Archive for the ‘Ashkenazi’ Category

Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube – Video



Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube
Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube.

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Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube – Video

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Angelina Jolie Effect Doubles BRCA Testing; @ProMedicaHealth Cancer Genetics Expert Discusses the Importance of …

Released: 5-Sep-2014 8:00 AM EDT Source Newsroom: ProMedica Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

New research shows more women are getting tested for BRCA1 and 2 mutations after actress Angelina Jolie revealed she had undergone a prophylactic mastectomy once she found out she was a carrier.

BRCA1 and 2 mutations dramatically increase the risk for breast and ovarian cancer. The mutations, which are found in about 2 4 percent of women, are more likely in those with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and those with personal risk factors, such as Ashkenazi Jewish descent.

Kelly Morse, a licensed genetic counselor at ProMedica Cancer Institute, says our family history plays a crucial role in our overall health and well-being.

Keeping a file with information about your familys medical history should be a priority for everyone, Morse said. As a parent, passing down detailed notes about your ancestors health to your children can be an invaluable gift. Once a loved one is gone, it becomes very difficult to recall this vital data.

Morse suggests patients begin with the following:

1. Start by making a list of your ancestors and immediate family members. It may be helpful to layout the information in a family tree format. Example: Grandparents Parents Siblings Children Aunts/Uncles Cousins

2. Next to each name write down any major health issues, especially cancer diagnoses in this case, and at what age.

3. It may also be helpful to include notes about your loved ones treatment journey. Including lab work and other tests can be especially helpful as well. These details can help tell the story and impact future care and treatment of you or your family.

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Angelina Jolie Effect Doubles BRCA Testing; @ProMedicaHealth Cancer Genetics Expert Discusses the Importance of …

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Despite advances, ovarian cancer survival rates refuse to budge

Ovarian cancer is often called silent because there are usually only vague symptoms early on. Others insist there are clear signs if you know what to watch for, such as abdominal bloating, pelvic pain and extreme fatigue.

Most experts say there is no reliable screening test for ovarian cancer. But some advocacy groups tell women to demand CA125 testing if they suspect ovarian cancer. This is a blood test used to monitor women for the cancer’s return during and after treatment. It is not approved for primary screening.

Some facts are not in dispute. According to the American Cancer Society, nearly 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and more than 14,000 will die of the disease. More than 70 percent of women with ovarian cancer had advanced disease when they were diagnosed, meaning the cancer had already spread beyond the ovaries. That fact makes this the most lethal gynecologic cancer in the United States.

The Times asked Dr. Mitchel Hoffman for a medical update on ovarian cancer detection and treatment. Hoffman is a professor of gynecologic oncology at USF Health and Tampa General Hospital, and has been treating women with gynecologic cancers for more than 30 years.

What’s going on in the search for a screening test?

We haven’t made much progress and there is still no reliable test. This is a difficult cancer to find early because there’s no prolonged precancerous phase, like with cervical cancer, where we can test for and remove abnormal cells or tissue, and prevent the development of cancer. By the time the cellular changes take place that make ovarian a detectable cancer, the disease is beyond the ovaries and has invaded the abdomen and other organs. Research continues but I’m afraid we may find that this cancer just isn’t amenable to screening.

Yet strides have been made in prevention?

Because of advances in genetic testing, we can now identify women at high risk for ovarian cancer: Those with the BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 gene; also, women with a strong family history, meaning ovarian cancer in their mother and/or a sister; and those of certain ancestry are also at high risk, such as Ashkenazi Jewish women. We can offer them surgical removal of the ovaries. We’ve also learned that ovarian cancer may start in the fallopian tubes, so removing the tubes may also be protective.

How has treatment changed?

In the past 10 years we’ve learned that aggressive surgery in the abdomen to remove everything that looks like a tumor extends survival. The surgery takes hours, but we have to be very thorough or patients don’t do very well.

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Despite advances, ovarian cancer survival rates refuse to budge

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FDA OKs insomnia, cancer drugs

10:28 a.m.Sept. 4, 2014

A roundup of consumer-oriented news and information about pharmaceutical drugs.

The FDA recently approved drugs to treat insomnia, late-stage cervical cancer, skin infections and Gaucher disease.

Belsomra (suvorexant) will be prescribed for people who have trouble falling and staying asleep, a health issue that affects about 30 percent of the general population. Drugs.com says that Belsomra, the first in a new class of sleep medications, will become available to patients late this year or in early 2015.

The FDA is expanding the use of the widely-known cancer drug Avastin (bevacizumab), allowing it to be prescribed for patients with persistent, recurrent or late-stage cervical cancer. The agency estimates that about 12,300 American women will be diagnosed with the disease this year.

Orbactiv (oritavancin) has been approved to treat adults who have acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The FDA says that such infections are typically caused by specific types of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. Orbactiv becomes the third new anti-bacterial drug approved this year.

Cerdelga (eliglustat) will be prescribed for the long-term treatment of adults who have the Type 1 form of Gaucher disease (go-shay), an inherited genetic disorder. The disease affects about 6,000 people in this country. The disease occurs most often in Ashkenazi Jewish people.

Science news

Info sources: FDA, Drugs.com, National Sleep Foundation, Gaucherdisease.org

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FDA OKs insomnia, cancer drugs

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Canadian researchers track Angelina effect on cancer gene screening

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt attend the world premiere of World War Z at on June 2, 2013 in London, England. GETTY IMAGES/Karwai Tang

Its being called the Angelina effect.

Angelina Jolies stunning revelation she had a preventative double mastectomy due to a genetic cancer risk has doubled the number of high risk women considering genetic testing to see if they carry certain genes linked to breast and ovarian cancers, new Canadian research suggests.

Doctors from the cancer centre at Torontos Sunnybrook Hospital presented their findings in San Francisco on Tuesday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Symposium.

The Angelina effect seemed to increase the awareness and the referral for women who were truly at high risk for hereditary breast cancer, said Dr. Andrea Eisen, one of the studys authors and head of the Familial Cancer Program at Sunnybrook.

Its not just worried women who came in, or those who have moderate or low risk it was really high risk women who perhaps were concerned before about pursuing genetic counselling or genetic testing, but who somehow seemed to have felt reassured or encouraged by this story and came forward for assessment.

Jolie made international headlines in May 2013 with an op-ed in the New York Times which detailed her familys history of breast and ovarian cancer, with the Oscar-winning actress noting that she had tested positive for the BRCA1 gene mutation.

She said her doctors estimated that she had a 50 per cent risk of getting ovarian cancer and an 87 per cent risk of breast cancer. After removing her breasts and reconstructing them with implants, she said her likelihood of developing breast cancer dropped to five per cent.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are known as tumour suppressor genes that make proteins to repair DNA and suppress the grown of cancer.

Having a mutation in either of the BRCA genes leads to an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Certain ethnic groups, among them Ashkenazi Jews, have a higher prevalence of these genetic mutations.

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Canadian researchers track Angelina effect on cancer gene screening

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Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) – Video

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M70aS–GziA]
Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS)
The majority of Jews today are of Ashkenazi Descent whose ancestors were from the Khazarian Kingdom located in Southern Russia. By Pastor Ben Heath Visit us …

By: Pastor Ben Heath

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Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) – Video

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Turkish court orders arrest of 4 former Israeli commanders over 2010 flotilla raid deaths

ANKARA, Turkey Turkey’s state-run agency says a Turkish court has ordered the arrests of four former Israeli military commanders being tried in absentia over the killing of nine people aboard a Turkish aid ship that tried to break a Gaza blockade in 2010.

The Anadolu Agency says the court in Istanbul on Monday ruled that authorities must seek an international warrant for Israel’s former military chief Lt. Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi and three other former commanders.

The court’s decision comes despite signs that Turkey and Israel could be close to ending a four-year rift over the deaths.

Turkish officials have said that the two countries are close to sealing a reconciliation pact. In March, Israel allowed building materials into the Gaza Strip for the construction of a Turkish hospital.

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Turkish court orders arrest of 4 former Israeli commanders over 2010 flotilla raid deaths

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May 26, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Wolpe Vows he will no longer address issue of ethnic percentages

Rabbi David Wolpe pledged in a sermon during Shabbat services at Sinai Temple on May 17 that he would no longer address the question of how many members of the congregation are Ashkenazi or Iranian or any other ethnicity.

We are 100 percent Jewish, the Sinai Temple leader said during a heartfelt 20-minute sermon intended to extinguish a firestorm that had erupted during the previous week.

Wolpes remarks came in response to community reaction to an advertisement for Sinai Akiba Academy, the synagogues day school, that ran in the May 9 edition of the Jewish Journal. The ad included the headline: Too Persian. Looks awful in print? It sounds worse in a whisper. It also included a picture of five smiling children and went on to say, Were proud of our diversity.

The wording of the headline set off a wave of angry conversations, phone calls and letters of protest to the temples staff, as well as some supportive responses. The result, Wolpe said, has probably exceeded any other controversy that Im aware of, that Ive been involved with at the synagogue, and Ive been involved in a few.

The advertisement was targeting prospective school families, Sarah Shulkind, the head of school, said. Im not saying this as a hyperbole, Shulkind said in an interview. On every single tour Ive given at the end of the tour, someone will say, One more question, can I ask you privately I dont mean to sound [rude], but is the school too Persian? Whats the ratio? Some variety of that question.

Sinai Akiba Academy has approximately 600 students, according to the Builders of Jewish Education website. Shulkind did not say how many are of Iranian heritage, but she said it is less than a majority.

Rabbi Lawrence Scheindlin, who retired in spring 2012 as head of school at Sinai Akiba, estimated the number to be somewhere around 30 percent as of 2012 and growing.

The ad was apart of an ongoing campaign in the Journal addressing perceptions about the school. Previous ads have focused on technology, green space and more.

The whole idea was to debunk the myth or the rumors of the school and to put out a proactive narrative about these topics, Shulkind said.

Our Persian families have lots of other choices for Jewish education in L.A., just like our Israeli, Russian, South American, South African and Ashkenazi-at-large families, the ad states.

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Wolpe Vows he will no longer address issue of ethnic percentages

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New Products: Asper Biotech's Ashkenazi Jewish Diseases Test

Foundation Medicine has appointed Urmi Prasad Richardson to vice president of its international business. Richardson will be based in Germany. Previously, she held leadership positions at Chiron, Novartis, and Immucor.

Scott Mendel has been named CFO at GenMark Diagnostics. Mendel joins GenMark from Active Network, where he held the same position for four years. Prior to Active Network, he worked at GE for more than 20 years, most recently serving as CFO of the company’s Healthcare IT division.

Sequenom Chief Medical Officer Allan Bombard plans to retire in June, the company said in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission this week. Bombard has served as the firm’s CMO since early 2009, and as one of its CLIA/CAP lab directors since 2010.

Keygene’s board of directors has appointed Fayaz Khazi as its new CEO, effective May 5. Khazi recently was VP of business analytics and strategy at Intrexon, where he worked since 2007 in various leadership positions focused on the food and agricultural sectors. He also was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute post-doctoral fellow at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania.

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New Products: Asper Biotech's Ashkenazi Jewish Diseases Test

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May 20, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube – Video




Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube Ashkenazi Jewish Children on the rampage YouTube. By: AbortedBabysInMakeUp

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Angelina Jolie Effect Doubles BRCA Testing; @ProMedicaHealth Cancer Genetics Expert Discusses the Importance of …

Released: 5-Sep-2014 8:00 AM EDT Source Newsroom: ProMedica Contact Information Available for logged-in reporters only New research shows more women are getting tested for BRCA1 and 2 mutations after actress Angelina Jolie revealed she had undergone a prophylactic mastectomy once she found out she was a carrier. BRCA1 and 2 mutations dramatically increase the risk for breast and ovarian cancer. The mutations, which are found in about 2 4 percent of women, are more likely in those with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and those with personal risk factors, such as Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Kelly Morse, a licensed genetic counselor at ProMedica Cancer Institute, says our family history plays a crucial role in our overall health and well-being. Keeping a file with information about your familys medical history should be a priority for everyone, Morse said. As a parent, passing down detailed notes about your ancestors health to your children can be an invaluable gift. Once a loved one is gone, it becomes very difficult to recall this vital data. Morse suggests patients begin with the following: 1. Start by making a list of your ancestors and immediate family members. It may be helpful to layout the information in a family tree format. Example: Grandparents Parents Siblings Children Aunts/Uncles Cousins 2. Next to each name write down any major health issues, especially cancer diagnoses in this case, and at what age. 3. It may also be helpful to include notes about your loved ones treatment journey. Including lab work and other tests can be especially helpful as well. These details can help tell the story and impact future care and treatment of you or your family.

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September 5, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Despite advances, ovarian cancer survival rates refuse to budge

Ovarian cancer is often called silent because there are usually only vague symptoms early on. Others insist there are clear signs if you know what to watch for, such as abdominal bloating, pelvic pain and extreme fatigue. Most experts say there is no reliable screening test for ovarian cancer. But some advocacy groups tell women to demand CA125 testing if they suspect ovarian cancer. This is a blood test used to monitor women for the cancer’s return during and after treatment. It is not approved for primary screening. Some facts are not in dispute. According to the American Cancer Society, nearly 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and more than 14,000 will die of the disease. More than 70 percent of women with ovarian cancer had advanced disease when they were diagnosed, meaning the cancer had already spread beyond the ovaries. That fact makes this the most lethal gynecologic cancer in the United States. The Times asked Dr. Mitchel Hoffman for a medical update on ovarian cancer detection and treatment. Hoffman is a professor of gynecologic oncology at USF Health and Tampa General Hospital, and has been treating women with gynecologic cancers for more than 30 years. What’s going on in the search for a screening test? We haven’t made much progress and there is still no reliable test. This is a difficult cancer to find early because there’s no prolonged precancerous phase, like with cervical cancer, where we can test for and remove abnormal cells or tissue, and prevent the development of cancer. By the time the cellular changes take place that make ovarian a detectable cancer, the disease is beyond the ovaries and has invaded the abdomen and other organs. Research continues but I’m afraid we may find that this cancer just isn’t amenable to screening. Yet strides have been made in prevention? Because of advances in genetic testing, we can now identify women at high risk for ovarian cancer: Those with the BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 gene; also, women with a strong family history, meaning ovarian cancer in their mother and/or a sister; and those of certain ancestry are also at high risk, such as Ashkenazi Jewish women. We can offer them surgical removal of the ovaries. We’ve also learned that ovarian cancer may start in the fallopian tubes, so removing the tubes may also be protective. How has treatment changed? In the past 10 years we’ve learned that aggressive surgery in the abdomen to remove everything that looks like a tumor extends survival. The surgery takes hours, but we have to be very thorough or patients don’t do very well.

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September 4, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

FDA OKs insomnia, cancer drugs

10:28 a.m.Sept. 4, 2014 A roundup of consumer-oriented news and information about pharmaceutical drugs. The FDA recently approved drugs to treat insomnia, late-stage cervical cancer, skin infections and Gaucher disease. Belsomra (suvorexant) will be prescribed for people who have trouble falling and staying asleep, a health issue that affects about 30 percent of the general population. Drugs.com says that Belsomra, the first in a new class of sleep medications, will become available to patients late this year or in early 2015. The FDA is expanding the use of the widely-known cancer drug Avastin (bevacizumab), allowing it to be prescribed for patients with persistent, recurrent or late-stage cervical cancer. The agency estimates that about 12,300 American women will be diagnosed with the disease this year. Orbactiv (oritavancin) has been approved to treat adults who have acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The FDA says that such infections are typically caused by specific types of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. Orbactiv becomes the third new anti-bacterial drug approved this year. Cerdelga (eliglustat) will be prescribed for the long-term treatment of adults who have the Type 1 form of Gaucher disease (go-shay), an inherited genetic disorder. The disease affects about 6,000 people in this country. The disease occurs most often in Ashkenazi Jewish people. Science news Info sources: FDA, Drugs.com, National Sleep Foundation, Gaucherdisease.org

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Canadian researchers track Angelina effect on cancer gene screening

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt attend the world premiere of World War Z at on June 2, 2013 in London, England. GETTY IMAGES/Karwai Tang Its being called the Angelina effect. Angelina Jolies stunning revelation she had a preventative double mastectomy due to a genetic cancer risk has doubled the number of high risk women considering genetic testing to see if they carry certain genes linked to breast and ovarian cancers, new Canadian research suggests. Doctors from the cancer centre at Torontos Sunnybrook Hospital presented their findings in San Francisco on Tuesday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Symposium. The Angelina effect seemed to increase the awareness and the referral for women who were truly at high risk for hereditary breast cancer, said Dr. Andrea Eisen, one of the studys authors and head of the Familial Cancer Program at Sunnybrook. Its not just worried women who came in, or those who have moderate or low risk it was really high risk women who perhaps were concerned before about pursuing genetic counselling or genetic testing, but who somehow seemed to have felt reassured or encouraged by this story and came forward for assessment. Jolie made international headlines in May 2013 with an op-ed in the New York Times which detailed her familys history of breast and ovarian cancer, with the Oscar-winning actress noting that she had tested positive for the BRCA1 gene mutation. She said her doctors estimated that she had a 50 per cent risk of getting ovarian cancer and an 87 per cent risk of breast cancer. After removing her breasts and reconstructing them with implants, she said her likelihood of developing breast cancer dropped to five per cent. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are known as tumour suppressor genes that make proteins to repair DNA and suppress the grown of cancer. Having a mutation in either of the BRCA genes leads to an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Certain ethnic groups, among them Ashkenazi Jews, have a higher prevalence of these genetic mutations.

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September 3, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) – Video




Ashkenazi Jews Are NOT From Judah (CHRISTIAN OVERCOMERS) The majority of Jews today are of Ashkenazi Descent whose ancestors were from the Khazarian Kingdom located in Southern Russia. By Pastor Ben Heath Visit us … By: Pastor Ben Heath

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September 1, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Turkish court orders arrest of 4 former Israeli commanders over 2010 flotilla raid deaths

ANKARA, Turkey Turkey’s state-run agency says a Turkish court has ordered the arrests of four former Israeli military commanders being tried in absentia over the killing of nine people aboard a Turkish aid ship that tried to break a Gaza blockade in 2010. The Anadolu Agency says the court in Istanbul on Monday ruled that authorities must seek an international warrant for Israel’s former military chief Lt. Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi and three other former commanders. The court’s decision comes despite signs that Turkey and Israel could be close to ending a four-year rift over the deaths. Turkish officials have said that the two countries are close to sealing a reconciliation pact. In March, Israel allowed building materials into the Gaza Strip for the construction of a Turkish hospital.

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May 26, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

Wolpe Vows he will no longer address issue of ethnic percentages

Rabbi David Wolpe pledged in a sermon during Shabbat services at Sinai Temple on May 17 that he would no longer address the question of how many members of the congregation are Ashkenazi or Iranian or any other ethnicity. We are 100 percent Jewish, the Sinai Temple leader said during a heartfelt 20-minute sermon intended to extinguish a firestorm that had erupted during the previous week. Wolpes remarks came in response to community reaction to an advertisement for Sinai Akiba Academy, the synagogues day school, that ran in the May 9 edition of the Jewish Journal. The ad included the headline: Too Persian. Looks awful in print? It sounds worse in a whisper. It also included a picture of five smiling children and went on to say, Were proud of our diversity. The wording of the headline set off a wave of angry conversations, phone calls and letters of protest to the temples staff, as well as some supportive responses. The result, Wolpe said, has probably exceeded any other controversy that Im aware of, that Ive been involved with at the synagogue, and Ive been involved in a few. The advertisement was targeting prospective school families, Sarah Shulkind, the head of school, said. Im not saying this as a hyperbole, Shulkind said in an interview. On every single tour Ive given at the end of the tour, someone will say, One more question, can I ask you privately I dont mean to sound [rude], but is the school too Persian? Whats the ratio? Some variety of that question. Sinai Akiba Academy has approximately 600 students, according to the Builders of Jewish Education website. Shulkind did not say how many are of Iranian heritage, but she said it is less than a majority. Rabbi Lawrence Scheindlin, who retired in spring 2012 as head of school at Sinai Akiba, estimated the number to be somewhere around 30 percent as of 2012 and growing. The ad was apart of an ongoing campaign in the Journal addressing perceptions about the school. Previous ads have focused on technology, green space and more. The whole idea was to debunk the myth or the rumors of the school and to put out a proactive narrative about these topics, Shulkind said. Our Persian families have lots of other choices for Jewish education in L.A., just like our Israeli, Russian, South American, South African and Ashkenazi-at-large families, the ad states.

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May 21, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed

New Products: Asper Biotech's Ashkenazi Jewish Diseases Test

Foundation Medicine has appointed Urmi Prasad Richardson to vice president of its international business. Richardson will be based in Germany. Previously, she held leadership positions at Chiron, Novartis, and Immucor. Scott Mendel has been named CFO at GenMark Diagnostics. Mendel joins GenMark from Active Network, where he held the same position for four years. Prior to Active Network, he worked at GE for more than 20 years, most recently serving as CFO of the company’s Healthcare IT division. Sequenom Chief Medical Officer Allan Bombard plans to retire in June, the company said in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission this week. Bombard has served as the firm’s CMO since early 2009, and as one of its CLIA/CAP lab directors since 2010. Keygene’s board of directors has appointed Fayaz Khazi as its new CEO, effective May 5. Khazi recently was VP of business analytics and strategy at Intrexon, where he worked since 2007 in various leadership positions focused on the food and agricultural sectors. He also was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute post-doctoral fellow at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania.

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May 20, 2014   Posted in: Ashkenazi  Comments Closed


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