Archive for the ‘Benjamin Netanyahu’ Category

Netanyahu, Gabbay face challenges within their parties – The Jerusalem Post

Netanyahu and Gabbay. (photo credit:MARC ISRAEL SELLEM,REUTERS)

Both Prime Minister and Likud leader Benjamin Netanyahu and Labor chairman Avi Gabbay will attempt to gain new powers in their parties in meetings of their party secretariats that will convene on Thursday evening.

Netanyahus allies will try to pass a proposal in the Likud secretariat to approve his confidant Tzuri Siso as the director-general of the party.

Netanyahu appointed Siso as interim director-general in December, replacing veteran Gadi Arieli, who held the post for a decade.

Sisos appointment was seen as controversial due to his closeness to the Netanyahu family and his lack of managerial experience. Netanyahu decided then to appoint Siso interim director-general, because giving him the post permanently required a vote in Likud institutions that the prime minister did not know if he could pass.

Following Netanyahus successful rally at the Tel Aviv Fairgrounds two weeks ago in which he entrenched his power in the party, he is not expected to have a problem passing the appointment of Siso, who has impressed party workers with his skills and his affable personality.

Transportation Minister Israel Katz, who chairs the secretariat, initially opposed the Siso appointment.

But he is expected to vote in favor on Thursday night.

Meanwhile, in Labor, Gabbays plan to expand his power at the expense of party secretary-general Eren Hermoni will face its first test when the secretariat of Labors executive committee meets on Thursday night.

Opponents of the move had their say at a meeting of the secretariat on Tuesday. Gabbay will formally present it and bring it a vote on Thursday after the partys law committee prepared the proposal at a meeting on Wednesday.

The most controversial change Gabbay intends to request is the right to select four candidates in realistic slots for the next Knesset, two of who would be placed in the top 10 on the partys candidates list. He also wants to make decisions about committee appointments of Zionist Union MKs in the Knesset and gain more control over the partys finances.

As of Wednesday, no MK came out against Gabbays proposal. But that could change on Thursday, when his rival, MK Amir Peretz, will meet with Gabbay and reveal what he thinks about the plan for the first time.

Both Gabbay and former prime minister Ehud Barak have denied reports that the plan is intended to facilitate a political comeback for Barak.

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Netanyahu, Gabbay face challenges within their parties – The Jerusalem Post

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Netanyahu to warn Putin not to cross red lines – The Jerusalem Post

THE TIES between Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu have been characterized as straightforward, open and built on personal trust. (photo credit:REUTERS)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus primary objective during his upcoming talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin will not be to try to convince the Russians to prevent an Iranian permanent presence in Syria, but rather to let them know what Israel plans to do if Tehran tries to set up such a presence, former National Security Council Advisor Yaakov Amidror said on Tuesday.

Netanyahu is scheduled to fly to Sochi on the Black Sea for a meeting with Putin on Wednesday, returning home the same day. This will be his fourth trip to Moscow in the last 16 months.

The main goal of the meeting, Amidror said, needs to be for the Russians to have a better understanding of Israel’s concerns and red lines, and how Israel is likely to react if those red lines are crossed.

Israel is not coordinating with the Russians, but it’s very important for Israel that the Russians understand where Israel stands, he said in a phone call with The Israel Project.

Israel should not try to convince Putin, but rather what is important is to make sure that if Israel is forced to act in the future, the Russians will not be surprised. They will understand what motivated Israel and why Israel is acting as it will.

Netanyahu, said Amidror, who has sat in on numerous meetings such as these in the past, will bring to Putin all of Israel’s facts, assessments and concerns so that the Russian leader will be able to take them into account. This way, he continued, if Israel feels compelled to act, the Russians though they might not agree will understand why it happened.

Israel has come out clearly against the ceasefire being brokered in Syria between Russia and the United States, fearing that it will enshrine a permanent Iranian military presence in the country. Neither Moscow nor Washington, however, have apparently been moved to alter their positions because of Israel’s concerns.

Amidror did not hold out any high hopes that Netanyahu’s visit to Sochi will change that situation.

We can give them our perspective and I think it’s important they will have it, but I’m not sure that they will agree with us about the details, he said.

Amidror defined two issues as of critical importance to Israel in the future arrangements in Syria. The first is that Iran will not have the ability to build bases there that will serve as a launching pad against it in the future, and the second is that Syria will not turn into a state through which game changing weapons — including Russian weapons systems — are moved into the region.

It should be well understood all over, mainly in Moscow, that Israel will do whatever is needed not to let the Iranians build these bases, and not to let Hezbollah get these weapons systems, he said. These are the two main concerns for Israel and they should be very clear in this meeting.

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Netanyahu to warn Putin not to cross red lines – The Jerusalem Post

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu takes a stand on right to privacy amid lawsuits … – The Jerusalem Post

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at a rally.. (photo credit:AVSHALOM SASSONI/MAARIV)

In light of multiple Freedom of Information lawsuits aimed at him and his family, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu took a stand for the right to privacy Tuesday, petitioning the Supreme Court.

Netanyahus attorneys asked a larger panel of judges to review the Supreme Court decision from earlier this month requiring him to hand over to Channel 10 reporter Raviv Drucker records of his telephone conversations with Israel Hayom owner Sheldon Adelson and the free dailys former editor-in-chief Amos Regev.

Druckers goal in getting phone records is to draw a connection the prime minister and the pro-Netanyahu newspaper, whereas Netanyahu argued that his conversations with Adelson and Regev were private and unrelated to Israel Hayom. The court had said that, while private conversations are generally beyond the scope of the Freedom of Information Law, the public interest overcomes the right to privacy in this case, especially in light of Druckers request to only know the times of the phone calls and not their content.

A statement released by the Netanyahu familys spokesman Nir Hefetz said that the prime minister still plans to release his phone records, for the simple reason that he has nothing to hide, but that he wants to fight the precedent the ruling set, which he argues limits the right to privacy.

Hefetz did not, however, respond as to when Netanyahu will release the phone records.

In the short time since the ruling was publicized, we have become witness to a massive wave of attempts to reveal private telephone conversations and schedules of civil servants and elected officials, and this is only the beginning, the statement reads. The prime minister gives a great importance on principle to the basic right to privacyIt is unacceptable that ministers, MKs, judges and civil servants will have to expose their private conversations to journalists and others.

The petition comes two days after Maariv reporter Ben Caspit won a Freedom of Information lawsuit requiring the Jerusalem Municipality to release the work hours of the prime ministers wife, Sarah Netanyahu, whom they employ as a child psychologist.

The lawyers petition points to a legal precedent from the US, in which it was determined that telephone slips and personal appointment calendars do not fall under the category of the Freedom of Information Act, but public officials daily agendas, which are used by office staff, do.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KPAX-TV

CNN Library

(CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel.

Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949

Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel

Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu

Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian

Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu

Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced)

Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa

Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976

Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain

Religion: Jewish

Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party.

Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.”

Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia.

First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948.

Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane.

Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984.

Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal.

1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group.

1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington.

1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations.

1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament.

1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.

1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office.

1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman.

June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel.

September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence.

1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset.

1999-2002 – Works in the private sector.

2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs.

2003-2005 – Minister of Finance.

August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control.

December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party.

August 2007 – Is re-elected.

February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position.

February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament.

February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government.

March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister.

September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell.

May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.”

May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries.

June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed.

September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners.

October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013.

January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats.

March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara.

October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.”

November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.”

April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.”

September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS.

December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature.

March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress.

March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister.

October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords.

October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem.

January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation.

January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations.

August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe.

TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KPAX-TV

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KTVQ.com | Q2 | Continuous News Coverage | Billings, MT – KTVQ Billings News

CNN Library

(CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel.

Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949

Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel

Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu

Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian

Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu

Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced)

Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa

Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976

Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain

Religion: Jewish

Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party.

Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.”

Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia.

First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948.

Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane.

Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984.

Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal.

1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group.

1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington.

1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations.

1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament.

1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.

1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office.

1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman.

June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel.

September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence.

1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset.

1999-2002 – Works in the private sector.

2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs.

2003-2005 – Minister of Finance.

August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control.

December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party.

August 2007 – Is re-elected.

February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position.

February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament.

February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government.

March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister.

September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell.

May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.”

May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries.

June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed.

September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners.

October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013.

January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats.

March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara.

October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.”

November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.”

April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.”

September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS.

December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature.

March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress.

March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister.

October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords.

October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem.

January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation.

January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations.

August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe.

TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KTVQ.com | Q2 | Continuous News Coverage | Billings, MT – KTVQ Billings News

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KITV Honolulu

CNN Library

(CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel.

Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949

Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel

Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu

Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian

Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu

Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced)

Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa

Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976

Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain

Religion: Jewish

Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party.

Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.”

Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia.

First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948.

Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane.

Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984.

Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal.

1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group.

1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington.

1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations.

1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament.

1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.

1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office.

1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman.

June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel.

September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence.

1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset.

1999-2002 – Works in the private sector.

2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs.

2003-2005 – Minister of Finance.

August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control.

December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party.

August 2007 – Is re-elected.

February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position.

February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament.

February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government.

March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister.

September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell.

May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.”

May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries.

June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed.

September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners.

October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013.

January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats.

March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara.

October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.”

November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.”

April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.”

September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS.

December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature.

March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress.

March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister.

October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords.

October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem.

January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation.

January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations.

August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe.

TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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Netanyahu strategist Arthur Finkelstein dies at 72 – The Jerusalem Post

Political strategist Arthur Finkelstein, who worked for the Likud in several elections, as well as US Republican presidential candidates, died of lung cancer Friday at age 72.

He is survived by his husband, whom he married in 2005, and their two daughters.

A Jewish American born in New York in 1945, Finkelstein came to prominence in the 1970s, helping turn Ronald Reagan into a nationally known politician in the 1976 Republican primary, and continued to help conservative politicians get elected first in the US, and later internationally. He worked with US presidents Richard Nixon, Reagan and George H.W. Bush, as well as with many Republican congressional and gubernatorial candidates.

Finkelstein was known for developing biting attack ads, a talent he used to help win Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu the premiership for the first time in 1996. He is credited with coining the winning slogan Peres will divide Jerusalem, referring to then-prime minister Shimon Peres, after analyzing polling data and finding that Israelis would reject a deal with the Palestinians that would require the capitals division.

The strategist worked with Netanyahu again in 1999, when he lost the election to Ehud Barak; Ariel Sharons winning campaign in 2001; Likud MK Silvan Shalom in 2003; and Shaul Mofaz in the Kadima primary in 2008.

Finkelstein was behind the union between Likud and Yisrael Beytenu in 2013, an election in which they lost a quarter of their combined seats in the Knesset.

Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman and Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat were among his recent Israeli clients.

Liberman, for whom Finkelstein wrote the slogans Da Liberman, using the Russian word for yes, and No Citizenship Without Loyalty, said Saturday that Finkelstein was an unorthodox man with a winning personality, charm and wisdom.

Arthur was a polymath with broad knowledge in many areas, but before all else, he was a warm Jew and a great admirer of the State of Israel, Liberman said. Arthur was a great professional, whose activities around the world introduced him to presidents and prime ministers, but never changed his comfortable personality, and he was always careful to remain grounded.

The defense minister called Finkelstein a personal friend whom he will remember as one of the most interesting people he has met.

Two pollsters who worked with Finkelstein shed some light on his influence and methods.

George Birnbaum, who worked with Finkelstein for 25 years and was his business partner for more than a decade, called Finkelstein proof that one man can really change the world, pointing to the impact he had both in Israel, where he helped get Netanyahu and Sharon elected, and in the US, with Nixon and Reagan, and saying he did the same in a dozen countries.

Arthurs genius was the ability to take data and translate it into an art form. A lot of consultants are good at polls or good at ads this was something very unique about Arthur, he said.

In Israel, Finkelstein would ask, in all his polls, the question of whether people identify first as Jews or as Israelis, and would use the answers to design campaigns.

It showed in a unique way how people behave when they voted, Birnbaum recounted. Out of that came Peres will divide Jerusalem…

Bibi is good for the Jews sort of came from that.

Pollster and strategist Mitchell Barak explained people who see themselves and Jews first respond to Auschwitz, or the kind of things you hear Netanyahu say about defensible borders. People who are Israelis first want to eat Hummus in Ramallah. Since 1996, thats how you define Israelis. Barak said that, for Finkelstein, working in Israel was more than just a place of work. It was a vested interest for him. He definitely loved Israel.

Finkelsteins polling for Sharon found that the war-hero-turned-politician was one of the most beloved people in Israel, Barak recalled, but the strategist later grew concerned and felt that Sharons Gaza-disengagement plan was splitting Israel apart.

We pitched the leaders of the Yesha Council of Jewish communities of the West Bank and, then Gaza, Barak said, and they thought they knew everything, that they could go with their gut instinct and dont need pollsters. He said to them: You know what I think? The disengagement will probably happen and life will move on. Whatll you do then? He was a very brilliant man.

Barak said Finkelstein was a rock star in Israel.

Every Israeli knew who he was. In very few countries do people know political pollsters, so he was more famous here than anywhere else.

Finkelstein gave very few interviews, but a rare one given to The Jerusalem Posts sister publication Maariv in 2004, provides insight into what he may have thought about todays politics.

When you allow people to choose between the corrupt and the stupid, they will go for the corrupt, he said, which could be his answer to whether Netanyahus current legal troubles will hurt him electorally.

As for Donald Trumps defeat of Hillary Clinton in the US Presidential election, one can look at what he said of the latter in 2004: In terms of the Republicans, Hillary Clinton is a wonderful candidate for the presidency.

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Netanyahu strategist Arthur Finkelstein dies at 72 – The Jerusalem Post

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August 20, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Why did Netanyahu wait so long to condemn anti-Semitism in Charlottesville? – Washington Post

By Gershom Gorenberg By Gershom Gorenberg August 17 at 6:29 PM

Gershom Gorenberg, an Israeli historian and journalist, is the author of The Accidental Empire: Israel and the Birth of the Settlements, 1967-1977 and, most recently, The Unmaking of Israel.

In the drama of Charlottesville, Benjamin Netanyahu had only a small supporting role, on the near-eastern side of the stage. The way he played that role, however, was breathtaking in its audacity: For three days, the prime minister of Israel said nothing about people marching with Nazi flags in an American city, or about a terrorist attack with a car allegedly by an admirer of Hitler. As of this writing, he has not uttered a word about President Trumps infamous both sides news conference.

We Israelis are used to Netanyahu responding immediately to terrorism, perceived anti-Semitism or threats that remind him of the Holocaust. This time, the anti-Semitism was blatant, with demonstrators in Charlottesville chanting Jews will not replace us and carrying Nazi flags. Understanding the connection of those flags to genocide required no more than a third-grade Israeli education. Understanding the nature of the murder was also easy: Israelis are familiar with terrorism by speeding auto.

Yet it took Netanyahu three long days before he managed to tweet, Outraged by expressions of anti-Semitism, neo-Nazism and racism. Everyone should oppose this hatred. Even the brevity that comes with using Twitter was un-Netanyahulike. He usually prefers Facebook, which has room for lucidity that, one must recognize, is beyond the reach of Americas tweeter in chief.

Netanyahus obliviousness to the odor of anti-Semitism around Trump isnt new. In February, Netanyahu traveled to Washington to meet the new president. At a news conference, Netanyahu was asked about Trumps statement on international Holocaust Remembrance Day. That statement made no mention of Jews, erasing the Holocausts victims and the anti-Semitic ideology behind the mass murder. Netanyahus answer: This man is a great friend of the Jewish people and the State of Israel.

At the time, it seemed to me that Netanyahus attitude followed a certain distorted logic: The Holocaust and Israel were inseparable, like shadow and light in the same picture. Threats to Israel were threats of a new Holocaust. Criticism of Israel, or of Netanyahus hawkish policies as Israels leader, were anti-Semitism. On the other hand, if you supported those policies, you were ipso-facto a friend of the Jews. Netanyahus inability to separate the issues was mistaken, but I was willing to believe it was sincere. His near-silence after Charlottesville convinces me that I was too kind.

Lets dispense with some possible explanations. For instance, that he thought a foreign leader shouldnt leap into a domestic American dispute. German Chancellor Angela Merkels quick denunciation, through a spokesman, of naked racism, anti-Semitism and hate in their most evil form in Charlottesville undercut that excuse.

Or perhaps Netanyahu is too involved in American domestic debates, too much the Republican from Israel, to criticize Trumps assignment of blame to both sides? No, he had cover on that front as well, after the condemnations of the presidents moral equivalency from the likes of John McCain and Mitt Romney.

If Netanyahu was concerned purely with internal Israeli politics, thered be even less reason for him to hold back. The Israeli media covered the flags, the violence and Trumps statements with horrified fascination. Condemnations from opposition politicians of the left and center were predictably harsh.

But one of the first statements came from Naftali Bennett, leader of the right-wing Jewish Home Party. The waving of Nazi flags offended Jews and dishonored American soldiers who sacrificed their lives fighting Nazism, Bennett said. He added a pointed demand that leaders of the U.S. denounce anti-Semitism. With his mumbling, Netanyahu ceded the high ground to the electoral rival who most concerns him.

So what gives? Netanyahu, it appears, is most concerned about staying on the good side of a U.S. president who is clueless about the Middle East and has made no meaningful effort to restrain Israeli actions in the occupied territories but who explodes at criticism and bears grudges. Netanyahu also understands that there is an emotional bond, a similarity of angry spirit, between the president and the torch-bearing crowd.

So the prime minister said nothing until Trump chose to recite his condemnation of racists and neo-Nazis on Monday. Then Netanyahu tweeted words calibrated to be no stronger. When Trump backtracked, Netanyahu went silent.

The man who built his rhetoric around the Holocaust is willing to speak softly about anti-Semitism and revived Nazism, and to excuse the president who has inspired the ugliness, for the sake of avoiding interference from Washington.

Here are two conclusions. First, for any U.S. Jews still trying to keep Trump and the chants in Charlottesville apart in your minds: Examine the implications of Netanyahus behavior. He deduced that criticizing the anti-Semites would offend the president.

Second, anti-Semitism is very real. We can see that. But the next time Netanyahu starts up about it, treat his talk with as much cynicism as he does.

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Why did Netanyahu wait so long to condemn anti-Semitism in Charlottesville? – Washington Post

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Pitiful Benjamin Netanyahu Is an Israeli Tragedy – Haaretz

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He could have been on top of the world now, but he preferred to dive headfirst into the swamp

Benjamin Netanyahu is an Israeli tragedy. The discrepancy between what he could have been and what became of him in the end is…

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Pitiful Benjamin Netanyahu Is an Israeli Tragedy – Haaretz

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Netanyahu, Gabbay face challenges within their parties – The Jerusalem Post

Netanyahu and Gabbay. (photo credit:MARC ISRAEL SELLEM,REUTERS) Both Prime Minister and Likud leader Benjamin Netanyahu and Labor chairman Avi Gabbay will attempt to gain new powers in their parties in meetings of their party secretariats that will convene on Thursday evening. Netanyahus allies will try to pass a proposal in the Likud secretariat to approve his confidant Tzuri Siso as the director-general of the party. Netanyahu appointed Siso as interim director-general in December, replacing veteran Gadi Arieli, who held the post for a decade. Sisos appointment was seen as controversial due to his closeness to the Netanyahu family and his lack of managerial experience. Netanyahu decided then to appoint Siso interim director-general, because giving him the post permanently required a vote in Likud institutions that the prime minister did not know if he could pass. Following Netanyahus successful rally at the Tel Aviv Fairgrounds two weeks ago in which he entrenched his power in the party, he is not expected to have a problem passing the appointment of Siso, who has impressed party workers with his skills and his affable personality. Transportation Minister Israel Katz, who chairs the secretariat, initially opposed the Siso appointment. But he is expected to vote in favor on Thursday night. Meanwhile, in Labor, Gabbays plan to expand his power at the expense of party secretary-general Eren Hermoni will face its first test when the secretariat of Labors executive committee meets on Thursday night. Opponents of the move had their say at a meeting of the secretariat on Tuesday. Gabbay will formally present it and bring it a vote on Thursday after the partys law committee prepared the proposal at a meeting on Wednesday. The most controversial change Gabbay intends to request is the right to select four candidates in realistic slots for the next Knesset, two of who would be placed in the top 10 on the partys candidates list. He also wants to make decisions about committee appointments of Zionist Union MKs in the Knesset and gain more control over the partys finances. As of Wednesday, no MK came out against Gabbays proposal. But that could change on Thursday, when his rival, MK Amir Peretz, will meet with Gabbay and reveal what he thinks about the plan for the first time. Both Gabbay and former prime minister Ehud Barak have denied reports that the plan is intended to facilitate a political comeback for Barak. Share on facebook

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Netanyahu to warn Putin not to cross red lines – The Jerusalem Post

THE TIES between Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu have been characterized as straightforward, open and built on personal trust. (photo credit:REUTERS) Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus primary objective during his upcoming talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin will not be to try to convince the Russians to prevent an Iranian permanent presence in Syria, but rather to let them know what Israel plans to do if Tehran tries to set up such a presence, former National Security Council Advisor Yaakov Amidror said on Tuesday. Netanyahu is scheduled to fly to Sochi on the Black Sea for a meeting with Putin on Wednesday, returning home the same day. This will be his fourth trip to Moscow in the last 16 months. The main goal of the meeting, Amidror said, needs to be for the Russians to have a better understanding of Israel’s concerns and red lines, and how Israel is likely to react if those red lines are crossed. Israel is not coordinating with the Russians, but it’s very important for Israel that the Russians understand where Israel stands, he said in a phone call with The Israel Project. Israel should not try to convince Putin, but rather what is important is to make sure that if Israel is forced to act in the future, the Russians will not be surprised. They will understand what motivated Israel and why Israel is acting as it will. Netanyahu, said Amidror, who has sat in on numerous meetings such as these in the past, will bring to Putin all of Israel’s facts, assessments and concerns so that the Russian leader will be able to take them into account. This way, he continued, if Israel feels compelled to act, the Russians though they might not agree will understand why it happened. Israel has come out clearly against the ceasefire being brokered in Syria between Russia and the United States, fearing that it will enshrine a permanent Iranian military presence in the country. Neither Moscow nor Washington, however, have apparently been moved to alter their positions because of Israel’s concerns. Amidror did not hold out any high hopes that Netanyahu’s visit to Sochi will change that situation. We can give them our perspective and I think it’s important they will have it, but I’m not sure that they will agree with us about the details, he said. Amidror defined two issues as of critical importance to Israel in the future arrangements in Syria. The first is that Iran will not have the ability to build bases there that will serve as a launching pad against it in the future, and the second is that Syria will not turn into a state through which game changing weapons — including Russian weapons systems — are moved into the region. It should be well understood all over, mainly in Moscow, that Israel will do whatever is needed not to let the Iranians build these bases, and not to let Hezbollah get these weapons systems, he said. These are the two main concerns for Israel and they should be very clear in this meeting. Share on facebook

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu takes a stand on right to privacy amid lawsuits … – The Jerusalem Post

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at a rally.. (photo credit:AVSHALOM SASSONI/MAARIV) In light of multiple Freedom of Information lawsuits aimed at him and his family, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu took a stand for the right to privacy Tuesday, petitioning the Supreme Court. Netanyahus attorneys asked a larger panel of judges to review the Supreme Court decision from earlier this month requiring him to hand over to Channel 10 reporter Raviv Drucker records of his telephone conversations with Israel Hayom owner Sheldon Adelson and the free dailys former editor-in-chief Amos Regev. Druckers goal in getting phone records is to draw a connection the prime minister and the pro-Netanyahu newspaper, whereas Netanyahu argued that his conversations with Adelson and Regev were private and unrelated to Israel Hayom. The court had said that, while private conversations are generally beyond the scope of the Freedom of Information Law, the public interest overcomes the right to privacy in this case, especially in light of Druckers request to only know the times of the phone calls and not their content. A statement released by the Netanyahu familys spokesman Nir Hefetz said that the prime minister still plans to release his phone records, for the simple reason that he has nothing to hide, but that he wants to fight the precedent the ruling set, which he argues limits the right to privacy. Hefetz did not, however, respond as to when Netanyahu will release the phone records. In the short time since the ruling was publicized, we have become witness to a massive wave of attempts to reveal private telephone conversations and schedules of civil servants and elected officials, and this is only the beginning, the statement reads. The prime minister gives a great importance on principle to the basic right to privacyIt is unacceptable that ministers, MKs, judges and civil servants will have to expose their private conversations to journalists and others. The petition comes two days after Maariv reporter Ben Caspit won a Freedom of Information lawsuit requiring the Jerusalem Municipality to release the work hours of the prime ministers wife, Sarah Netanyahu, whom they employ as a child psychologist. The lawyers petition points to a legal precedent from the US, in which it was determined that telephone slips and personal appointment calendars do not fall under the category of the Freedom of Information Act, but public officials daily agendas, which are used by office staff, do. Share on facebook

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KPAX-TV

CNN Library (CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel. Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949 Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced) Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976 Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain Religion: Jewish Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party. Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.” Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia. First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948. Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane. Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984. Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal. 1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group. 1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington. 1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations. 1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. 1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. 1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office. 1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman. June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel. September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence. 1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset. 1999-2002 – Works in the private sector. 2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs. 2003-2005 – Minister of Finance. August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control. December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party. August 2007 – Is re-elected. February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position. February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament. February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government. March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister. September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell. May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.” May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries. June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed. September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners. October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013. January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats. March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara. October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.” November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.” April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.” September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS. December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature. March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress. March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister. October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords. October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem. January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation. January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations. August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe. TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KTVQ.com | Q2 | Continuous News Coverage | Billings, MT – KTVQ Billings News

CNN Library (CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel. Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949 Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced) Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976 Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain Religion: Jewish Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party. Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.” Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia. First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948. Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane. Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984. Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal. 1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group. 1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington. 1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations. 1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. 1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. 1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office. 1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman. June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel. September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence. 1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset. 1999-2002 – Works in the private sector. 2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs. 2003-2005 – Minister of Finance. August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control. December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party. August 2007 – Is re-elected. February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position. February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament. February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government. March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister. September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell. May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.” May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries. June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed. September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners. October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013. January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats. March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara. October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.” November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.” April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.” September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS. December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature. March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress. March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister. October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords. October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem. January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation. January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations. August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe. TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Benjamin Netanyahu Fast Facts – KITV Honolulu

CNN Library (CNN) — Here’s a look at the life of Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel. Personal: Birth date: October 21, 1949 Birth place: Tel Aviv, Israel Birth name: Binyamin Netanyahu Father: Benzion Netanyahu, a historian Mother: Cela (Segal) Netanyahu Marriages: Sara Ben-Artzi (1991-present); Fleur Cates (1981-1988, divorced); Miriam Haran (divorced) Children: with Sara Ben-Artzi: Avner and Yair; with Miriam Haran: Noa Education: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1974 and M.S., 1976 Military service: Israeli Defense Forces, 1967-1972, Captain Religion: Jewish Other Facts: Leader of the right-wing Likud Party. Is known throughout Israel by the nickname “Bibi.” Spent his teenage years in the United States; went to high school in Philadelphia. First Israeli prime minister to be born after the state was founded in 1948. Netanyahu’s brother, Yonatan, was killed in action in 1976 while leading a mission to rescue Israeli passengers on a hijacked Air France plane. Netanyahu organized two international conferences on ways to combat terrorism, one in 1979 and another in 1984. Timeline: 1967-1972 – Serves in the Israeli Defense Forces in an elite commando unit, Sayeret Matkal. 1976-1978 – Works in the United States for Boston Consulting Group. 1982-1984 – Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Washington. 1984- 1988 – Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations. 1988 – Returns to Israel and wins a seat in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. 1988-1991 – Deputy foreign minister under Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. 1991-1992 – Deputy Minister in the prime minister’s office. 1993 – Is elected the Likud party chairman. June 1996-July 1999 – Prime Minister of Israel. September 1996 – Has first meeting with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. October 23, 1998 – Yasser Arafat and Netanyahu sign the Wye Memorandum, an interim accord, exchanging land and power to secure Israel from political violence. 1999 – Following his defeat in the elections, Netanyahu resigns from the Knesset. 1999-2002 – Works in the private sector. 2002-2003 – Minister of Foreign Affairs. 2003-2005 – Minister of Finance. August 2005 – Resigns in protest over the plan to withdraw Jewish settlers from Gaza and return their land to Palestinian control. December 2005 – Is elected leader of the Likud party. August 2007 – Is re-elected. February 10, 2009 – After an election, the results remain unclear as to who will become prime minister, Netanyahu or chief rival Tzipi Livni. Both make claims to the position. February 19, 2009 – Wins backing from Israeli parliament. February 20, 2009 – Becomes the prime minister-designate and begins working on the formation of the new government. March 31, 2009 – Is sworn in as prime minister. September 1-2, 2010 – Attends a meeting in Washington hosted by President Barack Obama to possibly restart peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Other leaders in attendance are Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. September 14, 2010 – Meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt for second round of peace talks in two weeks. Also in attendance are US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Special Envoy to Middle East George Mitchell. May 4, 2011 – Denounces the reconciliation agreement signed by Fatah and Hamas in Egypt and calls on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to “immediately cancel the reconciliation deal with Hamas and choose the path of peace with Israel.” May 24, 2011 – Addresses a joint meeting of Congress. He says that he is prepared to make “painful compromises” for a peace settlement with the Palestinians. However, he repeats that Israel will not accept a return to its pre-1967 boundaries. June 13, 2012 – Israel releases a 153-page report criticizing Netanyahu’s handling of a raid against a Turkish aid flotilla to Gaza in 2010, where nine Turkish activists were killed. September 27, 2012 – In an address to the United Nations, Netanyahu exhorts the General Assembly to draw “a clear red line” to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. October 9, 2012 – Calls for an early election after failing to agree on a budget with his coalition partners. October 9, 2012 – Israel’s parliament votes to dissolve itself and schedules an election for January 22, 2013. January 22, 2013 – According to media exit polling, Netanyahu’s Likud Beitenu party wins 31 Knesset seats in the election. The Yesh Atid party, a new centrist movement, comes in a surprising second place with at least 19 seats. March 24, 2013 – Apologizes to Turkey for the 2010 raid on the Gaza-bound flotilla Mavi Marmara. October 1, 2013 – In a speech at the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu accuses Iranian president Hassan Rouhani of seeking to obtain a nuclear weapon and describes him as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a wolf who thinks he can pull the wool over the eyes of the international community.” November 24, 2013 – Tells reporters that the Iran nuclear deal that world leaders reached with Tehran is a “historic mistake.” April 27, 2014 – Tells CNN that Israel cannot negotiate with the government of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas while it is backed by Hamas. “I call on President Abbas: Tear up your pact with Hamas.” September 29, 2014 – Warns delegates at the UN General Assembly not to overlook threats posed by Iran and Hamas in their zeal to defeat ISIS. December 2, 2014 – Calls for the dismissal of two members of his coalition cabinet and announces he will call for the dissolution of the nation’s legislature. March 3, 2015 – Addresses a joint session of Congress. March 18, 2015 – Is re-elected as prime minister. October 1, 2015 – Netanyahu says he is “prepared to immediately resume” direct peace talks with the Palestinian Authority “without any preconditions whatsoever.” His remarks come a day after the leader of the Palestinian Authority said Palestinians are stepping away from the Oslo Accords. October 20, 2015 – During a speech at the 37th Zionist Congress, Netanyahu says that Adolf Hitler “didn’t want to exterminate the Jews” but was urged to do so by Haj Amin al-Husseini, a former grand mufti of Jerusalem. January 2, 2017 – Israeli authorities question Netanyahu for three hours. He is suspected of corruption related to benefits he allegedly received from businessmen. The prime minister denies the allegations, suggesting that there are political motives for the probe. In a Facebook post, Netanyahu lists the charges and says that investigators will find “nothing” to support each allegation. January 27, 2017 – Is questioned a third time in an ongoing graft probe. Netanyahu continues to deny the accusations. August 4, 2017 – It is announced that Ari Harow, Netanyahu’s former chief-of-staff has agreed to testify against him in the graft probe. TM & 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Netanyahu strategist Arthur Finkelstein dies at 72 – The Jerusalem Post

Political strategist Arthur Finkelstein, who worked for the Likud in several elections, as well as US Republican presidential candidates, died of lung cancer Friday at age 72. He is survived by his husband, whom he married in 2005, and their two daughters. A Jewish American born in New York in 1945, Finkelstein came to prominence in the 1970s, helping turn Ronald Reagan into a nationally known politician in the 1976 Republican primary, and continued to help conservative politicians get elected first in the US, and later internationally. He worked with US presidents Richard Nixon, Reagan and George H.W. Bush, as well as with many Republican congressional and gubernatorial candidates. Finkelstein was known for developing biting attack ads, a talent he used to help win Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu the premiership for the first time in 1996. He is credited with coining the winning slogan Peres will divide Jerusalem, referring to then-prime minister Shimon Peres, after analyzing polling data and finding that Israelis would reject a deal with the Palestinians that would require the capitals division. The strategist worked with Netanyahu again in 1999, when he lost the election to Ehud Barak; Ariel Sharons winning campaign in 2001; Likud MK Silvan Shalom in 2003; and Shaul Mofaz in the Kadima primary in 2008. Finkelstein was behind the union between Likud and Yisrael Beytenu in 2013, an election in which they lost a quarter of their combined seats in the Knesset. Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman and Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat were among his recent Israeli clients. Liberman, for whom Finkelstein wrote the slogans Da Liberman, using the Russian word for yes, and No Citizenship Without Loyalty, said Saturday that Finkelstein was an unorthodox man with a winning personality, charm and wisdom. Arthur was a polymath with broad knowledge in many areas, but before all else, he was a warm Jew and a great admirer of the State of Israel, Liberman said. Arthur was a great professional, whose activities around the world introduced him to presidents and prime ministers, but never changed his comfortable personality, and he was always careful to remain grounded. The defense minister called Finkelstein a personal friend whom he will remember as one of the most interesting people he has met. Two pollsters who worked with Finkelstein shed some light on his influence and methods. George Birnbaum, who worked with Finkelstein for 25 years and was his business partner for more than a decade, called Finkelstein proof that one man can really change the world, pointing to the impact he had both in Israel, where he helped get Netanyahu and Sharon elected, and in the US, with Nixon and Reagan, and saying he did the same in a dozen countries. Arthurs genius was the ability to take data and translate it into an art form. A lot of consultants are good at polls or good at ads this was something very unique about Arthur, he said. In Israel, Finkelstein would ask, in all his polls, the question of whether people identify first as Jews or as Israelis, and would use the answers to design campaigns. It showed in a unique way how people behave when they voted, Birnbaum recounted. Out of that came Peres will divide Jerusalem… Bibi is good for the Jews sort of came from that. Pollster and strategist Mitchell Barak explained people who see themselves and Jews first respond to Auschwitz, or the kind of things you hear Netanyahu say about defensible borders. People who are Israelis first want to eat Hummus in Ramallah. Since 1996, thats how you define Israelis. Barak said that, for Finkelstein, working in Israel was more than just a place of work. It was a vested interest for him. He definitely loved Israel. Finkelsteins polling for Sharon found that the war-hero-turned-politician was one of the most beloved people in Israel, Barak recalled, but the strategist later grew concerned and felt that Sharons Gaza-disengagement plan was splitting Israel apart. We pitched the leaders of the Yesha Council of Jewish communities of the West Bank and, then Gaza, Barak said, and they thought they knew everything, that they could go with their gut instinct and dont need pollsters. He said to them: You know what I think? The disengagement will probably happen and life will move on. Whatll you do then? He was a very brilliant man. Barak said Finkelstein was a rock star in Israel. Every Israeli knew who he was. In very few countries do people know political pollsters, so he was more famous here than anywhere else. Finkelstein gave very few interviews, but a rare one given to The Jerusalem Posts sister publication Maariv in 2004, provides insight into what he may have thought about todays politics. When you allow people to choose between the corrupt and the stupid, they will go for the corrupt, he said, which could be his answer to whether Netanyahus current legal troubles will hurt him electorally. As for Donald Trumps defeat of Hillary Clinton in the US Presidential election, one can look at what he said of the latter in 2004: In terms of the Republicans, Hillary Clinton is a wonderful candidate for the presidency. Share on facebook

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August 20, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Why did Netanyahu wait so long to condemn anti-Semitism in Charlottesville? – Washington Post

By Gershom Gorenberg By Gershom Gorenberg August 17 at 6:29 PM Gershom Gorenberg, an Israeli historian and journalist, is the author of The Accidental Empire: Israel and the Birth of the Settlements, 1967-1977 and, most recently, The Unmaking of Israel. In the drama of Charlottesville, Benjamin Netanyahu had only a small supporting role, on the near-eastern side of the stage. The way he played that role, however, was breathtaking in its audacity: For three days, the prime minister of Israel said nothing about people marching with Nazi flags in an American city, or about a terrorist attack with a car allegedly by an admirer of Hitler. As of this writing, he has not uttered a word about President Trumps infamous both sides news conference. We Israelis are used to Netanyahu responding immediately to terrorism, perceived anti-Semitism or threats that remind him of the Holocaust. This time, the anti-Semitism was blatant, with demonstrators in Charlottesville chanting Jews will not replace us and carrying Nazi flags. Understanding the connection of those flags to genocide required no more than a third-grade Israeli education. Understanding the nature of the murder was also easy: Israelis are familiar with terrorism by speeding auto. Yet it took Netanyahu three long days before he managed to tweet, Outraged by expressions of anti-Semitism, neo-Nazism and racism. Everyone should oppose this hatred. Even the brevity that comes with using Twitter was un-Netanyahulike. He usually prefers Facebook, which has room for lucidity that, one must recognize, is beyond the reach of Americas tweeter in chief. Netanyahus obliviousness to the odor of anti-Semitism around Trump isnt new. In February, Netanyahu traveled to Washington to meet the new president. At a news conference, Netanyahu was asked about Trumps statement on international Holocaust Remembrance Day. That statement made no mention of Jews, erasing the Holocausts victims and the anti-Semitic ideology behind the mass murder. Netanyahus answer: This man is a great friend of the Jewish people and the State of Israel. At the time, it seemed to me that Netanyahus attitude followed a certain distorted logic: The Holocaust and Israel were inseparable, like shadow and light in the same picture. Threats to Israel were threats of a new Holocaust. Criticism of Israel, or of Netanyahus hawkish policies as Israels leader, were anti-Semitism. On the other hand, if you supported those policies, you were ipso-facto a friend of the Jews. Netanyahus inability to separate the issues was mistaken, but I was willing to believe it was sincere. His near-silence after Charlottesville convinces me that I was too kind. Lets dispense with some possible explanations. For instance, that he thought a foreign leader shouldnt leap into a domestic American dispute. German Chancellor Angela Merkels quick denunciation, through a spokesman, of naked racism, anti-Semitism and hate in their most evil form in Charlottesville undercut that excuse. Or perhaps Netanyahu is too involved in American domestic debates, too much the Republican from Israel, to criticize Trumps assignment of blame to both sides? No, he had cover on that front as well, after the condemnations of the presidents moral equivalency from the likes of John McCain and Mitt Romney. If Netanyahu was concerned purely with internal Israeli politics, thered be even less reason for him to hold back. The Israeli media covered the flags, the violence and Trumps statements with horrified fascination. Condemnations from opposition politicians of the left and center were predictably harsh. But one of the first statements came from Naftali Bennett, leader of the right-wing Jewish Home Party. The waving of Nazi flags offended Jews and dishonored American soldiers who sacrificed their lives fighting Nazism, Bennett said. He added a pointed demand that leaders of the U.S. denounce anti-Semitism. With his mumbling, Netanyahu ceded the high ground to the electoral rival who most concerns him. So what gives? Netanyahu, it appears, is most concerned about staying on the good side of a U.S. president who is clueless about the Middle East and has made no meaningful effort to restrain Israeli actions in the occupied territories but who explodes at criticism and bears grudges. Netanyahu also understands that there is an emotional bond, a similarity of angry spirit, between the president and the torch-bearing crowd. So the prime minister said nothing until Trump chose to recite his condemnation of racists and neo-Nazis on Monday. Then Netanyahu tweeted words calibrated to be no stronger. When Trump backtracked, Netanyahu went silent. The man who built his rhetoric around the Holocaust is willing to speak softly about anti-Semitism and revived Nazism, and to excuse the president who has inspired the ugliness, for the sake of avoiding interference from Washington. Here are two conclusions. First, for any U.S. Jews still trying to keep Trump and the chants in Charlottesville apart in your minds: Examine the implications of Netanyahus behavior. He deduced that criticizing the anti-Semites would offend the president. Second, anti-Semitism is very real. We can see that. But the next time Netanyahu starts up about it, treat his talk with as much cynicism as he does.

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed

Pitiful Benjamin Netanyahu Is an Israeli Tragedy – Haaretz

Home > Opinion He could have been on top of the world now, but he preferred to dive headfirst into the swamp Benjamin Netanyahu is an Israeli tragedy. The discrepancy between what he could have been and what became of him in the end is… Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today We’ve got more newsletters we think you’ll find interesting. Please try again later. This email address has already registered for this newsletter.

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Benjamin Netanyahu  Comments Closed


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