Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

Fairfield Museum After Dark: The Black Panthers from National to Local – Fairfield Sun

The public is invited to visit the Museum After Dark on Thursday, May 4, at 6 p.m., for a presentation about the legacy of the Black Panther party. The Fairfield Museum will host Dr. Yohuru Williams of Fairfield University and special guest Craig Kelly, former president of the NAACP in Bridgeport and member of the Black Panther party in New York. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. and the featured event will start at 6:45. This program is held in conjunction with the Museums newest exhibition, Talkin Bout My Generation: Fairfield in the 1960s and 1970s.

Dr. Yohuru Williams

Dr. Williams will lead a presentation on the Black Panther party, providing a broad analysis of the Party and its legacy. He will provide examples of the local chapters, including Connecticut, New England and New York City, and how the party chapters related to national scene, but also reflected their own community. Learn how New Haven became a pivotal point in the challenges between the different perspectives, from political nuances to militant philosophy.

Described in Diverse Issues in Higher Education as one of the most exciting scholars of his generation, Dr. Williams is the History Department Chair and the Director of Black Studies at Fairfield University in Fairfield, CT. He is the author of Black Politics/White Power: Civil Rights, Black Power, the Black Panthers in New Haven and editor of Liberated Territory: Untold Local Perspectives on the Black Panther Party. He is also Chief Historian for the Jackie Robinson Foundation and Museum in New York, NY. He received his Ph.D. from Howard University in 1998.

Following the presentation, Dr. Williams will lead a discussion with guest Craig Kelly, former president of the NAACP in Bridgeport and member of the Black Panther Party in New York. Kelly, a lifelong resident of the Bridgeport, received a masters degree in counseling from the University of Bridgeport. He has provided counseling services for the Inner City Violence Prevention Association, Inc., families of African American firefighters who died on 9/11, South African AIDS victims, and the Katrina Assistance Project. He retired from the Bridgeport Fire Department as a Lieutenant in 2004 and served as president of the Greater Bridgeport NAACP from 2007-2009. He is a member of Mt. Aery Baptist Church in Bridgeport.

The reception and presentation are for members, with a $5 suggested donation for nonmembers. For more information or to learn about the new exhibition visit Fairfieldhistory.org. Talkin Bout My Generation: Fairfield in the 1960s & 1970s runs through Sept. 17.

The Fairfield Museum is located at 370 Beach Road in Fairfield. For more information or to register for programs visit Fairfieldhistory.org or call 203-259-1598. The Museum and Museum Shop are open 10-4, daily. Admission is free for members and children ages 5 and under; $5 for adults; $3 for seniors/students.

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Fairfield Museum After Dark: The Black Panthers from National to Local – Fairfield Sun

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black Panther Footage Reveals the Ferocious Female Warriors of Wakanda – Vanity Fair

Update 7:35 E.T.: A Marvel representative reached out to say that the nature of the relationship between Danai Guriras Okoye and Florence Kasumbas Ayo in Black Panther is not a romantic one and that specific love storyline from the comic World of Wakanda was not used as a source.

The original article continues below.

Whether or not he had the approval of Disney when he did so, Beauty and the Beast director Bill Condon caused quite a stir in the April issue of Attitudeboth of hopeful expectations and of conservative pushbackwhen he touted Josh Gads character LeFou and his exclusively gay moment.Though Condon surely had his heart in the right place, the phrase overpromised on what the film ultimately underdelivered: the moment comes when LeFou ends the movie by dancing, briefly with a man. O.K. However, early footage of Marvels upcoming Black Panther screened for journalists Monday night movie promises much more.

The scene in question features Walking Dead star Danai Gurira dancing on a boat with her fellow Dora Milaje, i.e., Black Panthers personal female bodyguards. These womenfirst introduced to moviegoers in Captain America: Civil War are the warriors who watch over Chadwick Bosemans royal family. In Civil War, Uganda-born actress Florence Kasumba made an instant impression on audiences as one member of the select group when she curtly ordered Scarlett Johanssons Black Widow to move aside for TChalla.

In the rough cut of this Black Panther scene, we see Guriras Okoye and Kasumbas Ayo swaying rhythmically back in formation with the rest of their team. Okoye eyes Ayo flirtatiously for a long time as the camera pans in on them. Eventually, she says, appreciatively and appraisingly, You look good. Ayo responds in kind. Okoye grins and replies, I know.

This quick moment between two warrior women on their way to TChallas coronation leans into a current very popular run of the Black Panther comic. A 2016 spin-off called World of Wakanda by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay, and Yona Harvey is all about the relationship between two members of the Dora Milaje. The official description:

A Wakandan love storyits tenderness matched only by its brutality.

You know them now as The Midnight Angels, but in this story they are

just Ayo and Aneka, young women recruited to become Dora Milaje, an

elite task force trained to protect the crown at all costs. What happens when your nation needs your hearts

and minds, but you already gave them to each other?

Other footage from the film screened early for reporters centers more closely on TChalla, including scenes of a traditional and elaborate Wakandan ceremony, and a shoot-out in a South Korea casino featuring Andy Serkiss Claw and Martin Freemans Everett K. Ross. For fans of Lupita Nyongo, there was also a pair of scenes showing her character dancing (she gets her own boat) and taking out several armed guards.

The costumes in Black Pantherespecially the ones worn by the Dora Milajeare truly dazzling, with a lot of bright colors and elaborate patterns. Angela Bassett, as TChallas mother and Queen of Wakanda, sports a jaw-dropping coiffure of snow-white dreadlocks. According to the production team, director Ryan Coogler was interested in giving Black Pantherthe star of which debuted in Civil Waran updated look that was more faithful to the current run of comics. And though Marvel didnt screen any footage of Michael B. Jordan in costumehes playing villainous Erik Killmongerconcept art tacked to the Marvel office walls revealed a fearsome mask compete with horns and mane.

In other words: even if Marvel and superhero fatigue is setting in, rest assured that Black Panther isnt going to look like anything youve seen from them before.

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Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

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Black Panther Footage Reveals the Ferocious Female Warriors of Wakanda – Vanity Fair

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Milwaukee Black Panthers protest Common Council meeting – WISN Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE

The Milwaukee Black Panthers arrived at the Milwaukee Common Council meeting Tuesday morning,calling for elected officials to step down.

The Black Panthers held signs which read, “recall” and called for Mayor Tom Barrett and Common Council President Ashanti Hamilton to resign.

“This is a political process. Any one of them could have run for office,” Hamilton said. “This is a huge district and we’re trying to tackle some major issues. I really can’t get distracted by the catcalling and some of the stuff on the sidelines.”

The Black Panthers are fighting what they call, “hyper-segregation” and mass incarceration in the black community. Their leader, King Rick, said the Common Council is not doing enough to help.

Mayor Barrett’s office declined to comment.

WEBVTT EXPLAINS THEY’REARE HOPING TO FORCE ELECTEDOFFICIALS — >> THEY STOOD SILENTLY WITHSIGNS THAT DEMANDED THE MAYORAND THE COUNCIL PRESIDENTRESIGN.THEY ARE FIGHTING WITH THE CALLHYPER SEGREGATION.THE PRESIDENT SAYS THAT, IF THEBLACK PANTHERS WANT TO HELP,THEY SHOULD.>> IT IS A POLITICAL PROCESS ANDTHEY COULD RUN FOR OFFICE.THIS IS A HUGE DISTRICT THAT ISTRYING TO TACKLE SOME ISSUES.I CANNOT GET DISTRACTED BY SOMEOF THE CAT CALLING AND SOME OFTHE STUFF ON THE SIDELINES.>> WE REACHED OUT TO THE CHIEF

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Milwaukee Black Panthers protest Common Council meeting – WISN Milwaukee

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

St. Peter’s Basilica Meets the Black Panthers in a Contemporary Altarpiece – Hyperallergic

Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (all photos by Brian Forrest)

LOS ANGELES The Vault Gallery at the UCLAs Hammer Museum is named after the classic arched architecture that informs the shape and structure of many houses of worship. The installation Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley currently occupies the aforementioned hall, and the atmosphere is appropriately hushed. A thick black curtain encased in an exoskeleton made of knotted do-rags is suspended heavily from the high ceiling, tempering and softening the noise from the museums open courtyard. The room is darkened. Eyes take a moment to adjust. Visitors whisper.

After padding softly around the curtain, the viewer is confronted by an altar that has been carefully arranged and spotlit in the apse. A single wicker peacock chair, raised slightly off the floor on a platform strewn with clothing, is centered on a diamond-patterned rug and flanked by a number of floating housedresses shellacked phantoms with invisible bodies. Headless hoods face the audience. A pair of sweatpants halfheartedly hovers. A thin, molded figure clutching a black and red shield sits by each armrest. A flaming scarlet and gold sunburst hangs above and behind the throne, feathers dispersed across its shiny surface, a grate placed over its rectangular frame. More veils in florals and paisleys encircle the altarpiece.

The mournful surroundings suggest that these garments are widows weeds. All the fabric ghosts seem to be covered in a liquid sheen. Beasley often utilizes a concoction of polyurethane foam and resin to give three-dimensionality to materials that have less structural integrity. Though not cast in luxurious metals, his figures are prepared to weather the storm.

For this installation, Beasley lifted inspiration from two sources: the 17th-century Baroque altarpiece designed by sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini at the St. Peters Basilica in Rome and a photographic portrait of the Black Panther Party co-founder Huey P. Newton sitting in a rattan peacock chair. The relic of Saint Peters wooden chair is enclosed in an ornate bronze sculpture at the center of the altarpiece, supported by four saints whose robes swish and drape dramatically. The ceiling apse is outfitted in gilded stucco, and the opulent materials used reflect the spare-no-costs attitude of the Vatican: colorful marbles, stained glass, gilded bronze. Berninis lavish dcor symbolically reflects the power and endurance of the Church. The portrait of Newton, created centuries later, shows the man straight-backed on his throne, which sits upon a zebra skin, clutching both a spear and an automatic weapon. As art historian Jo-Ann Morgan notes, the mis-en-scne also flirts with mythology of the nonwest tinsel town meets National Geographic. The photograph has been reproduced and circulated widely since the late 1960s, and has become an image that reflects the authority and legitimacy of the Black Panther Party.

The composition of Newtons portrait is rooted in Western visual tradition but instantiates power through a fantastical staging that complicates what is expected through its deliberate presentation. Beasley inquires, What does it mean to replace Berninis chair of Saint Peter with the chair of Huey P. Newton? With this installation, he challenged himself to reconsider the role of power through this exchange. His work often deals with the intersection of materiality and sound, and sounds ubiquity (both its presence and non-presence) helps shape the experience of moving through a space. At the Hammer, the space feels sublime and sacred in its grandiose silence.

Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley continues at Hammer Museum, UCLA (10899 Wilshire Blvd.), through April 23.

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St. Peter’s Basilica Meets the Black Panthers in a Contemporary Altarpiece – Hyperallergic

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The Black Panther Party 50 years later – The Commonwealth Times

Students and community members had their fists raised last night at a panel event hosted by the VCU African-American Studies Department that explored the lessons and legacies of the Black Panther Party.

The event was held in celebration of the Black Panther Partys 50th anniversary. Three former Panthers Sekou Odinga, Jihad Abdulmumit and Pamela Hannah were invited to speak about their experiences to a packed venue at The Depot on Broad St.

A common misunderstanding is that the Black Panther Party was nothing more than a violent, terrorist group, full of criminals and sociopolitical outcasts, said Abdulmumit, a former BPP member and current Richmond resident who now works in a local health clinic and is active with VCUs Muslim Student Association.

Young people are the the future, Odinga said. What I would like people to take away from this, here tonight, is to go out and organize groups and to stand up for what they believe in.

Student and event attendee, Asia McCall, said as a black muslim-American she worries about standing up and fighting for what she believes in.

To me its so important to be here today and hear their stories, McCall said. The color of my skin has an embedded history of social demonstrations that changed the world around me. But my contribution to this social movement that is so desperately needed in light of the new presidency and Black Lives Matter to me is still grey.

The Black Panther Party was founded in 1966 in Oakland, California by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. The party began as a community service organization focused on protecting and promoting the civil rights of oppressed citizens.

Dressed in black and open carrying weapons, the Black Panthers of Defense quickly became a divisive entity in California. The movement spread to New York, where Sekou Odinga was a founding member of the east coast chapter.

Odingas legacy and contribution to the Black Panthers attracted many of the public who attended the event which quickly reached capacity and organizers had to begin turning away attendees. Odinga told the crowd that the fight for social change is always on-going and he remembers the moment where he knew he had to go into underground work as part of the Black Liberation Movement.

On Jan. 17, 1969, Odingas influence as a Black Panther member grew when a rival black nationalist group killed two Panthers from California Alprentis Bunchy Carter and John Huggins. A Panther from Odingas New York chapter was in police custody and had been beaten brutally; the police were actively searching for Odinga in connection to a police shooting.

That was probably the most terrifying and emotional experience I have had as a Black Panther, Odinga said.

Odinga ultimately was arrested on six counts of attempted murder. He was convicted in 1984 and sentenced to a consecutive 25 years to life state sentence and a 40 year federal sentence.

Odinga was released from prison on Nov. 25, 2014. He now runs the Jericho Movement which focuses on the rights of political prisoners in the United States some of whom have been in jail since the height of movements in the 1960s and 1970s.

Hannah said the total amount of time the remaining incarcerated members of the party are serving totals around 800 years.

Many of these people, they arent going to live out their sentence, Hannah said. They will die before they can do that.

Hannah also commented on the similarities between her native city of Harlem and Richmond, Va.

I was driving around the city today and it looks like gentrification, Hannah said to the crowd. The conditions that brought myself to the BPP in 1969 still exist today.

During her portion of the panel, Hannah emphasized the importance of young people looking critically into and at their communities.

(Political organization) doesnt have to be real complicated, this isnt a fancy community, Hannah said. Know your resources, focus on your resources and in the meantime instead of saving the world start with saving your community save each other.

Abdulmumit, the third panelist, began his speech by detailing an incident that led him to join the Panthers.

My father, my brother, and I were stopped on our way home by police officers, Abdulmumit said. The police pointed guns at the heads of my father and brother.

His father and brother were released without charges and no explanation, and Abdulmumit went on to co-found a Black Panther Party chapter in his New Jersey hometown. He is no longer able to reside there due to a robbery conviction, however.

For Abdulmumit, the robbery he was convicted for, much like the creation of the Black Panther for Self Defense, was crucial to the development and flourishing of the Black Panther Movement, the black power movement and for furthering civil rights.

Here we are 40 years later, and people may look at me as a criminal bank robber. But I never kept that money; I put it directly back into the work, for our community, Abdulmumit told Richmond Magazine.

Meanwhile, a group identified as ASH Antifa Seven Hills Antifascists Seven Hills on Facebook shared a widely-circulated post stating the VCU Police Department were outside stopping attendees who wished to enter the overcapacity event.

As this was happening, a young person from outside tried to walk past a cop, calmly, and he was nearly thrown to the ground, whipped around, reads ASH Antifa Facebook post. Ive seen (the VCU PD) be more aggressive and physically violent more often than RPD, and thats no f***ing compliment. They are the enforcement arm of VCUs colonization of Richmond.

According to VCU PD public information officer Corey Byers, the person mentioned in the post was not a VCU student and students were not being allowed in the venue because the crowd was over-capacity, as designated by the fire marshall, and event organizers asked for assistance.

Despite several communications from event organizers to those outside that no one else could be admitted, one person ran past an officer and entered the building, Byers wrote in an email. (The person) was briefly detained and escorted out of The Depot. The man was not arrested and no charges are pending. He was not a VCU student.

Byers said the VCU PD reviewed the incident this morning, and Police Chief John Venuti believes officers at the event should have communicated more clearly with guests outside to explain why no one was being admitted into the building even after other participants left the event.

Richmond Struggle, a local activist group, gathered in the VCU compass on Wednesday evening to protest not only the police interaction on Tuesday evening, but to raise awareness of police overreach in day-to-day interactions.

Were here to protest VCU PD in general, said Foster McClain, a member of Richmond Struggle, With its policies of racial profiling and generally serving as the shock troops for VCUs gentrification plan for Richmond.

Richmond Struggle said they plan on hosting similar events.

Keyris Manzanares, Contributing Writer

Siona Peterous, Spectrum Editor

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The Black Panther Party 50 years later – The Commonwealth Times

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The explosive true story of the British Black Panthers who inspired Idris Elba’s new TV drama – Telegraph.co.uk

In one episode of Guerrilla a new TV drama about the Black Power movement in Seventies London Idris Elbas fictional activist gives a speech to a rapt audience. Try to ignore him. Instead, pay attention to the extras in the background. Look for a pair of men in their seventies; one a little amused, the other perhaps a little annoyed. They are Farrukh Dhondy and Darcus Howe. Together, they led the real British Black Panther group to the peak of its success – and ultimately engineered its destruction.

Founded in 1977, the London group took their visual cues from their better-known American counterparts. As Howe once succinctly put it: Black berets, black trousers, black t-shirt and guns… But we didnt get to the gun bit over here.

Americas civil rights movement had undergone a sea-change in the mid-Sixties, as a more radical type of activism arose under the slogan Black Power – a…

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

HS Softball: Mifflinburg batters Brouse, Black Panthers – Sunbury Daily Item

MIFFLINBURG Despite an undefeated start, Steve Ross told his team that Thursday’s showdown with league favorite Milton was going to tell them a lot about his young squad with just three seniors.

“Coach came out here today and told us that this game would be a crossroads on the way our season would go,” senior first baseman Tori Hackenberg said. “The outcome is great. We came together as a team in this game.”

Sophomore Libby Whittaker and Hackenberg each knocked home three runs, while senior second baseman Emily Stauffer made an outstanding defensive play and got her 100th career hit as Mifflinburg knocked off Milton 8-3 in a Heartland Athletic Conference-Division II contest.

“This is our third game in three days. This is the start of seeing what type of team we are going to be,” Ross said. “We played well.”

Milton coach Bill Keefer triedto warn his team beforehand, telling them that the Wildcats “were averaging two touchdowns on offense”, but his defending District 4 Class AA champions didn’t heed the warning.

“Sometimes they’ll learn to listen. Sometimes you have to get your butt kicked to get the lesson pounded home,” Keefer said. “Practice should be fun (today).”

Milton got off to a quick start with three hits in the top of the first, but a Black Panthers’ runner got caught in a rundown between home and third after being sent by Keefer and then held up and was thrown out. Milton did notscore in the inning.

It was theme for the Black Panthers (3-1 overall, 2-1 HAC-II), who had 11 hits, but managed just three runs, two of which came in the seventh inning, already trailing 8-1.

“The other night we had a bunch of hits against Loyalsock, but only scored one run. We had 12 hits the other day against Montoursville and didn’t score much,” Keefer said. “We get the runners to third base and there they stop. Then, my stupidity in the first inning cost us a couple of runs, too. That didn’t help. It could have a been a different ball game.”

Delaney Good led off the first with a double for Mifflinburg (6-0, 3-0), but Milton pitcher Kylie Brouse was one strike away from getting out of the inning unscathed after Hackenberg fouled off two outside pitches to start her at bat.

“I was looking for anything inside. It was drilled into my head that (Brouse)was going to work us outside, outside,” Hackenberg said. “I love inside pitches and when that one came, I couldn’t resist it.”

Hackenberg launched the pitch over the left-field fence to give her team a 2-0 lead.

Milton got a run back when Tiani Mowrer doubled and later scored on a Taylor Gessner single in the top of the third, but the Wildcats had an immediate answer.

Good (3-for-4, three runs scored) led off the third with a single. Stauffer, who attempted a sacrifice bunt, popped it up a bit, but it landed between a pair of diving Black Panthers catcher Leighton Chappell and Gessner from third base. Good took third and a throwing error allowed Stauffer to take second. Whittaker followed with a two-run double to give MIfflinburg a 4-1 lead. Madison Machmer later singled home Whittaker to make it 5-1.

The Black Panthers tried to rally in the top of the fourth. Saige Graham singled with one out. Emily Snyder followed with a rocket that appeared headed to the right-center field gap. However, Emily Stauffer made an outstanding diving backhanded catch and then doubled Graham off first to end the inning.

“I was a little surprised I caught it. It was hit pretty hard up the middle,” Stauffer said. “I was like just lay out for it. I looked in my glove and the ball was there, so I came up throwing.”

After an out in the top of fourth, Good singled and Stauffer beat out another bunt for her 100th career hit.

“It was nice. I didn’t know for sure if it was 100, my mom was trying to keep it a secret,” said Stauffer, who was honored with balloons on the outfield fence and a sign. “I kind of knew I was close. I just tried to play my game and do what my team needed to win.”

Stauffer is now 18-of-23 this season, while she and Good at the top of the Mifflinburg lineup have 34 hits combined in six games.

“Having those two at the top of the lineup, it’s been a nice thing all year for us,” Ross said. “Delaney is a slapper, but if we tell her to go normal because the infield is in, she can swing away and put it over their heads. We’ve doing that all year long. To follow up with Emily, she makes the call (to bunt) and it’s worked out great for us.”

A throwing error put the runners on second and third for Mifflinburg. Whittaker followed with an RBI single. Hackenberg had an RBI groundout and Vanessa Martin followed with a run-scoring double to give Mifflinburg an 8-1 lead.

Milton scoredtwo runs in the top of the seventh when Graham doubled and Emily Snyder doubled her home. After the first out, Kacee Reitz lined an apparent two-run homer over the left-center fence, but it was ruled a ground-rule double. The rally ended there as the winning pitcher Martin got a groundout and flyout to end the game.

Email comments to thummel@dailyitem.com. Follow him on Twitter @HummelTodd

MIFFLINBURG 8, MILTON 3

Milton`001`000`2 3-11-3

Mifflinburg`203`300`x 8-12-0

Kylie Brouse and Leighton Chappell. Vanessa Martin and Vanessa Boop.

WP: Brouse; LP: Boop.

Milton: Tiani Mowrer, 2-for-4, double, run; Kacee Reitz, 2-for-4, 2 doubles, RBI; Chappell, 2-for-4; Amanda Arnold, double; Saige Graham, 2-for-3, double, run; Emily Snyder, double, RBI.

Mifflinburg: Delaney Good, 3-for-3, double, 3 runs scored; Emily Stauffer, 2-for-4, 2 runs; Libby Whittaker, 3-for-4, double, 2 runs, 3 RBIs; Tori Hackenberg 2-for-3, homer (1st, one on), 3 RBIs; Martin, double, RBI.

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Black Panther The SuperManual The A.V. Club – A.V. Club

Who he is: Black Panther, a.k.a. TChalla

His power: Black Panther possesses superhuman strength, speed, stamina, and agility. Hes also resilient, demonstrating a capability for taking hits and injuries that would cripple most people, though some of that is attributable to his vibranium mesh suit, essentially indestructible, like Captain Americas shield. The suit also possesses retractable claws made of vibranium.

His story: Black Panthers first appearance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is in Captain America: Civil War, where hes introduced by his real name, TChalla, prince of Wakanda, at the United Nations signing of the Sokovia Accordsright before a bomb explodes, killing his father. Believing the The Winter Soldier responsible, he dons his birthright, the Black Panther habit (a mantle passed down through generations to someone who stands as protector of the country), and tracks him, fighting Bucky Barnes, The Falcon, and Captain America before theyre all apprehended. Black Panther subsequently joins Iron Man and the other Avengers to try and bring in Captain America, though his motive remains a personal quest of revenge, until he eventually follows Iron Man to the Siberian facility where he learns Helmut Zemo was actually responsible. Rather than kill him, TChalla keeps Zemo alive to be imprisoned.

Played by: Chadwick Boseman

Currently, Black Panther is: Back home in Wakanda, where he oversaw the return of Bucky Barnes to cryosleep until a cure for his Hydra brainwashing can be found.

Where will we see him next? In Black Panther, due out February 16, 2018. Its unlikely hell make a cameo in any of the films before that.

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April 15, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Iconic: Black Panther: Art Show Celebrates 50th Anniversary of … – AlterNet

Photo Credit: Bobby Seale by Shepard Fairey

The Black Panthers were a catalyst for nationwide social change, working toward an equal future for black communities across America. It was a consciousness-raising movement for many marginalized groups, fighting against an entrenched culture of police brutality and discrimination. They created their own media, their own security, free breakfasts for children and other social service programs, in communities severely underserved by both government and nonprofits.

As the 50th anniversary of the party’s founding approaches, the SEPIA collective, an all-female African-American art collective based in Los Angeles, is curating a traveling show called Iconic: Black Panther. Its first stop was Oakland in October 2016, and it will be in Los Angeles from April 8 to May 14, with upcoming dates in Chicago, New York and other cities to be announced.

The art encompasses a wide range of forms. There’s Samella Lewis’ stark black-and-white linocut; Mark Stephen Greenfield’s “Charlotte Observer,” a mix of acrylic paint and ink, featuring a Panther with two megaphones against an abstract, floral background; and Shepherd Fairey’s Bobby Seale portrait, using his signature red-and-white borders and Andre the Giant logo to frame the legendary leader. Other participants includeEmory Douglas, Robbie Conal, Pilar Aguero-Esparza, Aise Bourne, Justin Dixon, F. Scott Hess, Ali Al Sharji, Mohammed Mubarak, Tslil Tsemet, Lexx Valdez, and over two-dozen more.

Los Angeles residents will get the chance to meet current and former Black Panthers at the opening, and everyone else can catch a sneak preview of the show’s images below.

For more information, visit the SEPIA Collective and the Gregorio Escalante Gallery.

Emory Douglas, Black Lives Matter

Dr. Samella Lewis, I See You

Mark Stephen Greenfield, Charlotte Observer

Robbie Conal, I Am Not Your Negro

Ilana Novick is an AlterNet contributing writer and production editor.

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Iconic: Black Panther: Art Show Celebrates 50th Anniversary of … – AlterNet

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April 6, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Fairfield Museum After Dark: The Black Panthers from National to Local – Fairfield Sun

The public is invited to visit the Museum After Dark on Thursday, May 4, at 6 p.m., for a presentation about the legacy of the Black Panther party. The Fairfield Museum will host Dr. Yohuru Williams of Fairfield University and special guest Craig Kelly, former president of the NAACP in Bridgeport and member of the Black Panther party in New York. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. and the featured event will start at 6:45. This program is held in conjunction with the Museums newest exhibition, Talkin Bout My Generation: Fairfield in the 1960s and 1970s. Dr. Yohuru Williams Dr. Williams will lead a presentation on the Black Panther party, providing a broad analysis of the Party and its legacy. He will provide examples of the local chapters, including Connecticut, New England and New York City, and how the party chapters related to national scene, but also reflected their own community. Learn how New Haven became a pivotal point in the challenges between the different perspectives, from political nuances to militant philosophy. Described in Diverse Issues in Higher Education as one of the most exciting scholars of his generation, Dr. Williams is the History Department Chair and the Director of Black Studies at Fairfield University in Fairfield, CT. He is the author of Black Politics/White Power: Civil Rights, Black Power, the Black Panthers in New Haven and editor of Liberated Territory: Untold Local Perspectives on the Black Panther Party. He is also Chief Historian for the Jackie Robinson Foundation and Museum in New York, NY. He received his Ph.D. from Howard University in 1998. Following the presentation, Dr. Williams will lead a discussion with guest Craig Kelly, former president of the NAACP in Bridgeport and member of the Black Panther Party in New York. Kelly, a lifelong resident of the Bridgeport, received a masters degree in counseling from the University of Bridgeport. He has provided counseling services for the Inner City Violence Prevention Association, Inc., families of African American firefighters who died on 9/11, South African AIDS victims, and the Katrina Assistance Project. He retired from the Bridgeport Fire Department as a Lieutenant in 2004 and served as president of the Greater Bridgeport NAACP from 2007-2009. He is a member of Mt. Aery Baptist Church in Bridgeport. The reception and presentation are for members, with a $5 suggested donation for nonmembers. For more information or to learn about the new exhibition visit Fairfieldhistory.org. Talkin Bout My Generation: Fairfield in the 1960s & 1970s runs through Sept. 17. The Fairfield Museum is located at 370 Beach Road in Fairfield. For more information or to register for programs visit Fairfieldhistory.org or call 203-259-1598. The Museum and Museum Shop are open 10-4, daily. Admission is free for members and children ages 5 and under; $5 for adults; $3 for seniors/students.

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black Panther Footage Reveals the Ferocious Female Warriors of Wakanda – Vanity Fair

Update 7:35 E.T.: A Marvel representative reached out to say that the nature of the relationship between Danai Guriras Okoye and Florence Kasumbas Ayo in Black Panther is not a romantic one and that specific love storyline from the comic World of Wakanda was not used as a source. The original article continues below. Whether or not he had the approval of Disney when he did so, Beauty and the Beast director Bill Condon caused quite a stir in the April issue of Attitudeboth of hopeful expectations and of conservative pushbackwhen he touted Josh Gads character LeFou and his exclusively gay moment.Though Condon surely had his heart in the right place, the phrase overpromised on what the film ultimately underdelivered: the moment comes when LeFou ends the movie by dancing, briefly with a man. O.K. However, early footage of Marvels upcoming Black Panther screened for journalists Monday night movie promises much more. The scene in question features Walking Dead star Danai Gurira dancing on a boat with her fellow Dora Milaje, i.e., Black Panthers personal female bodyguards. These womenfirst introduced to moviegoers in Captain America: Civil War are the warriors who watch over Chadwick Bosemans royal family. In Civil War, Uganda-born actress Florence Kasumba made an instant impression on audiences as one member of the select group when she curtly ordered Scarlett Johanssons Black Widow to move aside for TChalla. In the rough cut of this Black Panther scene, we see Guriras Okoye and Kasumbas Ayo swaying rhythmically back in formation with the rest of their team. Okoye eyes Ayo flirtatiously for a long time as the camera pans in on them. Eventually, she says, appreciatively and appraisingly, You look good. Ayo responds in kind. Okoye grins and replies, I know. This quick moment between two warrior women on their way to TChallas coronation leans into a current very popular run of the Black Panther comic. A 2016 spin-off called World of Wakanda by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay, and Yona Harvey is all about the relationship between two members of the Dora Milaje. The official description: A Wakandan love storyits tenderness matched only by its brutality. You know them now as The Midnight Angels, but in this story they are just Ayo and Aneka, young women recruited to become Dora Milaje, an elite task force trained to protect the crown at all costs. What happens when your nation needs your hearts and minds, but you already gave them to each other? Other footage from the film screened early for reporters centers more closely on TChalla, including scenes of a traditional and elaborate Wakandan ceremony, and a shoot-out in a South Korea casino featuring Andy Serkiss Claw and Martin Freemans Everett K. Ross. For fans of Lupita Nyongo, there was also a pair of scenes showing her character dancing (she gets her own boat) and taking out several armed guards. The costumes in Black Pantherespecially the ones worn by the Dora Milajeare truly dazzling, with a lot of bright colors and elaborate patterns. Angela Bassett, as TChallas mother and Queen of Wakanda, sports a jaw-dropping coiffure of snow-white dreadlocks. According to the production team, director Ryan Coogler was interested in giving Black Pantherthe star of which debuted in Civil Waran updated look that was more faithful to the current run of comics. And though Marvel didnt screen any footage of Michael B. Jordan in costumehes playing villainous Erik Killmongerconcept art tacked to the Marvel office walls revealed a fearsome mask compete with horns and mane. In other words: even if Marvel and superhero fatigue is setting in, rest assured that Black Panther isnt going to look like anything youve seen from them before. PreviousNext Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus. Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus. Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus. Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus. Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus. Left, courtesy of Clint Ramos; Right, courtesy of Joan Marcus.

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Milwaukee Black Panthers protest Common Council meeting – WISN Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE The Milwaukee Black Panthers arrived at the Milwaukee Common Council meeting Tuesday morning,calling for elected officials to step down. The Black Panthers held signs which read, “recall” and called for Mayor Tom Barrett and Common Council President Ashanti Hamilton to resign. “This is a political process. Any one of them could have run for office,” Hamilton said. “This is a huge district and we’re trying to tackle some major issues. I really can’t get distracted by the catcalling and some of the stuff on the sidelines.” The Black Panthers are fighting what they call, “hyper-segregation” and mass incarceration in the black community. Their leader, King Rick, said the Common Council is not doing enough to help. Mayor Barrett’s office declined to comment. WEBVTT EXPLAINS THEY’REARE HOPING TO FORCE ELECTEDOFFICIALS — > > THEY STOOD SILENTLY WITHSIGNS THAT DEMANDED THE MAYORAND THE COUNCIL PRESIDENTRESIGN.THEY ARE FIGHTING WITH THE CALLHYPER SEGREGATION.THE PRESIDENT SAYS THAT, IF THEBLACK PANTHERS WANT TO HELP,THEY SHOULD.> > IT IS A POLITICAL PROCESS ANDTHEY COULD RUN FOR OFFICE.THIS IS A HUGE DISTRICT THAT ISTRYING TO TACKLE SOME ISSUES.I CANNOT GET DISTRACTED BY SOMEOF THE CAT CALLING AND SOME OFTHE STUFF ON THE SIDELINES.> > WE REACHED OUT TO THE CHIEF

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

St. Peter’s Basilica Meets the Black Panthers in a Contemporary Altarpiece – Hyperallergic

Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (all photos by Brian Forrest) LOS ANGELES The Vault Gallery at the UCLAs Hammer Museum is named after the classic arched architecture that informs the shape and structure of many houses of worship. The installation Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley currently occupies the aforementioned hall, and the atmosphere is appropriately hushed. A thick black curtain encased in an exoskeleton made of knotted do-rags is suspended heavily from the high ceiling, tempering and softening the noise from the museums open courtyard. The room is darkened. Eyes take a moment to adjust. Visitors whisper. After padding softly around the curtain, the viewer is confronted by an altar that has been carefully arranged and spotlit in the apse. A single wicker peacock chair, raised slightly off the floor on a platform strewn with clothing, is centered on a diamond-patterned rug and flanked by a number of floating housedresses shellacked phantoms with invisible bodies. Headless hoods face the audience. A pair of sweatpants halfheartedly hovers. A thin, molded figure clutching a black and red shield sits by each armrest. A flaming scarlet and gold sunburst hangs above and behind the throne, feathers dispersed across its shiny surface, a grate placed over its rectangular frame. More veils in florals and paisleys encircle the altarpiece. The mournful surroundings suggest that these garments are widows weeds. All the fabric ghosts seem to be covered in a liquid sheen. Beasley often utilizes a concoction of polyurethane foam and resin to give three-dimensionality to materials that have less structural integrity. Though not cast in luxurious metals, his figures are prepared to weather the storm. For this installation, Beasley lifted inspiration from two sources: the 17th-century Baroque altarpiece designed by sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini at the St. Peters Basilica in Rome and a photographic portrait of the Black Panther Party co-founder Huey P. Newton sitting in a rattan peacock chair. The relic of Saint Peters wooden chair is enclosed in an ornate bronze sculpture at the center of the altarpiece, supported by four saints whose robes swish and drape dramatically. The ceiling apse is outfitted in gilded stucco, and the opulent materials used reflect the spare-no-costs attitude of the Vatican: colorful marbles, stained glass, gilded bronze. Berninis lavish dcor symbolically reflects the power and endurance of the Church. The portrait of Newton, created centuries later, shows the man straight-backed on his throne, which sits upon a zebra skin, clutching both a spear and an automatic weapon. As art historian Jo-Ann Morgan notes, the mis-en-scne also flirts with mythology of the nonwest tinsel town meets National Geographic. The photograph has been reproduced and circulated widely since the late 1960s, and has become an image that reflects the authority and legitimacy of the Black Panther Party. The composition of Newtons portrait is rooted in Western visual tradition but instantiates power through a fantastical staging that complicates what is expected through its deliberate presentation. Beasley inquires, What does it mean to replace Berninis chair of Saint Peter with the chair of Huey P. Newton? With this installation, he challenged himself to reconsider the role of power through this exchange. His work often deals with the intersection of materiality and sound, and sounds ubiquity (both its presence and non-presence) helps shape the experience of moving through a space. At the Hammer, the space feels sublime and sacred in its grandiose silence. Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley continues at Hammer Museum, UCLA (10899 Wilshire Blvd.), through April 23.

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

The Black Panther Party 50 years later – The Commonwealth Times

Students and community members had their fists raised last night at a panel event hosted by the VCU African-American Studies Department that explored the lessons and legacies of the Black Panther Party. The event was held in celebration of the Black Panther Partys 50th anniversary. Three former Panthers Sekou Odinga, Jihad Abdulmumit and Pamela Hannah were invited to speak about their experiences to a packed venue at The Depot on Broad St. A common misunderstanding is that the Black Panther Party was nothing more than a violent, terrorist group, full of criminals and sociopolitical outcasts, said Abdulmumit, a former BPP member and current Richmond resident who now works in a local health clinic and is active with VCUs Muslim Student Association. Young people are the the future, Odinga said. What I would like people to take away from this, here tonight, is to go out and organize groups and to stand up for what they believe in. Student and event attendee, Asia McCall, said as a black muslim-American she worries about standing up and fighting for what she believes in. To me its so important to be here today and hear their stories, McCall said. The color of my skin has an embedded history of social demonstrations that changed the world around me. But my contribution to this social movement that is so desperately needed in light of the new presidency and Black Lives Matter to me is still grey. The Black Panther Party was founded in 1966 in Oakland, California by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. The party began as a community service organization focused on protecting and promoting the civil rights of oppressed citizens. Dressed in black and open carrying weapons, the Black Panthers of Defense quickly became a divisive entity in California. The movement spread to New York, where Sekou Odinga was a founding member of the east coast chapter. Odingas legacy and contribution to the Black Panthers attracted many of the public who attended the event which quickly reached capacity and organizers had to begin turning away attendees. Odinga told the crowd that the fight for social change is always on-going and he remembers the moment where he knew he had to go into underground work as part of the Black Liberation Movement. On Jan. 17, 1969, Odingas influence as a Black Panther member grew when a rival black nationalist group killed two Panthers from California Alprentis Bunchy Carter and John Huggins. A Panther from Odingas New York chapter was in police custody and had been beaten brutally; the police were actively searching for Odinga in connection to a police shooting. That was probably the most terrifying and emotional experience I have had as a Black Panther, Odinga said. Odinga ultimately was arrested on six counts of attempted murder. He was convicted in 1984 and sentenced to a consecutive 25 years to life state sentence and a 40 year federal sentence. Odinga was released from prison on Nov. 25, 2014. He now runs the Jericho Movement which focuses on the rights of political prisoners in the United States some of whom have been in jail since the height of movements in the 1960s and 1970s. Hannah said the total amount of time the remaining incarcerated members of the party are serving totals around 800 years. Many of these people, they arent going to live out their sentence, Hannah said. They will die before they can do that. Hannah also commented on the similarities between her native city of Harlem and Richmond, Va. I was driving around the city today and it looks like gentrification, Hannah said to the crowd. The conditions that brought myself to the BPP in 1969 still exist today. During her portion of the panel, Hannah emphasized the importance of young people looking critically into and at their communities. (Political organization) doesnt have to be real complicated, this isnt a fancy community, Hannah said. Know your resources, focus on your resources and in the meantime instead of saving the world start with saving your community save each other. Abdulmumit, the third panelist, began his speech by detailing an incident that led him to join the Panthers. My father, my brother, and I were stopped on our way home by police officers, Abdulmumit said. The police pointed guns at the heads of my father and brother. His father and brother were released without charges and no explanation, and Abdulmumit went on to co-found a Black Panther Party chapter in his New Jersey hometown. He is no longer able to reside there due to a robbery conviction, however. For Abdulmumit, the robbery he was convicted for, much like the creation of the Black Panther for Self Defense, was crucial to the development and flourishing of the Black Panther Movement, the black power movement and for furthering civil rights. Here we are 40 years later, and people may look at me as a criminal bank robber. But I never kept that money; I put it directly back into the work, for our community, Abdulmumit told Richmond Magazine. Meanwhile, a group identified as ASH Antifa Seven Hills Antifascists Seven Hills on Facebook shared a widely-circulated post stating the VCU Police Department were outside stopping attendees who wished to enter the overcapacity event. As this was happening, a young person from outside tried to walk past a cop, calmly, and he was nearly thrown to the ground, whipped around, reads ASH Antifa Facebook post. Ive seen (the VCU PD) be more aggressive and physically violent more often than RPD, and thats no f***ing compliment. They are the enforcement arm of VCUs colonization of Richmond. According to VCU PD public information officer Corey Byers, the person mentioned in the post was not a VCU student and students were not being allowed in the venue because the crowd was over-capacity, as designated by the fire marshall, and event organizers asked for assistance. Despite several communications from event organizers to those outside that no one else could be admitted, one person ran past an officer and entered the building, Byers wrote in an email. (The person) was briefly detained and escorted out of The Depot. The man was not arrested and no charges are pending. He was not a VCU student. Byers said the VCU PD reviewed the incident this morning, and Police Chief John Venuti believes officers at the event should have communicated more clearly with guests outside to explain why no one was being admitted into the building even after other participants left the event. Richmond Struggle, a local activist group, gathered in the VCU compass on Wednesday evening to protest not only the police interaction on Tuesday evening, but to raise awareness of police overreach in day-to-day interactions. Were here to protest VCU PD in general, said Foster McClain, a member of Richmond Struggle, With its policies of racial profiling and generally serving as the shock troops for VCUs gentrification plan for Richmond. Richmond Struggle said they plan on hosting similar events. Keyris Manzanares, Contributing Writer Siona Peterous, Spectrum Editor

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April 20, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

The explosive true story of the British Black Panthers who inspired Idris Elba’s new TV drama – Telegraph.co.uk

In one episode of Guerrilla a new TV drama about the Black Power movement in Seventies London Idris Elbas fictional activist gives a speech to a rapt audience. Try to ignore him. Instead, pay attention to the extras in the background. Look for a pair of men in their seventies; one a little amused, the other perhaps a little annoyed. They are Farrukh Dhondy and Darcus Howe. Together, they led the real British Black Panther group to the peak of its success – and ultimately engineered its destruction. Founded in 1977, the London group took their visual cues from their better-known American counterparts. As Howe once succinctly put it: Black berets, black trousers, black t-shirt and guns… But we didnt get to the gun bit over here. Americas civil rights movement had undergone a sea-change in the mid-Sixties, as a more radical type of activism arose under the slogan Black Power – a…

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

HS Softball: Mifflinburg batters Brouse, Black Panthers – Sunbury Daily Item

MIFFLINBURG Despite an undefeated start, Steve Ross told his team that Thursday’s showdown with league favorite Milton was going to tell them a lot about his young squad with just three seniors. “Coach came out here today and told us that this game would be a crossroads on the way our season would go,” senior first baseman Tori Hackenberg said. “The outcome is great. We came together as a team in this game.” Sophomore Libby Whittaker and Hackenberg each knocked home three runs, while senior second baseman Emily Stauffer made an outstanding defensive play and got her 100th career hit as Mifflinburg knocked off Milton 8-3 in a Heartland Athletic Conference-Division II contest. “This is our third game in three days. This is the start of seeing what type of team we are going to be,” Ross said. “We played well.” Milton coach Bill Keefer triedto warn his team beforehand, telling them that the Wildcats “were averaging two touchdowns on offense”, but his defending District 4 Class AA champions didn’t heed the warning. “Sometimes they’ll learn to listen. Sometimes you have to get your butt kicked to get the lesson pounded home,” Keefer said. “Practice should be fun (today).” Milton got off to a quick start with three hits in the top of the first, but a Black Panthers’ runner got caught in a rundown between home and third after being sent by Keefer and then held up and was thrown out. Milton did notscore in the inning. It was theme for the Black Panthers (3-1 overall, 2-1 HAC-II), who had 11 hits, but managed just three runs, two of which came in the seventh inning, already trailing 8-1. “The other night we had a bunch of hits against Loyalsock, but only scored one run. We had 12 hits the other day against Montoursville and didn’t score much,” Keefer said. “We get the runners to third base and there they stop. Then, my stupidity in the first inning cost us a couple of runs, too. That didn’t help. It could have a been a different ball game.” Delaney Good led off the first with a double for Mifflinburg (6-0, 3-0), but Milton pitcher Kylie Brouse was one strike away from getting out of the inning unscathed after Hackenberg fouled off two outside pitches to start her at bat. “I was looking for anything inside. It was drilled into my head that (Brouse)was going to work us outside, outside,” Hackenberg said. “I love inside pitches and when that one came, I couldn’t resist it.” Hackenberg launched the pitch over the left-field fence to give her team a 2-0 lead. Milton got a run back when Tiani Mowrer doubled and later scored on a Taylor Gessner single in the top of the third, but the Wildcats had an immediate answer. Good (3-for-4, three runs scored) led off the third with a single. Stauffer, who attempted a sacrifice bunt, popped it up a bit, but it landed between a pair of diving Black Panthers catcher Leighton Chappell and Gessner from third base. Good took third and a throwing error allowed Stauffer to take second. Whittaker followed with a two-run double to give MIfflinburg a 4-1 lead. Madison Machmer later singled home Whittaker to make it 5-1. The Black Panthers tried to rally in the top of the fourth. Saige Graham singled with one out. Emily Snyder followed with a rocket that appeared headed to the right-center field gap. However, Emily Stauffer made an outstanding diving backhanded catch and then doubled Graham off first to end the inning. “I was a little surprised I caught it. It was hit pretty hard up the middle,” Stauffer said. “I was like just lay out for it. I looked in my glove and the ball was there, so I came up throwing.” After an out in the top of fourth, Good singled and Stauffer beat out another bunt for her 100th career hit. “It was nice. I didn’t know for sure if it was 100, my mom was trying to keep it a secret,” said Stauffer, who was honored with balloons on the outfield fence and a sign. “I kind of knew I was close. I just tried to play my game and do what my team needed to win.” Stauffer is now 18-of-23 this season, while she and Good at the top of the Mifflinburg lineup have 34 hits combined in six games. “Having those two at the top of the lineup, it’s been a nice thing all year for us,” Ross said. “Delaney is a slapper, but if we tell her to go normal because the infield is in, she can swing away and put it over their heads. We’ve doing that all year long. To follow up with Emily, she makes the call (to bunt) and it’s worked out great for us.” A throwing error put the runners on second and third for Mifflinburg. Whittaker followed with an RBI single. Hackenberg had an RBI groundout and Vanessa Martin followed with a run-scoring double to give Mifflinburg an 8-1 lead. Milton scoredtwo runs in the top of the seventh when Graham doubled and Emily Snyder doubled her home. After the first out, Kacee Reitz lined an apparent two-run homer over the left-center fence, but it was ruled a ground-rule double. The rally ended there as the winning pitcher Martin got a groundout and flyout to end the game. Email comments to thummel@dailyitem.com. Follow him on Twitter @HummelTodd MIFFLINBURG 8, MILTON 3 Milton`001`000`2 3-11-3 Mifflinburg`203`300`x 8-12-0 Kylie Brouse and Leighton Chappell. Vanessa Martin and Vanessa Boop. WP: Brouse; LP: Boop. Milton: Tiani Mowrer, 2-for-4, double, run; Kacee Reitz, 2-for-4, 2 doubles, RBI; Chappell, 2-for-4; Amanda Arnold, double; Saige Graham, 2-for-3, double, run; Emily Snyder, double, RBI. Mifflinburg: Delaney Good, 3-for-3, double, 3 runs scored; Emily Stauffer, 2-for-4, 2 runs; Libby Whittaker, 3-for-4, double, 2 runs, 3 RBIs; Tori Hackenberg 2-for-3, homer (1st, one on), 3 RBIs; Martin, double, RBI.

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April 15, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black Panther The SuperManual The A.V. Club – A.V. Club

Who he is: Black Panther, a.k.a. TChalla His power: Black Panther possesses superhuman strength, speed, stamina, and agility. Hes also resilient, demonstrating a capability for taking hits and injuries that would cripple most people, though some of that is attributable to his vibranium mesh suit, essentially indestructible, like Captain Americas shield. The suit also possesses retractable claws made of vibranium. His story: Black Panthers first appearance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is in Captain America: Civil War, where hes introduced by his real name, TChalla, prince of Wakanda, at the United Nations signing of the Sokovia Accordsright before a bomb explodes, killing his father. Believing the The Winter Soldier responsible, he dons his birthright, the Black Panther habit (a mantle passed down through generations to someone who stands as protector of the country), and tracks him, fighting Bucky Barnes, The Falcon, and Captain America before theyre all apprehended. Black Panther subsequently joins Iron Man and the other Avengers to try and bring in Captain America, though his motive remains a personal quest of revenge, until he eventually follows Iron Man to the Siberian facility where he learns Helmut Zemo was actually responsible. Rather than kill him, TChalla keeps Zemo alive to be imprisoned. Played by: Chadwick Boseman Currently, Black Panther is: Back home in Wakanda, where he oversaw the return of Bucky Barnes to cryosleep until a cure for his Hydra brainwashing can be found. Where will we see him next? In Black Panther, due out February 16, 2018. Its unlikely hell make a cameo in any of the films before that.

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April 15, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Iconic: Black Panther: Art Show Celebrates 50th Anniversary of … – AlterNet

Photo Credit: Bobby Seale by Shepard Fairey The Black Panthers were a catalyst for nationwide social change, working toward an equal future for black communities across America. It was a consciousness-raising movement for many marginalized groups, fighting against an entrenched culture of police brutality and discrimination. They created their own media, their own security, free breakfasts for children and other social service programs, in communities severely underserved by both government and nonprofits. As the 50th anniversary of the party’s founding approaches, the SEPIA collective, an all-female African-American art collective based in Los Angeles, is curating a traveling show called Iconic: Black Panther. Its first stop was Oakland in October 2016, and it will be in Los Angeles from April 8 to May 14, with upcoming dates in Chicago, New York and other cities to be announced. The art encompasses a wide range of forms. There’s Samella Lewis’ stark black-and-white linocut; Mark Stephen Greenfield’s “Charlotte Observer,” a mix of acrylic paint and ink, featuring a Panther with two megaphones against an abstract, floral background; and Shepherd Fairey’s Bobby Seale portrait, using his signature red-and-white borders and Andre the Giant logo to frame the legendary leader. Other participants includeEmory Douglas, Robbie Conal, Pilar Aguero-Esparza, Aise Bourne, Justin Dixon, F. Scott Hess, Ali Al Sharji, Mohammed Mubarak, Tslil Tsemet, Lexx Valdez, and over two-dozen more. Los Angeles residents will get the chance to meet current and former Black Panthers at the opening, and everyone else can catch a sneak preview of the show’s images below. For more information, visit the SEPIA Collective and the Gregorio Escalante Gallery. Emory Douglas, Black Lives Matter Dr. Samella Lewis, I See You Mark Stephen Greenfield, Charlotte Observer Robbie Conal, I Am Not Your Negro Ilana Novick is an AlterNet contributing writer and production editor.

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April 6, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed


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