Archive for the ‘Ashkenazi’ Category

Ashkenazi Jewish population has distinctive, yet similar genomes

An archival photo from long after the population bottleneck. Ashkenazi Jews hail from Eastern Europe”Ashkenaz” is the Hebrew word for Germanyand comprise the bulk of the Jewish population in the US. Their compatriots are Sephardi Jews, who lived in Spain until they were kicked out in 1492, and Mizrachi Jews, who lived in Arab countries for centuries until the founding of the state of Israel in 1948. Ashkenazi Jews are a genetically distinct population, andthe analysis of 128 complete Ashkenazi genomes shows just how distinct they are. Compared to genomes of modern Europeansin this case, the genomes of 26 Flemish peoplethe Ashkenazi genomes have 47 percent more novel DNA differencesper genome. These DNA variants, while novel, are population specific; sequence sharing, where two individuals have a set of the same variants, is eight percent more abundant among the Ashkenazi Jews than it is between the two populations or even among the Flemish genomes. Using the length of the shared genetic segments, researchers determined that the current Ashkenazi Jewish population underwent a bottleneck 25-32 generations back, approximately 600-800 years ago. Caused by the Plague in the mid 1300s, perhaps? Or maybe by the decimation of Eastern European Jewish communities by roving bands of Crusaders? Whatever the cause, this bottleneck reduced the founder population to between 250 and 420 individuals. When populations undergo bottlenecks that reduce their founder sizes, rare and recessive mutations become amplified. That is exactly what happened to Ashkenazi Jews. Pregnant Ashkenazi women currently get screened for a panel of thirty-six recessive diseases, including Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, Gaucher disease, Fanconi anemia, and cystic fibrosis. They also have higher rates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, estimated to occur in 1 in 40 individuals compared to 1 in 400 in the general population. These mutations cause 11 percent of the breast cancer and 40 percent of the ovarian cancer in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Defining the extent of the unique Ashkenazi DNA variation, as this study has done, will make clinical diagnosis much simpler. Now, when an individual’s genome is sequenced, it can be compared against this panel rather than one from the general European population, and doctors will more easily be able to ascertain which mutations might make a patient sick. Nature Communications, 2014. DOI: 10.1038ncomms5835 (About DOIs).

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September 23, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi – define Ashkenazi at The Free Dictionary

Ashkenazi (shk-nz) Ashkenazi (knz) n, pl -zim (-zm) 1. (Peoples) (modifier) of or relating to the Jews of Germany and E Europe 2. (Peoples) a Jew of German or E European descent 3. (Languages) the pronunciation of Hebrew used by these Jews [C19: Late Hebrew, from Hebrew Ashkenaz, the son of Gomer (Genesis 10:3; I Chronicles 1:6), a descendant of Noah through Japheth, and hence taken to be identified with the ancient Ascanians of Phrygia and, in the medieval period, the Germans] n., pl. -nazim (-n zm) [183040;

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September 22, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles – Video




Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles By: Simon Peter

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September 20, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Study: All Ashkenazi Jews descend from 350 people

(JNS.org)A new study conducted at Columbia University, based on the genetic sequencing of 128 Ashkenazi Jews, shows that modern Ashkenazi Jews descend from a small group of about 350 individuals who lived between 600 and 800 years ago. Those ancestors of current Ashkenazi Jews were both European and Middle Eastern, said the study, which was published Tuesday, Sept. 9, in the Nature Communications journal. Todays approximate population of 10 million Ashkenazi Jews descends from such a small group of ancestors due to the bottleneck effect, a drastic reduction in population size that occurred for unknown reasons about 25-30 generations ago, according to the study. [Among Ashkenazi Jews] everyone is a 30th cousin They have a stretch of the genome that is identical, Itsik Peer, an associate professor of computer science and systems biology at Columbia University, told Live Science.

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September 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

RETHINKING KHAZAR ASHKENAZI and SEPHARDI JEW THEORY Part 1 – Video




RETHINKING KHAZAR ASHKENAZI and SEPHARDI JEW THEORY Part 1 RETHINKING KHAZAR ASHKENAZI and SEPHARDI JEW THEORY GENETICS RELIGION CULTURE TRIBALISM SUPREMACISM. By: Albrecht Durer

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September 13, 2014  Tags: , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

All About – Ashkenazi Jews – Video




All About – Ashkenazi Jews What is Ashkenazi Jews? A report all about Ashkenazi Jews for homework/assignment :For other meanings see Ashkenaz (disambiguation). Intro/Outro music: Discovery Hit/Chucky the Construction… By: All About

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September 13, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Researchers find a link between Jewish women and cancer, without family history

By Jenna Birch Most women only undergo screening for harmful genetic mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes if many family members have developed cancer. However, a new study revealed women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent with cancer-causing mutations have a high prevalence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer even if theres no real family history. To mimic a universal screening on a small scale, researchers initially offered 8,000 cancer-free Ashkenazi men over age 30 to get tested for the genetic mutation, eventually finding 175 who carried a harmful mutation of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Then the researchers asked female relatives to be tested for the mutation, finding 211 women who were affected by it. Half had nearly no family history of cancer, and only about one-third of those who did had been sent for a screening. But after getting tested in the study, they found cancer rates were high. If the women reached age 60, around 60 percent of the BRCA1 carriers and roughly 33 percent of BRCA2 carriers had fallen victim to breast or ovarian cancer. By age 80, the number rose to 83 percent of the BRCA1 carriers and 76 percent of BRCA2 carriers. The mutations were found after random screenings, and many of the women in the study would not have discovered they were mutation carriers had the research not called for this test. Thats why the study authors recommend all women of Jewish Ashkenazi descent get tested for these potentially life-threatening mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The United States Preventive Services Task Force does not currently recommend counseling or screening in the absence of family history. The American Cancer Society only recommends action if an immediate family member has had cancer, or a family member developed it at a very young age. Researchers in this study suggest, with this new information, screening should be universal in this population of women. We should be testing people who are still healthy at a stage when we can prevent the disease, says study author Dr. Ephrat Levy-Lahad, director of the Medical Genetics Institute at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem. And we dont have many diseases with a mutation that so clearly affects risk as BRCA. Itll probably be a long time before changes are made to guidelines, though, and questions still remain as to the exact link between the mutation and cancer, or how to deal if a woman tests positive. Some experts still arent sure how high the risk of developing the disease is in a person with a mutation and no family history. Also, if a woman tests positive for the mutation, lowering risk of developing cancer might involve surgically removing healthy breasts and ovarieswhich is risky in itself, and obviously a huge decision for a woman to make. So, right now, theres no easy answer in light of this new information. However, the research seems to be a big step toward preventing cancer before it ever starts.

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September 12, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Should All Ashkenazi Women Get Tested for BRCA Gene Mutations?

New Study Says Yes Experts Are Divided Thinkstock Life-Saving Screening: A radiology technician examines a mammography test. No family history of cancer? Get tested anyway suggests a recently-published study, but medical experts are deeply divided. The study indicates that even Ashkenazi women with no family history of the disease but who test positive for a cancer-causing genetic mutation have high rates of breast and ovarian cancer. At the heart of the dispute is the question of whether all women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent should now get genetic testing to determine if they have the mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. And, if they do get tested, what should they do if the results show mutations? Ashkenazim are at a particularly high risk for these mutations: One in 40 carries a BRCA mutation as compared to one in 345 in the general population. But until now, the United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended against routine genetic counseling or BRCA testing for women who had no family history of cancer. Citing their findings, published September 5 on the website of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the studys authors recommended routine screening of all women of Ashkenazi backgrounds for harmful mutations in the BRCA genes. Some prominent experts agree. I think it is going to be a game changer, said Dr. Harry Ostrer, a noted geneticist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York, referring to the study results. I think it puts the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force on notice. Ostrer said he had just returned from a bar mitzvah, where the study was making waves. People were walking up to me and saying, Gee, I want to be tested. How do I do that? he said.

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September 12, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Researchers Develop Ashkenazi Jewish Reference Panel, Describe Population History

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September 9, 2014  Tags: , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Mapping the DNA Sequence of Ashkenazi Jews

Contact Information Available for logged-in reporters only Newswise New York, NYSeptember 9, 2014Led by Itsik Peer, associate professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering, a team of researchers has created a data resource that will improve genomic research in the Ashkenazi Jewish population and lead to more effective personalized medicine. The team, which includes experts from 11 labs in the New York City area and Israel, focused on the Ashkenazi Jewish population because of its demographic history of genetic isolation and the resulting abundance of population-specific mutations and high prevalence of rare genetic disorders. The Ashkenazi Jewish population has played an important role in human genetics, with notable successes in gene mapping as well as prenatal and cancer screening. The study was published online on Nature Communications today. Our study is the first full DNA sequence dataset available for Ashkenazi Jewish genomes, says Peer, who is also a co-chair of the Health Analytics Center at Columbias Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering, as well as a member of its Foundations of Data Science Center. With this comprehensive catalog of mutations present in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, we will be able to more effectively map disease genes onto the genome and thus gain a better understanding of common disorders. We see this study serving as a vehicle for personalized medicine and a model for researchers working with other populations. To help in his hunt for disease genes, Peer founded The Ashkenazi Genome Consortium (TAGC) in September 2011 with Todd Lencz, an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, director of the Laboratory of Analytic Genomics at the Zucker Hillside Hospital, and associate professor of molecular medicine and psychiatry at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. The other TAGC members, who are providing expertise in the diseases they are studying, are: Gil Atzmon, associate professor of medicine and genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (genetics of longevity and diabetes); Lorraine Clark, associate professor of clinical pathology and cell biology and co-director, Personalized Genomic Medicine Laboratory, Columbia University Medical Center, Laurie Ozelius, associate professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Susan Bressman, chair of neurology at Mount Sinai Beth Israel (Parkinsons disease and related neurological phenotypes); Harry Ostrer, professor of pathology, genetics, and pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (radiogenomics, cancers and rare genetic disorders); Ken Offit, chief of clinical genetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (breast, ovarian, colon and prostate cancers, lymphoma); Inga Peter, associate professor of genetics and genomic sciences, and Judy Cho, professor of medicine and professor of genetics and genomic sciences, both at The Mount Sinai Hospital(inflammatory bowel disease); and Ariel Darvasi, vice-dean of The Faculty of Life Sciences at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (multiple diseases). Before the TAGC study, data was available for a limited number of DNA markers (only approximately one in every 3000 letters of DNA) that are mostly common in Europeans. The TAGC researchers performed high-depth sequencing of 128 complete genomes of Ashkenazi Jewish healthy individuals. They compared their data to European samples, and found that Ashkenazi Jewish genomes had significantly more mutations that had not yet been mapped. Peer and his team analyzed the raw data and created a comprehensive catalog of mutations present in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The TAGC database is already proving useful for clinical genomics, identifying specific new mutations for carrier screening. Lencz explains: TAGC advances the goal of bringing personal genomics to the clinic, as it tells the physician whether a mutation in a patients genome is shared by healthy individuals, and can alleviate concerns that it is causing disease. Without our work, a patients genome sequence is much harder to interpret, and more prone to create false alarms. We have eliminated two thirds of these false alarms. The TAGC study further enables more effective discovery of disease-causing mutations, since some genetic factors are observable in Ashkenazi individuals but essentially absent elsewhere. Moreover, the demography of the Ashkenazi population, the largest isolated population in the U.S., enables large-scale recruitment of study patients and hence more genetic discoveries than in other well-known isolated populations like the Amish and Hutterites locally, or the Icelanders overseas. The researchers expect that medical insights from studies of specific populations will also be relevant to general populations as well. The TAGC teams findings also shed light on the long-debated origin of Ashkenazi Jews and Europeans. The genetic data indicates that the Ashkenazi Jewish population was founded in the late medieval times by a small number, effectively only hundreds of individuals, whose descendants expanded rapidly while remaining mostly isolated genetically. Our analysis shows that Ashkenazi Jewish medieval founders were ethnically admixed, with origins in Europe and in the Middle East, roughly in equal parts, says Shai Carmi, a post-doctoral scientist who works with Peer and who conducted the analysis. TAGC data are more comprehensive than what was previously available, and we believe the data settle the dispute regarding European and Middle Eastern ancestry in Ashkenazi Jews. In addition to illuminating medieval Jewish history, our results further pave the way to better understanding European origins, millennia before. For example, our data provides evidence for todays European population being genetically descendant primarily from late mid-eastern migrations that took place after the last ice age, rather than from the first humans to arrive to the continent, more than 40,000 years ago.

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September 9, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

New DNA colon cancer test holds hope; R&R rules!

Dr. Mehmet Oz, left, and Dr. Michael Roizen (King Features Syndicate) Q: I heard there is a DNA test for colon cancer. Can I cancel my colonoscopy? Please?! Stephen G., Colorado Springs, Colorado A: Sit tight! The news about a fecal DNA test to spot hemoglobin and mutant DNA that might indicate the presence of colon cancer and adenomatous polyps (benign polyps that could turn cancerous) is great news, but it doesn’t eliminate the need for colonoscopies. It may, however, tell you that you need one! The DNA stool test is an exam for folks 50 and older who have an average risk of colon cancer. Its cost is covered by Medicare and Medicaid; they’re recommending that it be done every three years. Compared with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), the DNA test is around 93 percent sensitive to 65 variations of malignancies; FIT rates just 73 percent. Also, it specifically detects precancerous lesions 42 percent of the time, while FIT detects only 23 percent. How you proceed with your regular screening for colon cancer depends on your risks and a discussion with your doctor. If you’ve already had a polyp found and removed during a colonoscopy, if anyone in your family has had colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, if you have irritable-bowel disease or genetic predispositions or if you are black or an Ashkenazi Jew, you may want to get the DNA stool test every year; you’ll need to have a colonoscopy as frequently as your doctor recommends. If you don’t have extra risk factors for colon cancer, you still may want to do the DNA test regularly and have a colonoscopy every 10 years after a base-line scope at age 50 (45 for blacks). Also, talk to your doc about taking two low-dose aspirins a day if you don’t take ‘em already; they decrease the risk of colon cancer by over 35 percent. So, don’t postpone a recommended colonoscopy; it’s a life-saver. A polyp removed never becomes cancerous, and colon cancer caught early has a very good prognosis. Q: I have 27 vacation days piled up, and if I don’t take them, they’ll expire at the end of the year. I also can skip the time off and get paid for it. That seems smarter. What do you think? Susan B., New York A: You’re lucky to have paid vacation days; the U.S. is the only advanced country in the world that doesn’t guarantee workers paid vacations. (Every country in the EU mandates at least four weeks off annually.) So if you have days off, take them! You’ll be much happier and healthier, and a more productive employee. (One Cincinnati janitorial firm reduced its employee turnover rate from 360 percent to 60 percent and increased productivity by introducing a week’s vacation.) Unfortunately, many Americans are like you, Susan, and don’t take vacations even when they’re offered! American workers left an estimated 577,212,000 vacation days untaken in 2013! And if you do take time off, 67 percent of you are still in contact with your office. The 1950s had a vision of an automated future that gave you loads of free time. That future is here and what do you get from all that advanced technology? MORE TIME TO WORK MORE!

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September 9, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Study: Test all women of Ashkenazi descent for BRCA defect

Image via Shutterstock.com All women of Ashkenazi descent should be screened from age 30 for the BRCA gene mutation that causes breast cancer, an Israeli study recommends. The study, by a research team headed by Ephrat Levy-Lahad of Shaare Zedek Medical Center, was published Friday in thejournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Until now, Ashkenazi women have been tested for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes only if a close blood relative had breast or ovarian cancer or were identified as carrying the gene. The research was conducted on a random group of Jewish women of Ashkenazi origin who did not necessarily have a family history of the disease. Many of the women identified during the study as being mutation carriers would not have known otherwise, according to the study. The mutation can be handed down to women through their fathers. We welcome your feedback. Privacy Policy Your information will not be shared or sold without your consent. Get all the details. Terms of Service JewishJournal.com has rules for its commenting community.Get all the details.

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September 9, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

New Study Recommends All Ashkenazi Women Be Screened for BRCA

1 in 40 Ashkenazi Jews Carries Gene Mutation By JTA Published September 08, 2014. All women of Ashkenazi descent should be screened from age 30 for the BRCA gene mutation that causes breast cancer, an Israeli study recommends. The study, by a research team headed by Ephrat Levy-Lahad of Shaare Zedek Medical Center, was published Friday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Until now, Ashkenazi women have been tested for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes only if a close blood relative had breast or ovarian cancer or were identified as carrying the gene. The research was conducted on a random group of Jewish women of Ashkenazi origin who did not necessarily have a family history of the disease. Many of the women identified during the study as being mutation carriers would not have known otherwise, according to the study. The mutation can be handed down to women through their fathers.

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New colon cancer test; vacation rewards

Q: I heard there is a DNA test for colon cancer. Can I cancel my colonoscopy? Please?! Stephen G., Colorado Springs, Colorado A: Sit tight! The news about a fecal DNA test to spot hemoglobin and mutant DNA that might indicate the presence of colon cancer and adenomatous polyps (benign polyps that could turn cancerous) is great news, but it doesn’t eliminate the need for colonoscopies. It may, however, tell you that you need one! The DNA stool test is an exam for folks 50 and older who have an average risk of colon cancer. Its cost is covered by Medicare and Medicaid; they’re recommending that it be done every three years. Compared with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), the DNA test is around 93 percent sensitive to 65 variations of malignancies; FIT rates just 73 percent. Also, it specifically detects precancerous lesions 42 percent of the time, while FIT detects only 23 percent. How you proceed with your regular screening for colon cancer depends on your risks and a discussion with your doctor. If you’ve already had a polyp found and removed during a colonoscopy, if anyone in your family has had colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, if you have irritable bowel disease or genetic predispositions or if you are black or an Ashkenazi Jew, you may want to get the DNA stool test every year; you’ll need to have a colonoscopy as frequently as your doctor recommends. If you don’t have extra risk factors for colon cancer, you still may want to do the DNA test regularly and have a colonoscopy every 10 years after a baseline scope at 50 (45 for blacks). Also, talk to your doc about taking two low-dose aspirins a day if you don’t take em already; they decrease the risk of colon cancer by over 35 percent. So, don’t postpone a recommended colonoscopy; it’s a lifesaver. A polyp removed never becomes cancerous, and colon cancer caught early has a very good prognosis. Q: I have 27 vacation days piled up, and if I don’t take them, they’ll expire at the end of the year. I also can skip the time off and get paid for it. That seems smarter. What do you think? Susan B., New York A: You’re lucky to have paid vacation days; the U.S. is the only advanced country in the world that doesn’t guarantee workers paid vacations. (Every country in the EU mandates at least four weeks off annually.) So if you have days off, take them! You’ll be much happier and healthier, and a more productive employee. (One Cincinnati janitorial firm reduced its employee turnover rate from 360 percent to 60 percent and increased productivity by introducing a week’s vacation.) Unfortunately, many Americans are like you, Susan, and don’t take vacations even when they’re offered! American workers left an estimated 577,212,000 vacation days untaken in 2013! And if you do take time off, 67 percent of you are still in contact with your office. The 1950s had a vision of an automated future that gave you loads of free time. That future is here and what do you get from all that advanced technology? MORE TIME TO WORK MORE! Take advantage of your vacation time: Disconnect from stress; reconnect with your family, and protect your health. One study of middle-age men (at risk for heart disease) found that those who skipped vacations had a 30 percent higher risk of heart attack than guys who took at least a week off. And women who rarely take time off are eight times more likely to have a heart attack than women who take two vacations a year. Other studies prove that vacations improve marriages and are great times to try to upgrade your habits quitting smoking, getting more exercise, banishing the Five Food Felons.

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September 8, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Who are the Ashkenazi Jews? (with pictures)

Why is it racism to tell the truth? Ashkenazi Jews claim by birthright they had a right to take Palestine and treat Palestinians as visitors. The promise God made to Abraham was not made to the sons of Japeth or Ham; it was made to Abraham and his sons, descendants of Shem. The Ashekenazi who say they are Jews by conversion have abandoned the principal way of determining a Jew’s heritage. All Old Testament lineages were traced through the father, not the mother. If a Christian says he/she is a Christian and hates their enemies, they are no more Christian than a Jew who says he/she is a Jew and traces their ancestry through women. The Ashekenazi have abandoned the daily sacrifice required by the Law and replaced it with the commandments of men and not God. It is said that prayers offered in the morning meet the requirement God requires of those that live under the Law. Clearly, that is not true. The Ashekenazi have allied themselves with idol worshippers and false prophets (the Mormons) and therefore not only have no birthright, but also have have set themselves apart from God. Every king and all false prophets in the Bible who allied with such were punished by the Lord. Mormons mask themselves as Christians, but are blasphemers and Ashekanazi have a lot of people fooled with their masks as well, but they are wolves in sheep’s clothing. They are the Jews who are not Jews in the Bible. You correctly said that if a person converts to Christianity, then it doesn’t matter what their Jewish ancestry is. But what does matter is that their works match their faith and that they do not pervert the inspired Word of God with man-made doctrines that exist to control others, benefit themselves, and are always fairly obvious because their fruits are always bad. It is not racism to say Ashekenazi are not Jews by promise, but as in Esther’s day, many Persians converted to Judaism out of fear and became Jews. The idea that Christians would ally themselves with a nation armed with 120 nukes crying about their neighbors who have not one single nuke because they believe God would have His temple on the blood soaked ground soaked with the blood of His Son is an anti-Christ dogma. Clearly, Paul and Revelation state there will be a new heaven and a new earth, and Zion will come out of that Heaven, not the polluted ruin that is covered with God’s Son’s blood. The Ashekenazi and false Christians have used this propaganda to profit from those poor souls that need to be freed. In this country where there is not supposed to be a religious test, let a politician say one word about the Ashekenazi or the home they stole, and that politician will never be elected. Yet our president can be called a monkey, a terrorist, the N word, and any other disgusting name and the politician who utters that evil is rewarded. I hardly think racism can be applied to the Ashekenazi who wield more power with less than 5 percent of the population of our nation of almost 300 million people. Lenin, Marx and Stalin — all engineers of mass murder and communism were all Ashekenazi Jews. I have heard that even Hitler was Ashkenazi. I don’t know.

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September 8, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube – Video




Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube. By: AbortedBabysInMakeUp

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September 5, 2014  Tags: , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Angelina Jolie Effect Doubles BRCA Testing; @ProMedicaHealth Cancer Genetics Expert Discusses the Importance of …

Released: 5-Sep-2014 8:00 AM EDT Source Newsroom: ProMedica Contact Information Available for logged-in reporters only New research shows more women are getting tested for BRCA1 and 2 mutations after actress Angelina Jolie revealed she had undergone a prophylactic mastectomy once she found out she was a carrier. BRCA1 and 2 mutations dramatically increase the risk for breast and ovarian cancer. The mutations, which are found in about 2 4 percent of women, are more likely in those with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and those with personal risk factors, such as Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Kelly Morse, a licensed genetic counselor at ProMedica Cancer Institute, says our family history plays a crucial role in our overall health and well-being. Keeping a file with information about your familys medical history should be a priority for everyone, Morse said. As a parent, passing down detailed notes about your ancestors health to your children can be an invaluable gift. Once a loved one is gone, it becomes very difficult to recall this vital data. Morse suggests patients begin with the following: 1. Start by making a list of your ancestors and immediate family members. It may be helpful to layout the information in a family tree format. Example: Grandparents Parents Siblings Children Aunts/Uncles Cousins 2. Next to each name write down any major health issues, especially cancer diagnoses in this case, and at what age. 3. It may also be helpful to include notes about your loved ones treatment journey. Including lab work and other tests can be especially helpful as well. These details can help tell the story and impact future care and treatment of you or your family.

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Despite advances, ovarian cancer survival rates refuse to budge

Ovarian cancer is often called silent because there are usually only vague symptoms early on. Others insist there are clear signs if you know what to watch for, such as abdominal bloating, pelvic pain and extreme fatigue. Most experts say there is no reliable screening test for ovarian cancer. But some advocacy groups tell women to demand CA125 testing if they suspect ovarian cancer. This is a blood test used to monitor women for the cancer’s return during and after treatment. It is not approved for primary screening. Some facts are not in dispute. According to the American Cancer Society, nearly 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and more than 14,000 will die of the disease. More than 70 percent of women with ovarian cancer had advanced disease when they were diagnosed, meaning the cancer had already spread beyond the ovaries. That fact makes this the most lethal gynecologic cancer in the United States. The Times asked Dr. Mitchel Hoffman for a medical update on ovarian cancer detection and treatment. Hoffman is a professor of gynecologic oncology at USF Health and Tampa General Hospital, and has been treating women with gynecologic cancers for more than 30 years. What’s going on in the search for a screening test? We haven’t made much progress and there is still no reliable test. This is a difficult cancer to find early because there’s no prolonged precancerous phase, like with cervical cancer, where we can test for and remove abnormal cells or tissue, and prevent the development of cancer. By the time the cellular changes take place that make ovarian a detectable cancer, the disease is beyond the ovaries and has invaded the abdomen and other organs. Research continues but I’m afraid we may find that this cancer just isn’t amenable to screening. Yet strides have been made in prevention? Because of advances in genetic testing, we can now identify women at high risk for ovarian cancer: Those with the BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 gene; also, women with a strong family history, meaning ovarian cancer in their mother and/or a sister; and those of certain ancestry are also at high risk, such as Ashkenazi Jewish women. We can offer them surgical removal of the ovaries. We’ve also learned that ovarian cancer may start in the fallopian tubes, so removing the tubes may also be protective. How has treatment changed? In the past 10 years we’ve learned that aggressive surgery in the abdomen to remove everything that looks like a tumor extends survival. The surgery takes hours, but we have to be very thorough or patients don’t do very well.

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September 4, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

FDA OKs insomnia, cancer drugs

10:28 a.m.Sept. 4, 2014 A roundup of consumer-oriented news and information about pharmaceutical drugs. The FDA recently approved drugs to treat insomnia, late-stage cervical cancer, skin infections and Gaucher disease. Belsomra (suvorexant) will be prescribed for people who have trouble falling and staying asleep, a health issue that affects about 30 percent of the general population. Drugs.com says that Belsomra, the first in a new class of sleep medications, will become available to patients late this year or in early 2015. The FDA is expanding the use of the widely-known cancer drug Avastin (bevacizumab), allowing it to be prescribed for patients with persistent, recurrent or late-stage cervical cancer. The agency estimates that about 12,300 American women will be diagnosed with the disease this year. Orbactiv (oritavancin) has been approved to treat adults who have acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The FDA says that such infections are typically caused by specific types of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. Orbactiv becomes the third new anti-bacterial drug approved this year. Cerdelga (eliglustat) will be prescribed for the long-term treatment of adults who have the Type 1 form of Gaucher disease (go-shay), an inherited genetic disorder. The disease affects about 6,000 people in this country. The disease occurs most often in Ashkenazi Jewish people. Science news Info sources: FDA, Drugs.com, National Sleep Foundation, Gaucherdisease.org

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Pariss Nouveau Yiddish Culture

In France, which houses the biggest Jewish community in Europe, the Ashkenazi legacy has been sadly shrinking. (What, the Sephardim are chopped liver?) In the latter half of the 20th century, what French Jews call their imaginary Yiddishland has been reduced to a small patch. However, there is reason for hope. In Paris, a new generation of entrepreneurs are launching initiatives to perpetuate the Yiddish way of life.

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September 4, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Canadian researchers track Angelina effect on cancer gene screening

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt attend the world premiere of World War Z at on June 2, 2013 in London, England. GETTY IMAGES/Karwai Tang Its being called the Angelina effect. Angelina Jolies stunning revelation she had a preventative double mastectomy due to a genetic cancer risk has doubled the number of high risk women considering genetic testing to see if they carry certain genes linked to breast and ovarian cancers, new Canadian research suggests. Doctors from the cancer centre at Torontos Sunnybrook Hospital presented their findings in San Francisco on Tuesday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Symposium. The Angelina effect seemed to increase the awareness and the referral for women who were truly at high risk for hereditary breast cancer, said Dr. Andrea Eisen, one of the studys authors and head of the Familial Cancer Program at Sunnybrook. Its not just worried women who came in, or those who have moderate or low risk it was really high risk women who perhaps were concerned before about pursuing genetic counselling or genetic testing, but who somehow seemed to have felt reassured or encouraged by this story and came forward for assessment. Jolie made international headlines in May 2013 with an op-ed in the New York Times which detailed her familys history of breast and ovarian cancer, with the Oscar-winning actress noting that she had tested positive for the BRCA1 gene mutation. She said her doctors estimated that she had a 50 per cent risk of getting ovarian cancer and an 87 per cent risk of breast cancer. After removing her breasts and reconstructing them with implants, she said her likelihood of developing breast cancer dropped to five per cent. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are known as tumour suppressor genes that make proteins to repair DNA and suppress the grown of cancer. Having a mutation in either of the BRCA genes leads to an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Certain ethnic groups, among them Ashkenazi Jews, have a higher prevalence of these genetic mutations.

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September 3, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Police recomment former IDF chief Ashkenazis indictment

The Israel police have advised the State Attorney to approve the indictment of former Chief of Staff Gaby Ashkenazi in connection with the allegation against Boaz Harpaz of forging document to wrongfully influence former Defense Minister Ehud Baraks choice of army chief. The former chief of staff is accused of illegally passing confidential information and breach of trust. Former IDF spokesman Avi Benayahu and Ashkenazis former chief of staff Erez Wiener face charges of obstructing justice. Facing the same charges too is incumbent Cabinet Secretary Avihai Mandelblitt, who served as chief military prosecutor at the time of the episode.

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Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) – Video




Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) The majority of Jews today are of Ashkenazi Descent whose ancestors were from the Khazarian Kingdom located in Southern Russia. By Pastor Ben Heath Visit us … By: Pastor Ben Heath

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September 1, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi – definition of Ashkenazi by The Free Dictionary

Ashkenazi (shk-nz) Ashkenazi (knz) n, pl -zim (-zm) 1. (Peoples) (modifier) of or relating to the Jews of Germany and E Europe 2. (Peoples) a Jew of German or E European descent 3. (Languages) the pronunciation of Hebrew used by these Jews [C19: Late Hebrew, from Hebrew Ashkenaz, the son of Gomer (Genesis 10:3; I Chronicles 1:6), a descendant of Noah through Japheth, and hence taken to be identified with the ancient Ascanians of Phrygia and, in the medieval period, the Germans] n., pl. -nazim (-n zm) [183040;

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August 26, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Jews are not Fake Jews but Fake Khazars – Video




Ashkenazi Jews are not Fake Jews but Fake Khazars The Ashkenazi Jews +/- 800 AD migrated from Old Israel through Khazaria into Russia and later on to Europe. The Khazars are mosty from Mongolian Descent. The… By: WeAreONEbigFamily is Back

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August 24, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed


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