Archive for the ‘Ashkenazi’ Category

Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi, in Norman – Patheos (blog)

Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi, in Norman

Sadly, Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer is one of those films that is far more interesting in conception than execution. Since both its premise and characters possess great potential, this is doubly unfortunate.

Writer and director Joseph Cedar quite articulate in interviews aimed for Norman to be a personality study and political commentary on the toxic nature of American-Israeli relations. Regrettably, his success is only slight on both counts.

His movies title character, Norman Oppenheimer, looks on the surface like any other fairly wealthy older gent on the streets of New York City. Well-dressed in cap and camel hair overcoat, hes aged well (this is Richard Gere, after all).

Poke a little deeper, though, and Norman is a curious chap. His business card impressively describes him as founder and CEO of Oppenheimer Strategies. In actuality, however, Norman barely scrapes the extreme periphery of gatherings of the rich and powerful, attempting to make mutually beneficial connections for people. Hes a fixer, or to use the Yiddish term, a macher.

We see Norman fail more than achieve, kicked out of one businessmans home and shouted at by another whom he pesters in Central Park. But Norman hits pay dirt when he befriends Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a charismatic rising star in Israeli politics. Norman seals their friendship when he buys Micha a luxury pair of shoes during an afternoon of schmoozing.

Three years later (and as an intertitle tells us, several small favors later), Micha is Israels prime minister. At a Washington conference, Micha gratefully bestows on Norman the informal title of special advisor for New York Jewry.

The body of the movie then concerns itself with Normans efforts to keep multiple plates spinning. Can he stay in Michas good graces while avoiding unwelcome legal scrutiny? Can he help Rabbi Blumenthal (Steve Buscemi) raise funds to preserve his synagogue? Can he secure a traditional Jewish wedding for his nephew Philip (Michael Sheen)?

Joseph Cedar who has lived in both Israel and America, benefitted from both countries educational systems, and served in the Israeli military intended for his film to be a political critique. Through the figures of Micha and Norman, Cedar strives to embody Israels financial exploitation of susceptible Americans, mostly wealthy Jewish Zionists but to a lesser degree evangelicals neck-deep in end times prophecy.

Unfortunately, the critique is too vague and low-key to carry any heft. Part of the problem is Normans pacing, which never advances beyond adagio speed. I dont mind slow movies in general; The Death of Louis XIV, a favorite from 2016, solidly falls in this category. But coupled with Normans other flaws, I was struggling to stay awake during its final 30 minutes.

For one thing, Normans dialogue seldom rises above pedestrian. Normans opening comment that hes a tireless swimmer among ocean liners is among the few lines that surmounts the level of merely serviceable.

Additionally, Richard Geres performance is extraordinarily subdued. Norman rarely shows significant emotion, with only a mild quickening of his breathing indicating excitement or fear. Even Cedars frequent close-ups on his actors faces do little to enhance the drama when such a paucity of emotion is on display.

To be certain, its nice to have Steve Buscemi doing more than his usual criminal/loser shtick, and Michael Sheen improves any movie hes in, whether excellent (The Queen) or subpar (Passengers). And Cedar exhibits some technical cleverness, most notably during the sequence of Normans apotheosis at the D.C. gathering, as the translucent faces of important people fade in and out of his awareness. But these touches are not enough to save Norman from a nearly terminal blandness.

Norman (Richard Gere), in one of his offices

This is too bad, because Norman is an intriguing figure. His business card, his attire, and his truth-stretching name-dropping give him impressive airs. However, we never observe him in an office, only making phone calls in quiet recesses of department stores or from the counters of coffee shops. Instead of stationery, he takes notes on napkins. We hear him mention family but never see evidence of them, beyond his nephew Philip. Underneath his desire to be important and needed, is anybody home?

Writer/director Joseph Cedar clearly had bigger fish to fry, in referencing recent political scandals in Israel. And appealingly, his characters are neither saints nor villains. Micha believably lives in a gray zone, all too human in his temptation to drop little guys like Norman who aided his rise to the top. If only Cedar couldve made his ideas and characters more interesting to watch.

2.5 out of 5 stars

(Parents guide: Norman is rated R for some language.)

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Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi, in Norman – Patheos (blog)

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June 4, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Full Service Creative Studio The-Artery Names Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar as Company’s New Lead Design Director – Multichannel News

Ashkenazi-Eldar is the Winner of a 2017 ADC “Silver Cube” Award from The One Club 6/02/2017 12:15 PM

New York & Los Angeles, June 2, 2017 Full service creative studio The-Artery has named Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar as the companys new Lead Design Director.

Ashkenazi-Eldar is the winner of a 2017 ADC Silver Cube Award from The One Club, in the category 2017 Design: Typography, for her project entitled Asa Wife Zine,” which was submitted via New Yorks prestigious School of Visual Arts. Please see: http://www.oneclub.org/awards/adcstudents/-award/26951/asa-wife-zine

At the tender age of 27, Ashkenazi-Eldar was also recently profiled in a story entitled 15 Artists Under 30 by the prestigious PRINT Magazine: http://www.printmag.com/print-magazine/new-visual-artists-print-magazine/up-and-coming-artists-liron-ashkenazi/

In her new position, Ashkenazi-Eldar will spearhead the formation of the new department within The-Artery that will focus on design and branding. She is developing in-house design capabilities to support the Company’s VFX, Experiential and VR & AR content, as well as website development.Looking to the future, Ashekanzi-Eldar and her team are also looking for innovative and design-based clients who are interested in working with The-Artery on creating unique projects revolving around branding, motion and art.

Regarding the hiring of Ashkenazi-Eldar, Deborah Sullivan, EP and Managing Director for The-Artery, said, Liron is a truly gifted and highly talented artist whose addition to thecompany helps steer us in a new direction. Having her on board gives us more creative opportunities – and we arebetter positioned to work with clientswhoare specifically looking for branding and design-focused strategies. Liron will oversee this new department, also providing motion graphics, print and social campaigns.

Adds Ashkenazi-Eldar, I am very excited to be offering The-Arterys existing and future client base something new – the design side of things. While weve been well established for many years in the areas of production and VFX, our Design Team can now bring a new dimension to our company. We are seeking brand clients with strong identities so that we can offer them exciting, new, and even weird creative solutions that are not part of the traditional branding process. Thats not how were going to do that here! We will be taking a completely new approach to branding providing imagery that is more emotional and more personal, instead of just following an existing protocol. Our goal is to provide a highly immersive experience for our new brand clients.

ABOUT LIRON ASHKENAZI-ELDAR:

Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar is a multidisciplinary Visual Designer who thrives to create bold, complex and conceptually driven imagery using 3D illustration, animation, photography, experimental typography and color.

Originally from Israel, she is a graduate of New Yorks School of Visual Arts with a BFA degree in Design.

Ashkenazi-Eldar is now based at The-Arterys office in New York City.

ABOUT THE-ARTERY:

Based in New York City and Los Angeles, The-Artery is a full service creative studio developing content and visual effects for feature films, episodic TV, and consumer brands across all platforms. The award winning teams specialties include: Visual Effects, Creative Strategy, Live Action Production, Experiential and VR/AR Content, Editorial & Color Grading, Motion Graphics Design, Animation and App Development.

https://www.facebook.com/TheArteryVfx/?ref=br_rs

https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-artery-vfx

https://twitter.com/TheArteryVFX?lang=en

# # #

The-Artery Company Contact:

Deborah Sullivan

EP/Managing Director

212/941-6020

Deborah@thearteryvfx.com

Media Contact:

Dan Harary

The Asbury PR Agency

Beverly Hills, CA

310/859-1831

dan@asburypr.com

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Spreading awareness about a killer gene in memory of young victim – New Jersey Jewish News

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Sheryl Lanman Nichols with her mother, Sandra Lanman, during Sheryls bridal shower. Nichols had a mammogram the next day and learned she had breast cancer caused by a gene common in Ashkenazi Jews. Photo courtesy Sandra Lanman

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by Debra Rubin NJJN Bureau Chief

May 30, 2017

Sheryl Lanman Nichols had everything to look forward to in life as a newlywed a great job, many friends, and a loving family. She had a masters degree in social work from Rutgers University and was a bilingual domestic violence social worker with Woman-space in Lawrenceville. She traveled twice with Habitat for Humanity to build homes in the Dominican Republic.

However, one month before her wedding day she received devastating news: She had breast cancer. Nichols had surgery, and doctors told her family they got everything, according to her mother, Sandra Lanman of East Brunswick. Nichols followed up the surgery with a course of chemotherapy, but a year later, she felt a pain in her side.

They found the cancer had spread all over, said Lanman.

In 2015, three years after the initial diagnosis, Nichols died at age 34.

What Nichols didnt know until it was too late was that she carried a hereditary BRCA gene mutation more common among Ashkenazi Jews than the rest of the population.

But even as the illness spread and weakened her body, she was determined to promote awareness about the need for genetic testing for those at risk. When it became clear Nichols would not live much longer, she enlisted her family and friends to fulfill her vow in her memory.

She was an amazing person, Lanman said. From her earliest childhood to the end of her life, her mission was to help people.

Honoring their promise, Nicholss family arranged a Day of Caring at Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick. The event, held on May 7, featured medical experts, counselors, and a friend of Nichols who also carries the BRCA gene mutation. The program was presented by Anshe Emeths Vaad Gmilut Chasadim, the Caring Community Committee.

She was the bravest fighter Ive ever known, Lanman, who attended with her husband, Steven, and son-in-law, Justin Nichols, told those gathered.

Like Nichols, up to 85 percent of those with the gene mutation will develop breast cancer, as opposed to 12 percent of the general population, said Hetal Vig, a genetic counselor specializing in cancer at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (RCINJ) in New Brunswick. Depending on the mutation of the gene, another 40 to 60 percent will develop ovarian cancer, which is highly treatable in its early stages but often deadly because it is usually asymptomatic until it is too late.

While one in 500 people in the general population have a BRCA mutation, Vig said one in 40 individuals of Ashkenazi descent have this deviation. Everyone is born with BRCA genes, but those with an inherited mutation are likely to develop cancer at a much younger age than the typical breast cancer victim. The mutation could also result in an increased risk of triple negative breast cancer, which is more resistant to treatment than other breast cancers, and an increased risk of recurrence.

BRCA mutations also increase the risk of male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and melanoma.

Vig said researchers know the vast amount of breast cancer and all cancer is sporadic, meaning we dont know why it occurs. She also said there is a common misconception is that the mutated genes can only be passed through the mother.

It can be passed through your dads side, she said. Both sides are equally important.

Lanman said she is the carrier in her family and doctors continually express surprise she has never developed cancer. Fortunately, her son tested negative, although her daughter-in-law is positive, meaning her granddaughters, ages 2 and 4, are at risk.

Dr. Deborah Toppmeyer, chief medical officer and director of the Stacy Goldstein Breast Cancer Center and the LIFE Center and chief of solid tumor oncology at RCINJ, said there have been remarkable advances in the understanding of hereditary cancers in the last 10 years that have driven up survival rates and changed the way it is treated.

For instance, Toppmeyer said breast removal for those with the gene mutation reduces a womans chances of developing cancer to 5 percent.

Those with the BRCA gene should have a breast MRI at age 25 and regular mammographies by age 30, according to Toppmeyer, But we do not recommend [genetic] testing for women under 25 unless the risk is so compelling, because they are too young for the onset of the disease.

Dr. Thomas Bock, a former oncologist and pharmaceutical executive, founded HeritX, an international research and development non-profit working to protect people from developing inherited cancers. He did so because of his wife, Irina, who had breast cancer and melanoma because of a BRCA mutation she inherited from her father who died of pancreatic cancer. He believes that the BRCA gene is the gateway to all cancer prevention.

We vaccinate against polio. I take cholesterol-lowering drugs, said Bock. But with cancer we dont do that. We wait until it occurs.

Abby Grayson, who became close with Nichols through her work in the mental health field, said her friend kept urging her to get tested. Grayson, who is of Ashkenazi descent, did not have any family history that would indicate she had the mutation.

Sheryl died in mid-August, but around the beginning of August she got tearful that she was not going to live long enough to be the advocate she wanted to be, said Grayson, who made a deathbed promise to Nichols that she would get tested. Graysons gynecologist agreed that her family history would not indicate that she would have the gene, but had her tested nonetheless. When the doctor called at 8 a.m. as Grayson was rushing to get her kids to school, she knew it was a bad sign.

In the end, Grayson, who already had her ovaries out because of complications with childbirth, decided to have her breasts removed, an emotional and physically painful decision she described as horrible and draconian.

I was a sitting duck, but I lived to tell the tale, she said, urging others to get tested. Knowledge is power.

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May 30, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Norman: Anonymous Donor – Fort Worth Weekly (satire) (press release) (registration) (blog)

I caught Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer this past weekend at the AMC Grapevine Mills, and I havent been able to get it out of my head. This comic tragedy isnt something thatll blow you away, but I cant stop admiring the neat turns that this thing takes.

Richard Gere plays the titular Norman Oppenheimer, a study in manic, unfocused ambition roaming the streets of Manhattan with his earbuds always in his ears, not because hes listening to music but for the ring of his iPhone. A self-styled consultant, hes made it his business to know all the wealthy and influential Jews in New York, whether they want to know him or not. He hopes to do small favors for them so he can broker business deals among them and take his cut. On one fateful day, he attends a conference of Israel lobbyists and makes the acquaintance of Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a handsome, youngish deputy labor minister in the Israeli government whose political fortunes are at a low ebb. Sensing that the politician is feeling down, Norman buys him a pair of designer shoes that hes been eyeballing, flinching momentarily when he receives the bill of $1,200. The pricey gift pays off when Eshel becomes Israels newest prime minister three years later, but as the movies subtitle implies, Eshels rise means he faces having to cut ties with Norman, who cant stop running his mouth or presuming to do business on Israels behalf.

This is the first American film by Joseph Cedar, the Israeli writer-director whose 2012 academic dark comedy Footnote garnered an Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Film. The same marvelous cleverness of that movie shines through here as we follow Normans dealings, which involves him calling Eshels people in Israel so often that he drives the prime ministers assistant (Neta Riskin) up the walls. Occasionally the drama is here is too on the nose, as when the now-important Norman finds himself being hounded by a younger clone of himself (Hank Azaria), or when a rabbi (Steve Buscemi) pushes Norman into a trash heap after his promises of a donor to save the congregations temple turn out to be empty air.

Despite those few missteps, Cedar expertly manages this story with myriad moving parts, showing how Normans business dealings on the East Coast are imperiling Eshels wide-ranging Mideast peace plan 7,000 miles away. Theres a great set piece where Norman makes a frantic series of phone calls from a Staples store, and a seamless split-screen makes it look like hes sharing space with the people hes talking to, whether theyre in ritzy offices in midtown or a car in Tel Aviv. The way Norman finally neutralizes himself as a political threat is devilishly done, one I should have seen coming but somehow didnt.

Even better is the desperate neediness pouring off Gere. A big part of the reason Norman makes other Jews uncomfortable is because hes a living Jewish stereotype, a shifty fast-talker who puffs himself up and pledges things he can barely hope to deliver. Yet Gere makes him feel all too real, this mans craving for the approval of the rich and powerful, his willingness to feed off their scraps, his pitiable lack of cool, his lonely quest for validation that drives him to make himself look more connected than he is. He is always hustling; we never see him at home. Indeed, an Israeli criminal investigator (Charlotte Gainsbourg) raises the question of whether he even has a home. The film would fall apart if Norman werent such a palpable presence, or if Eshels loyalty to him didnt feel as palpable. That last part is down to Ashkenazi, the star of Cedars Footnote, who finds the soul of this pragmatist with a weakness for fine clothes and chocolates. While his whole staff urges him to cut Norman loose and save himself, Eshel clings to this man who cheered him up on a bad day, who is a human being at the end of things. Eshels last declaration is, I love you, Norman, and Ashkenazi makes it haunting. This movie loves him, too, as it takes in all his flaws.

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer Starring Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi. Written and directed by Joseph Cedar. Rated R.

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May 24, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Shavuot and paper cutting, a forgotten folk art form – Canadian Jewish News (blog)

When I first met the wonderful American Jewish poet Marge Piercy, she asked me about Shavuot and paper cutting. Someone had sent her a piece of paper cut art and the gift evoked old memories of her grandmothers holiday observances. We both had vague recollections of the association of the spring festival with the folk art form, but it was not an active part of either of our families Jewish traditions.

There is an undeniable human impulse to beautify to adorn and embellish things that we hold dear. We take pleasure in decorating our home, outfitting our children and setting a lovely table. In my counter-culture phase, I thought of such activities as materialistic and superficial. But Ive come to realize that investing energy and resources to make things aesthetically pleasing can be deeply spiritual. We lavish attention on what we value and love not only physical things, but intangible ones, as well so that our values become visible from the outside.

In Judaism, we call this hiddur mitzvah, the beautification of a commandment. We see this in action when we look at the practice of adding decorative components to things that are dryly pragmatic in nature for example, a ketubah (marriage contract) or a mizrah, which is used to indicate the western direction of prayer.

READ: A VERY JEWISH COLLEGE CAMPUS GUIDE

One way that Ashkenazi Jews beautified their homes for Shavuot was by creating and displaying paper cuttings. Called in Yiddish, shevuoslakh (or shavuosl) and royzalakh (or raizelach) literally meaning little Shavuots and little roses the paper cuttings were mounted on windows, so they would be visible both indoors and out. In her poem, Snowflakes, my mother called them, Piercy recollects, Grandma tacked hers/ to the walls or on window/ that looked on the street/ the east window where the sun/ rose hidden behind the tenements with the rising sun evoking the rose of the Shavuot raizelach.

Paper cutting was not unique to Shavuot. It developed as a folk art form centuries ago, in both Ashkenazi and Sephardi communities. As art forms go, paper cut art is democratic: at its very basic, it requires relatively inexpensive raw materials paper and some sort of cutting tool, and perhaps something to add colour. Old newspapers, wrapping paper and used writing paper may be redeployed for this purpose. Even people with little artistic talent could produce pleasing designs, and gifted artisans could dazzle.

But for Ashkenazi Jews, there was a particular link between paper cutting and Shavuot, which stems from an old practice of decorating homes and synagogues with flowers, branches, boughs and trees. In shtetl culture, cut flowers were a luxury pricey and perishable. And Jewish culture was deeply literate, so paper especially used paper was always around and available for artistic repurposing. Some sources cite the objection of 18th century scholar Vilna Gaon to the Shavuot greening as another reason for the development of a Shavuot paper-cutting tradition. Because church decor involved cut flowers and pagan practices involved trees, the Vilna Gaon viewed such customs as inherently non-Jewish. Although most communities and religious authorities did not follow the Vilna Gaons ruling, paper-cut flora offered a good resolution of religious and economic restraints.

Most striking, however, is the disappearance of this Shavuot folk custom with the 20th-century movement of Jewish populations to North American so much so that both Piercy and I had only fuzzy memories of the practice.

In addition to their deep textual roots, Jewish holidays reach back into family memory, into inherited and lost traditions. Our impulse to beautify, to craft art and graft it onto whats most important, connects us with legacies we may have forgotten. Piercy reflects, I had lost it all/ until a woman sent me a papercut and then/ in my hand I felt a piece of the past/ materialize, a snowflake long melted,/ evaporated, cohering once/ again made of skill and absence.

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14-year-old Arrested in Arson of New York’s Oldest Ashkenazi Synagogue – Haaretz

Built in 1850 as a Baptist church, the building was purchased in 1885 to become the first Eastern European congregation founded in New York City

A 14-year-old boy has been charged with arson in connection with a fire that seriously damaged a historic synagogue on Manhattans Lower East Side.

The boy was arrested Tuesday night at his home near the Beth Hamedrash Hagadol synagogue, the New York Post reported Wednesday morning. He was expected to be arraigned later in the day in Manhattan Family Court, according to the newspaper. He has not been named because he is a minor.

Surveillance video showed three teens running away from the building shortly after the fire began on Sunday evening. Police reportedly spoke with friends of the teen who were with him at the time of the blaze, and they said he started the fire.

The fire burned for several hours and took at least two hours for firefighters to bring under control. The building was empty at the time; two firefighters were injured putting out the blaze.

Built in 1850 as a Baptist church, the building was purchased in 1885 to become the first Eastern European congregation founded in New York City and served Russian Jews. The congregation closed the synagogue in 2007 after determining it did not have the $3 million to $4 million needed for repairs. In 1967, the building was declared a city landmark, and in 2003 it was designated an endangered historic site.

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The synagogue in recent years has sought to de-landmark the building, allowing for condominiums to be built on the site, with a small synagogue to be built on the ground floor. The synagogues rabbi, Mendel Greenbaum, told the CBS New York affiliate on Tuesday that he was in the middle of plans to renovate and restore the congregation but said that was now in doubt because of the fire.

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GreenQ Hopes to Help Promote the Internet of Garbage – waste360

The waste and recycling industry has become familiar with the Internet of Things (IoT) or the inter-networking of physical devices, vehicles (also referred to as “connected devices” and “smart devices”) and other items.

Smart also is a familiar word tacked onto things like trucks and bins within the industry to signify that these devices or vehicles have additional technology and sensors that can track and monitor usage, among other things.

But the Internet of Garbage (IoG) is something one Israel-based technology company, GreenQ, hopes to make a household term.

Were all about the Internet of Garbage (IoG). Were bringing sensors and big data analytics to residential garbage routes so municipalities can reduce expenses, reduce emissions and provide better services to their citizens, according to the companys website.

GreenQ, with U.S. offices in Bexley, Ohio, was established in 2015 with the goal of bringing efficient technology to the waste management space through its monitoring device.

Waste360 recently sat down with Shlomy Ashkenazi, CEO and cofounder of GreenQ Ltd., to discuss the companys monitoring device, also known as smart truck system, and to learn more about the IoG concept.

Waste360: When and why was GreenQ established?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: In July 2015, GreenQ’s founders suddenly realized there were billions of dollars being thrown into the garbage and dissolving into [greenhouse gasses] due to an unmonitored and inefficient waste collection process. Thus, they founded a startup with the goal of making garbage trucks smarter.

Our smart waste management services are designed to meet the needs of municipalities, integrators and collection providers. GreenQ is currently operating in seven sites, with a [software as a service] business model, that differentiate to a monthly plan and yearly plan.

Waste360: What is the Internet of Garbage?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: The world is getting in to the IoT era. We are engaging in IoT as well, but we do it in a specific niche and apply our technology on garbage trucks and waste bins, we are doing Internet of Garbage.

Waste360: What type of hardware do you provide for waste haulers?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: We provide haulers with measuring, computing and monitoring sensors designed for heavy duty. The hardware is installed on existing trucks and does not require any internal modification to the trucks.

Waste360: What does the technology do and how does it work?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: A tracking device is installed on any garbage truck, making it a smart truck in just a one-day installation, enabling monitoring waste collection to a single bin level for only few cents per can.

With every lift of a waste bin, the system on the truck measures the amount of waste inside the bin and monitors the time and location of the pickup. The data is analyzed and sent through the cloud, directly to the end user’s mobile device along with notifications for any unusual event and recommendations for optimization of the collection process.

Waste360: Why did you choose to use this particular technology?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: We wanted to support the global efforts of reducing waste and enabling sustainability. We understood that the recycling and re-using spaces are getting the spotlight, while collection and disposal is left aside. The recycling hierarchy starts with collection, which is as important as the other parts of the pyramid.

Waste360: What specific benefits have you experienced?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: The GreenQ system is a learning machine that predicts waste production rates on a single bin level. After a few weeks, the hauler will know in advance when each bin will be full and when is the right time to execute every route out of its route pool. By knowing the waste production rate, the hauler could provide a better service to the municipality which enjoys a major decrease in waste related complaints from its residents.

Waste360: Is the data collected in real-time? If yes, how?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: Yes, real time status of the bins is collected and the truck is gathered and shown in an easy-to-use platform.

Waste360: How is this different than installing sensors on the bins themselves?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: Our unique technology enables large scale monitoring with minimum installations, for examplea collection of more than 500,000 residents is taking place with no more than 100 devices.

Waste360: Were there any challenges implementing?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: The challenges are mainly in are integrating technology and new ideas in to quite old-fashioned industry. For this reason, focus on the haulers and municipalities specific needs, emphasizing the value of our technology.

Waste360: Do you provide your technology to any waste haulers in the U.S.?

Shlomy Ashkenazi: We are approaching the U.S market along with strategic partners and offering medium size players to get to know our technology.

GreenQ believes in collaborations and therefore we are here, to find new partners. Our smart waste management services are designed to meet the needs of municipalities, integrators and collection providers. The technology can be applied on various kinds of collection platforms: loaders, grapple trucks, roll-off, underground bins and stationary compactors.

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Ashkenazi Hebrew – Wikipedia

Ashkenazi Hebrew (Hebrew: Hagiyya Ashkenazit, Yiddish: ), is the pronunciation system for Biblical and Mishnaic Hebrew favored for liturgical use and study by Ashkenazi Jewish practice. It survives today as a separate religious dialect within some parts of the Haredi community, even alongside Modern Hebrew in Israel, although its use amongst non-Israeli Ashkenazi Jews has greatly diminished.

As it is used parallel with Modern Hebrew, its phonological differences are clearly recognized:

There are considerable differences between the Lithuanian, Polish (also known as Galician), Hungarian, and German pronunciations.

In addition to geographical differences, there are differences in register between the “natural” pronunciation in general use and the more prescriptive rules advocated by some rabbis and grammarians, particularly for use in reading the Torah. For example:

There have been several theories on the origins of the different Hebrew reading traditions. The basic cleavage is between those who believe that the differences arose in medieval Europe and those who believe that they reflect older differences between the pronunciations of Hebrew and Aramaic current in different parts of the Fertile Crescent, that is to say Judaea, Galilee, Syria, northern Mesopotamia and Babylonia proper. Within the first group of theories, Zimmels believed that the Ashkenazi pronunciation arose in late medieval Europe and that the pronunciation prevailing in France and Germany in the time of the Tosafists was similar to the Sephardic. His evidence for this was the fact that Asher ben Jehiel, a German who became chief rabbi of Toledo, never refers to any difference of pronunciation, though he is normally very sensitive to differences between the two communities.[citation needed]

The difficulty with the second group of theories is that we do not know for certain what the pronunciations of these countries actually were and how far they differed. Since the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, if not before, the Sephardic pronunciation of the vowels became standard in all these countries, ironing out any differences that previously existed.[3] This makes it harder to adjudicate between the different theories on the relationship between today’s pronunciation systems and those of ancient times.

Leopold Zunz believed that the Ashkenazi pronunciation was derived from that of Palestine in Geonic times (7th11th centuries CE), while the Sephardi pronunciation was derived from that of Babylonia. This theory was supported by the fact that, in some respects, Ashkenazi Hebrew resembles the western dialect of Syriac while Sephardi Hebrew resembles the eastern, e.g. Eastern Syriac Peshitta as against Western Syriac Peshito. Ashkenazi Hebrew in its written form also resembles Palestinian Hebrew in its tendency to male spellings (see Mater lectionis).

Others, including Abraham Zevi Idelsohn, believed that the distinction is more ancient, and represents the distinction between the Judaean and Galilean dialects of Hebrew in Mishnaic times (1st2nd centuries CE), with the Sephardi pronunciation being derived from Judaean and the Ashkenazi from Galilean. This theory is supported by the fact that Ashkenazi Hebrew, like Samaritan Hebrew, has lost the distinct sounds of many of the guttural letters, while there are references in the Talmud to this as a feature of Galilean speech. Idelsohn ascribes the Ashkenazi (and, on his theory, Galilean) pronunciation of kamatz gadol as [o] to the influence of Phoenician: see Canaanite shift.

In the time of the Masoretes (8th10th centuries CE) there were three distinct notations for denoting vowels and other details of pronunciation in Biblical and liturgical texts. One was the Babylonian; another was the Palestinian; the third was the Tiberian, which eventually superseded the other two and is still in use today.

In certain respects the Ashkenazi pronunciation provides a better fit to the Tiberian notation than do the other reading traditions: for example, it distinguishes between pata and qama gadol, and between segol and ere, and does not make the qama symbol do duty for two different sounds. A distinctive variant of the Tiberian notation was in fact used by Ashkenazim, before being superseded by the standard version. On the other hand it is unlikely that in the Tiberian system ere and olam were diphthongs as they are in Ashkenazi Hebrew: they are more likely to have been closed vowels. (On the other hand, these vowels sometimes correspond to diphthongs in Arabic.) For more details of the reconstructed pronunciation underlying the Tiberian notation, see Tiberian vocalization.

In other respects Ashkenazi Hebrew resembles Yemenite Hebrew, which appears to be related to the Babylonian notation. Shared features include the pronunciation of qama gadol as [o] and, in the case of Lithuanian Jews and some but not all Yemenites, of olam as [e]. These features are not found in the Hebrew pronunciation of today’s Iraqi Jews, which as explained has been overlaid by Sephardi Hebrew, but are found in some of the Judeo-Aramaic languages of northern Iraq and in some dialects of Syriac.

Another possibility is that these features were found within an isogloss that included Syria, northern Palestine and northern Mesopotamia but not Judaea or Babylonia proper, and did not coincide exactly with the use of any one notation (and the olam = [e] shift may have applied to a more restricted area than the qama gadol = [o] shift). The Yemenite pronunciation would, on this hypothesis, be derived from that of northern Mesopotamia and the Ashkenazi pronunciation from that of northern Palestine. The Sephardic pronunciation appears to be derived from that of Judaea, as evidenced by its fit to the Palestinian notation.

According to the Maharal of Prague[4] and many other scholars,[5] including Rabbi Yaakov Emden, one of the leading Hebrew grammarians of all time,[6] Ashkenazi Hebrew is the most accurate pronunciation of Hebrew preserved. The reason given is that it preserves distinctions, such as between pata and qama, which are not reflected in the Sephardic and other dialects. Only in the Ashkenazi pronunciation are all seven “nequdot” (the Hebrew vowels of the ancient Tiberian tradition) distinguished: Yemenite, which comes close, does not distinguish pata from segol.

On the other hand, this view does not appear to be supported by any non-Ashkenazi scholars. Some scholars argue in favour of the greater authenticity of the Yemenite pronunciation on the ground that it is the only Hebrew pronunciation to distinguish all the consonants.

Although Modern Hebrew was intended to be based on Mishnaic spelling and Sephardi Hebrew pronunciation, the language as spoken in Israel has adapted to popular Ashkenazi Hebrew phonology in the following respects:

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Ashkenazi Hebrew – Wikipedia

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‘Throw Momma from the Train’ – The Madera Tribune

'Throw Momma from the Train'
The Madera Tribune
Ashkenazi Jews. Yiddish was brought to America by the Ashkenazi Jews who migrated to the United States (mostly settling in New York) between 1880 and 1914. One conspicuous exception was Lb Straub, who changed his name to Levi Strauss. After gold …

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‘Throw Momma from the Train’ – The Madera Tribune

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May 15, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi, in Norman – Patheos (blog)

Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi, in Norman Sadly, Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer is one of those films that is far more interesting in conception than execution. Since both its premise and characters possess great potential, this is doubly unfortunate. Writer and director Joseph Cedar quite articulate in interviews aimed for Norman to be a personality study and political commentary on the toxic nature of American-Israeli relations. Regrettably, his success is only slight on both counts. His movies title character, Norman Oppenheimer, looks on the surface like any other fairly wealthy older gent on the streets of New York City. Well-dressed in cap and camel hair overcoat, hes aged well (this is Richard Gere, after all). Poke a little deeper, though, and Norman is a curious chap. His business card impressively describes him as founder and CEO of Oppenheimer Strategies. In actuality, however, Norman barely scrapes the extreme periphery of gatherings of the rich and powerful, attempting to make mutually beneficial connections for people. Hes a fixer, or to use the Yiddish term, a macher. We see Norman fail more than achieve, kicked out of one businessmans home and shouted at by another whom he pesters in Central Park. But Norman hits pay dirt when he befriends Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a charismatic rising star in Israeli politics. Norman seals their friendship when he buys Micha a luxury pair of shoes during an afternoon of schmoozing. Three years later (and as an intertitle tells us, several small favors later), Micha is Israels prime minister. At a Washington conference, Micha gratefully bestows on Norman the informal title of special advisor for New York Jewry. The body of the movie then concerns itself with Normans efforts to keep multiple plates spinning. Can he stay in Michas good graces while avoiding unwelcome legal scrutiny? Can he help Rabbi Blumenthal (Steve Buscemi) raise funds to preserve his synagogue? Can he secure a traditional Jewish wedding for his nephew Philip (Michael Sheen)? Joseph Cedar who has lived in both Israel and America, benefitted from both countries educational systems, and served in the Israeli military intended for his film to be a political critique. Through the figures of Micha and Norman, Cedar strives to embody Israels financial exploitation of susceptible Americans, mostly wealthy Jewish Zionists but to a lesser degree evangelicals neck-deep in end times prophecy. Unfortunately, the critique is too vague and low-key to carry any heft. Part of the problem is Normans pacing, which never advances beyond adagio speed. I dont mind slow movies in general; The Death of Louis XIV, a favorite from 2016, solidly falls in this category. But coupled with Normans other flaws, I was struggling to stay awake during its final 30 minutes. For one thing, Normans dialogue seldom rises above pedestrian. Normans opening comment that hes a tireless swimmer among ocean liners is among the few lines that surmounts the level of merely serviceable. Additionally, Richard Geres performance is extraordinarily subdued. Norman rarely shows significant emotion, with only a mild quickening of his breathing indicating excitement or fear. Even Cedars frequent close-ups on his actors faces do little to enhance the drama when such a paucity of emotion is on display. To be certain, its nice to have Steve Buscemi doing more than his usual criminal/loser shtick, and Michael Sheen improves any movie hes in, whether excellent (The Queen) or subpar (Passengers). And Cedar exhibits some technical cleverness, most notably during the sequence of Normans apotheosis at the D.C. gathering, as the translucent faces of important people fade in and out of his awareness. But these touches are not enough to save Norman from a nearly terminal blandness. Norman (Richard Gere), in one of his offices This is too bad, because Norman is an intriguing figure. His business card, his attire, and his truth-stretching name-dropping give him impressive airs. However, we never observe him in an office, only making phone calls in quiet recesses of department stores or from the counters of coffee shops. Instead of stationery, he takes notes on napkins. We hear him mention family but never see evidence of them, beyond his nephew Philip. Underneath his desire to be important and needed, is anybody home? Writer/director Joseph Cedar clearly had bigger fish to fry, in referencing recent political scandals in Israel. And appealingly, his characters are neither saints nor villains. Micha believably lives in a gray zone, all too human in his temptation to drop little guys like Norman who aided his rise to the top. If only Cedar couldve made his ideas and characters more interesting to watch. 2.5 out of 5 stars (Parents guide: Norman is rated R for some language.)

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Full Service Creative Studio The-Artery Names Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar as Company’s New Lead Design Director – Multichannel News

Ashkenazi-Eldar is the Winner of a 2017 ADC “Silver Cube” Award from The One Club 6/02/2017 12:15 PM New York & Los Angeles, June 2, 2017 Full service creative studio The-Artery has named Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar as the companys new Lead Design Director. Ashkenazi-Eldar is the winner of a 2017 ADC Silver Cube Award from The One Club, in the category 2017 Design: Typography, for her project entitled Asa Wife Zine,” which was submitted via New Yorks prestigious School of Visual Arts. Please see: http://www.oneclub.org/awards/adcstudents/-award/26951/asa-wife-zine At the tender age of 27, Ashkenazi-Eldar was also recently profiled in a story entitled 15 Artists Under 30 by the prestigious PRINT Magazine: http://www.printmag.com/print-magazine/new-visual-artists-print-magazine/up-and-coming-artists-liron-ashkenazi/ In her new position, Ashkenazi-Eldar will spearhead the formation of the new department within The-Artery that will focus on design and branding. She is developing in-house design capabilities to support the Company’s VFX, Experiential and VR & AR content, as well as website development.Looking to the future, Ashekanzi-Eldar and her team are also looking for innovative and design-based clients who are interested in working with The-Artery on creating unique projects revolving around branding, motion and art. Regarding the hiring of Ashkenazi-Eldar, Deborah Sullivan, EP and Managing Director for The-Artery, said, Liron is a truly gifted and highly talented artist whose addition to thecompany helps steer us in a new direction. Having her on board gives us more creative opportunities – and we arebetter positioned to work with clientswhoare specifically looking for branding and design-focused strategies. Liron will oversee this new department, also providing motion graphics, print and social campaigns. Adds Ashkenazi-Eldar, I am very excited to be offering The-Arterys existing and future client base something new – the design side of things. While weve been well established for many years in the areas of production and VFX, our Design Team can now bring a new dimension to our company. We are seeking brand clients with strong identities so that we can offer them exciting, new, and even weird creative solutions that are not part of the traditional branding process. Thats not how were going to do that here! We will be taking a completely new approach to branding providing imagery that is more emotional and more personal, instead of just following an existing protocol. Our goal is to provide a highly immersive experience for our new brand clients. ABOUT LIRON ASHKENAZI-ELDAR: Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar is a multidisciplinary Visual Designer who thrives to create bold, complex and conceptually driven imagery using 3D illustration, animation, photography, experimental typography and color. Originally from Israel, she is a graduate of New Yorks School of Visual Arts with a BFA degree in Design. Ashkenazi-Eldar is now based at The-Arterys office in New York City. ABOUT THE-ARTERY: Based in New York City and Los Angeles, The-Artery is a full service creative studio developing content and visual effects for feature films, episodic TV, and consumer brands across all platforms. The award winning teams specialties include: Visual Effects, Creative Strategy, Live Action Production, Experiential and VR/AR Content, Editorial & Color Grading, Motion Graphics Design, Animation and App Development. https://www.facebook.com/TheArteryVfx/?ref=br_rs https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-artery-vfx https://twitter.com/TheArteryVFX?lang=en # # # The-Artery Company Contact: Deborah Sullivan EP/Managing Director 212/941-6020 Deborah@thearteryvfx.com Media Contact: Dan Harary The Asbury PR Agency Beverly Hills, CA 310/859-1831 dan@asburypr.com

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Spreading awareness about a killer gene in memory of young victim – New Jersey Jewish News

+ enlarge image Sheryl Lanman Nichols with her mother, Sandra Lanman, during Sheryls bridal shower. Nichols had a mammogram the next day and learned she had breast cancer caused by a gene common in Ashkenazi Jews. Photo courtesy Sandra Lanman + more images by Debra Rubin NJJN Bureau Chief May 30, 2017 Sheryl Lanman Nichols had everything to look forward to in life as a newlywed a great job, many friends, and a loving family. She had a masters degree in social work from Rutgers University and was a bilingual domestic violence social worker with Woman-space in Lawrenceville. She traveled twice with Habitat for Humanity to build homes in the Dominican Republic. However, one month before her wedding day she received devastating news: She had breast cancer. Nichols had surgery, and doctors told her family they got everything, according to her mother, Sandra Lanman of East Brunswick. Nichols followed up the surgery with a course of chemotherapy, but a year later, she felt a pain in her side. They found the cancer had spread all over, said Lanman. In 2015, three years after the initial diagnosis, Nichols died at age 34. What Nichols didnt know until it was too late was that she carried a hereditary BRCA gene mutation more common among Ashkenazi Jews than the rest of the population. But even as the illness spread and weakened her body, she was determined to promote awareness about the need for genetic testing for those at risk. When it became clear Nichols would not live much longer, she enlisted her family and friends to fulfill her vow in her memory. She was an amazing person, Lanman said. From her earliest childhood to the end of her life, her mission was to help people. Honoring their promise, Nicholss family arranged a Day of Caring at Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick. The event, held on May 7, featured medical experts, counselors, and a friend of Nichols who also carries the BRCA gene mutation. The program was presented by Anshe Emeths Vaad Gmilut Chasadim, the Caring Community Committee. She was the bravest fighter Ive ever known, Lanman, who attended with her husband, Steven, and son-in-law, Justin Nichols, told those gathered. Like Nichols, up to 85 percent of those with the gene mutation will develop breast cancer, as opposed to 12 percent of the general population, said Hetal Vig, a genetic counselor specializing in cancer at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (RCINJ) in New Brunswick. Depending on the mutation of the gene, another 40 to 60 percent will develop ovarian cancer, which is highly treatable in its early stages but often deadly because it is usually asymptomatic until it is too late. While one in 500 people in the general population have a BRCA mutation, Vig said one in 40 individuals of Ashkenazi descent have this deviation. Everyone is born with BRCA genes, but those with an inherited mutation are likely to develop cancer at a much younger age than the typical breast cancer victim. The mutation could also result in an increased risk of triple negative breast cancer, which is more resistant to treatment than other breast cancers, and an increased risk of recurrence. BRCA mutations also increase the risk of male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and melanoma. Vig said researchers know the vast amount of breast cancer and all cancer is sporadic, meaning we dont know why it occurs. She also said there is a common misconception is that the mutated genes can only be passed through the mother. It can be passed through your dads side, she said. Both sides are equally important. Lanman said she is the carrier in her family and doctors continually express surprise she has never developed cancer. Fortunately, her son tested negative, although her daughter-in-law is positive, meaning her granddaughters, ages 2 and 4, are at risk. Dr. Deborah Toppmeyer, chief medical officer and director of the Stacy Goldstein Breast Cancer Center and the LIFE Center and chief of solid tumor oncology at RCINJ, said there have been remarkable advances in the understanding of hereditary cancers in the last 10 years that have driven up survival rates and changed the way it is treated. For instance, Toppmeyer said breast removal for those with the gene mutation reduces a womans chances of developing cancer to 5 percent. Those with the BRCA gene should have a breast MRI at age 25 and regular mammographies by age 30, according to Toppmeyer, But we do not recommend [genetic] testing for women under 25 unless the risk is so compelling, because they are too young for the onset of the disease. Dr. Thomas Bock, a former oncologist and pharmaceutical executive, founded HeritX, an international research and development non-profit working to protect people from developing inherited cancers. He did so because of his wife, Irina, who had breast cancer and melanoma because of a BRCA mutation she inherited from her father who died of pancreatic cancer. He believes that the BRCA gene is the gateway to all cancer prevention. We vaccinate against polio. I take cholesterol-lowering drugs, said Bock. But with cancer we dont do that. We wait until it occurs. Abby Grayson, who became close with Nichols through her work in the mental health field, said her friend kept urging her to get tested. Grayson, who is of Ashkenazi descent, did not have any family history that would indicate she had the mutation. Sheryl died in mid-August, but around the beginning of August she got tearful that she was not going to live long enough to be the advocate she wanted to be, said Grayson, who made a deathbed promise to Nichols that she would get tested. Graysons gynecologist agreed that her family history would not indicate that she would have the gene, but had her tested nonetheless. When the doctor called at 8 a.m. as Grayson was rushing to get her kids to school, she knew it was a bad sign. In the end, Grayson, who already had her ovaries out because of complications with childbirth, decided to have her breasts removed, an emotional and physically painful decision she described as horrible and draconian. I was a sitting duck, but I lived to tell the tale, she said, urging others to get tested. Knowledge is power. Back to top Back to top

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May 30, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Norman: Anonymous Donor – Fort Worth Weekly (satire) (press release) (registration) (blog)

I caught Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer this past weekend at the AMC Grapevine Mills, and I havent been able to get it out of my head. This comic tragedy isnt something thatll blow you away, but I cant stop admiring the neat turns that this thing takes. Richard Gere plays the titular Norman Oppenheimer, a study in manic, unfocused ambition roaming the streets of Manhattan with his earbuds always in his ears, not because hes listening to music but for the ring of his iPhone. A self-styled consultant, hes made it his business to know all the wealthy and influential Jews in New York, whether they want to know him or not. He hopes to do small favors for them so he can broker business deals among them and take his cut. On one fateful day, he attends a conference of Israel lobbyists and makes the acquaintance of Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a handsome, youngish deputy labor minister in the Israeli government whose political fortunes are at a low ebb. Sensing that the politician is feeling down, Norman buys him a pair of designer shoes that hes been eyeballing, flinching momentarily when he receives the bill of $1,200. The pricey gift pays off when Eshel becomes Israels newest prime minister three years later, but as the movies subtitle implies, Eshels rise means he faces having to cut ties with Norman, who cant stop running his mouth or presuming to do business on Israels behalf. This is the first American film by Joseph Cedar, the Israeli writer-director whose 2012 academic dark comedy Footnote garnered an Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Film. The same marvelous cleverness of that movie shines through here as we follow Normans dealings, which involves him calling Eshels people in Israel so often that he drives the prime ministers assistant (Neta Riskin) up the walls. Occasionally the drama is here is too on the nose, as when the now-important Norman finds himself being hounded by a younger clone of himself (Hank Azaria), or when a rabbi (Steve Buscemi) pushes Norman into a trash heap after his promises of a donor to save the congregations temple turn out to be empty air. Despite those few missteps, Cedar expertly manages this story with myriad moving parts, showing how Normans business dealings on the East Coast are imperiling Eshels wide-ranging Mideast peace plan 7,000 miles away. Theres a great set piece where Norman makes a frantic series of phone calls from a Staples store, and a seamless split-screen makes it look like hes sharing space with the people hes talking to, whether theyre in ritzy offices in midtown or a car in Tel Aviv. The way Norman finally neutralizes himself as a political threat is devilishly done, one I should have seen coming but somehow didnt. Even better is the desperate neediness pouring off Gere. A big part of the reason Norman makes other Jews uncomfortable is because hes a living Jewish stereotype, a shifty fast-talker who puffs himself up and pledges things he can barely hope to deliver. Yet Gere makes him feel all too real, this mans craving for the approval of the rich and powerful, his willingness to feed off their scraps, his pitiable lack of cool, his lonely quest for validation that drives him to make himself look more connected than he is. He is always hustling; we never see him at home. Indeed, an Israeli criminal investigator (Charlotte Gainsbourg) raises the question of whether he even has a home. The film would fall apart if Norman werent such a palpable presence, or if Eshels loyalty to him didnt feel as palpable. That last part is down to Ashkenazi, the star of Cedars Footnote, who finds the soul of this pragmatist with a weakness for fine clothes and chocolates. While his whole staff urges him to cut Norman loose and save himself, Eshel clings to this man who cheered him up on a bad day, who is a human being at the end of things. Eshels last declaration is, I love you, Norman, and Ashkenazi makes it haunting. This movie loves him, too, as it takes in all his flaws. Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer Starring Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi. Written and directed by Joseph Cedar. Rated R.

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May 24, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Shavuot and paper cutting, a forgotten folk art form – Canadian Jewish News (blog)

When I first met the wonderful American Jewish poet Marge Piercy, she asked me about Shavuot and paper cutting. Someone had sent her a piece of paper cut art and the gift evoked old memories of her grandmothers holiday observances. We both had vague recollections of the association of the spring festival with the folk art form, but it was not an active part of either of our families Jewish traditions. There is an undeniable human impulse to beautify to adorn and embellish things that we hold dear. We take pleasure in decorating our home, outfitting our children and setting a lovely table. In my counter-culture phase, I thought of such activities as materialistic and superficial. But Ive come to realize that investing energy and resources to make things aesthetically pleasing can be deeply spiritual. We lavish attention on what we value and love not only physical things, but intangible ones, as well so that our values become visible from the outside. In Judaism, we call this hiddur mitzvah, the beautification of a commandment. We see this in action when we look at the practice of adding decorative components to things that are dryly pragmatic in nature for example, a ketubah (marriage contract) or a mizrah, which is used to indicate the western direction of prayer. READ: A VERY JEWISH COLLEGE CAMPUS GUIDE One way that Ashkenazi Jews beautified their homes for Shavuot was by creating and displaying paper cuttings. Called in Yiddish, shevuoslakh (or shavuosl) and royzalakh (or raizelach) literally meaning little Shavuots and little roses the paper cuttings were mounted on windows, so they would be visible both indoors and out. In her poem, Snowflakes, my mother called them, Piercy recollects, Grandma tacked hers/ to the walls or on window/ that looked on the street/ the east window where the sun/ rose hidden behind the tenements with the rising sun evoking the rose of the Shavuot raizelach. Paper cutting was not unique to Shavuot. It developed as a folk art form centuries ago, in both Ashkenazi and Sephardi communities. As art forms go, paper cut art is democratic: at its very basic, it requires relatively inexpensive raw materials paper and some sort of cutting tool, and perhaps something to add colour. Old newspapers, wrapping paper and used writing paper may be redeployed for this purpose. Even people with little artistic talent could produce pleasing designs, and gifted artisans could dazzle. But for Ashkenazi Jews, there was a particular link between paper cutting and Shavuot, which stems from an old practice of decorating homes and synagogues with flowers, branches, boughs and trees. In shtetl culture, cut flowers were a luxury pricey and perishable. And Jewish culture was deeply literate, so paper especially used paper was always around and available for artistic repurposing. Some sources cite the objection of 18th century scholar Vilna Gaon to the Shavuot greening as another reason for the development of a Shavuot paper-cutting tradition. Because church decor involved cut flowers and pagan practices involved trees, the Vilna Gaon viewed such customs as inherently non-Jewish. Although most communities and religious authorities did not follow the Vilna Gaons ruling, paper-cut flora offered a good resolution of religious and economic restraints. Most striking, however, is the disappearance of this Shavuot folk custom with the 20th-century movement of Jewish populations to North American so much so that both Piercy and I had only fuzzy memories of the practice. In addition to their deep textual roots, Jewish holidays reach back into family memory, into inherited and lost traditions. Our impulse to beautify, to craft art and graft it onto whats most important, connects us with legacies we may have forgotten. Piercy reflects, I had lost it all/ until a woman sent me a papercut and then/ in my hand I felt a piece of the past/ materialize, a snowflake long melted,/ evaporated, cohering once/ again made of skill and absence.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

14-year-old Arrested in Arson of New York’s Oldest Ashkenazi Synagogue – Haaretz

Built in 1850 as a Baptist church, the building was purchased in 1885 to become the first Eastern European congregation founded in New York City A 14-year-old boy has been charged with arson in connection with a fire that seriously damaged a historic synagogue on Manhattans Lower East Side. The boy was arrested Tuesday night at his home near the Beth Hamedrash Hagadol synagogue, the New York Post reported Wednesday morning. He was expected to be arraigned later in the day in Manhattan Family Court, according to the newspaper. He has not been named because he is a minor. Surveillance video showed three teens running away from the building shortly after the fire began on Sunday evening. Police reportedly spoke with friends of the teen who were with him at the time of the blaze, and they said he started the fire. The fire burned for several hours and took at least two hours for firefighters to bring under control. The building was empty at the time; two firefighters were injured putting out the blaze. Built in 1850 as a Baptist church, the building was purchased in 1885 to become the first Eastern European congregation founded in New York City and served Russian Jews. The congregation closed the synagogue in 2007 after determining it did not have the $3 million to $4 million needed for repairs. In 1967, the building was declared a city landmark, and in 2003 it was designated an endangered historic site. We’ve got more newsletters we think you’ll find interesting. Please try again later. This email address has already registered for this newsletter. The synagogue in recent years has sought to de-landmark the building, allowing for condominiums to be built on the site, with a small synagogue to be built on the ground floor. The synagogues rabbi, Mendel Greenbaum, told the CBS New York affiliate on Tuesday that he was in the middle of plans to renovate and restore the congregation but said that was now in doubt because of the fire. Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today

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GreenQ Hopes to Help Promote the Internet of Garbage – waste360

The waste and recycling industry has become familiar with the Internet of Things (IoT) or the inter-networking of physical devices, vehicles (also referred to as “connected devices” and “smart devices”) and other items. Smart also is a familiar word tacked onto things like trucks and bins within the industry to signify that these devices or vehicles have additional technology and sensors that can track and monitor usage, among other things. But the Internet of Garbage (IoG) is something one Israel-based technology company, GreenQ, hopes to make a household term. Were all about the Internet of Garbage (IoG). Were bringing sensors and big data analytics to residential garbage routes so municipalities can reduce expenses, reduce emissions and provide better services to their citizens, according to the companys website. GreenQ, with U.S. offices in Bexley, Ohio, was established in 2015 with the goal of bringing efficient technology to the waste management space through its monitoring device. Waste360 recently sat down with Shlomy Ashkenazi, CEO and cofounder of GreenQ Ltd., to discuss the companys monitoring device, also known as smart truck system, and to learn more about the IoG concept. Waste360: When and why was GreenQ established? Shlomy Ashkenazi: In July 2015, GreenQ’s founders suddenly realized there were billions of dollars being thrown into the garbage and dissolving into [greenhouse gasses] due to an unmonitored and inefficient waste collection process. Thus, they founded a startup with the goal of making garbage trucks smarter. Our smart waste management services are designed to meet the needs of municipalities, integrators and collection providers. GreenQ is currently operating in seven sites, with a [software as a service] business model, that differentiate to a monthly plan and yearly plan. Waste360: What is the Internet of Garbage? Shlomy Ashkenazi: The world is getting in to the IoT era. We are engaging in IoT as well, but we do it in a specific niche and apply our technology on garbage trucks and waste bins, we are doing Internet of Garbage. Waste360: What type of hardware do you provide for waste haulers? Shlomy Ashkenazi: We provide haulers with measuring, computing and monitoring sensors designed for heavy duty. The hardware is installed on existing trucks and does not require any internal modification to the trucks. Waste360: What does the technology do and how does it work? Shlomy Ashkenazi: A tracking device is installed on any garbage truck, making it a smart truck in just a one-day installation, enabling monitoring waste collection to a single bin level for only few cents per can. With every lift of a waste bin, the system on the truck measures the amount of waste inside the bin and monitors the time and location of the pickup. The data is analyzed and sent through the cloud, directly to the end user’s mobile device along with notifications for any unusual event and recommendations for optimization of the collection process. Waste360: Why did you choose to use this particular technology? Shlomy Ashkenazi: We wanted to support the global efforts of reducing waste and enabling sustainability. We understood that the recycling and re-using spaces are getting the spotlight, while collection and disposal is left aside. The recycling hierarchy starts with collection, which is as important as the other parts of the pyramid. Waste360: What specific benefits have you experienced? Shlomy Ashkenazi: The GreenQ system is a learning machine that predicts waste production rates on a single bin level. After a few weeks, the hauler will know in advance when each bin will be full and when is the right time to execute every route out of its route pool. By knowing the waste production rate, the hauler could provide a better service to the municipality which enjoys a major decrease in waste related complaints from its residents. Waste360: Is the data collected in real-time? If yes, how? Shlomy Ashkenazi: Yes, real time status of the bins is collected and the truck is gathered and shown in an easy-to-use platform. Waste360: How is this different than installing sensors on the bins themselves? Shlomy Ashkenazi: Our unique technology enables large scale monitoring with minimum installations, for examplea collection of more than 500,000 residents is taking place with no more than 100 devices. Waste360: Were there any challenges implementing? Shlomy Ashkenazi: The challenges are mainly in are integrating technology and new ideas in to quite old-fashioned industry. For this reason, focus on the haulers and municipalities specific needs, emphasizing the value of our technology. Waste360: Do you provide your technology to any waste haulers in the U.S.? Shlomy Ashkenazi: We are approaching the U.S market along with strategic partners and offering medium size players to get to know our technology. GreenQ believes in collaborations and therefore we are here, to find new partners. Our smart waste management services are designed to meet the needs of municipalities, integrators and collection providers. The technology can be applied on various kinds of collection platforms: loaders, grapple trucks, roll-off, underground bins and stationary compactors.

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Hebrew – Wikipedia

Ashkenazi Hebrew (Hebrew: Hagiyya Ashkenazit, Yiddish: ), is the pronunciation system for Biblical and Mishnaic Hebrew favored for liturgical use and study by Ashkenazi Jewish practice. It survives today as a separate religious dialect within some parts of the Haredi community, even alongside Modern Hebrew in Israel, although its use amongst non-Israeli Ashkenazi Jews has greatly diminished. As it is used parallel with Modern Hebrew, its phonological differences are clearly recognized: There are considerable differences between the Lithuanian, Polish (also known as Galician), Hungarian, and German pronunciations. In addition to geographical differences, there are differences in register between the “natural” pronunciation in general use and the more prescriptive rules advocated by some rabbis and grammarians, particularly for use in reading the Torah. For example: There have been several theories on the origins of the different Hebrew reading traditions. The basic cleavage is between those who believe that the differences arose in medieval Europe and those who believe that they reflect older differences between the pronunciations of Hebrew and Aramaic current in different parts of the Fertile Crescent, that is to say Judaea, Galilee, Syria, northern Mesopotamia and Babylonia proper. Within the first group of theories, Zimmels believed that the Ashkenazi pronunciation arose in late medieval Europe and that the pronunciation prevailing in France and Germany in the time of the Tosafists was similar to the Sephardic. His evidence for this was the fact that Asher ben Jehiel, a German who became chief rabbi of Toledo, never refers to any difference of pronunciation, though he is normally very sensitive to differences between the two communities.[citation needed] The difficulty with the second group of theories is that we do not know for certain what the pronunciations of these countries actually were and how far they differed. Since the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, if not before, the Sephardic pronunciation of the vowels became standard in all these countries, ironing out any differences that previously existed.[3] This makes it harder to adjudicate between the different theories on the relationship between today’s pronunciation systems and those of ancient times. Leopold Zunz believed that the Ashkenazi pronunciation was derived from that of Palestine in Geonic times (7th11th centuries CE), while the Sephardi pronunciation was derived from that of Babylonia. This theory was supported by the fact that, in some respects, Ashkenazi Hebrew resembles the western dialect of Syriac while Sephardi Hebrew resembles the eastern, e.g. Eastern Syriac Peshitta as against Western Syriac Peshito. Ashkenazi Hebrew in its written form also resembles Palestinian Hebrew in its tendency to male spellings (see Mater lectionis). Others, including Abraham Zevi Idelsohn, believed that the distinction is more ancient, and represents the distinction between the Judaean and Galilean dialects of Hebrew in Mishnaic times (1st2nd centuries CE), with the Sephardi pronunciation being derived from Judaean and the Ashkenazi from Galilean. This theory is supported by the fact that Ashkenazi Hebrew, like Samaritan Hebrew, has lost the distinct sounds of many of the guttural letters, while there are references in the Talmud to this as a feature of Galilean speech. Idelsohn ascribes the Ashkenazi (and, on his theory, Galilean) pronunciation of kamatz gadol as [o] to the influence of Phoenician: see Canaanite shift. In the time of the Masoretes (8th10th centuries CE) there were three distinct notations for denoting vowels and other details of pronunciation in Biblical and liturgical texts. One was the Babylonian; another was the Palestinian; the third was the Tiberian, which eventually superseded the other two and is still in use today. In certain respects the Ashkenazi pronunciation provides a better fit to the Tiberian notation than do the other reading traditions: for example, it distinguishes between pata and qama gadol, and between segol and ere, and does not make the qama symbol do duty for two different sounds. A distinctive variant of the Tiberian notation was in fact used by Ashkenazim, before being superseded by the standard version. On the other hand it is unlikely that in the Tiberian system ere and olam were diphthongs as they are in Ashkenazi Hebrew: they are more likely to have been closed vowels. (On the other hand, these vowels sometimes correspond to diphthongs in Arabic.) For more details of the reconstructed pronunciation underlying the Tiberian notation, see Tiberian vocalization. In other respects Ashkenazi Hebrew resembles Yemenite Hebrew, which appears to be related to the Babylonian notation. Shared features include the pronunciation of qama gadol as [o] and, in the case of Lithuanian Jews and some but not all Yemenites, of olam as [e]. These features are not found in the Hebrew pronunciation of today’s Iraqi Jews, which as explained has been overlaid by Sephardi Hebrew, but are found in some of the Judeo-Aramaic languages of northern Iraq and in some dialects of Syriac. Another possibility is that these features were found within an isogloss that included Syria, northern Palestine and northern Mesopotamia but not Judaea or Babylonia proper, and did not coincide exactly with the use of any one notation (and the olam = [e] shift may have applied to a more restricted area than the qama gadol = [o] shift). The Yemenite pronunciation would, on this hypothesis, be derived from that of northern Mesopotamia and the Ashkenazi pronunciation from that of northern Palestine. The Sephardic pronunciation appears to be derived from that of Judaea, as evidenced by its fit to the Palestinian notation. According to the Maharal of Prague[4] and many other scholars,[5] including Rabbi Yaakov Emden, one of the leading Hebrew grammarians of all time,[6] Ashkenazi Hebrew is the most accurate pronunciation of Hebrew preserved. The reason given is that it preserves distinctions, such as between pata and qama, which are not reflected in the Sephardic and other dialects. Only in the Ashkenazi pronunciation are all seven “nequdot” (the Hebrew vowels of the ancient Tiberian tradition) distinguished: Yemenite, which comes close, does not distinguish pata from segol. On the other hand, this view does not appear to be supported by any non-Ashkenazi scholars. Some scholars argue in favour of the greater authenticity of the Yemenite pronunciation on the ground that it is the only Hebrew pronunciation to distinguish all the consonants. Although Modern Hebrew was intended to be based on Mishnaic spelling and Sephardi Hebrew pronunciation, the language as spoken in Israel has adapted to popular Ashkenazi Hebrew phonology in the following respects:

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

‘Throw Momma from the Train’ – The Madera Tribune

'Throw Momma from the Train' The Madera Tribune Ashkenazi Jews. Yiddish was brought to America by the Ashkenazi Jews who migrated to the United States (mostly settling in New York) between 1880 and 1914. One conspicuous exception was Lb Straub, who changed his name to Levi Strauss. After gold …

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May 15, 2017   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed


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