Archive for the ‘Ashkenazi’ Category

Was Adolf Hitler's wife of Jewish descent?

Thought-provoking outcome: Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler’s wife Eva Braun may have been of Jewish descent according to DNA analysis carried out for a British television documentary. The anti-Semitic German leader responsible for the Holocaust married his long-term lover Braun shortly before they committed suicide in a Berlin bunker in 1945. But the program to be screened by Britain’s independent Channel 4 on Wednesday says hair samples show Braun may have had Jewish ancestry herself. Hair samples indicate possible Jewish ancestry: Eva Braun. Scientists commissioned by the Dead Famous DNA program tested hair said to have come from a brush used by Braun and found at Hitler’s mountain retreat. Advertisement In DNA from the hair, they found a sequence passed down through the maternal line – haplogroup N1b1 – which was “strongly associated” with Ashkenazi Jews. Ashkenazi Jews dispersed into central and eastern Europe in the early Middle Ages, and some converted to Catholicism in Germany in the 19th century. “This is a thought-provoking outcome – I never dreamt that I would find such a potentially extraordinary and profound result,” presenter Mark Evans said.

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December 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Was Adolf Hitler's wife of Jewish decent?

Thought-provoking outcome: Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler’s wife Eva Braun may have been of Jewish descent according to DNA analysis carried out for a British television documentary. The anti-Semitic German leader responsible for the Holocaust married his long-term lover Braun shortly before they committed suicide in a Berlin bunker in 1945. But the program to be screened by Britain’s independent Channel 4 on Wednesday says hair samples show Braun may have had Jewish ancestry herself. Hair samples indicate possible Jewish ancestry: Eva Braun. Scientists commissioned by the Dead Famous DNA program tested hair said to have come from a brush used by Braun and found at Hitler’s mountain retreat. Advertisement In DNA from the hair, they found a sequence passed down through the maternal line – haplogroup N1b1 – which was “strongly associated” with Ashkenazi Jews. Ashkenazi Jews dispersed into central and eastern Europe in the early Middle Ages, and some converted to Catholicism in Germany in the 19th century. “This is a thought-provoking outcome – I never dreamt that I would find such a potentially extraordinary and profound result,” presenter Mark Evans said.

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December 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

The Chosen Objects: A Soaring Market for Judaica As Museums Go on a Buying Spree

In the early 18th century, Jews in Europe began to commission handwritten and gorgeously decorated Hebrew books. One of the leading craftsmen of these was Aryeh Judah Leib Sofer ben Elhanan Katz of Treibitsch, known for his readable text, beautiful illustrations and page trim of gold. In 1716, he created his second full work, Ashkenazi Prayer Book for the Entire Year; Book of Psalms. Earlier this month, the nearly 300-year-old manuscript went on the block at Sothebys in New York with a price estimate of $550,000 to $750,000. It soared to $875,000. Sothebys holds a sale of Judaica every December in New York, specifically timed for Hanukkah. This years sale, like most, included prayer books, Hagaddahs and manuscripts, synagogue objects such as Torahs, mantles, finials and crowns, and household items such as seder compendiums and menorahs. But this auction raised $6.33 million, a leap from the $2.79 million raised at 2013s sale, and well above the sales high estimate. About three out of every four works offered sold. Whos bidding? While private collectors in the U.S.,IsraelandEuropetend to be the largest group, Sothebys senior vice president Jennifer Roth said that museums eager to address gaps in their collections have become a growing force in this market. I think it is part of museums efforts to become more diverse in their collections, she said. American museums didnt have much or any of this material before, and know that its time to acquire. Consider that just five years ago, one of the nations great encyclopedic museums, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, had no Judaica in its collection. Then, in 2009, a retired elementary school educator from Kansas, Jetskalina Phillips, left the bulk of her estate to the MFA to support the acquisition, study, and display of the material. So, last year, the MFA acquired the Charles and Lynn Schusterman collection of Judaica, featuring over 100 examples of silver and metalwork, textiles, ceramics, paintings and sculpture, among other objects. Jetskalina Phillips donation was a bolt out of the blue, and the Schusterman gift was part of a snowball effect, said Marietta Cambareri, curator of decorative arts and sculpture and, now, the Jetskalina H. Phillips curator of Judaica at the MFA. The Boston MFA is just one of several institutions filling in the gaps of their collections, so to speak, with purchases of Judaica, which is defined broadly as ritual objects and other artifacts related to the history and culture of the Jewish people. An institutional buying spree kicked off in 2013 with the sale of the Michael and Judy Steinhardt Judaica collection at auction. The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem jointly acquired the Steinhardts Mishneh Torah as a private sale; The Met also purchased at auction a circa 1740 Venetian silver Torah crown for $857,000 (double its pre-sale estimate) and a pair of circa 1896 Russian silver Torah finials for $43,750 (the pre-sale estimate was $20,000-$30,000). That same sale saw purchases by New Yorks Jewish Museum, the Columbus Museum of Art in Ohio, the Cincinnati Art Museum and the North Carolina Museum of Art. Other active institutional buyers in the Judaica market, Ms. Roth said, have been the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Sadly, very little Judaica from before the 18thcentury survives, as pogroms destroyed objects as well as people inEurope. Most of what you see for sale is 19thcentury or later, said Michael Ehrenthal, part-owner of Moriah Galleries inManhattan, which is one of the few shops in the country specializing in Judaica. Older than that, pieces are quite rare and more expensive. The oldest lot in the most recent Sothebys sale was a 1533 proclamation in Italian listing the Privileges of the Jews of Duchy of Milan, identifying their rights to engage in commerce, lend money, live in their own communities and other practices (it sold for $8,125, against a pre-sale estimate of $6,000-8,000).

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December 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Leo Frank is Interrogated by Atlanta Police On Monday morning, April 28, 1913 in the presence of his powerful lawyers Luther Zeigler Rosser and Herbert Haas.

The Monday morning, April 28, 1913 interrogation went like this (published in Atlanta Constitution, August 2nd, 1913) that became State’s Exhibit B at the Leo Frank trial. Both the Leo Frank defense and Leo Frank prosecution ratified it as being accurate. Pay attention to the time Leo Frank says Mary Phagan arrived at his second […]

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December 16, 2014   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, ADL, Anti-Defamation League, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, Leo Frank, Race Relations, Racism News, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC  Comments Closed

Michael Chertoff Ashkenazi Jew head of Homeland Security – Video




Michael Chertoff Ashkenazi Jew head of Homeland Security By: Dirty Steve

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December 14, 2014  Tags: , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed


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