Archive for the ‘Ashkenazi’ Category

Jewish movement disorders and genetics

Image via Shutterstock.com

As I was sitting (and standing) in a synagogue over the holidays I let my mind wander, as I often do under similar circumstances, and tried to answer the eternal question: If God designated the Jews as the Chosen People why did he/she also referred to them as the stiff-necked people? (Exodus 32:9: I have seen this people, and behold, it is a stiff-necked people). Was God making an analogy between hard-to-control oxens and the stubborn and obstinate Isrealites who used them to plow the fields? While this is one explanation offered by Jewish scholars for the term stiff-necked people, as an academic neurologist, specializing in movement disorders, and someone who likes to challenge an established dogma, I raise the possibility that the stiff-necked Jews had a neurologic condition that caused neck spasms and/or neck stiffness. After all, it is well-accepted that Moses had a neurological condition that apparently caused a speech impediment (stuttering). Indeed, it is also well known that over the centuries and possibly millennia, Jews have had an increased risk for a variety of neurologic conditions, called movement disorders. This important association of neurologic movement disorders in people of Jewish ancestry has been recently described in a scientific article in JAMA Neurol (1), but I thought it would be important bring this to the attention of readers of this journal.

Recent analysis of DNA sequences shared by Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals has provided insight into early Ashkenazi history. This research suggests that the world AJ population shrunk to only 350 as recently as 700 years ago (bottleneck) and that subsequent AJ generations, now totaling in millions, were a mixture of European and Middle Eastern ancestry (2). Because of intermarriages various genetic metabolic and neurologic diseases, such as Tay-Sachs, Niemann-Pick disease, mucolipidosis type IV, and Gaucher disease, became more common in the AJ population. In this review we wish to focus on neurologic diseases,categorized as movement disorders, that are being increasingly recognized to be relatively more frequent in people of Jewish ancestry compared to general population.

What are movement disorders? Movement disorders is a group of neurologic conditions that can be divided into slow movements (hypokinetic disorders) or abnormal involuntary movements (hyperkinesias). The best example of a hypokinetic movement disorder is Parkinsons disease. Hyperkinetic movement disorders are subdivided into tremors, dystonia, tics, chorea, athetosis, ballism, stereotypy, and akathisia. The latter term, akathisia, refers to motor restlessness, known in Yiddish as the shpilke. Restless legs syndrome, another movement disorder that could be described as the shpilke, refers to restlessness that occurs chiefly at night and predominantly involves the legs. Furthermore, incoordination, gait and balance disorders, and abnormalities in muscle tone (such as spasticity and rigidity) are also included among movement disorders (3,4). While the basal ganglia, the deep part of the brain that is involved in the fine controls of body movements, have been implicated in most of the movement disorders, there are many other parts of the central and peripheral nervous system that may be involved. Since the diagnosis of a movement disorder is based on accurate recognition of specific phenomenological features, clinicians who encounter patients with movement disorders must use their powers of observation to carefully characterize the disorder. Therefore, the phenomenological categorization of the movement disorder is absolutely critical in formulating the differential diagnosis, finding the cause, and selecting the most appropriate treatment (5).

The following is a brief summary of the most common movement disorders highlighting those that are particularly common in people of AJ ancestry.

Parkinsons Disease

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Jewish movement disorders and genetics

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October 21, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Golfer Pressel raises $3 million for breast cancer research

Jewish pro golfer Morgan Pressel of Boca Raton is not only an elite golfer on the women’s pro golf circuit, but is also a leader for breast cancer research over the past seven years.

Pressel has raised over $3.4 million through her annual Morgan Pressel and Friends pro-am golf tournament each January at the St. Andrews Country Club where she resides.

The money raised through the Morgan Pressel Foundation has benefited thousands of women through the founding last year of the Morgan Pressel Center For Cancer Genetics at Boca Raton Regional Hospital.

“Men and women now can be tested through genetics for breast, colon and ovarian cancer at the center, and we had more than doubled the number of people who have been tested, compared to 2013,” said Dr. Louise Morrell, medical director of the Lynn Cancer Institute.

Morrell has dedicated more than 25 years to cancer genetics research and acknowledges that Ashkenazi (Eastern European origin) Jewish women are especially prone to breast and ovarian cancers.

“The mutation of the BRCA gene 1 and BRCA gene 2 is extremely important among Ashkenazi Jewish women to identify early for cancer,” said Dr. Morrell.

Even men can be at risk for breast cancer. Bob Weaver, a well-known television weatherman at NBC 6, died of breast cancer in 2006.

Morrell acknowledges that Pressel has lent much more than her name and money to cancer research.

“Morgan has made frequent visits to patients at the center and has inspired both patients and donors by her passion for raising funds for cancer research.”

Pressel lost her mother, Kathy Krickstein Pressel, who died of breast cancer at age 43 in 2003, when Morgan was 15. In her memory, Pressel has also funded the Kathy Krickstein Mammovan, a mobile van that provides mammograms examination to women throughout Palm Beach County.

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Golfer Pressel raises $3 million for breast cancer research

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Richard Gere to star in Joseph Cedar movie filmed in Israel

Richard Gere. Image via Wikipedia

Actor Richard Gere is set to star in a new film by award-winning Israeli director Joseph Cedar.

Cedar also wrote the screenplay for the movie, which will be filmed in New York and Israel, the Israeli daily Yediot Acharonot reported Sunday.

The movie will be called Oppenheimer, according to Yediot, and also star Israeli actor Lior Ashkenazi.

Two of Cedars films, Footnote and Beaufort, were nominated for Academy Awards. Gere was a Golden Globe winner for his role in the film version of Chicago.

Meanwhile, the popular Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cats is slated to come to Israel for the first time.

The musical, which has been running on Broadway for 18 years, will be performed in Israel in November, according to reports.

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Making Strides' doctor talks about no family history

As a breast health specialist at West Boca Diagnostic Imaging, it was a natural fit for Dr. Cheryl Moss-Mellman to step into the role as chairwoman for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer South Palm Beach.

The American Cancer Society’s walk takes place at 8:30 a.m. Oct. 25 from the city’s Mizner Park Amphitheater. West Boca Medical Center is a silver sponsor, committing to raise at least $2,500, the hospital’s CEO Mitch Feldman announced last month.

Moss-Mellman recently talked about the results of a study on breast and ovarian cancer in Jewish women with an Ashkenazi (French, German or Eastern European) background. The study found they had high rates of these cancers, even when there was no family history. The findings were seen as a call for universal testing of this population.

The study is called “Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2.” An abstract was provided by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America: pnas.org/content/111/39/14205.abstract.

Were you surprised by this outcome?

With the Ashkenazi Jewish population, the frequency of being a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene carrier occurs in one out of 40 women. It’s important to look at the individual family. Maybe someone is an only child with no aunts and uncles. Maybe in a small family there are more males. [BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutations increase the risk of female breast and ovarian cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute].

Why does that make a difference?

The reason we see it in such high frequency is when Jews living in shtetls [Jewish villages] or isolated populations were marrying their cousins. If there is a mutation, once you start intermarrying, that defect in the DNA will reproduce in that population.

Are you already looking for these genes in your practice?

The most important thing is having a thorough view of the family history. That will be your strongest predictor of who has a higher likelihood of having a BRCA mutation. It can be passed down from either side, and I generally try to get at least three generations.

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Making Strides' doctor talks about no family history

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NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] – Video



NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH]
NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] Website at: http://peopleofyahuwah.wordpress.com Helpful Links: “No One Wants To Be A Khazar…

By: peopleofyahuwah2028

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NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] – Video

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Anglican with Ashkenazi Jew roots & reported paedophile David Cameron – I am a Zionist – Video



Anglican with Ashkenazi Jew roots reported paedophile David Cameron – I am a Zionist
Source: http://www.haaretz.com/news/tory-leader-calls-himself-zionist-u-k-jews-campaign-against-boycott-1.223009 http://gaiamilitia.wordpress.com/about/royal…

By: Jon Doe

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Anglican with Ashkenazi Jew roots & reported paedophile David Cameron – I am a Zionist – Video

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NWO Zionist Anglican religious extremist Ashkenazi Jew paedophile David Cameron – 911 Jew plot a lie – Video



NWO Zionist Anglican religious extremist Ashkenazi Jew paedophile David Cameron – 911 Jew plot a lie
The audio has been lowered by Google, the audio was clear when this video was uploaded…so if it is hard to hear, blame Google censorship… http://gaiamili…

By: Jon Doe

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NWO Zionist Anglican religious extremist Ashkenazi Jew paedophile David Cameron – 911 Jew plot a lie – Video

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Ashkenazi Jewish population has distinctive, yet similar genomes

An archival photo from long after the population bottleneck.

Ashkenazi Jews hail from Eastern Europe”Ashkenaz” is the Hebrew word for Germanyand comprise the bulk of the Jewish population in the US. Their compatriots are Sephardi Jews, who lived in Spain until they were kicked out in 1492, and Mizrachi Jews, who lived in Arab countries for centuries until the founding of the state of Israel in 1948.

Ashkenazi Jews are a genetically distinct population, andthe analysis of 128 complete Ashkenazi genomes shows just how distinct they are. Compared to genomes of modern Europeansin this case, the genomes of 26 Flemish peoplethe Ashkenazi genomes have 47 percent more novel DNA differencesper genome. These DNA variants, while novel, are population specific; sequence sharing, where two individuals have a set of the same variants, is eight percent more abundant among the Ashkenazi Jews than it is between the two populations or even among the Flemish genomes.

Using the length of the shared genetic segments, researchers determined that the current Ashkenazi Jewish population underwent a bottleneck 25-32 generations back, approximately 600-800 years ago. Caused by the Plague in the mid 1300s, perhaps? Or maybe by the decimation of Eastern European Jewish communities by roving bands of Crusaders? Whatever the cause, this bottleneck reduced the founder population to between 250 and 420 individuals.

When populations undergo bottlenecks that reduce their founder sizes, rare and recessive mutations become amplified. That is exactly what happened to Ashkenazi Jews. Pregnant Ashkenazi women currently get screened for a panel of thirty-six recessive diseases, including Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, Gaucher disease, Fanconi anemia, and cystic fibrosis.

They also have higher rates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, estimated to occur in 1 in 40 individuals compared to 1 in 400 in the general population. These mutations cause 11 percent of the breast cancer and 40 percent of the ovarian cancer in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

Defining the extent of the unique Ashkenazi DNA variation, as this study has done, will make clinical diagnosis much simpler. Now, when an individual’s genome is sequenced, it can be compared against this panel rather than one from the general European population, and doctors will more easily be able to ascertain which mutations might make a patient sick.

Nature Communications, 2014. DOI: 10.1038ncomms5835 (About DOIs).

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Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles – Video



Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles

By: Simon Peter

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Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles – Video

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September 20, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Jewish movement disorders and genetics

Image via Shutterstock.com As I was sitting (and standing) in a synagogue over the holidays I let my mind wander, as I often do under similar circumstances, and tried to answer the eternal question: If God designated the Jews as the Chosen People why did he/she also referred to them as the stiff-necked people? (Exodus 32:9: I have seen this people, and behold, it is a stiff-necked people). Was God making an analogy between hard-to-control oxens and the stubborn and obstinate Isrealites who used them to plow the fields? While this is one explanation offered by Jewish scholars for the term stiff-necked people, as an academic neurologist, specializing in movement disorders, and someone who likes to challenge an established dogma, I raise the possibility that the stiff-necked Jews had a neurologic condition that caused neck spasms and/or neck stiffness. After all, it is well-accepted that Moses had a neurological condition that apparently caused a speech impediment (stuttering). Indeed, it is also well known that over the centuries and possibly millennia, Jews have had an increased risk for a variety of neurologic conditions, called movement disorders. This important association of neurologic movement disorders in people of Jewish ancestry has been recently described in a scientific article in JAMA Neurol (1), but I thought it would be important bring this to the attention of readers of this journal. Recent analysis of DNA sequences shared by Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals has provided insight into early Ashkenazi history. This research suggests that the world AJ population shrunk to only 350 as recently as 700 years ago (bottleneck) and that subsequent AJ generations, now totaling in millions, were a mixture of European and Middle Eastern ancestry (2). Because of intermarriages various genetic metabolic and neurologic diseases, such as Tay-Sachs, Niemann-Pick disease, mucolipidosis type IV, and Gaucher disease, became more common in the AJ population. In this review we wish to focus on neurologic diseases,categorized as movement disorders, that are being increasingly recognized to be relatively more frequent in people of Jewish ancestry compared to general population. What are movement disorders? Movement disorders is a group of neurologic conditions that can be divided into slow movements (hypokinetic disorders) or abnormal involuntary movements (hyperkinesias). The best example of a hypokinetic movement disorder is Parkinsons disease. Hyperkinetic movement disorders are subdivided into tremors, dystonia, tics, chorea, athetosis, ballism, stereotypy, and akathisia. The latter term, akathisia, refers to motor restlessness, known in Yiddish as the shpilke. Restless legs syndrome, another movement disorder that could be described as the shpilke, refers to restlessness that occurs chiefly at night and predominantly involves the legs. Furthermore, incoordination, gait and balance disorders, and abnormalities in muscle tone (such as spasticity and rigidity) are also included among movement disorders (3,4). While the basal ganglia, the deep part of the brain that is involved in the fine controls of body movements, have been implicated in most of the movement disorders, there are many other parts of the central and peripheral nervous system that may be involved. Since the diagnosis of a movement disorder is based on accurate recognition of specific phenomenological features, clinicians who encounter patients with movement disorders must use their powers of observation to carefully characterize the disorder. Therefore, the phenomenological categorization of the movement disorder is absolutely critical in formulating the differential diagnosis, finding the cause, and selecting the most appropriate treatment (5). The following is a brief summary of the most common movement disorders highlighting those that are particularly common in people of AJ ancestry. Parkinsons Disease

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Golfer Pressel raises $3 million for breast cancer research

Jewish pro golfer Morgan Pressel of Boca Raton is not only an elite golfer on the women’s pro golf circuit, but is also a leader for breast cancer research over the past seven years. Pressel has raised over $3.4 million through her annual Morgan Pressel and Friends pro-am golf tournament each January at the St. Andrews Country Club where she resides. The money raised through the Morgan Pressel Foundation has benefited thousands of women through the founding last year of the Morgan Pressel Center For Cancer Genetics at Boca Raton Regional Hospital. “Men and women now can be tested through genetics for breast, colon and ovarian cancer at the center, and we had more than doubled the number of people who have been tested, compared to 2013,” said Dr. Louise Morrell, medical director of the Lynn Cancer Institute. Morrell has dedicated more than 25 years to cancer genetics research and acknowledges that Ashkenazi (Eastern European origin) Jewish women are especially prone to breast and ovarian cancers. “The mutation of the BRCA gene 1 and BRCA gene 2 is extremely important among Ashkenazi Jewish women to identify early for cancer,” said Dr. Morrell. Even men can be at risk for breast cancer. Bob Weaver, a well-known television weatherman at NBC 6, died of breast cancer in 2006. Morrell acknowledges that Pressel has lent much more than her name and money to cancer research. “Morgan has made frequent visits to patients at the center and has inspired both patients and donors by her passion for raising funds for cancer research.” Pressel lost her mother, Kathy Krickstein Pressel, who died of breast cancer at age 43 in 2003, when Morgan was 15. In her memory, Pressel has also funded the Kathy Krickstein Mammovan, a mobile van that provides mammograms examination to women throughout Palm Beach County.

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October 14, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Richard Gere to star in Joseph Cedar movie filmed in Israel

Richard Gere. Image via Wikipedia Actor Richard Gere is set to star in a new film by award-winning Israeli director Joseph Cedar. Cedar also wrote the screenplay for the movie, which will be filmed in New York and Israel, the Israeli daily Yediot Acharonot reported Sunday. The movie will be called Oppenheimer, according to Yediot, and also star Israeli actor Lior Ashkenazi. Two of Cedars films, Footnote and Beaufort, were nominated for Academy Awards. Gere was a Golden Globe winner for his role in the film version of Chicago. Meanwhile, the popular Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cats is slated to come to Israel for the first time. The musical, which has been running on Broadway for 18 years, will be performed in Israel in November, according to reports. We welcome your feedback. Privacy Policy Your information will not be shared or sold without your consent. Get all the details.

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October 14, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Making Strides' doctor talks about no family history

As a breast health specialist at West Boca Diagnostic Imaging, it was a natural fit for Dr. Cheryl Moss-Mellman to step into the role as chairwoman for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer South Palm Beach. The American Cancer Society’s walk takes place at 8:30 a.m. Oct. 25 from the city’s Mizner Park Amphitheater. West Boca Medical Center is a silver sponsor, committing to raise at least $2,500, the hospital’s CEO Mitch Feldman announced last month. Moss-Mellman recently talked about the results of a study on breast and ovarian cancer in Jewish women with an Ashkenazi (French, German or Eastern European) background. The study found they had high rates of these cancers, even when there was no family history. The findings were seen as a call for universal testing of this population. The study is called “Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2.” An abstract was provided by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America: pnas.org/content/111/39/14205.abstract. Were you surprised by this outcome? With the Ashkenazi Jewish population, the frequency of being a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene carrier occurs in one out of 40 women. It’s important to look at the individual family. Maybe someone is an only child with no aunts and uncles. Maybe in a small family there are more males. [BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutations increase the risk of female breast and ovarian cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute]. Why does that make a difference? The reason we see it in such high frequency is when Jews living in shtetls [Jewish villages] or isolated populations were marrying their cousins. If there is a mutation, once you start intermarrying, that defect in the DNA will reproduce in that population. Are you already looking for these genes in your practice? The most important thing is having a thorough view of the family history. That will be your strongest predictor of who has a higher likelihood of having a BRCA mutation. It can be passed down from either side, and I generally try to get at least three generations.

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October 13, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] – Video




NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] NO ONE WANTS TO BE A KHAZAR JEW PART TWO ASHKENAZI JEW [YAHUWAH] Website at: http://peopleofyahuwah.wordpress.com Helpful Links: “No One Wants To Be A Khazar… By: peopleofyahuwah2028

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October 8, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Anglican with Ashkenazi Jew roots & reported paedophile David Cameron – I am a Zionist – Video




Anglican with Ashkenazi Jew roots reported paedophile David Cameron – I am a Zionist Source: http://www.haaretz.com/news/tory-leader-calls-himself-zionist-u-k-jews-campaign-against-boycott-1.223009 http://gaiamilitia.wordpress.com/about/royal… By: Jon Doe

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September 28, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

NWO Zionist Anglican religious extremist Ashkenazi Jew paedophile David Cameron – 911 Jew plot a lie – Video




NWO Zionist Anglican religious extremist Ashkenazi Jew paedophile David Cameron – 911 Jew plot a lie The audio has been lowered by Google, the audio was clear when this video was uploaded…so if it is hard to hear, blame Google censorship… http://gaiamili… By: Jon Doe

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September 28, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Jewish population has distinctive, yet similar genomes

An archival photo from long after the population bottleneck. Ashkenazi Jews hail from Eastern Europe”Ashkenaz” is the Hebrew word for Germanyand comprise the bulk of the Jewish population in the US. Their compatriots are Sephardi Jews, who lived in Spain until they were kicked out in 1492, and Mizrachi Jews, who lived in Arab countries for centuries until the founding of the state of Israel in 1948. Ashkenazi Jews are a genetically distinct population, andthe analysis of 128 complete Ashkenazi genomes shows just how distinct they are. Compared to genomes of modern Europeansin this case, the genomes of 26 Flemish peoplethe Ashkenazi genomes have 47 percent more novel DNA differencesper genome. These DNA variants, while novel, are population specific; sequence sharing, where two individuals have a set of the same variants, is eight percent more abundant among the Ashkenazi Jews than it is between the two populations or even among the Flemish genomes. Using the length of the shared genetic segments, researchers determined that the current Ashkenazi Jewish population underwent a bottleneck 25-32 generations back, approximately 600-800 years ago. Caused by the Plague in the mid 1300s, perhaps? Or maybe by the decimation of Eastern European Jewish communities by roving bands of Crusaders? Whatever the cause, this bottleneck reduced the founder population to between 250 and 420 individuals. When populations undergo bottlenecks that reduce their founder sizes, rare and recessive mutations become amplified. That is exactly what happened to Ashkenazi Jews. Pregnant Ashkenazi women currently get screened for a panel of thirty-six recessive diseases, including Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, Gaucher disease, Fanconi anemia, and cystic fibrosis. They also have higher rates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, estimated to occur in 1 in 40 individuals compared to 1 in 400 in the general population. These mutations cause 11 percent of the breast cancer and 40 percent of the ovarian cancer in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Defining the extent of the unique Ashkenazi DNA variation, as this study has done, will make clinical diagnosis much simpler. Now, when an individual’s genome is sequenced, it can be compared against this panel rather than one from the general European population, and doctors will more easily be able to ascertain which mutations might make a patient sick. Nature Communications, 2014. DOI: 10.1038ncomms5835 (About DOIs).

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September 23, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles – Video




Israel Moment 49 Ashkenazi Jews are Actually Gentiles By: Simon Peter

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September 20, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed


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