Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them
With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement confronting the same issues. …

By: Dawt Maasax Yisrael Ankhenaten Dejen

See original here:

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video

Fair Usage Law

February 6, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

Oak Bluffs is one of the rarest of places, a place where many, past and present, have been contributors to American black history. Rarer still, but not unexpected, our richly diverse town has benefited from having black history makers who arent (or werent) necessarily black.

One of those great stories is about the late Justine Tyrell Priestly Smadbeck (1921 2004) who was, surprisingly, a white Upper East Side New York mother of four who from 1961 to 1971, using the nom de plume Gertrude Wilson, wrote 75 columns in New Yorks historic black newspaper, the Amsterdam News. Her column, White on White, was her view on the civil rights era from her decidedly unique perspective as a woman journalist dedicated to social justice. Justine wrote about the march on Washington, Selma and Montgomery and the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. She knew them and was with Betty Shabazz, Malcolm Xs widow, and Coretta Scott King in the days after their husbands deaths. She received fan mail from Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, Oak Bluffs New York congressman Adam Clayton Powell and was the only white person at Malcolm Xs funeral, about which she wrote touched me more than I can ever say. In an interview she was quoted saying, Its my fight, too. If one black person is told he cant vote because he is black I mean, thats my country. One of my countrymen cant have his rights. Its humiliating.

When working at the Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation, an organization that provided educational grants to minorities, she met C.B. Powell, the black publisher of the Amsterdam News who brought her aboard to do the column. Howard-educated Dr. Powell had bought the Amsterdam News in 1935. Dr. Powell and Amsterdam News editor James L. Hicks were both coincidentally Oak Bluffs homeowners in those years. Justine moved here in 1974 to Waterview Farm. She founded the Vineyard real estate firm, Priestley, Smadbeck & Mone, in partnership with her son, Arthur Smadbeck, today an Edgartown selectman.

Oak Bluffs Emmy award-winning filmmaker Stan Nelsons new film, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, is his eighth to debut at the Sundance Film Festival. Im sure well get to screen Stanleys 12th movie, a feature-length documentary, here this summer. Last year Stan was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

As part of Black History Month, the film Passage at St. Augustine will be shown by the League of Women Voters at Howes House from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday morning with brunch served at 8:30 at 1042 State Road in West Tisbury. The civil rights-based film features the late Esther Burgess, Julia Burgess mother, who, as a bishops wife, flew to St. Augustine, Fla., along with three white church women, two of whom were also wives of Episcopal bishops.

Participating in a sit-in, they all went to jail to promote the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday the library has Valentine cookie decorating for kids who can make someone a special cookie. All ages are of course welcome.

The high school is having the 2015 Science and Engineering Fair Saturday from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; you remember how good your project was, stop by and see how much better todays future techies are.

Victorian Secrets is the delightful, if not titillating, title of the Marthas Vineyard Museums exhibit showcasing beautiful but uncomfortable 19th-century undergarments, from silk and whalebone corsets to padded bodices. Free for members (you should join!), $7 for nonmembers in time for Valentines Day. The museum encourages you to join them for the reception from 5 to 7 p.m. next Friday, cheekily inviting you to help . . . unveil the exhibit. Your prurience may be disappointed but your interest piqued.

Look What A Wonder, an hour-long gospel opera created by Walter Johnson, will be played at the Marthas Vineyard Film Center on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. This is the tragic story of Denmark Vesey and the Slave Conspiracy. Using gospel music, the story illustrates courage and resistance, freedom and justice and portrays enslavement and resistance through the perspective of its victims. The Marthas Vineyard NAACP presents this and there will be a conversation and brunch after.

Read this article:

Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

Fair Usage Law

February 6, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBI’s War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBI's War Against Them
http://democracynow.org – With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement con…

By: democracynow

The rest is here:

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBI’s War Against Them – Video

Fair Usage Law

February 2, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

X and the black panthers – Video



X and the black panthers

By: Emily Nicer

Link:

X and the black panthers – Video

Fair Usage Law

February 1, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

"Vanguard of the Revolution" Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution” Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them
“The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” tells the history of the Black Panther Party through rare archival footage and interviews with party leaders, rank-and-file members, journalists…

By: freespeechtv

See the original post here:

"Vanguard of the Revolution" Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video

Fair Usage Law

January 31, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

‘The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution’: Sundance …

Courtesy of Sundance International Film Festival

A fine primer that admires the movement more than its leaders.

Sundance Film Festival, Doc Premieres

Stanley Nelson

A strong if only occasionally transporting biography of a movement that terrified the establishment in its day, Stanley Nelson’s The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution speaks to many former members of the Black Panther Party about what its breed of revolutionary activism felt like at the time. Joining some other recent histories about black Americans fighting powers that are too rarely held accountable to them, the film continues a discussion whose present-day relevance is painfully, increasingly obvious. Straighter in its attitude than The Black Power Mixtape and covering much more ground than Free Angela & All Political Prisoners, it does so in a way that will be an easy sell on public TV, where it’s likely to find most of its initial audience before a long and useful life on video.

Beginning in the group’s birthplace of Oakland, California, the doc points out how the persecution of the civil rights era had a different flavor in coastal cities than in the South. Here, we’re told, thuggish police “might not have called you nr, but they treated you the same.” We’re introduced to the young Huey P. Newton, who realized that it was legal to carry loaded guns in public and understood that doing so in the vicinity of police interacting with Oakland’s black population would draw more attention to racial justice issues than a million printed fliers. He and Bobby Seale organized the party, which began with a focus on militancy but soon launched major charitable programs, including a famous free-breakfast effort that fed children 20,000 meals a week.

Drama was never in short supply with the Panthers, and Newton’s arrest early in their existence provided a rallying cry that was (like their fondness for calling police “pigs”) taken up by white college students and other left-leaning groups. While he shows the power of the “Free Huey” slogan, Nelson isn’t eager to investigate it; he tells us almost nothing about the incident that led to Newton’s imprisonment (he was accused of killing a policeman), nor does he give us any way of guessing whether it was just or unjust.

Read more Sundance: 5 Hot-Button Docs Set to Make Waves at the Festival

The omission of such significant details is puzzling given that Nelson soon enough proves willing to show the group’s leaders in an unfavorable light. We watch in some detail as their intellectual star,Eldridge Cleaver, goes off the deep end following an armed standoff, fleeing to Algeria and eventually fracturing the party. And near the end, we briefly hear of Newton’s descent into drugs and erratic, criminal behavior. It’s tempting to conclude that the film is willing to be frank about the problems party figures caused themselves and each other, but the doc wants few shades of gray when it comes to antagonism between Panthers and the police.

The film’s most involving bit of storytelling comes when the villainy of law enforcement is in no doubt. After detailing J. Edgar Hoover’s fervor to destroy the group with COINTELPRO and dirty tricks, it introduces the tremendously charismatic Fred Hampton, who in 1969 seemed poised to emerge as the kind of “black messiah” Hoover feared. Just as he was starting to build inspiring alliances between Panthers and activists in Latino and poor white communities, Hampton was killed in an FBI-engineered police raid that begs to be called a political assassination.

Go here to read the rest:

‘The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution’: Sundance …

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

45 Wars: The Black Panthers – Video



45 Wars: The Black Panthers
From 45 Wars: A WW2 Rockumentary. WW2 Vet talks about Patton and the 761st Tank Battalion. check out http://www.gerardfilms.com/films/45-wars/ for more first…

By: zzzz9991

See the original post here:

45 Wars: The Black Panthers – Video

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

RigaCup 2015 U-14 FC HONKA BLACK PANTHERS – Video



RigaCup 2015 U-14 FC HONKA BLACK PANTHERS

By: Riga Cup

See more here:

RigaCup 2015 U-14 FC HONKA BLACK PANTHERS – Video

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

RigaCup 2015 U-14 BLACK PANTHERS – KUPS – Video



RigaCup 2015 U-14 BLACK PANTHERS – KUPS

By: Riga Cup

Link:

RigaCup 2015 U-14 BLACK PANTHERS – KUPS – Video

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement confronting the same issues. … By: Dawt Maasax Yisrael Ankhenaten Dejen

Fair Usage Law

February 6, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

Oak Bluffs is one of the rarest of places, a place where many, past and present, have been contributors to American black history. Rarer still, but not unexpected, our richly diverse town has benefited from having black history makers who arent (or werent) necessarily black. One of those great stories is about the late Justine Tyrell Priestly Smadbeck (1921 2004) who was, surprisingly, a white Upper East Side New York mother of four who from 1961 to 1971, using the nom de plume Gertrude Wilson, wrote 75 columns in New Yorks historic black newspaper, the Amsterdam News. Her column, White on White, was her view on the civil rights era from her decidedly unique perspective as a woman journalist dedicated to social justice. Justine wrote about the march on Washington, Selma and Montgomery and the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. She knew them and was with Betty Shabazz, Malcolm Xs widow, and Coretta Scott King in the days after their husbands deaths. She received fan mail from Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, Oak Bluffs New York congressman Adam Clayton Powell and was the only white person at Malcolm Xs funeral, about which she wrote touched me more than I can ever say. In an interview she was quoted saying, Its my fight, too. If one black person is told he cant vote because he is black I mean, thats my country. One of my countrymen cant have his rights. Its humiliating. When working at the Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation, an organization that provided educational grants to minorities, she met C.B. Powell, the black publisher of the Amsterdam News who brought her aboard to do the column. Howard-educated Dr. Powell had bought the Amsterdam News in 1935. Dr. Powell and Amsterdam News editor James L. Hicks were both coincidentally Oak Bluffs homeowners in those years. Justine moved here in 1974 to Waterview Farm. She founded the Vineyard real estate firm, Priestley, Smadbeck & Mone, in partnership with her son, Arthur Smadbeck, today an Edgartown selectman. Oak Bluffs Emmy award-winning filmmaker Stan Nelsons new film, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, is his eighth to debut at the Sundance Film Festival. Im sure well get to screen Stanleys 12th movie, a feature-length documentary, here this summer. Last year Stan was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama. As part of Black History Month, the film Passage at St. Augustine will be shown by the League of Women Voters at Howes House from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday morning with brunch served at 8:30 at 1042 State Road in West Tisbury. The civil rights-based film features the late Esther Burgess, Julia Burgess mother, who, as a bishops wife, flew to St. Augustine, Fla., along with three white church women, two of whom were also wives of Episcopal bishops. Participating in a sit-in, they all went to jail to promote the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday the library has Valentine cookie decorating for kids who can make someone a special cookie. All ages are of course welcome. The high school is having the 2015 Science and Engineering Fair Saturday from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; you remember how good your project was, stop by and see how much better todays future techies are. Victorian Secrets is the delightful, if not titillating, title of the Marthas Vineyard Museums exhibit showcasing beautiful but uncomfortable 19th-century undergarments, from silk and whalebone corsets to padded bodices. Free for members (you should join!), $7 for nonmembers in time for Valentines Day. The museum encourages you to join them for the reception from 5 to 7 p.m. next Friday, cheekily inviting you to help . . . unveil the exhibit. Your prurience may be disappointed but your interest piqued. Look What A Wonder, an hour-long gospel opera created by Walter Johnson, will be played at the Marthas Vineyard Film Center on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. This is the tragic story of Denmark Vesey and the Slave Conspiracy. Using gospel music, the story illustrates courage and resistance, freedom and justice and portrays enslavement and resistance through the perspective of its victims. The Marthas Vineyard NAACP presents this and there will be a conversation and brunch after.

Fair Usage Law

February 6, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBI’s War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBI's War Against Them http://democracynow.org – With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement con… By: democracynow

Fair Usage Law

February 2, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

X and the black panthers – Video




X and the black panthers By: Emily Nicer

Fair Usage Law

February 1, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

"Vanguard of the Revolution" Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution” Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” tells the history of the Black Panther Party through rare archival footage and interviews with party leaders, rank-and-file members, journalists… By: freespeechtv

Fair Usage Law

January 31, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

‘The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution’: Sundance …

Courtesy of Sundance International Film Festival A fine primer that admires the movement more than its leaders. Sundance Film Festival, Doc Premieres Stanley Nelson A strong if only occasionally transporting biography of a movement that terrified the establishment in its day, Stanley Nelson’s The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution speaks to many former members of the Black Panther Party about what its breed of revolutionary activism felt like at the time. Joining some other recent histories about black Americans fighting powers that are too rarely held accountable to them, the film continues a discussion whose present-day relevance is painfully, increasingly obvious. Straighter in its attitude than The Black Power Mixtape and covering much more ground than Free Angela & All Political Prisoners, it does so in a way that will be an easy sell on public TV, where it’s likely to find most of its initial audience before a long and useful life on video. Beginning in the group’s birthplace of Oakland, California, the doc points out how the persecution of the civil rights era had a different flavor in coastal cities than in the South. Here, we’re told, thuggish police “might not have called you nr, but they treated you the same.” We’re introduced to the young Huey P. Newton, who realized that it was legal to carry loaded guns in public and understood that doing so in the vicinity of police interacting with Oakland’s black population would draw more attention to racial justice issues than a million printed fliers. He and Bobby Seale organized the party, which began with a focus on militancy but soon launched major charitable programs, including a famous free-breakfast effort that fed children 20,000 meals a week. Drama was never in short supply with the Panthers, and Newton’s arrest early in their existence provided a rallying cry that was (like their fondness for calling police “pigs”) taken up by white college students and other left-leaning groups. While he shows the power of the “Free Huey” slogan, Nelson isn’t eager to investigate it; he tells us almost nothing about the incident that led to Newton’s imprisonment (he was accused of killing a policeman), nor does he give us any way of guessing whether it was just or unjust. Read more Sundance: 5 Hot-Button Docs Set to Make Waves at the Festival The omission of such significant details is puzzling given that Nelson soon enough proves willing to show the group’s leaders in an unfavorable light. We watch in some detail as their intellectual star,Eldridge Cleaver, goes off the deep end following an armed standoff, fleeing to Algeria and eventually fracturing the party. And near the end, we briefly hear of Newton’s descent into drugs and erratic, criminal behavior. It’s tempting to conclude that the film is willing to be frank about the problems party figures caused themselves and each other, but the doc wants few shades of gray when it comes to antagonism between Panthers and the police. The film’s most involving bit of storytelling comes when the villainy of law enforcement is in no doubt. After detailing J. Edgar Hoover’s fervor to destroy the group with COINTELPRO and dirty tricks, it introduces the tremendously charismatic Fred Hampton, who in 1969 seemed poised to emerge as the kind of “black messiah” Hoover feared. Just as he was starting to build inspiring alliances between Panthers and activists in Latino and poor white communities, Hampton was killed in an FBI-engineered police raid that begs to be called a political assassination.

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

45 Wars: The Black Panthers – Video




45 Wars: The Black Panthers From 45 Wars: A WW2 Rockumentary. WW2 Vet talks about Patton and the 761st Tank Battalion. check out http://www.gerardfilms.com/films/45-wars/ for more first… By: zzzz9991

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

RigaCup 2015 U-14 FC HONKA BLACK PANTHERS – Video




RigaCup 2015 U-14 FC HONKA BLACK PANTHERS By: Riga Cup

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

RigaCup 2015 U-14 BLACK PANTHERS – KUPS – Video




RigaCup 2015 U-14 BLACK PANTHERS – KUPS By: Riga Cup

Fair Usage Law

January 29, 2015   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."