area.

Mandlenkosi Sitonga, manager of one of two of Khayelitshas sub-councils, said he had been working on improving lighting for his specific district, reaching out to the directors of electricity, city parks and asset management in an effort to get a comprehensive solution.

But others in the room appeared sceptical of the focus SJC was placing on lighting. They agreed it was important, but questioned how the government drew up development plans that didnt include lighting and who approved them.

How do you build houses and parks and streets and sewers and not put in lights?” asked Kagiso Themba, 30, of Khayelitsha.

Khayelitsha has a mall but the mall does not have lights, Themba said.

Is this a continuation of apartheid spatial planning?”

Themba pointed to land reform as the primary issue they should focus on and the occupation of empty, privately-owned land by backpackers in Town Two, Khayelitsha.

Weekend Argus

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‘Harry Potter’ star Radcliffe in apartheid jail break film – SowetanLIVE

Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe is set to star in the epic story of a white anti-apartheid activist who escaped from one of South Africas toughest jails, the films producers said Friday.

The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkins account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979.

Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress.

But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the countrys death row.

Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee.

Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London.

Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this astonishing true story would be political without being polemical.

Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan, he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival.

Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year.

Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

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‘Violence against women, children linked to apartheid’ – Independent Online

Cape Town The current wave of abuse, including murder, against women and children has a direct link to the apartheid system which was fundamentally violent, Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa said on Tuesday. “In recent weeks and days, the scourge of women and child abuse has come to the fore. These are some of the social ills that continuously affect our society,” Mthethwa addressed Parliament while presenting his departmental budget vote speech. “This violence has a long history. Our country was taken by force and it was ruled by force for more than 350 years. Violence is part of the South African DNA and this need to be combated.” Minister of Arts and Culture Nathi Mthethwa. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi Earlier, Mthethwa said the South African government is deeply concerned over the incidents of racism which are often witnessed in different parts of the nation. In recent times, racism has continued to come to the fore at times and rear its ugly head. Legislation is being tightened and progress made so far in terms of the mooted Prevention and the Combating of Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill, he said. Once accented into law, this Act will criminalise all forms of bigoted crimes and speech. He said government is currently leading community conversations on the emotive subject, and the country seeks solutions to the scourge of intolerance. We have had 33 community conversations across all nine provinces in a big to address the scourge of racism and other social ills facing society. Work is continuing apace to conclude these sectoral conversations with the view of crafting and adopting a common compact to unify our people, and strengthen the mental frameworks for complete emancipation, said Mthethwa. Through our community conversations, we also continue to address racism, language, heritage, patriotism, inequality, unemployment and poverty. The department has presented a report from the 2016 community conversations to various government departments so that they can action some of the recommendations proposed. He said several community conversations were held to respond to the violent protests in Limpopo that swept through Vhuwani and the surrounding villages in Makhadho and Thulamela municipalities. These protests saw the burning and vandalism of over 20 million schools. The social cohesion advocates have carried out comprehensive social cohesion community dialogues so far to foster peace, unity and social cohesion in this area, said Mthethwa.

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Montclair’s Bnai Keshet To Host Talk About ‘Jewishness’ And Apartheid – Patch.com

Patch.com Montclair's Bnai Keshet To Host Talk About 'Jewishness' And Apartheid Patch.com From Bnai Keshet Reconstructionist Synagogue: Steve Ellmann will speak about South Africa's late Chief Justice, Arthur Chaskalson, and what role his Jewishness may have played in his opposition to apartheid at Bnai Keshet's Kaplan Minyan on Saturday …

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Educational Apartheid in Pennsylvania must end, activists say – ABC27

ABC27 Educational Apartheid in Pennsylvania must end, activists say ABC27 Or more accurately, according to study after study, the way schools are funded in the commonwealth in inequitable. We are experiencing here in Pennsylvania educational apartheid , said Reverend Gregory Holston, Executive Director of POWER, …

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Has Brian Molefe just told the biggest lie in post-apartheid South Africa? – Rand Daily Mail (registration)

Molefe who was made an ANC MP after he resigned from the power utility in November last year returned to his old job at Megawatt Park in Johannesburg last week amid a dispute in which he believed he was entitled to a payment of more than R30-million after his resignation. He had initially resigned from Eskom “in the interest of good corporate governance” but now he and Brown say he was actually on unpaid leave. While Brown and the Eskom board is expected to brief Parliament’s portfolio committee on the reappointment of Molefe on Tuesday the two submitted affidavits in response to the DA’s application on Monday. The Mail and Guardian reported that Molefe in his affidavit said: “It was explained to me that Eskom wanted me to return because of a concern about stabilising leadership and to address operational issues that it was facing.” Brown said she was unhappy about Molefe’s pension pay-out reported to be R30-million by the Sunday Times and she had in fact asked the board to make another plan. The plan was to reinstate him in his former position. “The correct position is that my original contract of employment did not come to an end” Molefe said in his affidavit.

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Angolan apartheid troops battle to survive in South Africa – Times LIVE

Without healthcare, jobs or basic services, some 3,000 Angolan-born men call home the town of Pomfret in a far-flung northern corner of South Africa on the edge of the Kalahari Desert. Dilapidated buildings crumble by the side of the town’s sun-baked main road, water and power are cut off, and the asbestos factory that once sustained the region was abandoned long ago. Former soldier Jose Lourenco, 69, a black Angolan, pointed to yellowing photos of “32 Battalion” — his elite and much-feared South African unit — in action in Angola against communist government forces. “We didn’t fear anyone, we were the best unit in the world,” he said in his shabby home, one of the few still standing in the town. In the 1980s, while still living in Angola, he joined the apartheid-era unit that had been formed to fight communism across southern Africa, including in Namibia and Zambia. It was a cause that meant taking up arms against his mother country, but Lourenco remembers that time with pride, saying he fought in a close-knit, professional unit that won great battlefield honours. Souvenirs of those years cover the walls and a sniper rifle rests on his dining table “to hunt birds”. A television sits unused in the corner, covered in a white sheet — a reminder that Pomfret is cut off from the rest of the rainbow nation. “The government should tell us what we did wrong? Why are they punishing us like this?” he said, speaking in Angolan Portuguese. “There was no apartheid in 32 Battalion. Where the whites drank, we drank, where the whites slept, we slept,” said Lourenco as he gestured to the unit’s uniform patches, emblazoned with a stylised black and white buffalo. When the Cold War ended and as Pretoria ceased its shadowy regional wars against supposed communist threats, 32 Battalion was relocated to Pomfret with the promise that its members would be integrated into the regular South African army. Life was initially good in the extreme northern outpost. The town had its own public swimming pool, tennis courts and a large, well-stocked supermarket. Despite its remote location, the community functioned well. “Here there was a club where the senior men partied. There was even a ballroom,” said Makamba Tchimoco, the son of a former battalion member, pointing to a derelict complex of buildings. But the whirlwind political change of the 1990s swept away the white-minority government, brought Nelson Mandela’s ANC to power and shattered the town’s sheltered existence. The battalion was disbanded in 1993 and a number of the soldiers left Pomfret along with their families. Many of the men of Angolan heritage waived their right to be incorporated into the reformed army in return for a significant cash handout worth $32,000 (30,000 euros) in today’s terms. Gradually families who had contributed to the small community began to drift away and the town started its slide into decline. By the 2000s, the government signalled its intention to close the base in Pomfret and to relocate the remaining families. But a hard core of ex-servicemen refused to budge. “We arrived here with many promises. Then the new government wanted us to go, leaving us without a future. Why should we leave our homes?” asked Lourenco. The police service left the town, homes were ransacked and the hospital was trashed. The modest graveyard, which stood as a reminder to the men of 32 Battalion lost in South Africa’s “border wars”, became overgrown. Finally in 2014, authorities cut the power to the town. Water is only supplied once a week. “The biggest challenge for Pomfret is that it’s 200 kilometres (124 miles) from the first city,” said a white South African, who served in 32 Battalion and now helps Pomfret’s remaining residents. “There’s no economy,” he said, declining to be named. “Most of the shops have closed and buildings have been destroyed to prevent people from staying there.” Just one school remains open to serve the entire town, educating students up to the age of 18. Antonio Isaac, an 18-year-old relative of a 32 Battalion fighter, said: “Staying here is useless for me. It’s not a good place; after school, I will go.” Many of those who opted to remain feel stranded between South Africa, where their service is scorned, and Angola, where they are seen as traitors. “Angolans say we killed them. The ANC here think that we killed their fighters,” said Alexander Joaquim, a 74-year-old veteran of 32 Battalion. “What are we supposed to do?”

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Harry Potter’s Daniel Radcliffe to star in SA anti-apartheid prison … – Times LIVE

Harry Potter’s Daniel Radcliffe to star in SA anti-apartheid prison break movie TshisaLIVE | 2017-05-22 08:00:00.0 The 27-year-old Harry Potter star will head to South Africa in 2018 to begin the filming of the movie based on white activist Tim Jenkin’s autobiographyInside Out: Escape from Pretoria Prison. Image by: CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP The 27-year-old Harry Potter star will head to Mzansi in 2018 to begin the filming of the movie, which is based on Tim’s autobiographyInside Out: Escape from Pretoria Prison The breakout thrillertells the story of how Tim escaped one of the maximum prisons in South Africa using a device made from a broom handle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell. It narrates how he planned and executed the prison break where he freed himself and his prison mate Stephen Lee. Tim, who is now 68, had been arrested and sentenced to 12 years for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress. The film titled Escape from Pretoria will be produced by David Barron, who also produced the magical school series Harry Potter. HDO reported that the film will be directed by Francis Annan and Daniel will play the lead role. “I am very excited to work with the immensely talented Francis Annan on this astonishing true story.Political without being polemical. “Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan,” said producer David.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

How apartheid state was able to buy guns – Independent Online

In a world where opinion, substantiated or not, is rapidly replacing evidence, a book as thoroughly researched as this is something of a Molotov cocktail. The vast amount of empirical evidence presented simply cannot be dismissed as mere opinion. As former Constitutional Court judge Kate ORegan has written: This is an expos of that machinery created in defence of apartheid and the people who made this possible: heads of state, arms dealers, aristocrats, plutocrats, senators, bankers, spies, journalists and members of secret lobby groups. Van Vuurens book provides a brilliant expos of how an international criminal conspiracy was set up to enable the apartheid state to buy guns and other weapons, including flame-throwers. This network included bankers, politicians, spies and shady businessmen around the world. And this network was vast. The book shows that Armscor (the state arms company that later became Denel) had 844 bank accounts in 196 banks in at least 27 countries – the majority in Europe. The myth that the apartheid state was isolated during the sanctions era was first bust by Sasha Polakow Suranskys important 2010 book, The Unspoken Alliance: Israels Secret Relationship With Apartheid South Africa. The book showed that the apartheid state and Israel collaborated closely on military matters. It is also well known that the apartheid state had links to Taiwan and also Chile, under the fascist dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. Van Vuurens book shows that bankers, right-wing politicians and spies across Europe, and especially in Switzerland and Belgium, were deeply implicated in working to support the apartheid state. Reading this story is a bit like reading a spy novel. And among the many villains that emerge in the story is one Andr Vlrick, a Flemish banker and professor based in Belgium. He set up a network of right-wing politicians to support apartheid and, as head of Kredietbank, ran a huge money-laundering system for apartheid. The business school at the University of Ghent is today named the Vlrick Business School. As Van Vuuren argues in his book, staff and students at the university have a moral obligation that the name of this odious, racist and deeply corrupt man is removed. And some of the actors in this pro-apartheid network are well known organisations in South Africa today. The role of the banks, especially in Belgium and Switzerland, in propping up apartheid is particularly nauseating. The old Volkskas Bank, now part of Absa, also played a central role. Absa has blood on its hands and must be forced to pay reparations. Lonmin, the infamous British mining company implicated in the Marikana massacre, was also part of this network, under the name of LonRho. A number of well-known individuals are also part of this story. For instance, Christo Wiese, owner of Shoprite and one of the richest men in South Africa, was a regular donor to the National Party. Van Vuuren also shows that the international criminal network set up to support apartheid continued to operate after apartheid fell. After apartheid, this criminal network intersected with the corruption that had also festered in the ANC in exile. The arms deal, which originated the rot of the democratic state, brought both networks into a toxic alliance. It is this toxic alliance that is rotting our democracy and our economy from the inside. Many commentators have argued that under Jacob Zuma we have collapsed into a kleptocratic or Mafia state. These commentators are correct. But what is often lacking in this analysis is a history of corruption, and, in particular, how the foundation for the present crisis was laid in the 1970s and 1980s. South Africa cannot progress until all who have been complicit with this rule are removed from public office. We need to have a well- informed and honest conversation about just how deep the rot runs, how long it has run for, and what will be required to finally root it out. Organisations like Lonmin and Absa all need to be dealt with. Reparations must be paid. We also need to reopen the investigation into the arms deal and to have an honest conversation about corruption in the ANC in exile. There can be no holy cows. This book is not a quick read; it is 624 pages long. But it is absolutely vital reading for anyone who seriously wants to understand how a society that was born in such a wellspring of hope has collapsed into a kleptrocracy. Van Vuuren has done his country a great service. If you read one book this year, make it Apartheid, Guns and Money. * Buccus is senior research associate at the Auwal Socio-Economic Research Institute, research fellow in the School of Social Sciences at UKZN and academic director of a university study abroad programme on political transformation. He promotes #Reading Revolution via [emailprotected] at Antique Caf in Morningside, Durban. ** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media. The Sunday Independent

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May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

City of Cape Town accused of apartheid practices – Independent Online

Cape Town – Township residents on Saturday accused the city of continuing apartheid-era spatial planning practices at a Social Justice Commission (SJC) meeting on their new advocacy campaign for better street lighting in Khayelitsha, Nyanga, Harare and other townships. Last week, the SJC launched a campaign over the inadequate lighting in the townships, which it said was leaving residents vulnerable to crime and contributing to Cape Towns status as the murder capital of Africa. Khayelitsha and other townships still rely on apartheid-era mast lighting that towers about 30m or more in the air and can cast deep shadows in streets and between structures, creating cover for aggravated assaults and other crimes. This is what a typical night looks like in the Taiwan informal settlement in Khayelitsha, where residents say inadequate lighting is making them vulnerable to criminals. Picture: Jason Boud/ANA Pictures The uneven lighting can temporarily blind people who step out of the shadowed areas, SJC researcher Dalli Weyers said, making them easy targets for would-be assailants. Around the world, mast lighting is primarily used worldwide to illuminate highways. Thats what the apartheid government deemed appropriate for Khayelitsha,” Weyers said. City guidelines specifically state that high-mast lighting must be avoided because it casts dark shadows. The guidelines state quality lighting is one of the most effective measures to deter crime. Weyers said that while lighting may not seem directly connected to crime, a large portion of the crime in townships occurs between 6pm and 6am, including the hours when people are going to and coming from work. Darkness and crime and misdeeds like happening in the dark, Weyers said. SJC convened the meeting at their headquarters to answer residents questions, hear their concerns and convene a strategy to address their concerns. A council member and EMS representatives, who have been attacked when responding to emergencies in poorly lit areas, also spoke on the need for better lighting. The meeting also was to respond to the specific claims the DA made last week about the campaign. In a statement, mayoral committee member Xanthea Limberg wrote that the city addresses lighting based on the response from the community and that none of Khayelitshas community had raised the issue in meetings from the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry. At the meeting, residents discussed ways of making their demands known. People proposed passing around petitions and holding a symbolic picket at night in a darkened area. Mandlenkosi Sitonga, manager of one of two of Khayelitshas sub-councils, said he had been working on improving lighting for his specific district, reaching out to the directors of electricity, city parks and asset management in an effort to get a comprehensive solution. But others in the room appeared sceptical of the focus SJC was placing on lighting. They agreed it was important, but questioned how the government drew up development plans that didnt include lighting and who approved them. How do you build houses and parks and streets and sewers and not put in lights?” asked Kagiso Themba, 30, of Khayelitsha. Khayelitsha has a mall but the mall does not have lights, Themba said. Is this a continuation of apartheid spatial planning?” Themba pointed to land reform as the primary issue they should focus on and the occupation of empty, privately-owned land by backpackers in Town Two, Khayelitsha. Weekend Argus

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May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed

‘Harry Potter’ star Radcliffe in apartheid jail break film – SowetanLIVE

Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe is set to star in the epic story of a white anti-apartheid activist who escaped from one of South Africas toughest jails, the films producers said Friday. The breakout thriller Escape From Pretoria is based on Tim Jenkins account of his dramatic escape from the notorious Pretoria Maximum Security Prison with his friend Stephen Lee in 1979. Jenkin, now 68, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for handing out leaflets supporting the then banned African National Congress. But the following year he managed to make a set of wooden keys for a series of doors inside the jail, which housed the countrys death row. Using a device made from a broomhandle and a mirror he had hidden in his cell, Jenkin opened his cell door and then freed his neighbour and friend Lee. Both managed to slip out of the tightly guarded prison and eventually flee to London. Producer David Barron, who also worked on the Harry Potter films, said the movie of this astonishing true story would be political without being polemical. Escape From Pretoria is a rare combination of genre and drama, and I am delighted to bring together the potent combination of Daniel Radcliffe and Francis Annan, he added, as the film was launched at the Cannes film festival. Annan, a rising young black British director, also wrote the script for the film, which will be shot in South Africa next year. Radcliffe, 27, has also been signed up to play the lead in the action comedy Guns Akimbo, which was also unveiled at Cannes.

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May 21, 2017   Posted in: Apartheid  Comments Closed


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