Archive for the ‘Black Panthers’ Category

ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 7 – Video



ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 7
ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 7 Finally got some paint on it.

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ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 7 – Video

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CNN’s Cooper Grills Black Panthers over Racism, ‘Uncle Toms’ – Video



CNN's Cooper Grills Black Panthers over Racism, 'Uncle Toms'

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CNN’s Cooper Grills Black Panthers over Racism, ‘Uncle Toms’ – Video

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New Black Panthers At Philadelphia Voting Center2654 – Video



New Black Panthers At Philadelphia Voting Center2654

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New Black Panthers At Philadelphia Voting Center2654 – Video

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ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 8 – Video



ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 8
ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 8 I Got Alex To Apply The Decals, He Did A Fantastic Job With These Difficult Decals.

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ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 8 – Video

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The Black Panthers

The Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCDO) was established by Stokely Carmichael in Alabama in 1964. This organization later changed its name to the Black Panther Party. In October 1966 Bobby Seale and Huey Newton formed the Black Panther Party (BPP) in Oakland, California. They named the new organization after the emblem adopted by the Lowndes County Freedom Organization.

The Black Panthers were initially formed to protect local communities from police brutality and racism. The group also ran medical clinics and provided free food to school children. Within a couple of years the Black Panthers in Oakland were feeding over 10,000 children every day before they went to school.

Prominent members of the Black Panthers included Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, Fred Hampton, Fredrika Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, Kathleen Cleaver, David Hilliard, Angela Davis, Bobby Hutton and Elaine Brown.

The Black Panthers had chapters in several major cities and had a membership of over 2,000. Harassed by the police, members became involved in several shoot-outs. This included an exchange of fire between Panthers and the police at Oakland on 28th October, 1967. Huey Newton was wounded and while in hospital was charged with killing a police officer. The following year he was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter.

On 6th April, 1968 eight BPP members, including Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Hutton and David Hilliard, were travelling in two cars when they were ambushed by the Oakland police. Cleaver and Hutton ran for cover and found themselves in a basement surrounded by police. The building was fired upon for over an hour. When a tear-gas canister was thrown into the basement the two men decided to surrender. Cleaver was wounded in the leg and so Hutton said he would go first. When he left the building with his hands in the air he was shot twelve times by the police and was killed instantly.

In November 1968 Fred Hampton founded the Chicago chapter of the Black Panther Party. He immediately established a community service program. This included the provision of free breakfasts for schoolchildren and a medical clinic that did not charge patients for treatment. Hampton also taught political education classes and instigated a community control of police project.

One of Hampton’s greatest achievements was to persuade Chicago’s most powerful street gangs to stop fighting against each other. In May 1969 Hampton held a press conference where he announced a nonaggression pact between the gangs and the formation of what he called a “rainbow coalition” (a multiracial alliance of black, Puerto Rican, and poor youths).

The leaders of the Black Panthers were influenced by the ideas expressed by Malcolm X in the final months of his life. The Panthers therefore argued for international working class unity and supported joint action with white revolutionary groups. The Black Panthers eventually developed into a Marxist revolutionary group.

The activities of the Black Panthers came to the attention of J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. Hoover described the Panthers as “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country” and in November 1968 ordered the FBI to employ “hard-hitting counter-intelligence measures to cripple the Black Panthers”.

In 1968 Bobby Seale was charged with inciting riots during the Democratic Party National Convention. When Seale repeatedly interrupted court proceedings the judge ordered him to be bound and gagged. Seale was found guilty and sentenced to four years in prison for 16 counts of contempt of court.

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The Black Panthers

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snopes.com: Black Panthers and Hillary Clinton

Home

Search Send Comments What’s New Hottest 25 Legends Odd News Glossary FAQ

Status: False.

Example: [Collected on the Internet, 1999]

Back in 1969 a group of Black Panthers decided that a Black man named Alex Rackley needed to die. Rackley was a fellow Panther suspected of disloyalty.

Rackley was first tied to a chair. Safely immobilized his “friends” tortured him for hours by, among other things, pouring boiling water on him.

When they got tired of torturing Rackley Black Panther member Warren Kimbro took Mr. Rackley’s outside and put a bullet in his head. Rackley’s body was found floating in a river about 25 miles north of New Haven, Conn.

Maybe at this point you’re curious as to what happened to these Black Panthers. Well, in 1977, that’s only eight years later, only one of the killers was still in jail. The shooter, Warren Kimbro, managed to get a scholarship to Harvard. He later became an assistant dean at Eastern Connecticut State College.

Isn’t that something? As a 60’s radical you can pump a bullet into someone’s head, and years later, in the same State, you can be an assistant college dean! Only in America!

Ericka Huggins was the lady who served the Panthers by boiling the water for Mr. Rackley’s torture. Some years later Ms. Huggins was elected to a California school board.

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snopes.com: Black Panthers and Hillary Clinton

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Black Panther

Black panthers are powerful, intelligent, and exotic animals. People are fascinated by these animals. Many books, movies, and articles have the black panther as a subject. Numerous American sport teams include the word Panther in their names. Many commercial products are associated with the black panther. This site is divided into three major parts as follows:

Black Panther Animal This is the core of the Black Panther Wonderland. You can find every piece of information about the black panther – the animal, such as classification, description, behavior, habitat, life cycle, cubs, and endangered status.

Black Panther Pictures This section includes various types of visual images about black panthers, such as photos, tattoos, artworks, and clip art.

Black Panther Community Enjoy your time here for a virtual tour of the Black Panther Wonderland. You can use the navigation menus on the left and bottom to find the major sections on this site. Other than the information about animal itself, you will find more information about the black panther in the resource section. If you get lost, you can use the site map to find your way around or you can use the search box at the top to search this site or the entire internet. If you are tired or overwhelmed by extensive amount of information, please take a break and have some fun by playing some games on this site.

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Black Panther

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Retired Carbondale police officer talks about Black Panther attacks

CARBONDALE, IL (KFVS) –

The shootout between Carbondale police and members of the Black Panthers on November 12, 1970 was just the final note in a long battle.

Larry Hillof Makanda joined the Carbondale Police Department in November of 1967 as a young veteran returning from the battlefields of Vietnam.

Hillrecalls how things changed in Carbondale after the Black Panthers arrived in town.

“Late ’68 and that’s when it started. No one had shot and anybody until they got here,” Hill said. “We hadn’t shot at anybody and no body had shot at us.”

“They didn’t make any bones about who they were,” he said. “They walked around with their berets, and their black jackets and their guns with their bandoliers. They let people know who they were. They put out a little newspaper. We knew who they were.”

Hill said the attacks on his fellow officers and himself carried on for more than a year and half. He remembers one shooting just a month before the shootout on November 12.

“They hit two of our officers and hit one pretty badly. The two Panthers had used a stolen vehicle. And the officers tried to make a traffic stop. When the two guys in the car saw the squad car, they came out shooting a semi-automatic carbine. And just blew the squad car away,” Hill said. “I was the first officer on the scene and Larry Davis had been hit in the leg. And he was on the ground calling for help.”

“We had quite a few cars in the area there around South Washington,” he continued. “But they got away. And then the gun they were using turned up a month later in the Panther shootout. It was matched by ballistics.”

In the early morning hours of November 12, just past 5 a.m. that morning the call came out over the police radios about a shooting on the SIU campus. Two of their officers had been shot while checking on a vehicle sitting on the railroad tracks at Grand and Illinois Avenue.

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Retired Carbondale police officer talks about Black Panther attacks

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H.S. roundup: Milton’s Preisch wins 100th match

MILTON A long list of accomplished wrestlers have pulled on the singlet and strapped on the headgear for the Milton Black Panthers, and senior 170-pounder Ryan Preisch put his name on that list.

Preisch became the 14th Milton wrestler to reach 100 career wins on Thursday as the Black Panthers rolled to a 59-18 Heartland-I victory over Williamsport.

Preisch, who is committed to wrestle at Lehigh next year, reached his milestone by pinning Mikale Guinter in 32 seconds to improve to 6-0 on the season. He is 100-18 in his career.

The Black Panthers (1-2, 1-1 HAC-I) picked up a total of seven pins against the Millionaires (0-2, 0-2), as well as one technical fall.

Also getting falls for Milton were Dillian Sweeley (132), Taylor Houtz (138), Zack Bennett (152), Gage Heller (182), Brandon Stokes (195) and Nevin Aeppli (220).

Midd-West 51, Shamokin 15

COAL TOWNSHIP With a couple of double forfeits mixed in, the Mustangs won their first five matches by pin to cruise to the HAC-I victory.

Corey Stauffer got the first pin at 113 pounds for Midd-West in 2 minutes, 56 seconds.

From there, Dalton Klingler got a pin at 120 before other pins came from Michael Ettinger (132), Brody McGlaughlin (138), Tanner Ebright (145), Jerry Lewis (182), Alex Lieberman (195) and Adam Zerby (285).

BOYS BASKETBALL

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H.S. roundup: Milton’s Preisch wins 100th match

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ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 7 – Video




ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 7 ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 7 Finally got some paint on it. By: ChrisandAlexModeling

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CNN’s Cooper Grills Black Panthers over Racism, ‘Uncle Toms’ – Video




CNN's Cooper Grills Black Panthers over Racism,'Uncle Toms' By: moujdidi med

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New Black Panthers At Philadelphia Voting Center2654 – Video




New Black Panthers At Philadelphia Voting Center2654 By: wondoloskig21287

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ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS "Black Panthers" Build Part 8 – Video




ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 8 ITALERI 1:48 Tornado IDS “Black Panthers” Build Part 8 I Got Alex To Apply The Decals, He Did A Fantastic Job With These Difficult Decals. By: ChrisandAlexModeling

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The Black Panthers

The Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCDO) was established by Stokely Carmichael in Alabama in 1964. This organization later changed its name to the Black Panther Party. In October 1966 Bobby Seale and Huey Newton formed the Black Panther Party (BPP) in Oakland, California. They named the new organization after the emblem adopted by the Lowndes County Freedom Organization. The Black Panthers were initially formed to protect local communities from police brutality and racism. The group also ran medical clinics and provided free food to school children. Within a couple of years the Black Panthers in Oakland were feeding over 10,000 children every day before they went to school. Prominent members of the Black Panthers included Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, Fred Hampton, Fredrika Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, Kathleen Cleaver, David Hilliard, Angela Davis, Bobby Hutton and Elaine Brown. The Black Panthers had chapters in several major cities and had a membership of over 2,000. Harassed by the police, members became involved in several shoot-outs. This included an exchange of fire between Panthers and the police at Oakland on 28th October, 1967. Huey Newton was wounded and while in hospital was charged with killing a police officer. The following year he was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter. On 6th April, 1968 eight BPP members, including Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Hutton and David Hilliard, were travelling in two cars when they were ambushed by the Oakland police. Cleaver and Hutton ran for cover and found themselves in a basement surrounded by police. The building was fired upon for over an hour. When a tear-gas canister was thrown into the basement the two men decided to surrender. Cleaver was wounded in the leg and so Hutton said he would go first. When he left the building with his hands in the air he was shot twelve times by the police and was killed instantly. In November 1968 Fred Hampton founded the Chicago chapter of the Black Panther Party. He immediately established a community service program. This included the provision of free breakfasts for schoolchildren and a medical clinic that did not charge patients for treatment. Hampton also taught political education classes and instigated a community control of police project. One of Hampton’s greatest achievements was to persuade Chicago’s most powerful street gangs to stop fighting against each other. In May 1969 Hampton held a press conference where he announced a nonaggression pact between the gangs and the formation of what he called a “rainbow coalition” (a multiracial alliance of black, Puerto Rican, and poor youths). The leaders of the Black Panthers were influenced by the ideas expressed by Malcolm X in the final months of his life. The Panthers therefore argued for international working class unity and supported joint action with white revolutionary groups. The Black Panthers eventually developed into a Marxist revolutionary group. The activities of the Black Panthers came to the attention of J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. Hoover described the Panthers as “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country” and in November 1968 ordered the FBI to employ “hard-hitting counter-intelligence measures to cripple the Black Panthers”. In 1968 Bobby Seale was charged with inciting riots during the Democratic Party National Convention. When Seale repeatedly interrupted court proceedings the judge ordered him to be bound and gagged. Seale was found guilty and sentenced to four years in prison for 16 counts of contempt of court.

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snopes.com: Black Panthers and Hillary Clinton

Home Search Send Comments What’s New Hottest 25 Legends Odd News Glossary FAQ Status: False. Example: [Collected on the Internet, 1999] Back in 1969 a group of Black Panthers decided that a Black man named Alex Rackley needed to die. Rackley was a fellow Panther suspected of disloyalty. Rackley was first tied to a chair. Safely immobilized his “friends” tortured him for hours by, among other things, pouring boiling water on him. When they got tired of torturing Rackley Black Panther member Warren Kimbro took Mr. Rackley’s outside and put a bullet in his head. Rackley’s body was found floating in a river about 25 miles north of New Haven, Conn. Maybe at this point you’re curious as to what happened to these Black Panthers. Well, in 1977, that’s only eight years later, only one of the killers was still in jail. The shooter, Warren Kimbro, managed to get a scholarship to Harvard. He later became an assistant dean at Eastern Connecticut State College. Isn’t that something? As a 60’s radical you can pump a bullet into someone’s head, and years later, in the same State, you can be an assistant college dean! Only in America! Ericka Huggins was the lady who served the Panthers by boiling the water for Mr. Rackley’s torture. Some years later Ms. Huggins was elected to a California school board.

Fair Usage Law

December 20, 2013   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Black Panther

Black panthers are powerful, intelligent, and exotic animals. People are fascinated by these animals. Many books, movies, and articles have the black panther as a subject. Numerous American sport teams include the word Panther in their names. Many commercial products are associated with the black panther. This site is divided into three major parts as follows: Black Panther Animal This is the core of the Black Panther Wonderland. You can find every piece of information about the black panther – the animal, such as classification, description, behavior, habitat, life cycle, cubs, and endangered status. Black Panther Pictures This section includes various types of visual images about black panthers, such as photos, tattoos, artworks, and clip art. Black Panther Community Enjoy your time here for a virtual tour of the Black Panther Wonderland. You can use the navigation menus on the left and bottom to find the major sections on this site. Other than the information about animal itself, you will find more information about the black panther in the resource section. If you get lost, you can use the site map to find your way around or you can use the search box at the top to search this site or the entire internet. If you are tired or overwhelmed by extensive amount of information, please take a break and have some fun by playing some games on this site.

Fair Usage Law

December 20, 2013   Posted in: Black Panthers  Comments Closed

Retired Carbondale police officer talks about Black Panther attacks

CARBONDALE, IL (KFVS) – The shootout between Carbondale police and members of the Black Panthers on November 12, 1970 was just the final note in a long battle. Larry Hillof Makanda joined the Carbondale Police Department in November of 1967 as a young veteran returning from the battlefields of Vietnam. Hillrecalls how things changed in Carbondale after the Black Panthers arrived in town. “Late ’68 and that’s when it started. No one had shot and anybody until they got here,” Hill said. “We hadn’t shot at anybody and no body had shot at us.” “They didn’t make any bones about who they were,” he said. “They walked around with their berets, and their black jackets and their guns with their bandoliers. They let people know who they were. They put out a little newspaper. We knew who they were.” Hill said the attacks on his fellow officers and himself carried on for more than a year and half. He remembers one shooting just a month before the shootout on November 12. “They hit two of our officers and hit one pretty badly. The two Panthers had used a stolen vehicle. And the officers tried to make a traffic stop. When the two guys in the car saw the squad car, they came out shooting a semi-automatic carbine. And just blew the squad car away,” Hill said. “I was the first officer on the scene and Larry Davis had been hit in the leg. And he was on the ground calling for help.” “We had quite a few cars in the area there around South Washington,” he continued. “But they got away. And then the gun they were using turned up a month later in the Panther shootout. It was matched by ballistics.” In the early morning hours of November 12, just past 5 a.m. that morning the call came out over the police radios about a shooting on the SIU campus. Two of their officers had been shot while checking on a vehicle sitting on the railroad tracks at Grand and Illinois Avenue.

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H.S. roundup: Milton’s Preisch wins 100th match

MILTON A long list of accomplished wrestlers have pulled on the singlet and strapped on the headgear for the Milton Black Panthers, and senior 170-pounder Ryan Preisch put his name on that list. Preisch became the 14th Milton wrestler to reach 100 career wins on Thursday as the Black Panthers rolled to a 59-18 Heartland-I victory over Williamsport. Preisch, who is committed to wrestle at Lehigh next year, reached his milestone by pinning Mikale Guinter in 32 seconds to improve to 6-0 on the season. He is 100-18 in his career. The Black Panthers (1-2, 1-1 HAC-I) picked up a total of seven pins against the Millionaires (0-2, 0-2), as well as one technical fall. Also getting falls for Milton were Dillian Sweeley (132), Taylor Houtz (138), Zack Bennett (152), Gage Heller (182), Brandon Stokes (195) and Nevin Aeppli (220). Midd-West 51, Shamokin 15 COAL TOWNSHIP With a couple of double forfeits mixed in, the Mustangs won their first five matches by pin to cruise to the HAC-I victory. Corey Stauffer got the first pin at 113 pounds for Midd-West in 2 minutes, 56 seconds. From there, Dalton Klingler got a pin at 120 before other pins came from Michael Ettinger (132), Brody McGlaughlin (138), Tanner Ebright (145), Jerry Lewis (182), Alex Lieberman (195) and Adam Zerby (285). BOYS BASKETBALL

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