Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

Tomorrow: A White Panther Party reunion at the Wright Museum – Detroit Metro Times

For instance, Detroit’s White Panther Party was founded in 1968, by Pun Plamondon and John and Leni Sinclair, The anti-racist, anti-imperialist, pro-marijuana white American political collective was apparently inspired by a quote from Black Panther Party leader Huey P. Newton. Asked, What could white people do to support he Black Panthers? Newton reportedly responded, Start a White Panther Party. And that’s just what Detroit’s white radical contingent at the time did.

Tomorrow brings them together once again, with a panel discussion featuring the Sinclairs, Plamondon, and the party’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Genie Parker. The discussion will be moderated by longtime Nightcall host Peter Werbe. It should be an eye-opening discussion, given how a lot of the radical beliefs of the White Panther Party are mainstream issues today, given the increasing decriminalization of marijuana or the way political and economic conditions are now seen as main drivers of the 12th Street Riot.

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Tomorrow: A White Panther Party reunion at the Wright Museum – Detroit Metro Times

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July 14, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

FAGAN: (Video) Baton Rouge Activist Caught On Tape Saying Many More Black Panthers Are Heading To Baton … – The Hayride

We are learning more about Wednesdays New Black Panther protest in front of Baton Rouge police headquarters. Police now believe one of the Black Panther protestors had a stun gun and may have tasered a police officer causing him to fall to the ground. Police released a picture of a Black Panther holding a stun gun during the protest.

There is also evidence a production crew was hired to tape the protest as several of the Black Panthers arrested had microphones on them.

One of the protestors at the event, civil rights leader and Black Panther supporter Ron Ceasar told me by phone on Thursday he expects a civil war between Black Panthers and law enforcement in the coming days. Ceasar says Baton Rouge PD has pissed of the Black Panthers and hundreds will be coming to Baton Rouge soon and will bring violence.

Click on the video below to hear Ceasars chilling words.

Of the seven Black Panthers arrested Wednesday five are from out of town and the home of the other two were not specified on arrest records. If Mr. Ceasars prediction of more Black Panthers coming to Baton Rouge is true, and thats a big if, you would expect Baton Rouge PD to take every precaution necessary to prevent violence. Ceasar also told me the family of Alton Sterling requested that the Black Panthers keep their guns in the trunk of their vehicles during Wednesdays protest. Its well known the Black Panthers carry guns in states that allow it.

Dan Fagan is a former television news reporter, journalism professor, newspaper columnist, and radio talk show host. He grew up in New Orleans and currently lives there. He is a regular contributor for The Hayride. If you have a news tip for Mr. Fagan you can reach him at [emailprotected] or 504-458-2542.

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FAGAN: (Video) Baton Rouge Activist Caught On Tape Saying Many More Black Panthers Are Heading To Baton … – The Hayride

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July 8, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

FAGAN: Civil Rights Leader Says Hundreds Of More Black Panthers Are Headed To Baton Rouge And Promises … – The Hayride

Three days before Wednesdays New Black Panther protest in Baton Rouge, civil rights leader and Black Panther supporter Ron Ceasar posted on his Facebook page,

SHOWDOWN IN BATON ROUGE, LA THE NEW BLACK PANTHERS FACE-OFF WITH BATON ROUGE POLICE, HIGH NOON, JULY 5, (WEDNESDAY) AT THE POLICE STATION AT 9000 AIRLINE HWY OVER THE NON-INDICTMENT OF WHITE POLICE OFFICER SALMANELLI FOR EXECUTING BROTHER ALTON STERLING. WOW! THE PANTHERS BELIEVE IN STRAPPING UP WITH SHOTGUNS AND RIFLES STAYING PREPARED TO DO BATTLE!!!!WOW!, GONNA BE A SHOWDOWN IN LOUISIANA!!!

Clearly, the 64-year old Ceasar was excited about the prospect of a violent encounter with police. There was violence but no guns were involved Wednesday. Its no secret Black Panthers have been known to carry guns but Mr. Ceasar told me the family of Alton Sterling was aware of that and asked them to leave their guns in the trunk of their cars at the protest.

Ceasar told me more Black Panthers are heading to Baton Rouge as a military tactic where they send in a few members to test the waters, if police rough them up they bring in the big boys from all over the nation.

We getting ready to have us a civil war. Ceasar said.

Of the seven Black Panthers arrested Wednesday in front of Baton Rouge police headquarters, 5 were from out of town and arrest records dont list the residences of the other two.

These guys will die for the cause. Something is going to happen and its not going to be peaceful. The Panthers are not going to sit out and just go home and they are going to make a move and it will be unannounced.

I asked Ceasar if the unannounced Black Panther event would be violent.

Of course its going to be violent. Because the police have shown that violence begets violence. We cant go over there and demonstrate peacefully, look what we got. You shot our women. Ceasar said.

I asked Mr. Ceasar if hes had discussions with the leaders in the Black Panther movement and whether theyve indicated to him if there would be violence. He responded, Thats top secret.

Ceasar said police brought this on themselves by the way he and his fellow protestors were treated Wednesday.

There were snipers in the trees, there were guys riding around in tinted vehicles, there was the FBI, they were all there. Ive worked civil rights for over 30 some years. I know how they operate. They were prepared to kill us all. But all of us there, we would have died for the cause. Ceasar said.

Ceasar described Wednesdays protest this way to the Daily Mail, What we saw today was the white man once again treating the black man as his slave.

Police stop out of town Black Panthers with a history of violence from storming their headquarters and Ceasar describes it as the white man once again treating the black man as his slave. What do you even say to something like that?

Dan Fagan is a former television news reporter, journalism professor, newspaper columnist, and radio talk show host. He grew up in New Orleans and currently lives there. He is a regular contributor for The Hayride. If you have a news tip for Mr. Fagan you can reach him at [emailprotected] or 504-458-2542.

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FAGAN: Civil Rights Leader Says Hundreds Of More Black Panthers Are Headed To Baton Rouge And Promises … – The Hayride

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July 7, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

VIDEO: The New Black Panthers Have A Mini-Riot At BRPD Headquarters – The Hayride

UPDATE: Boy, heres something interesting apparently, one of the people who were tased during the little riot the New Black Panthers touched off at Baton Rouge Police Headquarters was a policeman. It was originally assumed he must have gotten in the way of one of his colleagues and was tased by mistake.

Apparently, not, though, as one of the New Black Panthers showed up armed with a taser gun. That individual could well have been responsible for the cop getting tased.

ORIGINAL: This mini-riot is brought to you by the New Black Panthers courtesy of it being the one-year anniversary of the Alton Sterling shooting, something the local media in Baton Rouge and the citys mayor, who was elected partly on the strength of the hype surrounding the incident, have been vigorously playing up.

It turns out that when an incident like the one with Sterling turns into a feeding frenzy, which this one in particularly absolutely has, youll have all kinds of people attempting to use it to get attention. That phenomenon turned deadly in late July last year when a black separatist loon named Gavin Long blew in from out of town and proceeded to launch an attack which killed three local law enforcement officers and caused permanent serious injury to a fourth.

Less deadly but even more persistent (Longs violent days are done, since he was put down by the cops he was attempting to kill) are the New Black Panthers, who see in the Sterling case a ticket to relevance they are continuing to cash. So today, the New Black Panthers brought a paltry crowd to the convenience store parking lot where Sterling was shot and then led a march to Baton Rouge Police Headquarters where they proceeded to scuffle with the local cops on duty.

Thats where the mini-riot ensued.

BRPD spokesman LJean McKneely, displaying his white privilege (oh, wait!), explains the police decision to arrest the seven mini-rioters

The race-hustling mob in residence continues to complain about there being no justice for Alton Sterling, which is a fairly inarticulate euphemism for complaining theres no retribution for him. Gavin Long would seem to have already satisfied the latter, but of course its only a few people wholl have the courage, or stupidity, depending on your perspective, to admit thats what they wanted. Sterlings family filed a wrongful death action against the city and the police department, and the Justice Department concluded a months-long investigation finding no violations of Sterlings civil rights inherent in a shooting which happened as he struggled for his illegal weapon amid an arrest.

This is little more than advertising for the New Black Panthers, who as you can see in these videos have a paltry following there are more media members present at their protests than actual protesters. Whats noticeable, though, is the damage they can do. Were bound to hear more demands for a conversation about race relations due to these protests, when most of us black and white would really rather be treated as individual citizens rather than members of some warring tribe requiring a conversation.

Nobody unrelated to Alton Sterling will see their lives improved by any justice done for him. But thats a point lost on the chanting attention whores who tried to bum-rush the BRPD headquarters today.

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VIDEO: The New Black Panthers Have A Mini-Riot At BRPD Headquarters – The Hayride

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July 7, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black America Demands Power for the People and Freedom From White Art Establishment in ‘Soul of a Nation’ Exhibit – Newsweek

In 1970, artist Faith Ringgold made a poster for the Committee to Defend the Black Panthers. A black face looked out from a red background. Some of the facial features were rendered in green, completing the triumvirate of the African liberation color palette. Free all political prisoners, it read. All power to the people.

Ringgold brought the poster to the committees offices on East 18th Street in Manhattan. They didnt like it, she recalls. And youve got our address on there, they pointed out. Defend the Panthers had just had its offices firebombed; announcing its location might invite another attack.

Ringgold made a second poster, sans address, this one showing an armed black family. Defend the Panthers hated that, too.

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Faith Ringgold outside her studio in Englewood, N.J. on Wednesday. Gioncarlo Valentine for Newsweek

The artist wasnt deterred; she was used to rejection, particularly as an African-American woman working in the largely white, male art world. Several years after Defend the Panthers rejected her, she offered her alma mater, the City College of New York, a painting. I want my art in a public place, she remembered thinking.

City College thought otherwise: They said no. I said, Well, good. I wont waste my time on them.

Her next offer, in 1971, was to the New York Women’s House of Detention, where black revolutionary Angela Davis was being held. The prison agreed to take an enormous painting called For the Womens House, which showed women in traditionally male occupations: police officers, doctors, basketball players. But in the 1988, long after the jail had moved to Rikers Island, the complex changed over from female inmates to male ones. Ringgolds painting seemed out of place given the jails new population. Accordingly, it was covered in white paint.

Speak the truth, and you get negative feedback, she jokes now.

Despite these disappointments, Ringgold persistedand was rewarded for doing so. She eventually became famous for the childrens book Tar Beach, about growing up in Harlem, as well as others, most notably We Came to America. Ive read both to my daughter without realizing Ringgolds history as an artist. But if the childrens books are popular (and they are, immensely), her political art is essential in another way. Im the one who has to speak up for who I am and what my story is, she says. Im the one gotta say what I was doing in the 70s when other people were keeping quiet.

Faith Ringgold outside her studio in Englewood, N.J. on Wednesday. Gioncarlo Valentine for Newsweek

I met Ringgold at New Yorks Ace Gallery, a longtime champion of radical artists. In the room is her painting American People Series #20: Die, depicting blacks and whites, men and women, stabbing and shooting one another. In the center of the painting, two small children cower. Last year, the Museum of Modern Art acquired that painting, the surest sign yet that the art world is finally taking Ringgold seriously.

It is a gruesome work, but Ringgold defends its gore, because that is her vision of America: During the 60s and 70s, American art was beautifully done, but there was no violence.

This summer, Ringgolds second poster for Defend the Panthers will be on display at the Tate Modern, where the new exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power opens on July 12. There are other artists in Soul of a Nation who might disagree with Ringgolds vision of what art should do and be, but thats one of the rewards of a catholic show like this. It allows for artistic disagreements without adjudicating them. Impressively comprehensive in scope, the show contains more than 150 works by over 50 artists. Spanning two decades, from 1963 to 1983, and occupying 12 galley rooms, Soul of a Nation chronicles the hope, violence and despair of the years, roughly, between the age of Kennedy and the age of Reagan. And though planned nearly three years ago, it offers insights into the age of Trump, none of which are especially sunny.

American People Series #20: Die (1967) by Faith Ringgold. Oil on canvas, 1828 x 3657 mm. Modern Women’s Fund/The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Many works speak to the unfilled promises of the civil rights movement, to the anger that followed as the nation became more conservative under Nixon and Reagan: Ringgolds United States of Attica, a map that chronicles racial and political violence throughout American history; Jeff Donaldsons Wives of Sango, a lush, almost Fauvist portrait of several chic revolutionaries; and Elizabeth Catletts Black Unity sculpture, an abstracted mahogany fist, raised in the Black Power salute. The fist is a rebellion against white racism, as well as the white art establishment.

Art relating to the Black Panthers has been the subject of many stand-alone exhibitions, including the Oakland Museum of Arts All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50 last fall and an excellent 2009 show of Emory Douglas prints at New Yorks New Museum. Soul of a Nation does a fine job of chronicling African-American militancy and pride. But there is also, crucially, art that has nothing to do with those topics. Despite the shows seemingly inescapable political overtones, Soul of a Nation successfullyand provocativelyargues that there is more to African-American postwar art than explicit expressions of anger over social injustice.

Black Unity (1968) by Elizabeth Catlett. Mahogony wood, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Catlett Mora Family Trust/DACS, London/VAGA, NY

Is the job of the black artist different than the job of a white artist? asks Mark Godfrey, one of the shows two curators. (The other is Zoe Whitley, a native of Los Angeles who has long worked as a curator in London.) Whats the role of the black woman artist? Those questions form the basis of a very compelling story. Godfrey knows the Tate Modern cant answer those questions, but the greater risk would be in not asking them.

Without belaboring the point, Soul of a Nation makes the case that just as the Italian Renaissance meant one thing to the artists of Siena and another to those of Pisa, the black art of the 1960s had its own competing centers of creativity and influence. The art coming out of Oakland, the California city that gave birth to the Panthers, was, unsurprisingly, the most political. New Yorks Spiral Group was friendlier to abstract works, while Los Angeles was home to what Godfrey calls assemblage aesthetic, best exemplified by the art of Noah Purifoy. In 1971, he created an Environmental Experience that was a reconstruction of increasingly impoverished inner-city life. The explanation attached to the piece played on the ugliest white prejudices: Niggers aint gonna never be nothing. All they want to do is drink and fuck.

Trane (1969) by William T. Williams. Studio Museum Harlem. William T. Williams/Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York

William T. Williams is one of the New York artists featured in the Tate Modern show. The bespoke septuagenarian lived out many of the tensions inherent in Soul of a Nation, his own career an argument with itself about what black art can (and should) be. And while others flocked to the political debates of the day, he retreated from them, eventually to a studio in Connecticut. He recently showed his work at a commercial art gallery for the first time in more than 40 years, at the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, which has a history of championing African-American artists. We met there on a recent afternoon, amidst the paintings that constitute Things Unknown.

A native of North Carolina, Williams went north to study art at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, and later at Yale, where he got a masters degree. In the late 60s, he was part of the Smokehouse Painters, a collective that created murals around Harlem, on tenement walls and neglected public spacesa radical notion at the time, Williams remembers.

21 August 1971, ‘We Shall Survive without a doubt’ (1971) by Emory Douglas. Newspaper, 445 x 580 mm. Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Culver City, USA. Emory Douglas/Art Resource, NY

Printmaker Emory Douglas is on one end of the spectrum, his art summoning revolutionaries to the barricades. Williams is on the other. I dont wake up and be preoccupied by being a black person, Williams says. Its a nonissue.

Yet he admits that race is inescapable: How do you experience this society without thinking about race? Some of the most intriguing works in Soul of a Nation suggest thats about as realistic as swimming without touching water. Dana Chandlers Fred Hamptons Door 2, a reference to the Black Panther killed in an FBI raid in Chicago, is deceptivethe teal and rhubarb colors suggestive of a summer cottage out of childhood dreams. But the door is riddled with bullet holes. Reverie over. Welcome to America.

One of those standouts is Icon for My Man Superman (Superman Never Saved any Black People–Bobby Seale by Barkley L. Hendricks, who died earlier this year. Painted in 1969, it shows a male figure imbued with Black Power cool: the Afro hair-style, the goatee, the aviator shades, arms crossed nonchalantly just below the chest. But he is also wearing a t-shirt with the logo of Superman, beloved superhero of white America. Is Hendricks suggesting that his subject, a Panther perhaps, is also a hero? Maybe that accounts for the serene, unperturbed expression on his lips.

Soul of a Nation ends in 1983, with performance art, depicted in videos and photographs, and the show makes a persuasive case for artists like Lorraine OGrady and Senga Nengudi, who were making complex and transgressive works at a time when the art world was favoring the commercial gestures of machismo by artists like Julian Schnabel.

Muhammad Ali (1978) by Andy Warhol. Synthetic polymer and silkscreen inks on canvas, 1016 x 1016 mm. The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society, New York and DACS, London

After four months at the Tate, the show will travel to the United States: first to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, followed by the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Until then, the Brooklyn Museum is offering a kind of sister exhibition, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 196585. These womenmarginalized by whites for their race and by male black peers for their genderpoured their outrage into art, as some today pour into Twitter. Their works exemplify the old truth about privation, personal or collective, being a catalyst for creativity. (Included is Ringgolds For the Womens House, which was restored after being painted over.)

At the Brooklyn exhibition, which was crowded on a recent Saturday afternoon, I lingered in front of a work by Emma Amos, Sandy and Her Husband, painted in 1973. It shows a couple dancing in a living room, hands clasped, eyes closed. He has a hand at the small of Sandys back, which suggests he is familiar with her body. She leans into him, head resting on his shoulder.

Sandys race is plainly African-American, while her husbands is difficult to determine. It made me conscious of my desire to know his race, because it is a thing we always want to know in America. But Amos is more concerned with the basic humanity of the scene, two people quietly dancing, two people in love.

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Black America Demands Power for the People and Freedom From White Art Establishment in ‘Soul of a Nation’ Exhibit – Newsweek

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July 4, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Williamsburg vet made mark with African-American tank battalion in WWII – Daily Press

Growing up in 1930s Newport News, Thomas Mangrum Sr. picked up a little skill that would help change his life, both as a soldier and an African-American.

He learned Morse code.

Credit the Boy Scouts. Mangrum tapped out the dots and dashes on a tin washtub under the tutelage of a scoutmaster who had served in World War I.

The lessons stuck, and Mangrum caught the attention of Army brass years later when he signed up to fight in World War II. At a time when many black soldiers were assigned menial tasks, the Army trained Mangrum to transmit coded messages and repair radios.

They sent him to England to continue training. Somehow, he ended up unloading trucks.

“I tried to tell this captain that I was supposed to go to code school. He said, ‘You get the hell on that truck’ So I got on the truck.”

A major eventually intervened, and Mangrum’s military career kicked into high gear. He went from unloading trucks to serving with the 761st Tank Battalion, an African-American unit of tankers that fought its way across northern Europe, earning respect and praise from Gen. George Patton, the legendary U.S. military strategist.

The 761st was activated in 1942 at Camp Claiborne, La., one of three black tank battalions that made up the 5th Tank Group. When the unit landed in France in October 1944, the men received a personal welcome from Patton.

Author Gina M. DiNicolo, who chronicled the history of the 761st in her book, “The Black Panthers,” included an account of Patton’s welcome in his customary salty-tongued style.

“Men, you’re the first Negro tankers to ever fight in the American Army. I would never have asked for you if you weren’t good. I have nothing but the best in my Army. I don’t care what color you are as long as you go up there and kill those Kraut sons of bitches. Everyone has their eyes on you and is expecting great things from you. Most of all, your race is looking forward to you. Don’t let them down and damn you, don’t let me down.”

The 761st became the first black armored unit to enter combat on Nov. 8, 1944, according to Joseph E. Wilson Jr., who has also chronicled the unit’s history. It pushed through France and participated in the American counter-offensive after the Battle of the Bulge.

Later, it was among the units that helped smash the Siegfried Line, a series of German bunkers, tank traps and fortifications that protected the country’s western flank. The 761st captured seven towns, more than 400 vehicles, 80 heavy weapons and thousands of small arms during this push, according to Wilson.

As the tanks advanced, Mangrum transmitted and received coded messages between commanders. He occasionally had to climb into the tanks to fix radios.

“We supported the infantry,” he said. “We would go town by town, with the infantry. We did that all through Germany.”

As the war in Europe neared its end, the Black Panthers were among the first American units to link up with Soviet troops.

Mangrum reflected on his time in battle during the 2015 American Veterans Center conference. The interview was videotaped and is widely available on YouTube.

“It was crazy,” he said. “I took a lot of chances. I had a Jeep and electronic gear. It’s a funny thing. When you’re in combat, you go crazy. You see men dying and you’re anxious to get payback.”

After the war, Mangrum re-enlisted for a year and ended up in Berlin, where he recorded interviews with former German soldiers. He was allowed occasional breaks, but unlike the other men, he didn’t go out to smoke.

“I walked outside and looked for girls,” he said.

He did more than look. Mangrum became involved with a German girl and had the family’s blessing to take her back to the states. But she was white, and the Army wouldn’t allow it, he said.

He left the Army in 1946, having achieved the rank of staff sergeant. Returning to the U.S., he saw the same signs for segregated drinking fountains and restrooms. After working to gain respect on the battlefield, he realized the homefront hadn’t changed. Blacks were still treated like second-class citizens.

But now he tapped a new weapon. Just as learning Morse code had given him a leg up in the military, an education would help him fight the institutional racism of the late 1940s and ’50s.

“The secret for a black person to beat the system is to get an education,” he said. “And after you get an education, you can’t carry a chip on your shoulder and you can’t act smarter than that white guy you’re working with. You keep your mouth closed and work as you go along, start saving a little money. That’s the best way to beat the system.”

Still, it was a battle.

He went to school for electronics and eventually landed a job at Fort Eustis. The Army sent him to school in New Jersey for training on digital equipment. He was the only black student in a class that required him to troubleshoot equipment placed on his desk. When the students took a break, he would return to find more problems with his equipment, courtesy of some white students.

“I would be the last one to turn my test in,” he said. “But I didn’t want to stir up anything. The less you said, the better off you are.”

As attitudes slowly changed, Mangrum didn’t stay silent forever. Retiring to Mathews County, he noticed the lack of African-American representation in local government and decided to do something about it.

He ran for county supervisor, ignoring the predictions of his black friends who said he wouldn’t win. Mangrum served as a county supervisor from 1984 to 1996.

Lessig can be reached by phone at 757-247-7821.

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Williamsburg vet made mark with African-American tank battalion in WWII – Daily Press

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Halle Berry: My Undying Wish Is To Play Angela Davis In A Biopic – HuffPost

Halle Berrys admiration for acclaimed scholar and activist Angela Davis is perhaps as strong as her desire to portray her onscreen.

The Oscar-winning actress, who is promoting her new film Kidnap, spoke on the empowerment stage at the Essence Festival on Friday about her experiences in Hollywood as well as those shes still hoping to gain. However, perhaps the highest priority on her list is the opportunity to play Davis in a biopic chronicling her evolution and activism over the years.

Theres one woman that Id really like to play before I die, Berry told Essence Editor-in-Chief Vanessa DeLuca onstage before the crowd. Id really love to play Angela Davis.

This isnt Berrys first time pitching herself to play Davis, who is now 73-years-old and still outspoken about politics and activism. The actress first expressed her interest in a Jet magazine interview in 2011 and has praised the former Black Panther and revolutionary activist for consistently speaking out against oppression and fighting for justice. Davis work, which highlights the intersection of issues like race, gender, prison and politics, dominates throughout black history and she stands as a leading freedom fighter to this day.

Ill probably never get to play it in my life and I am going to be sad until the day I die, but I really want to play Angela Davis badly, she reportedly told Jet magazine at the time. So badly. I just think shes fascinating and I think I would love to tell a story from her perspective about that time in our history and what it was all about with the Black Panthers.

In a separate interview with The Guardian from 2015, Berry restated her admiration for Davis and talked about how her desire to play her had become a passion project of sorts for her.

[Davis story] has always been a passion of mine, Berry told The Guardian in 2015. Shes just fascinating: the era she lived in, the Black Panthers and all that they stood for, and her connection to it, or not to it. I have a lot of respect for how she lived her life.

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Killmonger Explained: Who Is the Black Panther Villain? – IGN – IGN

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Black Panther is finally starring in his own superhero movie next year. But for hardcore fans of the character, half the fun with this new addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe is seeing T’Challa’s nemesis, Erik Killmonger, finally brought to life (and played by Michael B. Jordan).

But don’t worry if you’ve never heard of this Marvel villain before. We’re here to break down everything you need to know about the man who would rule Wakanda.

The Basics

Most superheroes worth their salt have at least one villain who serves as their dark, twisted mirror image, and Killmonger fills that role for Black Panther. This exiled Wakandan native is obsessed with overthrowing King T’Challa and ridding the country of all white imperialist influences. Basically, he’s loyal to Wakanda, but not its ruling family.

Killmonger is one of the few men who manages to rival T’Challa in both mental acuity and skill on the battlefield. That’s why Killmongerhas remained a very dangerous thorn in T’Challa’s side over the years, cheating death on more than one occasion.

Powers and Abilities

Killmonger is a brilliant strategist and scientist who received his PhD from MIT. He’s also a highly skilled martial artist, able to go toe-to-toe with Wakanda’s finest warriors, including Black Panther himself.

While Killmonger didn’t originally possess any superhuman powers, he eventually created a synthetic version of the “heart-shaped herb” that gives the Black Panthers their enhanced senses and reflexes. Much like Captain America’s Super-Soldier Serum, this herb also boosts Killmonger’s speed, strength and stamina to the absolute peak of human performance.

As if that weren’t enough, Killmonger often wears a specially designed, armored suit that can inject opponents with poison and even fire energy blasts. Plus, he has several trained leopards and a group of fanatical followers capable of using dark magic to resurrect their master.

Origin and Background

Killmonger was created by writer Don McGregor and artist Rich Buckler and made his debut in 1973’s Jungle Action #6. Early stories established Killmonger as a Wakandan native (originally namedN’Jadaka) whose father was forced to help Ulysses Klaw invade Wakanda and steal its valuable vibranium. After Klaw was defeated andN’Jadaka’s father was killed, he and his family were exiled to America.

Ever since moving to America and taking his new name, Killmonger has fostered a deep hatred of the Black Panther. And while T’Challa made overtures to Killmonger by repatriating him and giving him a new home in a Wakandan village, Killmonger has frequently attempted to overthrow his king and end the reign of the Black Panthers. He’s come closer than most, particularly during the course of Christopher Priest’s Black Panther series. One storyline saw the two foes resume their feud, only for Killmonger to defeat T’Challa in ritual combat and claim the Black Panther title for himself. Only the fact that Killmonger’s body couldn’t handle the effects of the heart-shaped herb spared Wakanda from its tyrannical new ruler.

Killmonger continues to be one of the greatest threats to Wakanda’s security. Most recently, he orchestrated a war between Wakanda and the neighboring nation of Niganda. Killmonger was killed during the climax of that conflict in 2008’s Black Panther Vol. 4 #38, but a man as smart as T’Challa must know it’s only a matter of time before his nemesis returns.

Beyond the Comics

Killmonger hasn’t had a prolific career outside of the comics, but it’s safe to assume that will quickly change once he makes his live-action debut in 2018’s Black Panther (played by Michael B. Jordan).

For now, Killmonger’s only non-comics appearance came in the 2016 video game LEGO Marvel’s Avengers, where he’s a playable character for those who purchase the Black Panther DLC pack.

How the character will fit into the Black Panther’s world of the MCU remains to be seen, but so far it looks as though he’s following similar beats as his comics counterpart as a powerful figure who seeks usurp T’Challa and take the throne for himself.

Jesse is a mild-mannered writer for IGN. Allow him to lend a machete to your intellectual thicket by following @jschedeen on Twitter, or Kicksplode on MyIGN.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Considering the current state of play – Amsterdam News

Last week we dealt with the news that once again an African-American man was killed by the actions of the police and will not receive any justice. Philando Castile was shot and killed by a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minn., and the officer who shot him was acquitted of all charges. Although this outcome may seem surprising to many, the death of Black men by police officers has become normalized for Blacks such as myself.

This killing is just a recent example of sanctioned violence by the state, where African-American men do not have the legal ability to defend themselves against police officers with loaded firearms.

However, there was a time when African-Americans did have the right to carry loaded guns and protect themselves and their respective communities. Beginning in the late 1960s, these actions were seen among members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in California, but received criticism by the government, causing the creation of the Mulford Act.

It is important to highlight the history of policies such as the Mulford Act to understand its impact on the epidemic of police brutality on African-American men.

The Black Panthers and the Mulford Act

The Black Panthers were the voices of persecuted African-Americans during the 1960s and 1970s in the Oakland, Calif., area. During this time, the injustices of Blacks influenced the teaching of state laws and community policing. These initiatives of the Black Panthers incited fear in the minds of the lawmakers in California.

The Blacks Panthers openly carried loaded guns to police their respective communities. Governor Ronald Reagan and the California Legislature were not pleased by these actions and created the Mulford Act.

When the NRA supported gun control

Gun control is a policy issue that tends to receive support from a liberal legislature. However, such was not the case when it came to the Mulford Act, which was backed by the NRA, written by California Republican Assemblyman Don Mulford, and signed into law by then California Governor Reagan.

This support is not surprising, because the events of the Watts Riots of 1966 and rise of the Black Panthers influenced the shift of the legislature to promote gun control for California citizens. These actions caused many to believe that the Mulford Act was created to stop Blacks from openly carrying loaded guns.

However, the Panthers were indeed following the law of California before the creation of the Mulford Act. The gun laws of California stated that you could carry a loaded gun out on the street so long it was registered, not concealed and not pointed in a threatening manner. Yet, the California Legislature perceived these actions of the Black Panthers as being intimidating, when they were seen carrying guns, and changed the law to maintain their safety and restrict their actions.

The Mulford Act and our current political climate

The negation of African-Americans within the Mulford Act demonstrates the ability of the state to decide who takes part in the decision-making process when it comes to the creation of laws. These actions are evident within the federal government today. Recently, the Department of Justice reported that it will not look into police accountability measures in communities plagued by police brutality, such as Baltimore and Baton Rouge. Yet, police accountability actions were called upon by members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Once again, it is not surprising that state-sanctioned violence is occurring today in the form of police brutality toward African-American men and others. This violence is indeed sanctioned by an arm of the state, the police department. In the current political climate in which we are living, it would not be a surprise if the federal government created a policy that is equivalent to the Mulford Act. Potentially, maybe the future bill will limit the power of movements such as Black Lives Matter. Let us not forget that the Mulford Act was signed into law by President Reagan, when he was governor in California. Like Reagan, President Trump called himself, the candidate of law and order.

Walter A. Jean-Jacques is a graduate student at University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice. He is an incoming law student at the University of Notre Dame Law School in Notre Dame. Contact him at walter.jeanjacques@gmail.com.

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Considering the current state of play – Amsterdam News

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Tomorrow: A White Panther Party reunion at the Wright Museum – Detroit Metro Times

For instance, Detroit’s White Panther Party was founded in 1968, by Pun Plamondon and John and Leni Sinclair, The anti-racist, anti-imperialist, pro-marijuana white American political collective was apparently inspired by a quote from Black Panther Party leader Huey P. Newton. Asked, What could white people do to support he Black Panthers? Newton reportedly responded, Start a White Panther Party. And that’s just what Detroit’s white radical contingent at the time did. Tomorrow brings them together once again, with a panel discussion featuring the Sinclairs, Plamondon, and the party’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Genie Parker. The discussion will be moderated by longtime Nightcall host Peter Werbe. It should be an eye-opening discussion, given how a lot of the radical beliefs of the White Panther Party are mainstream issues today, given the increasing decriminalization of marijuana or the way political and economic conditions are now seen as main drivers of the 12th Street Riot.

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July 14, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

FAGAN: (Video) Baton Rouge Activist Caught On Tape Saying Many More Black Panthers Are Heading To Baton … – The Hayride

We are learning more about Wednesdays New Black Panther protest in front of Baton Rouge police headquarters. Police now believe one of the Black Panther protestors had a stun gun and may have tasered a police officer causing him to fall to the ground. Police released a picture of a Black Panther holding a stun gun during the protest. There is also evidence a production crew was hired to tape the protest as several of the Black Panthers arrested had microphones on them. One of the protestors at the event, civil rights leader and Black Panther supporter Ron Ceasar told me by phone on Thursday he expects a civil war between Black Panthers and law enforcement in the coming days. Ceasar says Baton Rouge PD has pissed of the Black Panthers and hundreds will be coming to Baton Rouge soon and will bring violence. Click on the video below to hear Ceasars chilling words. Of the seven Black Panthers arrested Wednesday five are from out of town and the home of the other two were not specified on arrest records. If Mr. Ceasars prediction of more Black Panthers coming to Baton Rouge is true, and thats a big if, you would expect Baton Rouge PD to take every precaution necessary to prevent violence. Ceasar also told me the family of Alton Sterling requested that the Black Panthers keep their guns in the trunk of their vehicles during Wednesdays protest. Its well known the Black Panthers carry guns in states that allow it. Dan Fagan is a former television news reporter, journalism professor, newspaper columnist, and radio talk show host. He grew up in New Orleans and currently lives there. He is a regular contributor for The Hayride. If you have a news tip for Mr. Fagan you can reach him at [emailprotected] or 504-458-2542.

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July 8, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

FAGAN: Civil Rights Leader Says Hundreds Of More Black Panthers Are Headed To Baton Rouge And Promises … – The Hayride

Three days before Wednesdays New Black Panther protest in Baton Rouge, civil rights leader and Black Panther supporter Ron Ceasar posted on his Facebook page, SHOWDOWN IN BATON ROUGE, LA THE NEW BLACK PANTHERS FACE-OFF WITH BATON ROUGE POLICE, HIGH NOON, JULY 5, (WEDNESDAY) AT THE POLICE STATION AT 9000 AIRLINE HWY OVER THE NON-INDICTMENT OF WHITE POLICE OFFICER SALMANELLI FOR EXECUTING BROTHER ALTON STERLING. WOW! THE PANTHERS BELIEVE IN STRAPPING UP WITH SHOTGUNS AND RIFLES STAYING PREPARED TO DO BATTLE!!!!WOW!, GONNA BE A SHOWDOWN IN LOUISIANA!!! Clearly, the 64-year old Ceasar was excited about the prospect of a violent encounter with police. There was violence but no guns were involved Wednesday. Its no secret Black Panthers have been known to carry guns but Mr. Ceasar told me the family of Alton Sterling was aware of that and asked them to leave their guns in the trunk of their cars at the protest. Ceasar told me more Black Panthers are heading to Baton Rouge as a military tactic where they send in a few members to test the waters, if police rough them up they bring in the big boys from all over the nation. We getting ready to have us a civil war. Ceasar said. Of the seven Black Panthers arrested Wednesday in front of Baton Rouge police headquarters, 5 were from out of town and arrest records dont list the residences of the other two. These guys will die for the cause. Something is going to happen and its not going to be peaceful. The Panthers are not going to sit out and just go home and they are going to make a move and it will be unannounced. I asked Ceasar if the unannounced Black Panther event would be violent. Of course its going to be violent. Because the police have shown that violence begets violence. We cant go over there and demonstrate peacefully, look what we got. You shot our women. Ceasar said. I asked Mr. Ceasar if hes had discussions with the leaders in the Black Panther movement and whether theyve indicated to him if there would be violence. He responded, Thats top secret. Ceasar said police brought this on themselves by the way he and his fellow protestors were treated Wednesday. There were snipers in the trees, there were guys riding around in tinted vehicles, there was the FBI, they were all there. Ive worked civil rights for over 30 some years. I know how they operate. They were prepared to kill us all. But all of us there, we would have died for the cause. Ceasar said. Ceasar described Wednesdays protest this way to the Daily Mail, What we saw today was the white man once again treating the black man as his slave. Police stop out of town Black Panthers with a history of violence from storming their headquarters and Ceasar describes it as the white man once again treating the black man as his slave. What do you even say to something like that? Dan Fagan is a former television news reporter, journalism professor, newspaper columnist, and radio talk show host. He grew up in New Orleans and currently lives there. He is a regular contributor for The Hayride. If you have a news tip for Mr. Fagan you can reach him at [emailprotected] or 504-458-2542.

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July 7, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

VIDEO: The New Black Panthers Have A Mini-Riot At BRPD Headquarters – The Hayride

UPDATE: Boy, heres something interesting apparently, one of the people who were tased during the little riot the New Black Panthers touched off at Baton Rouge Police Headquarters was a policeman. It was originally assumed he must have gotten in the way of one of his colleagues and was tased by mistake. Apparently, not, though, as one of the New Black Panthers showed up armed with a taser gun. That individual could well have been responsible for the cop getting tased. ORIGINAL: This mini-riot is brought to you by the New Black Panthers courtesy of it being the one-year anniversary of the Alton Sterling shooting, something the local media in Baton Rouge and the citys mayor, who was elected partly on the strength of the hype surrounding the incident, have been vigorously playing up. It turns out that when an incident like the one with Sterling turns into a feeding frenzy, which this one in particularly absolutely has, youll have all kinds of people attempting to use it to get attention. That phenomenon turned deadly in late July last year when a black separatist loon named Gavin Long blew in from out of town and proceeded to launch an attack which killed three local law enforcement officers and caused permanent serious injury to a fourth. Less deadly but even more persistent (Longs violent days are done, since he was put down by the cops he was attempting to kill) are the New Black Panthers, who see in the Sterling case a ticket to relevance they are continuing to cash. So today, the New Black Panthers brought a paltry crowd to the convenience store parking lot where Sterling was shot and then led a march to Baton Rouge Police Headquarters where they proceeded to scuffle with the local cops on duty. Thats where the mini-riot ensued. BRPD spokesman LJean McKneely, displaying his white privilege (oh, wait!), explains the police decision to arrest the seven mini-rioters The race-hustling mob in residence continues to complain about there being no justice for Alton Sterling, which is a fairly inarticulate euphemism for complaining theres no retribution for him. Gavin Long would seem to have already satisfied the latter, but of course its only a few people wholl have the courage, or stupidity, depending on your perspective, to admit thats what they wanted. Sterlings family filed a wrongful death action against the city and the police department, and the Justice Department concluded a months-long investigation finding no violations of Sterlings civil rights inherent in a shooting which happened as he struggled for his illegal weapon amid an arrest. This is little more than advertising for the New Black Panthers, who as you can see in these videos have a paltry following there are more media members present at their protests than actual protesters. Whats noticeable, though, is the damage they can do. Were bound to hear more demands for a conversation about race relations due to these protests, when most of us black and white would really rather be treated as individual citizens rather than members of some warring tribe requiring a conversation. Nobody unrelated to Alton Sterling will see their lives improved by any justice done for him. But thats a point lost on the chanting attention whores who tried to bum-rush the BRPD headquarters today.

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Black America Demands Power for the People and Freedom From White Art Establishment in ‘Soul of a Nation’ Exhibit – Newsweek

In 1970, artist Faith Ringgold made a poster for the Committee to Defend the Black Panthers. A black face looked out from a red background. Some of the facial features were rendered in green, completing the triumvirate of the African liberation color palette. Free all political prisoners, it read. All power to the people. Ringgold brought the poster to the committees offices on East 18th Street in Manhattan. They didnt like it, she recalls. And youve got our address on there, they pointed out. Defend the Panthers had just had its offices firebombed; announcing its location might invite another attack. Ringgold made a second poster, sans address, this one showing an armed black family. Defend the Panthers hated that, too. Culture Emails and Alerts- Get the best of Newsweek Culture delivered to your inbox Faith Ringgold outside her studio in Englewood, N.J. on Wednesday. Gioncarlo Valentine for Newsweek The artist wasnt deterred; she was used to rejection, particularly as an African-American woman working in the largely white, male art world. Several years after Defend the Panthers rejected her, she offered her alma mater, the City College of New York, a painting. I want my art in a public place, she remembered thinking. City College thought otherwise: They said no. I said, Well, good. I wont waste my time on them. Her next offer, in 1971, was to the New York Women’s House of Detention, where black revolutionary Angela Davis was being held. The prison agreed to take an enormous painting called For the Womens House, which showed women in traditionally male occupations: police officers, doctors, basketball players. But in the 1988, long after the jail had moved to Rikers Island, the complex changed over from female inmates to male ones. Ringgolds painting seemed out of place given the jails new population. Accordingly, it was covered in white paint. Speak the truth, and you get negative feedback, she jokes now. Despite these disappointments, Ringgold persistedand was rewarded for doing so. She eventually became famous for the childrens book Tar Beach, about growing up in Harlem, as well as others, most notably We Came to America. Ive read both to my daughter without realizing Ringgolds history as an artist. But if the childrens books are popular (and they are, immensely), her political art is essential in another way. Im the one who has to speak up for who I am and what my story is, she says. Im the one gotta say what I was doing in the 70s when other people were keeping quiet. Faith Ringgold outside her studio in Englewood, N.J. on Wednesday. Gioncarlo Valentine for Newsweek I met Ringgold at New Yorks Ace Gallery, a longtime champion of radical artists. In the room is her painting American People Series #20: Die, depicting blacks and whites, men and women, stabbing and shooting one another. In the center of the painting, two small children cower. Last year, the Museum of Modern Art acquired that painting, the surest sign yet that the art world is finally taking Ringgold seriously. It is a gruesome work, but Ringgold defends its gore, because that is her vision of America: During the 60s and 70s, American art was beautifully done, but there was no violence. This summer, Ringgolds second poster for Defend the Panthers will be on display at the Tate Modern, where the new exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power opens on July 12. There are other artists in Soul of a Nation who might disagree with Ringgolds vision of what art should do and be, but thats one of the rewards of a catholic show like this. It allows for artistic disagreements without adjudicating them. Impressively comprehensive in scope, the show contains more than 150 works by over 50 artists. Spanning two decades, from 1963 to 1983, and occupying 12 galley rooms, Soul of a Nation chronicles the hope, violence and despair of the years, roughly, between the age of Kennedy and the age of Reagan. And though planned nearly three years ago, it offers insights into the age of Trump, none of which are especially sunny. American People Series #20: Die (1967) by Faith Ringgold. Oil on canvas, 1828 x 3657 mm. Modern Women’s Fund/The Museum of Modern Art, New York Many works speak to the unfilled promises of the civil rights movement, to the anger that followed as the nation became more conservative under Nixon and Reagan: Ringgolds United States of Attica, a map that chronicles racial and political violence throughout American history; Jeff Donaldsons Wives of Sango, a lush, almost Fauvist portrait of several chic revolutionaries; and Elizabeth Catletts Black Unity sculpture, an abstracted mahogany fist, raised in the Black Power salute. The fist is a rebellion against white racism, as well as the white art establishment. Art relating to the Black Panthers has been the subject of many stand-alone exhibitions, including the Oakland Museum of Arts All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50 last fall and an excellent 2009 show of Emory Douglas prints at New Yorks New Museum. Soul of a Nation does a fine job of chronicling African-American militancy and pride. But there is also, crucially, art that has nothing to do with those topics. Despite the shows seemingly inescapable political overtones, Soul of a Nation successfullyand provocativelyargues that there is more to African-American postwar art than explicit expressions of anger over social injustice. Black Unity (1968) by Elizabeth Catlett. Mahogony wood, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Catlett Mora Family Trust/DACS, London/VAGA, NY Is the job of the black artist different than the job of a white artist? asks Mark Godfrey, one of the shows two curators. (The other is Zoe Whitley, a native of Los Angeles who has long worked as a curator in London.) Whats the role of the black woman artist? Those questions form the basis of a very compelling story. Godfrey knows the Tate Modern cant answer those questions, but the greater risk would be in not asking them. Without belaboring the point, Soul of a Nation makes the case that just as the Italian Renaissance meant one thing to the artists of Siena and another to those of Pisa, the black art of the 1960s had its own competing centers of creativity and influence. The art coming out of Oakland, the California city that gave birth to the Panthers, was, unsurprisingly, the most political. New Yorks Spiral Group was friendlier to abstract works, while Los Angeles was home to what Godfrey calls assemblage aesthetic, best exemplified by the art of Noah Purifoy. In 1971, he created an Environmental Experience that was a reconstruction of increasingly impoverished inner-city life. The explanation attached to the piece played on the ugliest white prejudices: Niggers aint gonna never be nothing. All they want to do is drink and fuck. Trane (1969) by William T. Williams. Studio Museum Harlem. William T. Williams/Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York William T. Williams is one of the New York artists featured in the Tate Modern show. The bespoke septuagenarian lived out many of the tensions inherent in Soul of a Nation, his own career an argument with itself about what black art can (and should) be. And while others flocked to the political debates of the day, he retreated from them, eventually to a studio in Connecticut. He recently showed his work at a commercial art gallery for the first time in more than 40 years, at the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, which has a history of championing African-American artists. We met there on a recent afternoon, amidst the paintings that constitute Things Unknown. A native of North Carolina, Williams went north to study art at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, and later at Yale, where he got a masters degree. In the late 60s, he was part of the Smokehouse Painters, a collective that created murals around Harlem, on tenement walls and neglected public spacesa radical notion at the time, Williams remembers. 21 August 1971, ‘We Shall Survive without a doubt’ (1971) by Emory Douglas. Newspaper, 445 x 580 mm. Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Culver City, USA. Emory Douglas/Art Resource, NY Printmaker Emory Douglas is on one end of the spectrum, his art summoning revolutionaries to the barricades. Williams is on the other. I dont wake up and be preoccupied by being a black person, Williams says. Its a nonissue. Yet he admits that race is inescapable: How do you experience this society without thinking about race? Some of the most intriguing works in Soul of a Nation suggest thats about as realistic as swimming without touching water. Dana Chandlers Fred Hamptons Door 2, a reference to the Black Panther killed in an FBI raid in Chicago, is deceptivethe teal and rhubarb colors suggestive of a summer cottage out of childhood dreams. But the door is riddled with bullet holes. Reverie over. Welcome to America. One of those standouts is Icon for My Man Superman (Superman Never Saved any Black People–Bobby Seale by Barkley L. Hendricks, who died earlier this year. Painted in 1969, it shows a male figure imbued with Black Power cool: the Afro hair-style, the goatee, the aviator shades, arms crossed nonchalantly just below the chest. But he is also wearing a t-shirt with the logo of Superman, beloved superhero of white America. Is Hendricks suggesting that his subject, a Panther perhaps, is also a hero? Maybe that accounts for the serene, unperturbed expression on his lips. Soul of a Nation ends in 1983, with performance art, depicted in videos and photographs, and the show makes a persuasive case for artists like Lorraine OGrady and Senga Nengudi, who were making complex and transgressive works at a time when the art world was favoring the commercial gestures of machismo by artists like Julian Schnabel. Muhammad Ali (1978) by Andy Warhol. Synthetic polymer and silkscreen inks on canvas, 1016 x 1016 mm. The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society, New York and DACS, London After four months at the Tate, the show will travel to the United States: first to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, followed by the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Until then, the Brooklyn Museum is offering a kind of sister exhibition, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 196585. These womenmarginalized by whites for their race and by male black peers for their genderpoured their outrage into art, as some today pour into Twitter. Their works exemplify the old truth about privation, personal or collective, being a catalyst for creativity. (Included is Ringgolds For the Womens House, which was restored after being painted over.) At the Brooklyn exhibition, which was crowded on a recent Saturday afternoon, I lingered in front of a work by Emma Amos, Sandy and Her Husband, painted in 1973. It shows a couple dancing in a living room, hands clasped, eyes closed. He has a hand at the small of Sandys back, which suggests he is familiar with her body. She leans into him, head resting on his shoulder. Sandys race is plainly African-American, while her husbands is difficult to determine. It made me conscious of my desire to know his race, because it is a thing we always want to know in America. But Amos is more concerned with the basic humanity of the scene, two people quietly dancing, two people in love.

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July 4, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Williamsburg vet made mark with African-American tank battalion in WWII – Daily Press

Growing up in 1930s Newport News, Thomas Mangrum Sr. picked up a little skill that would help change his life, both as a soldier and an African-American. He learned Morse code. Credit the Boy Scouts. Mangrum tapped out the dots and dashes on a tin washtub under the tutelage of a scoutmaster who had served in World War I. The lessons stuck, and Mangrum caught the attention of Army brass years later when he signed up to fight in World War II. At a time when many black soldiers were assigned menial tasks, the Army trained Mangrum to transmit coded messages and repair radios. They sent him to England to continue training. Somehow, he ended up unloading trucks. “I tried to tell this captain that I was supposed to go to code school. He said, ‘You get the hell on that truck’ So I got on the truck.” A major eventually intervened, and Mangrum’s military career kicked into high gear. He went from unloading trucks to serving with the 761st Tank Battalion, an African-American unit of tankers that fought its way across northern Europe, earning respect and praise from Gen. George Patton, the legendary U.S. military strategist. The 761st was activated in 1942 at Camp Claiborne, La., one of three black tank battalions that made up the 5th Tank Group. When the unit landed in France in October 1944, the men received a personal welcome from Patton. Author Gina M. DiNicolo, who chronicled the history of the 761st in her book, “The Black Panthers,” included an account of Patton’s welcome in his customary salty-tongued style. “Men, you’re the first Negro tankers to ever fight in the American Army. I would never have asked for you if you weren’t good. I have nothing but the best in my Army. I don’t care what color you are as long as you go up there and kill those Kraut sons of bitches. Everyone has their eyes on you and is expecting great things from you. Most of all, your race is looking forward to you. Don’t let them down and damn you, don’t let me down.” The 761st became the first black armored unit to enter combat on Nov. 8, 1944, according to Joseph E. Wilson Jr., who has also chronicled the unit’s history. It pushed through France and participated in the American counter-offensive after the Battle of the Bulge. Later, it was among the units that helped smash the Siegfried Line, a series of German bunkers, tank traps and fortifications that protected the country’s western flank. The 761st captured seven towns, more than 400 vehicles, 80 heavy weapons and thousands of small arms during this push, according to Wilson. As the tanks advanced, Mangrum transmitted and received coded messages between commanders. He occasionally had to climb into the tanks to fix radios. “We supported the infantry,” he said. “We would go town by town, with the infantry. We did that all through Germany.” As the war in Europe neared its end, the Black Panthers were among the first American units to link up with Soviet troops. Mangrum reflected on his time in battle during the 2015 American Veterans Center conference. The interview was videotaped and is widely available on YouTube. “It was crazy,” he said. “I took a lot of chances. I had a Jeep and electronic gear. It’s a funny thing. When you’re in combat, you go crazy. You see men dying and you’re anxious to get payback.” After the war, Mangrum re-enlisted for a year and ended up in Berlin, where he recorded interviews with former German soldiers. He was allowed occasional breaks, but unlike the other men, he didn’t go out to smoke. “I walked outside and looked for girls,” he said. He did more than look. Mangrum became involved with a German girl and had the family’s blessing to take her back to the states. But she was white, and the Army wouldn’t allow it, he said. He left the Army in 1946, having achieved the rank of staff sergeant. Returning to the U.S., he saw the same signs for segregated drinking fountains and restrooms. After working to gain respect on the battlefield, he realized the homefront hadn’t changed. Blacks were still treated like second-class citizens. But now he tapped a new weapon. Just as learning Morse code had given him a leg up in the military, an education would help him fight the institutional racism of the late 1940s and ’50s. “The secret for a black person to beat the system is to get an education,” he said. “And after you get an education, you can’t carry a chip on your shoulder and you can’t act smarter than that white guy you’re working with. You keep your mouth closed and work as you go along, start saving a little money. That’s the best way to beat the system.” Still, it was a battle. He went to school for electronics and eventually landed a job at Fort Eustis. The Army sent him to school in New Jersey for training on digital equipment. He was the only black student in a class that required him to troubleshoot equipment placed on his desk. When the students took a break, he would return to find more problems with his equipment, courtesy of some white students. “I would be the last one to turn my test in,” he said. “But I didn’t want to stir up anything. The less you said, the better off you are.” As attitudes slowly changed, Mangrum didn’t stay silent forever. Retiring to Mathews County, he noticed the lack of African-American representation in local government and decided to do something about it. He ran for county supervisor, ignoring the predictions of his black friends who said he wouldn’t win. Mangrum served as a county supervisor from 1984 to 1996. Lessig can be reached by phone at 757-247-7821.

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Halle Berry: My Undying Wish Is To Play Angela Davis In A Biopic – HuffPost

Halle Berrys admiration for acclaimed scholar and activist Angela Davis is perhaps as strong as her desire to portray her onscreen. The Oscar-winning actress, who is promoting her new film Kidnap, spoke on the empowerment stage at the Essence Festival on Friday about her experiences in Hollywood as well as those shes still hoping to gain. However, perhaps the highest priority on her list is the opportunity to play Davis in a biopic chronicling her evolution and activism over the years. Theres one woman that Id really like to play before I die, Berry told Essence Editor-in-Chief Vanessa DeLuca onstage before the crowd. Id really love to play Angela Davis. This isnt Berrys first time pitching herself to play Davis, who is now 73-years-old and still outspoken about politics and activism. The actress first expressed her interest in a Jet magazine interview in 2011 and has praised the former Black Panther and revolutionary activist for consistently speaking out against oppression and fighting for justice. Davis work, which highlights the intersection of issues like race, gender, prison and politics, dominates throughout black history and she stands as a leading freedom fighter to this day. Ill probably never get to play it in my life and I am going to be sad until the day I die, but I really want to play Angela Davis badly, she reportedly told Jet magazine at the time. So badly. I just think shes fascinating and I think I would love to tell a story from her perspective about that time in our history and what it was all about with the Black Panthers. In a separate interview with The Guardian from 2015, Berry restated her admiration for Davis and talked about how her desire to play her had become a passion project of sorts for her. [Davis story] has always been a passion of mine, Berry told The Guardian in 2015. Shes just fascinating: the era she lived in, the Black Panthers and all that they stood for, and her connection to it, or not to it. I have a lot of respect for how she lived her life.

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Killmonger Explained: Who Is the Black Panther Villain? – IGN – IGN

Share. Black Panther is finally starring in his own superhero movie next year. But for hardcore fans of the character, half the fun with this new addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe is seeing T’Challa’s nemesis, Erik Killmonger, finally brought to life (and played by Michael B. Jordan). But don’t worry if you’ve never heard of this Marvel villain before. We’re here to break down everything you need to know about the man who would rule Wakanda. The Basics Most superheroes worth their salt have at least one villain who serves as their dark, twisted mirror image, and Killmonger fills that role for Black Panther. This exiled Wakandan native is obsessed with overthrowing King T’Challa and ridding the country of all white imperialist influences. Basically, he’s loyal to Wakanda, but not its ruling family. Killmonger is one of the few men who manages to rival T’Challa in both mental acuity and skill on the battlefield. That’s why Killmongerhas remained a very dangerous thorn in T’Challa’s side over the years, cheating death on more than one occasion. Powers and Abilities Killmonger is a brilliant strategist and scientist who received his PhD from MIT. He’s also a highly skilled martial artist, able to go toe-to-toe with Wakanda’s finest warriors, including Black Panther himself. While Killmonger didn’t originally possess any superhuman powers, he eventually created a synthetic version of the “heart-shaped herb” that gives the Black Panthers their enhanced senses and reflexes. Much like Captain America’s Super-Soldier Serum, this herb also boosts Killmonger’s speed, strength and stamina to the absolute peak of human performance. As if that weren’t enough, Killmonger often wears a specially designed, armored suit that can inject opponents with poison and even fire energy blasts. Plus, he has several trained leopards and a group of fanatical followers capable of using dark magic to resurrect their master. Origin and Background Killmonger was created by writer Don McGregor and artist Rich Buckler and made his debut in 1973’s Jungle Action #6. Early stories established Killmonger as a Wakandan native (originally namedN’Jadaka) whose father was forced to help Ulysses Klaw invade Wakanda and steal its valuable vibranium. After Klaw was defeated andN’Jadaka’s father was killed, he and his family were exiled to America. Ever since moving to America and taking his new name, Killmonger has fostered a deep hatred of the Black Panther. And while T’Challa made overtures to Killmonger by repatriating him and giving him a new home in a Wakandan village, Killmonger has frequently attempted to overthrow his king and end the reign of the Black Panthers. He’s come closer than most, particularly during the course of Christopher Priest’s Black Panther series. One storyline saw the two foes resume their feud, only for Killmonger to defeat T’Challa in ritual combat and claim the Black Panther title for himself. Only the fact that Killmonger’s body couldn’t handle the effects of the heart-shaped herb spared Wakanda from its tyrannical new ruler. Killmonger continues to be one of the greatest threats to Wakanda’s security. Most recently, he orchestrated a war between Wakanda and the neighboring nation of Niganda. Killmonger was killed during the climax of that conflict in 2008’s Black Panther Vol. 4 #38, but a man as smart as T’Challa must know it’s only a matter of time before his nemesis returns. Beyond the Comics Killmonger hasn’t had a prolific career outside of the comics, but it’s safe to assume that will quickly change once he makes his live-action debut in 2018’s Black Panther (played by Michael B. Jordan). For now, Killmonger’s only non-comics appearance came in the 2016 video game LEGO Marvel’s Avengers, where he’s a playable character for those who purchase the Black Panther DLC pack. How the character will fit into the Black Panther’s world of the MCU remains to be seen, but so far it looks as though he’s following similar beats as his comics counterpart as a powerful figure who seeks usurp T’Challa and take the throne for himself. Jesse is a mild-mannered writer for IGN. Allow him to lend a machete to your intellectual thicket by following @jschedeen on Twitter, or Kicksplode on MyIGN.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Considering the current state of play – Amsterdam News

Last week we dealt with the news that once again an African-American man was killed by the actions of the police and will not receive any justice. Philando Castile was shot and killed by a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minn., and the officer who shot him was acquitted of all charges. Although this outcome may seem surprising to many, the death of Black men by police officers has become normalized for Blacks such as myself. This killing is just a recent example of sanctioned violence by the state, where African-American men do not have the legal ability to defend themselves against police officers with loaded firearms. However, there was a time when African-Americans did have the right to carry loaded guns and protect themselves and their respective communities. Beginning in the late 1960s, these actions were seen among members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in California, but received criticism by the government, causing the creation of the Mulford Act. It is important to highlight the history of policies such as the Mulford Act to understand its impact on the epidemic of police brutality on African-American men. The Black Panthers and the Mulford Act The Black Panthers were the voices of persecuted African-Americans during the 1960s and 1970s in the Oakland, Calif., area. During this time, the injustices of Blacks influenced the teaching of state laws and community policing. These initiatives of the Black Panthers incited fear in the minds of the lawmakers in California. The Blacks Panthers openly carried loaded guns to police their respective communities. Governor Ronald Reagan and the California Legislature were not pleased by these actions and created the Mulford Act. When the NRA supported gun control Gun control is a policy issue that tends to receive support from a liberal legislature. However, such was not the case when it came to the Mulford Act, which was backed by the NRA, written by California Republican Assemblyman Don Mulford, and signed into law by then California Governor Reagan. This support is not surprising, because the events of the Watts Riots of 1966 and rise of the Black Panthers influenced the shift of the legislature to promote gun control for California citizens. These actions caused many to believe that the Mulford Act was created to stop Blacks from openly carrying loaded guns. However, the Panthers were indeed following the law of California before the creation of the Mulford Act. The gun laws of California stated that you could carry a loaded gun out on the street so long it was registered, not concealed and not pointed in a threatening manner. Yet, the California Legislature perceived these actions of the Black Panthers as being intimidating, when they were seen carrying guns, and changed the law to maintain their safety and restrict their actions. The Mulford Act and our current political climate The negation of African-Americans within the Mulford Act demonstrates the ability of the state to decide who takes part in the decision-making process when it comes to the creation of laws. These actions are evident within the federal government today. Recently, the Department of Justice reported that it will not look into police accountability measures in communities plagued by police brutality, such as Baltimore and Baton Rouge. Yet, police accountability actions were called upon by members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Once again, it is not surprising that state-sanctioned violence is occurring today in the form of police brutality toward African-American men and others. This violence is indeed sanctioned by an arm of the state, the police department. In the current political climate in which we are living, it would not be a surprise if the federal government created a policy that is equivalent to the Mulford Act. Potentially, maybe the future bill will limit the power of movements such as Black Lives Matter. Let us not forget that the Mulford Act was signed into law by President Reagan, when he was governor in California. Like Reagan, President Trump called himself, the candidate of law and order. Walter A. Jean-Jacques is a graduate student at University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice. He is an incoming law student at the University of Notre Dame Law School in Notre Dame. Contact him at walter.jeanjacques@gmail.com.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed


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