Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers take part in Thomasville rally – Times-Enterprise

THOMASVILLE Throngs of people took part in a rally on Magnolia Street on Monday evening.

The rally was in response to a Thomasville-Thomas County drug squad shooting that claimed the life of a suspect.

The rally began at the shooting incident scene on Magnolia Street and was led by Sir Maejor Page of Black Lives Matter Greater Atlanta. Members of the Southeast Region of the Black Panthers, some who also carried weapons, were also in attendance.

The march moved through the Magnolia Street neighborhood toward Broad Street, going through downtown Thomasville. Thomasville Police Department blocked off sections of downtown as the rally briefly stopped at the intersection of Broad Street and Remington Avenue.

Marchers moved to the Historic Courthouse and the Thomas County Judicial Center and down Madison Street.

Chants of “no justice, no peace, hands up, dont shoot, among others rang through the downtown Thomasville Streets.

The march concluded at Magnolia Street.

For more, see Wednesdays Times-Enterprise and www.timesenterprise.com.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

We Should All Take A Note From Dick Gregory’s Unapologetic Activism – Essence.com

Gregory went from pioneering comedian to acerbic voice of the civil rights movement

Dick Gregory, who segued from pioneering comedian to acerbic voice of the civil rights movement, passed away Saturday at the age of 84. Imagine Dave Chappelle transforming into a Black Lives Matter activist, author, nutritionist and presidential nominee after leaving behind his Comedy Central show and youll have some idea of Gregorys legacy.

Well never have a Dick Gregory Show or boisterous buddy comedies ( la Sidney Poitier/Bill Cosby) to look back on. Dick Gregory gave up entertainment for activism, and while the entertainment world is certainly poorer for his choice, activism was clearly the higher calling. For that, Gregory will always be applauded.

RELATED: Civil Rights Activist And Groundbreaking Comedian Dick Gregory Dead At 84

Gregorys 1964 autobiography nigger served as inspiration for the original title of Nass 2008 album Untitled, but the rappers record company wouldnt permit the pejorative. (Times had changed.) His memoir took readers on a journey from Gregorys upbringing in mid-western St. Louis, Missouri, to his collegiate track stardom at Southern Illinois University to a stint in the army and the budding career as a comedian that made him famous. But Gregory was only 32 in 1964, and his calling as a social activist had barely begun. By 1971s No More Lies: The Myth and the Reality of American History, both Gregory and his audience were even clearer on what he was about politically and artistically.

Watch: Lights, Camera, Activism

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Hed eventually publish 12 books and 15 comedy albums (Live at the Village Gate, In Living Black and White, etc.), making multiple movie appearances (the Black Panthers biopic Panther, for example) while fighting for African-American freedoms. Chappelle, Kevin Hart, Tiffany Haddish and any other wildly successful Black comedian of modern times owes Gregory for smashing color barriers.

Filling in for an absent comic at Chicagos flagship Playboy Club in 1961, a young Dick Gregory killed the crowd and was immediately booked there for weeks on end. Paving the way for trailblazers like Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor, he soon appeared on The Tonight Show (hosted then by Jack Paar, 1961s Jimmy Fallon) before mainstream white America, and they swiftly compared him to the best of their own: the late Lenny Bruce.

RELATED: Original Woke: Dick Gregory’s Life Of Activism In Vintage Photos

Always dedicated to the uplift of his people, Gregory suffered multiple arrests protesting injustice against Blacks in the U.S. In 1963, he landed in a Birmingham jail for five days after demonstrating with Martin Luther King Jr. Lending his aid to calm down rioting in Watts, Gregory got shot in the leg in 65.

In the 60s and 70s, the thirtysomething comic forever cemented his status in the annals of woke by engaging in the first of many career-long hunger strikes against the Vietnam War, and running for president in 68 with the Freedom and Peace Party. He was also a proud feminist and card-carrying conspiracy theorist.

Knowing that the personal is also political, Gregory (a vegetarian since the mid-70s) also devised the Slim-Safe Bahamian Diet in 1985, a weight-loss powder created to counter poor nutritional habits in the Black community. Trying to summarize all the bullet points of his career almost does a disservice to the mans legacy.

Digging into Dick Gregorys lifeworkthat discography, bibliography and activismis the best way to learn of Black Americas loss and what he left behind. To give Gregory the last laugh: I am really enjoying the new Martin Luther King Jr. stampjust think about all those White bigots licking the backside of a Black man.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Hundreds participate in Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston – Beckley Register-Herald

CHARLESTON Hundreds of people participated in a peaceful gathering of the Black Lives Matter rally on Sunday at the Capitol Complex.

Those who attended the rally said they considered the gathering to be a historical occurrence in West Virginia. They said the event meant spreading awareness for racial inequality.

Police were present all around the Capitol and checked belongings before people entered the rallies.

Sunday’s Black Lives Matter rally proved peaceful and concluded without incident, the Capitol Police announced later that night. They estimated about 400 people attended the Black Lives Matter event, which was organized by Black Lives Matter West Virginia as well as the CARE, or Call to Action for Racial Equality, Coalition.

Substantial assistance from the West Virginia State Police, Charleston Police and Fire Departments and the West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center was instrumental in providing for a safe evening, Director Kevin Foreman of the West Virginia Division of Protective Services said in a release.

We work very well with these public safety partners, and these kinds of collaborations serve to make that relationship more successful going forward, Foreman said in the release.

Jennifer Wells, director of Youth Leadership with the Our Children Our Future campaign and a member of the CARE Coalition, said the rally was about standing in solidarity and uplifting people in a peaceful gathering.

We are standing for the community and those who have been marginalized, she said. We’re here and we’re working toward a better future.

She said although she felt negativity surrounded the cause, the group’s intention was not violence.

We don’t intend to come out in a violent nature. The fight does not mean violence. It means standing up, being very clear what we need to survive in this country. We have been met with violence, violent words, violent actions and violent perception. That’s not what this movement is. That’s not what we are about and it’s not what this event is about. It’s about coming together as a group, first and foremost. … It’s fortifying the fact that we should be together and work for a better country and a better state.

Gabrielle Chapman, executive director for the CARE Coalition, stressed the event is separate from those who want to remove Confederate statues such as the Stonewall Jackson statue, which is on the opposite side of the Capitol from where the Black Lives Matter rally took place.

She said the purpose of the rally is to shed light on ways people can eliminate racism throughout the state.

I feel like this is a historic event, she said. I don’t know if anything like this has happened in the state of West Virginia before, but I’m really proud to be part of it.

Before the rallies, several members of the West Virginia Council of Churches lined up to give a brief prayer for peace. They then marched for peace around the fountain of the complex. They also went to the Free Speech Rally to make sure each group could come to the areas safely.

The Rev. Jeff Allen, a United Methodist pastor and the executive director of the West Virginia Council of Churches, said he and other members felt it was important to support the rally.

We were concerned after what happened in Charlottesville, he said. We felt it was really important that we have some sort of clergy and church presence here to de-escalate any violence that might happen and also provide presence and witness for the church and to support the Black Lives Matter rally.

Caitlin Hays Gaffin, director of Operations with West Virginia Free, attended the Black Lives Matter rally. At her feet was a sign she had created that said “West Virginians for Racial Justice.” People came up to her to place their signatures on the sign for support. The banner had originally been made for a vigil last week at St. John’s Episcopal Church.

We wanted to bring it back today and made stickers to go along with it, she said. Everybody has been really responsive so far and that’s been good, especially with all these scary, horrible things that we have going on right now. It’s been nice to be able to come together as a community for something good. We are hoping to fill up this banner and bring it to events through the year.

Aliyah and Wayne Crozier, both of Charleston, and William Jewett, of Dunbar, also were at the Black Lives Matter rally. Aliyah Crozier said she was happy to see many people there.

I’m happy to see a lot of people know that racism is a bad thing and that all lives matter, she said.

Wayne Crozier said the event has special importance to him.

Black Lives Matter doesn’t mean that other lives don’t matter, he said. It’s really just to say that Black Lives Matter also. It’s sad that we have to focus on the black lives matter but there are certain attacks that black people face that other people do not. So, it’s good to see a rainbow of people come out and say, ‘Hey, we support that,’ and let everyone know that racism will not win.

Jewett said he was happy to see the response.

It feels like my heart is going to jump out of my body, he said. I never thought I would see this in the city of Charleston, W.Va. It’s amazing. I thought maybe in one of the larger metropolitan cities or wherever but here in Charleston. It’s just love.

The Black Lives Matter rally also featured several speakers including Adrienne Belafonte Biesemeyer. Biesemeyer, whose father is Harry Belafonte, said she spent her life in West Virginia, graduating from West Virginia State College.

The reason I stayed here is because I fell in love, not only with the state but with the man I have been married to for 45 years, she said.

She reflected on her father, who is known for his humanitarian work and for songs including The Banana Boat Song (Day-O). She reflected on advice from her father, who she said is now 90 years old.

This has to be a fight, a struggle with young people, she said. His reply was that fascism is everybody’s fight. It doesn’t matter what your age is. He said that does not get you off the hook.

She said she wants to see West Virginia come to understanding and acceptance. She also talked about what the movement means to her.

A lot of people say, ‘Well, don’t all lives matter?’ Some view it as an offshoot of the Black Panthers. My answer is yes, all lives do matter. I believe in that. But how many white parents have to give instructions to their kids of, ‘If you’re stopped by the police, then this is what you have to do’? And for me, the phrase Black Lives Matter means yes, our lives matter also not exclusively but our lives matter also.

Email: alannom@register-herald.com; follow on Twitter @AndreaLannom

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Black Panther History Pop-Ups Spotlight Ongoing Struggle For Affordable Housing – Hoodline

The Mission tenants are in trouble, stated a1966article by the civil rights organization S.N.C.C. We demand decent housing, read the front-page headline of an issue of The Black Panthera few years later.

According to former Black Panther Madalynn Rucker, people of color are still fighting for social justice when it comes to housing.

If you close your eyes, some of the issues people are really concerned about now sound as if it were back in the 1960s, said Rucker, now executive director of On Track, a diversity consulting group.

Today, she’s part of a team organizing Stay In The Bay, a pop-up in Margaret Haywood Park from noon to 4pm.

The first in a series of six, today’s event will present images from the Its About Time Black Panther Party Archive with workshops, resources, and experts who’ll connect the housing issues and solutions from the past to the present day.

When Rucker and her team visited an exhibit at the Oakland Museum last year commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther Party, she was moved by the diversity of attendees.

She said she’d kept her party membership to herself due to the controversy often associated with the Black Panthers, militants who often dressed in paramilitary garb and appeared armed in public.

But the exhibit also reminded her of the work Panthers did in the community, such as a free breakfast program in Oakland that spread to many citiesand preceded the establishment of a federal program that exists to this day.

Certainly we had a lot of missteps, but it also reminded us of the good that we did and that many peoplebecause there were so many who came to seerecognized it, Rucker said.

Sometimes you just need little emotional reminders that we can fight for what we know is right. We changed our little piece of history.

At Stay In The Bay events, attendees can browse artifacts such as newspapers and posters to see past examples of community organizing.

In an archival interview with Bobby Seale, one of the founders of the Black Panther Party, Seale described boycotting a store that declined to donate food to the free breakfast program by organizing a carpool to take shoppers instead to the Lucky Store, which supported the program.

Next thing I know, Ive got four other Lucky Stores donating food to us, Seals said. Its economic power. Its unity in the community.

Billy Jennings, a curator and archivist who’s helped organize the events, said relocation housing for people displaced by urban renewal was another example of the Black Panthers’ ability to mobilize the community.

Thousands of minority residents were displaced in the Fillmore; in Oakland, a similar redevelopment took place in the city’s center, demolishing more than a dozen blocks of mostly minority housing.

The Black Panther Party filed a suit to avoid mass displacement; the suit, according to Robyn C. Spencer, a professor at the City University of New York, led the City Council to agree to build the replacement housing.

Despite its name, Jennings said the party’s membership included people of difference races throughout the country and around the world.

We were there at a time when folks needed to hear that they had a right to struggle for what they believe in, said Rucker.

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Black Panther History Pop-Ups Spotlight Ongoing Struggle For Affordable Housing – Hoodline

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‘Black Power’ Spray-Painted on Statue of Polarizing Philadelphia Mayor – NBC4 Washington

The Center City statue of Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia’s polarizing former police commissioner and mayor, was defaced late Thursday with the words “Black Power” written in white spray paint.

The vandal also wrote “The Black community should be their own police” on the steps of the Municipal Services Building on John F. Kennedy Boulevardwhere the statue stands.

Vandalism of the bronze statue follows renewed calls for its removal in the wake of the deadly violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and national discussion over how to handle statues and monuments linked to racism and other emotionally charged issues.

A Rizzo supporter covered the vandalized midsection of the statue with a sheet overnight. City crews later used soap and brooms to clean up the graffiti and by daybreak the words were gone from the statue of a waving Rizzo at its prominent location across from City Hall.

Philadelphia police took the suspected vandal, who investigators say drove off in a Toyota station wagon, into custody before 7 a.m. It is unclear what charges he could face. The latest act of vandalism came after protesters clashed with police near the statue and a man from Maplewood, New Jersey, was arrested after cameras allegedly captured him throwing eggs at the statue.

The bronze statue, unveiled in the late 1990s, depicts Rizzo bounding down the steps of the Municipal Services Building. It was donated to the city.

Driven by Philadelphia Councilwoman Helen Gym, there is growing support for removing the tribute to Rizzo, who died of a heart attack in 1991. Some call it a reminder of Rizzo’s racist relationship towards Philadelphias African-American community” in the late 1960s and 1970s.

The first-term Democrat tweeted that all around the country, we’re fighting to remove the monuments to slavery & racism. Philly, we have work to do. Take the Rizzo statue down.

Mayor Jim Kenney hasn’t rejected the idea.

“If there’s a group of people or folks in the city who want to reconsider the placement of the statue, whether it be removed or relocated, that’s up to them to go through the same process as the people who erected it,” Kenney said.

It’s not the first time activists have demanded the statue be removed. Last year, an anti-police brutality group called Philly Coalition for Real Justice petitioned for its removal.

Rizzo, a hard-charging, big-mouthed icon of head-cracking law enforcement in Philadelphia,served as police commissioner for four years before serving two terms as the citys mayor from 1972 to 1980.His friends, family and fans remember him as a devoted public servant unafraid to speak his mind.Thousands of people signed a recent online petition to keep the statue in place.

Rizzo’s detractors saw his police force as corrupt and brutal.

Lowlights from his time as police commissioner include an incident in 1970 of officers raiding the Philadelphia headquarters of the Black Panthers and forcing the men to strip in public.

For those who knew and covered him, like former cop and retired Inquirer reporter Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, Rizzo can’t be easily compared to other politicians. And Rizzo doesn’t belong in the same category as long-gone Confederate leaders whose statues are coming down across the country.

Gibbons remembers Rizzo fondly for his tough policing, describing the 6 feet, 2 inch Italian American from South Philly as the guy who when he entered a room, everything else stopped.

He is not by any means Robert E. Lee, or Chief Justice Roger Taney, who wrote the Dred Scott decision,” said Mitchell, who began her career as a radio and television reporter for KYW during much of the Rizzo years. “He was a twice-elected mayor of Philadelphia, who was clearly controversial in his years as police commissioner. But from a distance, I would say he is not analogous to those Confederate leaders who tried to overthrow the government.

WhenRizzosaid in 1978 that he wouldn’t seek a third term in office he vowed to “defend the rights” of whites who had been “kicked around too long,”The Washington Post reported.

But Mitchell said that, For all of this flaws, Rizzo never publicly defended white separatists.”

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Beyonc Just Released the Most Stylish 600-Page Coffee Table Book – Vogue.com

Photo: Courtesy of Parkwood Entertainment

Anyone familiar with Beyonc s landmark sixth record, Lemonade , will tell you its more than just an album. Personal, political, and unapologetically honest, it stands as the crowning achievement in the career of one of musics most beloved artists, thanks in large part to its stunning visuals. Whether you watched the HBO special or tuned in for one of Beyoncs jaw-dropping Formation tour performances, the impact was impossible to ignore. Yet the full scope of its journey from idea to final product has been kept under wrapsuntil now. Today Beyonc will release How to Make Lemonade , an expansive 600-page book that finally takes the audience behind the scenes with an array of exclusive photos, outtakes, and art that shines light on her dynamic use of fashion to convey her message.

The book offers an in-depth look at each element of Lemonade s visual presentation, putting the projects many influences, collaborators, and cameos on display. Through collages and photographic juxtapositions, Beyoncs it-takes-a-village method of creativity comes into full view. From the Laolu Senbanjo Yoruba body painting featured in Sorry to the wardrobe of artfully customized Gucci in Formation, each aesthetic detail is now featured and given greater context. Many of these fashion-forward touches register as merely stylish in music video format, but are in fact imbued with deeper meaning. Case in point: One section outlines the connection between a head wrap and Louisianas Tignon laws, which restricted the dress of Creole women in an effort to maintain the states racist social hierarchies.

Photo: Courtesy of Parkwood Entertainment

A celebration of blackness and femininity, Lemonade wasnt shy about its social commentary. With Beyonc evoking the Black Panthers at the Super Bowl in a black leather bodysuit, bringing the Mothers of the Movement onstage at the Video Music Awards , and turning the Grammys into a fertility goddess tribute with an ornate gold headdress, she has used her platform and wardrobe choices to create a dialogue. Tabloids may have focused on the revelations regarding her marriage, but Lemonade s true message went beyond thata fact that the book highlights perfectly. These never-before-seen images (including a series of vintage family photos) document each step in the process, and the personal and political are connected for an exploration of what it means to be a black woman with the weight of the world on her shoulders. How to Make Lemonade digs deep into highs and historical realities. An automatic must have for members of the BeyHivewho have no doubt preordered the special-edition boxed set, which comes with a double vinyl LPit provides something even the most casual fan can appreciate: an inside look at an artist in her prime.

The Collectors Edition How to Make Lemonade Box Set including double vinyl LP, $299.99 beyonce.com

Beyonc Made a Video at the September Issue Cover Shoot

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Harris and the Black Panthers were forces to be reckoned with – News Courier

Editor’s note: Portions of the following article were taken from George S. Pattons Magnificent Panthers: The 761st Tank Battalion, written by By Charles W. Sasser.

What are you laughing at man? asked the soldier.

They say ol’ General Patton asked them to send him the best Negro Tank Battalion in the army, said the laughing soldier. They say the colonel wrote him back and told him he couldnt send him the best Negro Tank Battalion in the army but he could send him the best tank battalion in the army and they just happened to be Negroes.

The year was 1944. America was at war, and the Black Panthers of the 761st Tank Battalion was riding high. They had just completed maneuvers in Texas, where they outclassed every other battalion. They were good and knew it.

The 761st was formed in March 1942 and activated a month later on April 1, 1942. The unit had 676 enlisted men 30 black officers and six white officers. An independent tank battalion, the unit, and its soldiers, by federal law, were not allowed to serve alongside white troops.

Among the enlisted men was Trinity High School graduate Wilmer Harris, son of Mrs. Willie Harris. Pfc. Harris was inducted into the Army June 19, 1943, and by 1944 found himself in France with the 761st assigned as a light machine gunner to Pattons 3rd Army. Patton was generally skeptical of the abilities of black soldiers and he thought African-American tankers were intellectually incapable of handling the challenges of armored warfare. In his pivotal book, War As I Knew It, Patton stated that he believed a colored soldier cannot think fast enough to fight in armor.

Harris and the 761st would prove him wrong.

Confident in their abilities after having been told at Camp Hood, Texas, they had a superior training record, the 761st was ready to fight at Omaha Beach. Their motto was Come out Fighting! and fighting they did.

After landing at Normandy, the 761st raced 400 miles across France in six days and began wreaking havoc on their German enemies. Logan Nye, in an article for We Are The Mighty, said that the 761st crushed Nazi Forces on the Western Front.

During World War II, tank units rotated to the rear after three month at the front. The 761st, however, spent 183 days in continuous combat at the front and inflicted massive casualties on German combat units. In their first months of fighting, the Panthers earned three Medal of Honor nominations.

Driving toward Germanys Saar Region, the Panthers were laying down an immense amount of fire. At some point during this maneuver Harris was wounded. A letter addressed to his mother was sent by general delivery to Athens, but by the time it arrived, he was back into the fray.

On Dec. 9, 1944, the 761st rolled onto German soil. Sgt. Willie McCall got out of his tank and looked around. Spitting contemptuously, he said, So this is the home of Superman?

At the time, Superman was not looking so good because the Black Panthers were clawing on his turf.

When the Battle of the Bulge began on Dec. 16, 1944, the Panthers were in the thick of things. Racing across frozen ground they landed at Bastogne and relieved the fabled 101st Airborne Division, dubbed The Battling Bastards of Bastogne for their heroic fight in slowing the German advance.

The town of Tillett, located 15 miles west of Bastogne, fell to the 761st on January 7, 1944. A German soldier captured by the Panthers was stunned to see black soldiers in uniform. He asked Sgt. Johnny Holmes, in English, What are you doing here? This is a white mans war.

Holmes offered him a cigarette and replied, You aint got no black or white when youre over here and the nation is in trouble. You only got Americans.

Continuing to fight, the Panthers broke the Siegfried Line in late March and crossed Germanys main river, the Rhine, later in the same month. On May 5, 1945, they rolled into Steyr, Austria, and became one of the first American units to link up with elements of the Soviet Unions Red Army.

By wars end in May 1945, the 761st had participated in four major campaigns, inflicted more than 130,000 casualties and captured close to 100,000 enemy soldiers. They had earned a Medal of Honor, seven silver stars, 56 Bronze stars, 246 Purple Hearts, 391 decorations for heroism and eight enlisted men had been given battlefield commissions as army officers.

On Victory in Europe Day, the 761st lined their tanks besides a small bridge on the Enns River. Patton stood straight and tall in a jeep and with a satisfied look on his face returned the salutes of the prideful Black Panthers.

By the time Pfc. Harris departed the European Theater on March 21, 1945, former Trinity student and Tuskegee Airman Leroy Murray and the “Red Tails” had proven that Negroes could fly airplanes and former Trinity student and Montfort Point Marine Melvin Ballard and his corps compadres had proven that Negroes had what it took to be undeniably Marines. Lastly, Trinity student and 370th Regiment Combat Team Purple Heart recipient Thomas C. Malone and his regiment had proven that Negroes were not afraid to fight.

Harris arrived in the United States on March 28, 1945. His awards and decorations included the Combat Infantryman Badge, Purple Heart, World War II Victory Medal and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

He received an honorable discharge from the United States Army on Feb. 8, 1946.

Walker, a retired lieutenant colonel, is the JROTC instructor at Austin High School in Decatur. He can be reached at James.Walker@dcs.edu.

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Lexus And Marvel Team Up For The Black Panther Movie – The Art of Gears

Courtesy: Lexus USA Newsroom

Lexus LFA: 12 Brand-New Unsold Units Are In US Dealerships Now by Ray Prince

We had covered the videos and pics which were being uploaded to social media, when the cast and crew of Marvels Black Panther movie were filming in Busan, South Korea. What caught our interest was the sight of the car on which the titular MCU superhero was seen crouched upon in what could be a high-speed chase scene. It was a 2018 Lexus LC 500.

While Lexus hadnt started its promo work on the movie tie-in marketing then, it has gradually opened the account now. The Lexus USA Newsroom now has an update on the brands association with the Black Panther movie. The press release states the collaboration between the first-ever 2018 Lexus LC and the Black Panther character. Brian Bolain, General Manager, Lexus Marketing said,

Marvel continuously captures audiences through charismatic characters and inspiring stories the ideal fit for Lexus mission to craft amazing, engaging experiences. And the LCs aggressive styling, high performance and agile handling are a perfect fit for the Black Panthers quick, cat-like reflexes and superhuman feats. Were excited to see the duo in action.

Courtesy: Lexus USA Newsroom

Marvel Custom Solutions have created an original graphic novel as well as part of the campaign, featuring the Lexus LC 500 with a Wakandan spin, helping out TChalla (Black Panther) to defeat the baddie. Lexus was also actively involved in this years San Diego Comic-Con where the Black Panther promotions were in full swing.

The character of Black Panther had made its onscreen debut in Captain America: Civil War and was noted as one of the best aspects of the blockbuster. The solo movie which is set to release on February 16, 2018 will focus on TChalla who returns to his isolated, yet technologically advanced kingdom of Wakanda to take his new role as King. The trailer, character images and production design are out on the web already and have received universal acclaim so far for remarkably capturing the idea of Wakanda as in the comic books.

The casting and the talent involved in creating the cinematic adaptation of the Marvel character is being applauded too. Directed by Ryan Coogler and starring a fabulous bunch of actors like Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyongo, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Danai Gurira, Sterling K. Brown, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya and Andy Serkis, the superhero flick boasts of some of the finest actors in the business.

As for the car, the 2018 Lexus LC 500 comes in a 5.0-liter 471 hp V8 version and also in a new hybrid variant that packs a V6 with 354 hp of power. Prices start at $92,000.

Source: Lexus USA Newsroom

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Original Black Panthers Of Milwaukee Aim to Improve the State of … – WUWM

Across the country, Black Panther Parties are once again becoming more active. The organization was founded in the 1960s and was known for its militant self-defense and community-based programs. In Milwaukee, there are currently two active groups. WUWM’sLaToya Dennis went out with one, called the Original Black Panthers of Milwaukee, to learn about its mission.

Its around 6 p.m. on a weekday evening when I arrive at the Original Black Panther Party headquarters. The group’s members are already hopping into two different vehicles. They’re heading out to businesses that they’ve heard are selling substances harmful to the community.

The General — who heads the Original Black Panthers group — goes by the name King Rick. Weve got some reports that there are three areas that are selling Legal Lean and High Tech syrup. Legal Lean and High Tech syrup is the equivalent to what the rappers drink. It dopes up our community, makes us lethargic, he says.

After about a 15 minute ride, we arrived at the first location. The driver parks the car and runs in to survey the store, then comes back to the car with a report.

They sell it, but theyre apparently sold out. But they have the signs and posters up.

And with that, about 10 members of the Original Black Panther Party exit their respective vehicles and head into the store.

How you doing, bro? Listen bro, were coming to you as black men. We have an issue with the Legal Lean and High Tech K syrup being sold in our community. And when we find out, we go to stores and ask them to stop selling it because its a detriment, King Rick says.

The story owner agrees to take down the signs and stop selling the dangerous drink.

Once back in the car, King Rick says that people typically agree to stop doing whatever theyre being asked, but sometimes they dont follow through. And when they dont, he says the Black Panthers boycott and protest in front of their establishment.

King Rick says he was introduced to the Black Panthers as a child. He was a member of what was called Panther Cubs in the early 70s. The Black Panthers taught the kids about Black History and organized a breakfast program.

At the age of 54, he says hes been a Panther for 44 years — although for a long time, the group wasnt very active here. But King Rick says about two years ago, some black elders called for a reemergence of the party to tackle some of the problems in the community.

Were number one in so many negative statistical categories, education, housing, jobs, incarceration, hyper segregation. When you have those dynamics, it creates chaos, he says.

“Love for community and strength and love and honor. Our goal for the community is the provision and protection of our queens, our family and our community by any means necessary.”

King Rick says what’s at the core of the party’s reemergence is love.

Love for community and strength and love and honor. Our goal for the community is the provision and protection of our queens, our family and our community by any means necessary, he says.

And by any means necessary, King Rick says hes not talking about violence.

The day of violence is over. I mean violence is only necessary when its coming at you. But now its about economics because we as African Americans spend $1.1 trillion a year on goods and services and less than 2 percent of that is spent with our own, he says.

“The day of violence is over. I mean violence is only necessary when it’s coming at you. But now it’s about economics.”

King Rick says if black people unite, they have the power to change the way theyre seen in society, and gain the power to achieve economic freedom.

Across the country, Black Panther parties have never truly gone away. It’s just that theyre now becoming more visible, according to UW-Madison sociology professor Pamela Oliver. She says they parties are an outgrowth of Black Power movements, whose ranks have swelled in recent years.

You tend to get social movements when you have that combination of grievance and the belief that theres something you can do something about it, Oliver says.

Historically, some Black Panther groups have been accused of racism — arguing they’re pro-black, at the expense of other groups. But back in the car with King Rick, he says the Black Panthers are not a racist group: When has a Black Panther lynched somebody? When has a Black Panther burned somebody? When has a Black Panther stopped people from going to school?

King Rick says the reality is that the Black Panther Party is against racism and oppression of Black people.

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Original Black Panthers Of Milwaukee Aim to Improve the State of … – WUWM

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August 8, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers take part in Thomasville rally – Times-Enterprise

THOMASVILLE Throngs of people took part in a rally on Magnolia Street on Monday evening. The rally was in response to a Thomasville-Thomas County drug squad shooting that claimed the life of a suspect. The rally began at the shooting incident scene on Magnolia Street and was led by Sir Maejor Page of Black Lives Matter Greater Atlanta. Members of the Southeast Region of the Black Panthers, some who also carried weapons, were also in attendance. The march moved through the Magnolia Street neighborhood toward Broad Street, going through downtown Thomasville. Thomasville Police Department blocked off sections of downtown as the rally briefly stopped at the intersection of Broad Street and Remington Avenue. Marchers moved to the Historic Courthouse and the Thomas County Judicial Center and down Madison Street. Chants of “no justice, no peace, hands up, dont shoot, among others rang through the downtown Thomasville Streets. The march concluded at Magnolia Street. For more, see Wednesdays Times-Enterprise and www.timesenterprise.com.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

We Should All Take A Note From Dick Gregory’s Unapologetic Activism – Essence.com

Gregory went from pioneering comedian to acerbic voice of the civil rights movement Dick Gregory, who segued from pioneering comedian to acerbic voice of the civil rights movement, passed away Saturday at the age of 84. Imagine Dave Chappelle transforming into a Black Lives Matter activist, author, nutritionist and presidential nominee after leaving behind his Comedy Central show and youll have some idea of Gregorys legacy. Well never have a Dick Gregory Show or boisterous buddy comedies ( la Sidney Poitier/Bill Cosby) to look back on. Dick Gregory gave up entertainment for activism, and while the entertainment world is certainly poorer for his choice, activism was clearly the higher calling. For that, Gregory will always be applauded. RELATED: Civil Rights Activist And Groundbreaking Comedian Dick Gregory Dead At 84 Gregorys 1964 autobiography nigger served as inspiration for the original title of Nass 2008 album Untitled, but the rappers record company wouldnt permit the pejorative. (Times had changed.) His memoir took readers on a journey from Gregorys upbringing in mid-western St. Louis, Missouri, to his collegiate track stardom at Southern Illinois University to a stint in the army and the budding career as a comedian that made him famous. But Gregory was only 32 in 1964, and his calling as a social activist had barely begun. By 1971s No More Lies: The Myth and the Reality of American History, both Gregory and his audience were even clearer on what he was about politically and artistically. Watch: Lights, Camera, Activism RELATED: Subscribe to ourdaily newsletterfor the latest in hair, beauty, style and celebrity news. Hed eventually publish 12 books and 15 comedy albums (Live at the Village Gate, In Living Black and White, etc.), making multiple movie appearances (the Black Panthers biopic Panther, for example) while fighting for African-American freedoms. Chappelle, Kevin Hart, Tiffany Haddish and any other wildly successful Black comedian of modern times owes Gregory for smashing color barriers. Filling in for an absent comic at Chicagos flagship Playboy Club in 1961, a young Dick Gregory killed the crowd and was immediately booked there for weeks on end. Paving the way for trailblazers like Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor, he soon appeared on The Tonight Show (hosted then by Jack Paar, 1961s Jimmy Fallon) before mainstream white America, and they swiftly compared him to the best of their own: the late Lenny Bruce. RELATED: Original Woke: Dick Gregory’s Life Of Activism In Vintage Photos Always dedicated to the uplift of his people, Gregory suffered multiple arrests protesting injustice against Blacks in the U.S. In 1963, he landed in a Birmingham jail for five days after demonstrating with Martin Luther King Jr. Lending his aid to calm down rioting in Watts, Gregory got shot in the leg in 65. In the 60s and 70s, the thirtysomething comic forever cemented his status in the annals of woke by engaging in the first of many career-long hunger strikes against the Vietnam War, and running for president in 68 with the Freedom and Peace Party. He was also a proud feminist and card-carrying conspiracy theorist. Knowing that the personal is also political, Gregory (a vegetarian since the mid-70s) also devised the Slim-Safe Bahamian Diet in 1985, a weight-loss powder created to counter poor nutritional habits in the Black community. Trying to summarize all the bullet points of his career almost does a disservice to the mans legacy. Digging into Dick Gregorys lifeworkthat discography, bibliography and activismis the best way to learn of Black Americas loss and what he left behind. To give Gregory the last laugh: I am really enjoying the new Martin Luther King Jr. stampjust think about all those White bigots licking the backside of a Black man.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Hundreds participate in Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston – Beckley Register-Herald

CHARLESTON Hundreds of people participated in a peaceful gathering of the Black Lives Matter rally on Sunday at the Capitol Complex. Those who attended the rally said they considered the gathering to be a historical occurrence in West Virginia. They said the event meant spreading awareness for racial inequality. Police were present all around the Capitol and checked belongings before people entered the rallies. Sunday’s Black Lives Matter rally proved peaceful and concluded without incident, the Capitol Police announced later that night. They estimated about 400 people attended the Black Lives Matter event, which was organized by Black Lives Matter West Virginia as well as the CARE, or Call to Action for Racial Equality, Coalition. Substantial assistance from the West Virginia State Police, Charleston Police and Fire Departments and the West Virginia Intelligence Fusion Center was instrumental in providing for a safe evening, Director Kevin Foreman of the West Virginia Division of Protective Services said in a release. We work very well with these public safety partners, and these kinds of collaborations serve to make that relationship more successful going forward, Foreman said in the release. Jennifer Wells, director of Youth Leadership with the Our Children Our Future campaign and a member of the CARE Coalition, said the rally was about standing in solidarity and uplifting people in a peaceful gathering. We are standing for the community and those who have been marginalized, she said. We’re here and we’re working toward a better future. She said although she felt negativity surrounded the cause, the group’s intention was not violence. We don’t intend to come out in a violent nature. The fight does not mean violence. It means standing up, being very clear what we need to survive in this country. We have been met with violence, violent words, violent actions and violent perception. That’s not what this movement is. That’s not what we are about and it’s not what this event is about. It’s about coming together as a group, first and foremost. … It’s fortifying the fact that we should be together and work for a better country and a better state. Gabrielle Chapman, executive director for the CARE Coalition, stressed the event is separate from those who want to remove Confederate statues such as the Stonewall Jackson statue, which is on the opposite side of the Capitol from where the Black Lives Matter rally took place. She said the purpose of the rally is to shed light on ways people can eliminate racism throughout the state. I feel like this is a historic event, she said. I don’t know if anything like this has happened in the state of West Virginia before, but I’m really proud to be part of it. Before the rallies, several members of the West Virginia Council of Churches lined up to give a brief prayer for peace. They then marched for peace around the fountain of the complex. They also went to the Free Speech Rally to make sure each group could come to the areas safely. The Rev. Jeff Allen, a United Methodist pastor and the executive director of the West Virginia Council of Churches, said he and other members felt it was important to support the rally. We were concerned after what happened in Charlottesville, he said. We felt it was really important that we have some sort of clergy and church presence here to de-escalate any violence that might happen and also provide presence and witness for the church and to support the Black Lives Matter rally. Caitlin Hays Gaffin, director of Operations with West Virginia Free, attended the Black Lives Matter rally. At her feet was a sign she had created that said “West Virginians for Racial Justice.” People came up to her to place their signatures on the sign for support. The banner had originally been made for a vigil last week at St. John’s Episcopal Church. We wanted to bring it back today and made stickers to go along with it, she said. Everybody has been really responsive so far and that’s been good, especially with all these scary, horrible things that we have going on right now. It’s been nice to be able to come together as a community for something good. We are hoping to fill up this banner and bring it to events through the year. Aliyah and Wayne Crozier, both of Charleston, and William Jewett, of Dunbar, also were at the Black Lives Matter rally. Aliyah Crozier said she was happy to see many people there. I’m happy to see a lot of people know that racism is a bad thing and that all lives matter, she said. Wayne Crozier said the event has special importance to him. Black Lives Matter doesn’t mean that other lives don’t matter, he said. It’s really just to say that Black Lives Matter also. It’s sad that we have to focus on the black lives matter but there are certain attacks that black people face that other people do not. So, it’s good to see a rainbow of people come out and say, ‘Hey, we support that,’ and let everyone know that racism will not win. Jewett said he was happy to see the response. It feels like my heart is going to jump out of my body, he said. I never thought I would see this in the city of Charleston, W.Va. It’s amazing. I thought maybe in one of the larger metropolitan cities or wherever but here in Charleston. It’s just love. The Black Lives Matter rally also featured several speakers including Adrienne Belafonte Biesemeyer. Biesemeyer, whose father is Harry Belafonte, said she spent her life in West Virginia, graduating from West Virginia State College. The reason I stayed here is because I fell in love, not only with the state but with the man I have been married to for 45 years, she said. She reflected on her father, who is known for his humanitarian work and for songs including The Banana Boat Song (Day-O). She reflected on advice from her father, who she said is now 90 years old. This has to be a fight, a struggle with young people, she said. His reply was that fascism is everybody’s fight. It doesn’t matter what your age is. He said that does not get you off the hook. She said she wants to see West Virginia come to understanding and acceptance. She also talked about what the movement means to her. A lot of people say, ‘Well, don’t all lives matter?’ Some view it as an offshoot of the Black Panthers. My answer is yes, all lives do matter. I believe in that. But how many white parents have to give instructions to their kids of, ‘If you’re stopped by the police, then this is what you have to do’? And for me, the phrase Black Lives Matter means yes, our lives matter also not exclusively but our lives matter also. Email: alannom@register-herald.com; follow on Twitter @AndreaLannom

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Black Panther History Pop-Ups Spotlight Ongoing Struggle For Affordable Housing – Hoodline

The Mission tenants are in trouble, stated a1966article by the civil rights organization S.N.C.C. We demand decent housing, read the front-page headline of an issue of The Black Panthera few years later. According to former Black Panther Madalynn Rucker, people of color are still fighting for social justice when it comes to housing. If you close your eyes, some of the issues people are really concerned about now sound as if it were back in the 1960s, said Rucker, now executive director of On Track, a diversity consulting group. Today, she’s part of a team organizing Stay In The Bay, a pop-up in Margaret Haywood Park from noon to 4pm. The first in a series of six, today’s event will present images from the Its About Time Black Panther Party Archive with workshops, resources, and experts who’ll connect the housing issues and solutions from the past to the present day. When Rucker and her team visited an exhibit at the Oakland Museum last year commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther Party, she was moved by the diversity of attendees. She said she’d kept her party membership to herself due to the controversy often associated with the Black Panthers, militants who often dressed in paramilitary garb and appeared armed in public. But the exhibit also reminded her of the work Panthers did in the community, such as a free breakfast program in Oakland that spread to many citiesand preceded the establishment of a federal program that exists to this day. Certainly we had a lot of missteps, but it also reminded us of the good that we did and that many peoplebecause there were so many who came to seerecognized it, Rucker said. Sometimes you just need little emotional reminders that we can fight for what we know is right. We changed our little piece of history. At Stay In The Bay events, attendees can browse artifacts such as newspapers and posters to see past examples of community organizing. In an archival interview with Bobby Seale, one of the founders of the Black Panther Party, Seale described boycotting a store that declined to donate food to the free breakfast program by organizing a carpool to take shoppers instead to the Lucky Store, which supported the program. Next thing I know, Ive got four other Lucky Stores donating food to us, Seals said. Its economic power. Its unity in the community. Billy Jennings, a curator and archivist who’s helped organize the events, said relocation housing for people displaced by urban renewal was another example of the Black Panthers’ ability to mobilize the community. Thousands of minority residents were displaced in the Fillmore; in Oakland, a similar redevelopment took place in the city’s center, demolishing more than a dozen blocks of mostly minority housing. The Black Panther Party filed a suit to avoid mass displacement; the suit, according to Robyn C. Spencer, a professor at the City University of New York, led the City Council to agree to build the replacement housing. Despite its name, Jennings said the party’s membership included people of difference races throughout the country and around the world. We were there at a time when folks needed to hear that they had a right to struggle for what they believe in, said Rucker.

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‘Black Power’ Spray-Painted on Statue of Polarizing Philadelphia Mayor – NBC4 Washington

The Center City statue of Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia’s polarizing former police commissioner and mayor, was defaced late Thursday with the words “Black Power” written in white spray paint. The vandal also wrote “The Black community should be their own police” on the steps of the Municipal Services Building on John F. Kennedy Boulevardwhere the statue stands. Vandalism of the bronze statue follows renewed calls for its removal in the wake of the deadly violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and national discussion over how to handle statues and monuments linked to racism and other emotionally charged issues. A Rizzo supporter covered the vandalized midsection of the statue with a sheet overnight. City crews later used soap and brooms to clean up the graffiti and by daybreak the words were gone from the statue of a waving Rizzo at its prominent location across from City Hall. Philadelphia police took the suspected vandal, who investigators say drove off in a Toyota station wagon, into custody before 7 a.m. It is unclear what charges he could face. The latest act of vandalism came after protesters clashed with police near the statue and a man from Maplewood, New Jersey, was arrested after cameras allegedly captured him throwing eggs at the statue. The bronze statue, unveiled in the late 1990s, depicts Rizzo bounding down the steps of the Municipal Services Building. It was donated to the city. Driven by Philadelphia Councilwoman Helen Gym, there is growing support for removing the tribute to Rizzo, who died of a heart attack in 1991. Some call it a reminder of Rizzo’s racist relationship towards Philadelphias African-American community” in the late 1960s and 1970s. The first-term Democrat tweeted that all around the country, we’re fighting to remove the monuments to slavery & racism. Philly, we have work to do. Take the Rizzo statue down. Mayor Jim Kenney hasn’t rejected the idea. “If there’s a group of people or folks in the city who want to reconsider the placement of the statue, whether it be removed or relocated, that’s up to them to go through the same process as the people who erected it,” Kenney said. It’s not the first time activists have demanded the statue be removed. Last year, an anti-police brutality group called Philly Coalition for Real Justice petitioned for its removal. Rizzo, a hard-charging, big-mouthed icon of head-cracking law enforcement in Philadelphia,served as police commissioner for four years before serving two terms as the citys mayor from 1972 to 1980.His friends, family and fans remember him as a devoted public servant unafraid to speak his mind.Thousands of people signed a recent online petition to keep the statue in place. Rizzo’s detractors saw his police force as corrupt and brutal. Lowlights from his time as police commissioner include an incident in 1970 of officers raiding the Philadelphia headquarters of the Black Panthers and forcing the men to strip in public. For those who knew and covered him, like former cop and retired Inquirer reporter Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, Rizzo can’t be easily compared to other politicians. And Rizzo doesn’t belong in the same category as long-gone Confederate leaders whose statues are coming down across the country. Gibbons remembers Rizzo fondly for his tough policing, describing the 6 feet, 2 inch Italian American from South Philly as the guy who when he entered a room, everything else stopped. He is not by any means Robert E. Lee, or Chief Justice Roger Taney, who wrote the Dred Scott decision,” said Mitchell, who began her career as a radio and television reporter for KYW during much of the Rizzo years. “He was a twice-elected mayor of Philadelphia, who was clearly controversial in his years as police commissioner. But from a distance, I would say he is not analogous to those Confederate leaders who tried to overthrow the government. WhenRizzosaid in 1978 that he wouldn’t seek a third term in office he vowed to “defend the rights” of whites who had been “kicked around too long,”The Washington Post reported. But Mitchell said that, For all of this flaws, Rizzo never publicly defended white separatists.” Published 2 hours ago

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Beyonc Just Released the Most Stylish 600-Page Coffee Table Book – Vogue.com

Photo: Courtesy of Parkwood Entertainment Anyone familiar with Beyonc s landmark sixth record, Lemonade , will tell you its more than just an album. Personal, political, and unapologetically honest, it stands as the crowning achievement in the career of one of musics most beloved artists, thanks in large part to its stunning visuals. Whether you watched the HBO special or tuned in for one of Beyoncs jaw-dropping Formation tour performances, the impact was impossible to ignore. Yet the full scope of its journey from idea to final product has been kept under wrapsuntil now. Today Beyonc will release How to Make Lemonade , an expansive 600-page book that finally takes the audience behind the scenes with an array of exclusive photos, outtakes, and art that shines light on her dynamic use of fashion to convey her message. The book offers an in-depth look at each element of Lemonade s visual presentation, putting the projects many influences, collaborators, and cameos on display. Through collages and photographic juxtapositions, Beyoncs it-takes-a-village method of creativity comes into full view. From the Laolu Senbanjo Yoruba body painting featured in Sorry to the wardrobe of artfully customized Gucci in Formation, each aesthetic detail is now featured and given greater context. Many of these fashion-forward touches register as merely stylish in music video format, but are in fact imbued with deeper meaning. Case in point: One section outlines the connection between a head wrap and Louisianas Tignon laws, which restricted the dress of Creole women in an effort to maintain the states racist social hierarchies. Photo: Courtesy of Parkwood Entertainment A celebration of blackness and femininity, Lemonade wasnt shy about its social commentary. With Beyonc evoking the Black Panthers at the Super Bowl in a black leather bodysuit, bringing the Mothers of the Movement onstage at the Video Music Awards , and turning the Grammys into a fertility goddess tribute with an ornate gold headdress, she has used her platform and wardrobe choices to create a dialogue. Tabloids may have focused on the revelations regarding her marriage, but Lemonade s true message went beyond thata fact that the book highlights perfectly. These never-before-seen images (including a series of vintage family photos) document each step in the process, and the personal and political are connected for an exploration of what it means to be a black woman with the weight of the world on her shoulders. How to Make Lemonade digs deep into highs and historical realities. An automatic must have for members of the BeyHivewho have no doubt preordered the special-edition boxed set, which comes with a double vinyl LPit provides something even the most casual fan can appreciate: an inside look at an artist in her prime. The Collectors Edition How to Make Lemonade Box Set including double vinyl LP, $299.99 beyonce.com Beyonc Made a Video at the September Issue Cover Shoot

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Harris and the Black Panthers were forces to be reckoned with – News Courier

Editor’s note: Portions of the following article were taken from George S. Pattons Magnificent Panthers: The 761st Tank Battalion, written by By Charles W. Sasser. What are you laughing at man? asked the soldier. They say ol’ General Patton asked them to send him the best Negro Tank Battalion in the army, said the laughing soldier. They say the colonel wrote him back and told him he couldnt send him the best Negro Tank Battalion in the army but he could send him the best tank battalion in the army and they just happened to be Negroes. The year was 1944. America was at war, and the Black Panthers of the 761st Tank Battalion was riding high. They had just completed maneuvers in Texas, where they outclassed every other battalion. They were good and knew it. The 761st was formed in March 1942 and activated a month later on April 1, 1942. The unit had 676 enlisted men 30 black officers and six white officers. An independent tank battalion, the unit, and its soldiers, by federal law, were not allowed to serve alongside white troops. Among the enlisted men was Trinity High School graduate Wilmer Harris, son of Mrs. Willie Harris. Pfc. Harris was inducted into the Army June 19, 1943, and by 1944 found himself in France with the 761st assigned as a light machine gunner to Pattons 3rd Army. Patton was generally skeptical of the abilities of black soldiers and he thought African-American tankers were intellectually incapable of handling the challenges of armored warfare. In his pivotal book, War As I Knew It, Patton stated that he believed a colored soldier cannot think fast enough to fight in armor. Harris and the 761st would prove him wrong. Confident in their abilities after having been told at Camp Hood, Texas, they had a superior training record, the 761st was ready to fight at Omaha Beach. Their motto was Come out Fighting! and fighting they did. After landing at Normandy, the 761st raced 400 miles across France in six days and began wreaking havoc on their German enemies. Logan Nye, in an article for We Are The Mighty, said that the 761st crushed Nazi Forces on the Western Front. During World War II, tank units rotated to the rear after three month at the front. The 761st, however, spent 183 days in continuous combat at the front and inflicted massive casualties on German combat units. In their first months of fighting, the Panthers earned three Medal of Honor nominations. Driving toward Germanys Saar Region, the Panthers were laying down an immense amount of fire. At some point during this maneuver Harris was wounded. A letter addressed to his mother was sent by general delivery to Athens, but by the time it arrived, he was back into the fray. On Dec. 9, 1944, the 761st rolled onto German soil. Sgt. Willie McCall got out of his tank and looked around. Spitting contemptuously, he said, So this is the home of Superman? At the time, Superman was not looking so good because the Black Panthers were clawing on his turf. When the Battle of the Bulge began on Dec. 16, 1944, the Panthers were in the thick of things. Racing across frozen ground they landed at Bastogne and relieved the fabled 101st Airborne Division, dubbed The Battling Bastards of Bastogne for their heroic fight in slowing the German advance. The town of Tillett, located 15 miles west of Bastogne, fell to the 761st on January 7, 1944. A German soldier captured by the Panthers was stunned to see black soldiers in uniform. He asked Sgt. Johnny Holmes, in English, What are you doing here? This is a white mans war. Holmes offered him a cigarette and replied, You aint got no black or white when youre over here and the nation is in trouble. You only got Americans. Continuing to fight, the Panthers broke the Siegfried Line in late March and crossed Germanys main river, the Rhine, later in the same month. On May 5, 1945, they rolled into Steyr, Austria, and became one of the first American units to link up with elements of the Soviet Unions Red Army. By wars end in May 1945, the 761st had participated in four major campaigns, inflicted more than 130,000 casualties and captured close to 100,000 enemy soldiers. They had earned a Medal of Honor, seven silver stars, 56 Bronze stars, 246 Purple Hearts, 391 decorations for heroism and eight enlisted men had been given battlefield commissions as army officers. On Victory in Europe Day, the 761st lined their tanks besides a small bridge on the Enns River. Patton stood straight and tall in a jeep and with a satisfied look on his face returned the salutes of the prideful Black Panthers. By the time Pfc. Harris departed the European Theater on March 21, 1945, former Trinity student and Tuskegee Airman Leroy Murray and the “Red Tails” had proven that Negroes could fly airplanes and former Trinity student and Montfort Point Marine Melvin Ballard and his corps compadres had proven that Negroes had what it took to be undeniably Marines. Lastly, Trinity student and 370th Regiment Combat Team Purple Heart recipient Thomas C. Malone and his regiment had proven that Negroes were not afraid to fight. Harris arrived in the United States on March 28, 1945. His awards and decorations included the Combat Infantryman Badge, Purple Heart, World War II Victory Medal and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal. He received an honorable discharge from the United States Army on Feb. 8, 1946. Walker, a retired lieutenant colonel, is the JROTC instructor at Austin High School in Decatur. He can be reached at James.Walker@dcs.edu.

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Lexus And Marvel Team Up For The Black Panther Movie – The Art of Gears

Courtesy: Lexus USA Newsroom Lexus LFA: 12 Brand-New Unsold Units Are In US Dealerships Now by Ray Prince We had covered the videos and pics which were being uploaded to social media, when the cast and crew of Marvels Black Panther movie were filming in Busan, South Korea. What caught our interest was the sight of the car on which the titular MCU superhero was seen crouched upon in what could be a high-speed chase scene. It was a 2018 Lexus LC 500. While Lexus hadnt started its promo work on the movie tie-in marketing then, it has gradually opened the account now. The Lexus USA Newsroom now has an update on the brands association with the Black Panther movie. The press release states the collaboration between the first-ever 2018 Lexus LC and the Black Panther character. Brian Bolain, General Manager, Lexus Marketing said, Marvel continuously captures audiences through charismatic characters and inspiring stories the ideal fit for Lexus mission to craft amazing, engaging experiences. And the LCs aggressive styling, high performance and agile handling are a perfect fit for the Black Panthers quick, cat-like reflexes and superhuman feats. Were excited to see the duo in action. Courtesy: Lexus USA Newsroom Marvel Custom Solutions have created an original graphic novel as well as part of the campaign, featuring the Lexus LC 500 with a Wakandan spin, helping out TChalla (Black Panther) to defeat the baddie. Lexus was also actively involved in this years San Diego Comic-Con where the Black Panther promotions were in full swing. The character of Black Panther had made its onscreen debut in Captain America: Civil War and was noted as one of the best aspects of the blockbuster. The solo movie which is set to release on February 16, 2018 will focus on TChalla who returns to his isolated, yet technologically advanced kingdom of Wakanda to take his new role as King. The trailer, character images and production design are out on the web already and have received universal acclaim so far for remarkably capturing the idea of Wakanda as in the comic books. The casting and the talent involved in creating the cinematic adaptation of the Marvel character is being applauded too. Directed by Ryan Coogler and starring a fabulous bunch of actors like Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyongo, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Danai Gurira, Sterling K. Brown, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya and Andy Serkis, the superhero flick boasts of some of the finest actors in the business. As for the car, the 2018 Lexus LC 500 comes in a 5.0-liter 471 hp V8 version and also in a new hybrid variant that packs a V6 with 354 hp of power. Prices start at $92,000. Source: Lexus USA Newsroom

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Original Black Panthers Of Milwaukee Aim to Improve the State of … – WUWM

Across the country, Black Panther Parties are once again becoming more active. The organization was founded in the 1960s and was known for its militant self-defense and community-based programs. In Milwaukee, there are currently two active groups. WUWM’sLaToya Dennis went out with one, called the Original Black Panthers of Milwaukee, to learn about its mission. Its around 6 p.m. on a weekday evening when I arrive at the Original Black Panther Party headquarters. The group’s members are already hopping into two different vehicles. They’re heading out to businesses that they’ve heard are selling substances harmful to the community. The General — who heads the Original Black Panthers group — goes by the name King Rick. Weve got some reports that there are three areas that are selling Legal Lean and High Tech syrup. Legal Lean and High Tech syrup is the equivalent to what the rappers drink. It dopes up our community, makes us lethargic, he says. After about a 15 minute ride, we arrived at the first location. The driver parks the car and runs in to survey the store, then comes back to the car with a report. They sell it, but theyre apparently sold out. But they have the signs and posters up. And with that, about 10 members of the Original Black Panther Party exit their respective vehicles and head into the store. How you doing, bro? Listen bro, were coming to you as black men. We have an issue with the Legal Lean and High Tech K syrup being sold in our community. And when we find out, we go to stores and ask them to stop selling it because its a detriment, King Rick says. The story owner agrees to take down the signs and stop selling the dangerous drink. Once back in the car, King Rick says that people typically agree to stop doing whatever theyre being asked, but sometimes they dont follow through. And when they dont, he says the Black Panthers boycott and protest in front of their establishment. King Rick says he was introduced to the Black Panthers as a child. He was a member of what was called Panther Cubs in the early 70s. The Black Panthers taught the kids about Black History and organized a breakfast program. At the age of 54, he says hes been a Panther for 44 years — although for a long time, the group wasnt very active here. But King Rick says about two years ago, some black elders called for a reemergence of the party to tackle some of the problems in the community. Were number one in so many negative statistical categories, education, housing, jobs, incarceration, hyper segregation. When you have those dynamics, it creates chaos, he says. “Love for community and strength and love and honor. Our goal for the community is the provision and protection of our queens, our family and our community by any means necessary.” King Rick says what’s at the core of the party’s reemergence is love. Love for community and strength and love and honor. Our goal for the community is the provision and protection of our queens, our family and our community by any means necessary, he says. And by any means necessary, King Rick says hes not talking about violence. The day of violence is over. I mean violence is only necessary when its coming at you. But now its about economics because we as African Americans spend $1.1 trillion a year on goods and services and less than 2 percent of that is spent with our own, he says. “The day of violence is over. I mean violence is only necessary when it’s coming at you. But now it’s about economics.” King Rick says if black people unite, they have the power to change the way theyre seen in society, and gain the power to achieve economic freedom. Across the country, Black Panther parties have never truly gone away. It’s just that theyre now becoming more visible, according to UW-Madison sociology professor Pamela Oliver. She says they parties are an outgrowth of Black Power movements, whose ranks have swelled in recent years. You tend to get social movements when you have that combination of grievance and the belief that theres something you can do something about it, Oliver says. Historically, some Black Panther groups have been accused of racism — arguing they’re pro-black, at the expense of other groups. But back in the car with King Rick, he says the Black Panthers are not a racist group: When has a Black Panther lynched somebody? When has a Black Panther burned somebody? When has a Black Panther stopped people from going to school? King Rick says the reality is that the Black Panther Party is against racism and oppression of Black people.

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August 8, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed


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