Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

Black Panther (comics) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Black Panther Publication information Publisher Marvel Comics First appearance Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966) Created by Stan Lee Jack Kirby In-story information Alter ego T’Challa Team affiliations Fantastic Four Avengers Defenders Fantastic Force Illuminati Partnerships Storm Notable aliases Luke Charles, Black Leopard, Mr. Okonkwo Abilities Skilled hunter, tracker, strategist, politician, inventor, and scientist Trained acrobat, gymnast and martial artist Superhuman senses Olympic-level strength, speed, agility, stamina and reflexes Genius-level intellect Wields vibranium uniform, boots, and equipment

The Black Panther (T’Challa) is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in publications by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and penciller-co-plotter Jack Kirby, he first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966). He is the first black superhero in mainstream American comics, debuting several years before such early African-American superheroes as Marvel Comics’ the Falcon, Storm, and Luke Cage, and DC Comics’ Tyroc, Black Lightning, and Green Lantern John Stewart. Black Panther was ranked the 71st greatest comic book character of all time by Wizard magazine. IGN also ranked the Black Panther as the 51st greatest comic book hero. Chadwick Boseman will play the character in several films as a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The Black Panther’s name predates the October 1966 founding of the Black Panther Party, though not the black panther logo of the party’s predecessor, the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, nor the segregated World War II Black Panthers Tank Battalion.[1][2] He is the first black superhero in mainstream comic books; virtually no black heroes were created before him, and none with actual superpowers. These included the characters in the single-issue, low-distribution All-Negro Comics #1 (1947); Waku, Prince of the Bantu, who starred in his own feature in the omnibus title Jungle Tales, from Marvel’s 1950s predecessor, Atlas Comics; and the Dell Comics Western character Lobo, the first black person to star in his own comic book. Previous non-caricatured Black supporting characters in comics include U.S. Army infantry private Gabriel Jones of Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos.

Following his debut in Fantastic Four #52-53 (July-Aug. 1966) and subsequent guest appearance in Fantastic Four Annual #5 (1967) and with Captain America in Tales of Suspense #97-99 (Jan.-March 1968), the Black Panther journeyed from the fictional African nation of Wakanda to New York City, New York to join the titular American superhero team in The Avengers #52 (May 1968), appearing in that comic for the next few years. During his time with the Avengers, he made solo guest-appearances in three issues of Daredevil, and fought Doctor Doom in Astonishing Tales #6-7 (June & Aug. 1971), in that supervillain’s short-lived starring feature. He later returned in a guest-appearance capacity in Fantastic Four #119 (Feb. 1972) during which he briefly tried using the name Black Leopard to avoid connotations invoking the Black-militant political party the Black Panthers.[3]

He received his first starring feature with Jungle Action #5 (July 1973), a reprint of the Panther-centric story in The Avengers #62 (March 1969). A new series began running the following issue, written by Don McGregor, with art by pencilers Rich Buckler, Gil Kane, and Billy Graham, and which gave inkers Klaus Janson and Bob McLeod some of their first professional exposure. The critically acclaimed[4] series ran in Jungle Action #6-24 (Sept. 1973 – Nov. 1976).[5]

One now-common format McGregor pioneered was that of the self-contained, multi-issue story arc.[6] The first, “Panther’s Rage”, ran through the first 13 issues. Critic Jason Sacks has called the arc “Marvel’s first graphic novel”:

[T]here were real character arcs in Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four [comics] over time. But … ‘Panther’s Rage’ is the first comic that was created from start to finish as a complete novel. Running in two years’ issues of Jungle Action (#s 6 through 18), ‘Panther’s Rage’ is a 200-page novel that journeys to the heart of the African nation of Wakanda, a nation ravaged by a revolution against its king, T’Challa, the Black Panther.[6]

The second and final arc, “Panther vs. the Klan”, ran as mostly 17-page stories in Jungle Action #19-24 (Jan.-Nov. 1976), except for issue #23, a reprint of Daredevil #69 (Oct. 1970), in which the Black Panther guest-starred.[5] The subject matter of the Ku Klux Klan was considered controversial in the Marvel offices at the time, creating difficulties for the creative team.[7]

African-American writer-editor Dwayne McDuffie said of the Jungle Action “Black Panther” feature:

This overlooked and underrated classic is arguably the most tightly written multi-part superhero epic ever. If you can get your hands on it … sit down and read the whole thing. It’s damn-near flawless, every issue, every scene, a functional, necessary part of the whole. Okay, now go back and read any individual issue. You’ll find seamlessly integrated words and pictures; clearly introduced characters and situations; a concise (sometimes even transparent) recap; beautifully developed character relationships; at least one cool new villain; a stunning action set piece to test our hero’s skills and resolve; and a story that is always moving forward towards a definite and satisfying conclusion. That’s what we should all be delivering, every single month. Don [McGregor] and company did it in only 17 story pages per issue.[4]

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Black Panther (comics) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Black Panther Habitat – Rainforest Animals

An animals habitat is the place where its basic needs for food, water, shelter, and reproduction are met. Black panthers are adapted to living in a wide variety of habitats within their range. The black panthers habitats include the rainforest, marshland, woodlands, swamps, savannahs, and even mountains and deserts.

One of the reasons that black panthers are able to live in such variety of habitats is that they can eat many types of animals. Their food includes various species of mammals, reptiles, and birds, all of which live in different habitats. They are also able to live in human-populated areas more effectively than any other big cats if they have to.

Black panthers, both black leopards and black jaguars, are found mainly in dense rainforest areas. The dark coat of black panthers provides good camouflage at night or in dense forest areas. Such camouflage helps them to avoid dangerous enemies and to stalk and approach their prey without being noticed. These areas do not attract human dwellers or even hunters.

Black panthers can survive only in natural communities which provide good habitat areas for them; however, the black panthers’ habitats and natural communities are threatened by

next => Black Panther Location => Black Panther Territory

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Black Panther Habitat – Rainforest Animals

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Gala Black Panthers (Chearleaders Precious Dance School) – Video



Gala Black Panthers (Chearleaders Precious Dance School)
Fancy,Britney Spears,Jason derulo,Run boy run,Aron Chupa,Chris Brown…

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The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton’s Black Panthers WWII – Video



The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton's Black Panthers WWII
761st Tank Battalion website http://www.761st.com/j2/ TRS Salutes “The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton's Black Panthers WWII”. General Patton himself believed that, “blacks lack…

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"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them
With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement confronting the same issues. …

By: Dawt Maasax Yisrael Ankhenaten Dejen

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Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

Oak Bluffs is one of the rarest of places, a place where many, past and present, have been contributors to American black history. Rarer still, but not unexpected, our richly diverse town has benefited from having black history makers who arent (or werent) necessarily black.

One of those great stories is about the late Justine Tyrell Priestly Smadbeck (1921 2004) who was, surprisingly, a white Upper East Side New York mother of four who from 1961 to 1971, using the nom de plume Gertrude Wilson, wrote 75 columns in New Yorks historic black newspaper, the Amsterdam News. Her column, White on White, was her view on the civil rights era from her decidedly unique perspective as a woman journalist dedicated to social justice. Justine wrote about the march on Washington, Selma and Montgomery and the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. She knew them and was with Betty Shabazz, Malcolm Xs widow, and Coretta Scott King in the days after their husbands deaths. She received fan mail from Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, Oak Bluffs New York congressman Adam Clayton Powell and was the only white person at Malcolm Xs funeral, about which she wrote touched me more than I can ever say. In an interview she was quoted saying, Its my fight, too. If one black person is told he cant vote because he is black I mean, thats my country. One of my countrymen cant have his rights. Its humiliating.

When working at the Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation, an organization that provided educational grants to minorities, she met C.B. Powell, the black publisher of the Amsterdam News who brought her aboard to do the column. Howard-educated Dr. Powell had bought the Amsterdam News in 1935. Dr. Powell and Amsterdam News editor James L. Hicks were both coincidentally Oak Bluffs homeowners in those years. Justine moved here in 1974 to Waterview Farm. She founded the Vineyard real estate firm, Priestley, Smadbeck & Mone, in partnership with her son, Arthur Smadbeck, today an Edgartown selectman.

Oak Bluffs Emmy award-winning filmmaker Stan Nelsons new film, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, is his eighth to debut at the Sundance Film Festival. Im sure well get to screen Stanleys 12th movie, a feature-length documentary, here this summer. Last year Stan was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

As part of Black History Month, the film Passage at St. Augustine will be shown by the League of Women Voters at Howes House from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday morning with brunch served at 8:30 at 1042 State Road in West Tisbury. The civil rights-based film features the late Esther Burgess, Julia Burgess mother, who, as a bishops wife, flew to St. Augustine, Fla., along with three white church women, two of whom were also wives of Episcopal bishops.

Participating in a sit-in, they all went to jail to promote the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday the library has Valentine cookie decorating for kids who can make someone a special cookie. All ages are of course welcome.

The high school is having the 2015 Science and Engineering Fair Saturday from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; you remember how good your project was, stop by and see how much better todays future techies are.

Victorian Secrets is the delightful, if not titillating, title of the Marthas Vineyard Museums exhibit showcasing beautiful but uncomfortable 19th-century undergarments, from silk and whalebone corsets to padded bodices. Free for members (you should join!), $7 for nonmembers in time for Valentines Day. The museum encourages you to join them for the reception from 5 to 7 p.m. next Friday, cheekily inviting you to help . . . unveil the exhibit. Your prurience may be disappointed but your interest piqued.

Look What A Wonder, an hour-long gospel opera created by Walter Johnson, will be played at the Marthas Vineyard Film Center on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. This is the tragic story of Denmark Vesey and the Slave Conspiracy. Using gospel music, the story illustrates courage and resistance, freedom and justice and portrays enslavement and resistance through the perspective of its victims. The Marthas Vineyard NAACP presents this and there will be a conversation and brunch after.

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Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

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"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBI’s War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBI's War Against Them
http://democracynow.org – With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement con…

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X and the black panthers – Video



X and the black panthers

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"Vanguard of the Revolution" Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video



“Vanguard of the Revolution” Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them
“The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” tells the history of the Black Panther Party through rare archival footage and interviews with party leaders, rank-and-file members, journalists…

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Black Panther (comics) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Black Panther Publication information Publisher Marvel Comics First appearance Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966) Created by Stan Lee Jack Kirby In-story information Alter ego T’Challa Team affiliations Fantastic Four Avengers Defenders Fantastic Force Illuminati Partnerships Storm Notable aliases Luke Charles, Black Leopard, Mr. Okonkwo Abilities Skilled hunter, tracker, strategist, politician, inventor, and scientist Trained acrobat, gymnast and martial artist Superhuman senses Olympic-level strength, speed, agility, stamina and reflexes Genius-level intellect Wields vibranium uniform, boots, and equipment The Black Panther (T’Challa) is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in publications by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and penciller-co-plotter Jack Kirby, he first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966). He is the first black superhero in mainstream American comics, debuting several years before such early African-American superheroes as Marvel Comics’ the Falcon, Storm, and Luke Cage, and DC Comics’ Tyroc, Black Lightning, and Green Lantern John Stewart. Black Panther was ranked the 71st greatest comic book character of all time by Wizard magazine. IGN also ranked the Black Panther as the 51st greatest comic book hero. Chadwick Boseman will play the character in several films as a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The Black Panther’s name predates the October 1966 founding of the Black Panther Party, though not the black panther logo of the party’s predecessor, the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, nor the segregated World War II Black Panthers Tank Battalion.[1][2] He is the first black superhero in mainstream comic books; virtually no black heroes were created before him, and none with actual superpowers. These included the characters in the single-issue, low-distribution All-Negro Comics #1 (1947); Waku, Prince of the Bantu, who starred in his own feature in the omnibus title Jungle Tales, from Marvel’s 1950s predecessor, Atlas Comics; and the Dell Comics Western character Lobo, the first black person to star in his own comic book. Previous non-caricatured Black supporting characters in comics include U.S. Army infantry private Gabriel Jones of Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos. Following his debut in Fantastic Four #52-53 (July-Aug. 1966) and subsequent guest appearance in Fantastic Four Annual #5 (1967) and with Captain America in Tales of Suspense #97-99 (Jan.-March 1968), the Black Panther journeyed from the fictional African nation of Wakanda to New York City, New York to join the titular American superhero team in The Avengers #52 (May 1968), appearing in that comic for the next few years. During his time with the Avengers, he made solo guest-appearances in three issues of Daredevil, and fought Doctor Doom in Astonishing Tales #6-7 (June & Aug. 1971), in that supervillain’s short-lived starring feature. He later returned in a guest-appearance capacity in Fantastic Four #119 (Feb. 1972) during which he briefly tried using the name Black Leopard to avoid connotations invoking the Black-militant political party the Black Panthers.[3] He received his first starring feature with Jungle Action #5 (July 1973), a reprint of the Panther-centric story in The Avengers #62 (March 1969). A new series began running the following issue, written by Don McGregor, with art by pencilers Rich Buckler, Gil Kane, and Billy Graham, and which gave inkers Klaus Janson and Bob McLeod some of their first professional exposure. The critically acclaimed[4] series ran in Jungle Action #6-24 (Sept. 1973 – Nov. 1976).[5] One now-common format McGregor pioneered was that of the self-contained, multi-issue story arc.[6] The first, “Panther’s Rage”, ran through the first 13 issues. Critic Jason Sacks has called the arc “Marvel’s first graphic novel”: [T]here were real character arcs in Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four [comics] over time. But … ‘Panther’s Rage’ is the first comic that was created from start to finish as a complete novel. Running in two years’ issues of Jungle Action (#s 6 through 18), ‘Panther’s Rage’ is a 200-page novel that journeys to the heart of the African nation of Wakanda, a nation ravaged by a revolution against its king, T’Challa, the Black Panther.[6] The second and final arc, “Panther vs. the Klan”, ran as mostly 17-page stories in Jungle Action #19-24 (Jan.-Nov. 1976), except for issue #23, a reprint of Daredevil #69 (Oct. 1970), in which the Black Panther guest-starred.[5] The subject matter of the Ku Klux Klan was considered controversial in the Marvel offices at the time, creating difficulties for the creative team.[7] African-American writer-editor Dwayne McDuffie said of the Jungle Action “Black Panther” feature: This overlooked and underrated classic is arguably the most tightly written multi-part superhero epic ever. If you can get your hands on it … sit down and read the whole thing. It’s damn-near flawless, every issue, every scene, a functional, necessary part of the whole. Okay, now go back and read any individual issue. You’ll find seamlessly integrated words and pictures; clearly introduced characters and situations; a concise (sometimes even transparent) recap; beautifully developed character relationships; at least one cool new villain; a stunning action set piece to test our hero’s skills and resolve; and a story that is always moving forward towards a definite and satisfying conclusion. That’s what we should all be delivering, every single month. Don [McGregor] and company did it in only 17 story pages per issue.[4]

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Black Panther Habitat – Rainforest Animals

An animals habitat is the place where its basic needs for food, water, shelter, and reproduction are met. Black panthers are adapted to living in a wide variety of habitats within their range. The black panthers habitats include the rainforest, marshland, woodlands, swamps, savannahs, and even mountains and deserts. One of the reasons that black panthers are able to live in such variety of habitats is that they can eat many types of animals. Their food includes various species of mammals, reptiles, and birds, all of which live in different habitats. They are also able to live in human-populated areas more effectively than any other big cats if they have to. Black panthers, both black leopards and black jaguars, are found mainly in dense rainforest areas. The dark coat of black panthers provides good camouflage at night or in dense forest areas. Such camouflage helps them to avoid dangerous enemies and to stalk and approach their prey without being noticed. These areas do not attract human dwellers or even hunters. Black panthers can survive only in natural communities which provide good habitat areas for them; however, the black panthers’ habitats and natural communities are threatened by next => Black Panther Location => Black Panther Territory

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Gala Black Panthers (Chearleaders Precious Dance School) – Video




Gala Black Panthers (Chearleaders Precious Dance School) Fancy,Britney Spears,Jason derulo,Run boy run,Aron Chupa,Chris Brown… By: kelis Fama

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The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton’s Black Panthers WWII – Video




The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton's Black Panthers WWII 761st Tank Battalion website http://www.761st.com/j2/ TRS Salutes “The All Black 761st Tank Battalion General Patton's Black Panthers WWII”. General Patton himself believed that, “blacks lack… By: Tyrone Thompson

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"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement confronting the same issues. … By: Dawt Maasax Yisrael Ankhenaten Dejen

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Oak Bluffs Town Column: Feb. 6

Oak Bluffs is one of the rarest of places, a place where many, past and present, have been contributors to American black history. Rarer still, but not unexpected, our richly diverse town has benefited from having black history makers who arent (or werent) necessarily black. One of those great stories is about the late Justine Tyrell Priestly Smadbeck (1921 2004) who was, surprisingly, a white Upper East Side New York mother of four who from 1961 to 1971, using the nom de plume Gertrude Wilson, wrote 75 columns in New Yorks historic black newspaper, the Amsterdam News. Her column, White on White, was her view on the civil rights era from her decidedly unique perspective as a woman journalist dedicated to social justice. Justine wrote about the march on Washington, Selma and Montgomery and the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. She knew them and was with Betty Shabazz, Malcolm Xs widow, and Coretta Scott King in the days after their husbands deaths. She received fan mail from Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, Oak Bluffs New York congressman Adam Clayton Powell and was the only white person at Malcolm Xs funeral, about which she wrote touched me more than I can ever say. In an interview she was quoted saying, Its my fight, too. If one black person is told he cant vote because he is black I mean, thats my country. One of my countrymen cant have his rights. Its humiliating. When working at the Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation, an organization that provided educational grants to minorities, she met C.B. Powell, the black publisher of the Amsterdam News who brought her aboard to do the column. Howard-educated Dr. Powell had bought the Amsterdam News in 1935. Dr. Powell and Amsterdam News editor James L. Hicks were both coincidentally Oak Bluffs homeowners in those years. Justine moved here in 1974 to Waterview Farm. She founded the Vineyard real estate firm, Priestley, Smadbeck & Mone, in partnership with her son, Arthur Smadbeck, today an Edgartown selectman. Oak Bluffs Emmy award-winning filmmaker Stan Nelsons new film, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, is his eighth to debut at the Sundance Film Festival. Im sure well get to screen Stanleys 12th movie, a feature-length documentary, here this summer. Last year Stan was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama. As part of Black History Month, the film Passage at St. Augustine will be shown by the League of Women Voters at Howes House from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday morning with brunch served at 8:30 at 1042 State Road in West Tisbury. The civil rights-based film features the late Esther Burgess, Julia Burgess mother, who, as a bishops wife, flew to St. Augustine, Fla., along with three white church women, two of whom were also wives of Episcopal bishops. Participating in a sit-in, they all went to jail to promote the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday the library has Valentine cookie decorating for kids who can make someone a special cookie. All ages are of course welcome. The high school is having the 2015 Science and Engineering Fair Saturday from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; you remember how good your project was, stop by and see how much better todays future techies are. Victorian Secrets is the delightful, if not titillating, title of the Marthas Vineyard Museums exhibit showcasing beautiful but uncomfortable 19th-century undergarments, from silk and whalebone corsets to padded bodices. Free for members (you should join!), $7 for nonmembers in time for Valentines Day. The museum encourages you to join them for the reception from 5 to 7 p.m. next Friday, cheekily inviting you to help . . . unveil the exhibit. Your prurience may be disappointed but your interest piqued. Look What A Wonder, an hour-long gospel opera created by Walter Johnson, will be played at the Marthas Vineyard Film Center on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. This is the tragic story of Denmark Vesey and the Slave Conspiracy. Using gospel music, the story illustrates courage and resistance, freedom and justice and portrays enslavement and resistance through the perspective of its victims. The Marthas Vineyard NAACP presents this and there will be a conversation and brunch after.

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"Vanguard of the Revolution": New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBI’s War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution”: New Film Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBI's War Against Them http://democracynow.org – With groups around the country taking on issues of police brutality and accountability, we go back 50 years to another movement con… By: democracynow

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X and the black panthers – Video




X and the black panthers By: Emily Nicer

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"Vanguard of the Revolution" Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers & FBIs War Against Them – Video




“Vanguard of the Revolution” Chronicles Rise of Black Panthers FBIs War Against Them “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” tells the history of the Black Panther Party through rare archival footage and interviews with party leaders, rank-and-file members, journalists… By: freespeechtv

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