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August 13, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Crystal Bridges to Debut ‘Art in the Age of Black Power’ Exhibit … – Arkansas Business Online

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville on Tuesday announced its exhibitions for 2018, including the U.S. debut of “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power.”

Also appearing next year will be the Crystal Bridges-organized exhibitions “Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art” and “Native North America.”

“Our 2018 exhibitions complement the story of American art shared through our permanent collection,” said Rod Bigelow, the museum’s executive director and chief diversity and inclusion officer.

The museum called “Soul of a Nation,” organized by the Tate Modern in London and debuting in the United States at Crystal Bridges, “a look at how American culture was reshaped through the work of Black artists during the tumultuous 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s.”

Crystal Bridges is one of only two American venues to host this exhibition. Following its debut at Crystal Bridges, the exhibition travels to the Brooklyn Museum in New York.

The exhibit will feature artworks by more than 60 black artists, including Romare Bearden, Melvin Edwards, Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, Charles White, Alvin Loving, Alma Thomas and Lorraine O’Grady.

And the art includes a wide range of styles and media, including painting, photography, fashion, sculpture and mixed media work, as well as street art in the form of murals and posters by artists of the AfriCOBRA collective, the graphic art created by Emory Douglas for The Black Panther newspaper and black feminist art.

“Soul of a Nation opens a window into the heart of the Black Power movement in all of its beauty, pride, power, and aspiration,” the museum said.

Soul of a Nation runs Feb. 3 through April 23, 2018.

As for the Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit, Crystal Bridges is building on its collection of major works by O’Keeffe including Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1 and Radiator Building-Night, New York and is bringing together a selection of O’Keeffe’s most important works.

Alongside the works by O’Keeffe, the exhibition will display artworks by emerging contemporary artists “that evoke, investigate, and expand upon O’Keeffe’s artistic legacy,” the museum said. “This exhibition demonstrates the continuing power of O’Keeffe’s work as a touchstone for contemporary art.”

These contemporary artists include Sharona Eliassaf, Monica Kim Garza, Loie Hollowell, Molly Larkey and Matthew Ronay.

This exhibit will run May 26 through Sept. 3, 2018.

The exhibit “Native North America,” which will be on display Oct. 6, 2018, through Jan. 7, 2019, is the first exhibition to chart the development of contemporary indigenous art from the United States and Canada from the 1960s to the present, the museum said.

The exhibition will present about 75 works of art by important native artists such as Kay WalkingStick, Carl Beam, Fritz Scholder, Andrea Carlson and Kent Monkman and features works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, videos, sculpture and sound, installation and performance art.

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August 8, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

The original Black Ranger talks ‘Power Rangers,’ his thoughts on the … – AiPT! Comics

There have been many Power Rangers over the course of 25 years but precious few can say they were a part of the first crew. I was able to chat with Walter Jones, who played the original Black Power Ranger Zack Taylor in season 1 of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. Jones was able to be a part of something new that changed pop culture forever. Even if you werent a fan of the series, when someone mentions Power Rangers, you know exactly what theyre talking about. I talked with Jones about the original series, the 2017 Power Rangers film, and a new film hes a part of featuring an impressive cast of original Power Rangers from previous seasons.

AiPT!:Did you know anything about the original Sentai series prior to auditioning?

Walter Jones: Ihad never seen the show or had any idea about it.

AiPT!:Was Zack the Black Ranger the role you auditioned for? Or was that the role given to you?

Walter Jones:I auditioned for the character Zack. I had no idea what color Ranger I would be. When I saw the costumes the first time I wanted the Red or the Black. I was happy to get the black costume.

AiPT!:Did you ever think that Power Rangers would last as long as it has?

Walter Jones: I never thought that Power Rangers would still be talked about 24 years later, much less that there would be new merchandise about the original series.

AiPT!:What did you enjoy most about the new Power Rangers movie?

Walter Jones:RJ Cyler was super captivating as Billy. I enjoyed all the actors! Great effects.

AiPT!:Was there anything you didnt like about it? And was there anything you would have changed about the film?

Walter Jones:[It had] no Hip Hop Kido! It was a major motivator for so many fans to explore physical arts, dancing, gymnastics, parkour, etc My character was the only character with that ability. It should have been included in some fashion.

AiPT!:Do you ever get tired of talking about Power Rangers? Is there any moment where you just arent in the mood for it?

Walter Jones:Talking about Rangers doesnt bother me. Im proud of its legacy. Of course, theres a time and place for everything.

AiPT!:One of my favorite comedies of all time is Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. While watching this film I noticed that you made a cameo as an angry fan. How did you come across that role?

Walter Jones:I was looping (doing voice over) on the film and the producers decided they wanted to add that part. I auditioned and got it!

AiPT!:Who was the brain behind The Order movie that you and a fantastic cast of former Power Rangers are a part of?

Walter Jones:David Fielding and Karan Ashley are the brains of the order. Its going to be a very exciting project!

AiPT!:When can we see the film and how can fans help support it?

Walter Jones:The Order should be out next year. We still have production to complete.

AiPT!:Youre about to go on a dangerous mission but can only take one other Power Ranger from any season with you. Who do you take?

Walter Jones:The one solid leader has always been Red. Gotta go with the tried and true!

Walter Jones left the Power Ranger series after season 1 and despite never making a return as his character, he did come back to voice various antagonists. Jones was the very first actor to do voice work for any character other than a Ranger (mainly for monsters or villains) on a Power Rangers show after having a role as a Ranger himself. Jones to this day is still acting, dancing and makes Con appearances all over, meeting and greeting the Power Rangers fans that he helped create.

David Fieldinginterviewmighty morphin power rangersThe OrderWalter Jones

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Revolt, Resistance and Black Power: Lessons From 50 Years of Righteous Struggle – Lasentinel

Part 3. Even as a central lesson of the 60s is the indispensability and obligation of struggle, it is also a central and sustained teaching and lesson of Kawaida that regardless of the other battles we must and might wage, the first and continuing battle is the battle is to win the hearts and minds of our people. And as we said in the 60s and constantly reaffirm, unless we win this battle, we cannot win any other. Thus, we of Us called for a radical revolution in views and values, an overturning of our negro selves and recovering the African within us.

We said that inside every negro, there is a Black person, an African, striving to come into being and we must wage a daily struggle to bring into being and sustain the best of what it means to be African and human in the world. For we are American by habit and African by choice. And we must choose every day to be African and to embody the instruction of our ancestors that African means excellence in how we understand and assert ourselves in the world.

Thus, we maintained, following Min. Malcolm, that we needed a cultural revolution that precedes, makes possible and sustains the political revolution. Clearly, we need to wage the political struggle to free ourselves, but we cant really free ourselves, if we dont be ourselves, if we deny, diminish or deform who we are as African persons and an African people. And likewise, we cant fully be ourselves, if we dont free ourselves and create space for us to come into the fullness of ourselves as persons and a people. So, we wage a simultaneous double struggle, stressing each aspect in its turn. Again, following Malcolm, we said We are a nation within a nation, a cultural nation striving to come into political existence, a people seeking power over the space it occupies, over its destiny and daily lives.

In the call for peace and security, we must not join or mimic the unthoughtful or unjust who talk of peace without justice, a submission to evil and injustice for the sake of calm or the comfort of the ruling race/class. We must refuse and reject calls for a repressive peace imposed by police violence or what Frantz Fanon calls the peaceful violence of the system which uses institutional violence without the show of weapons. Indeed, the policies and practices of its structured domination, deprivation and degradation is daily violence against the body, heart, mind and soul.

It is the violence of a degrading and deficient educational system, the denial of access to affordable and adequate housing, healthcare and employment, and the means to make a living and a decent and good life. It is the violence of the media, making us into self-mutilating mascots, blackish caricatures of humanity, and turning our social savaging and suffering into entertainment for the ruling race. And it is the violence of displacing our people from historical living spaces, replacing them with Whites, dispersing us to the winds, destroying community and centralized sites of culture, and calling it gentrification to camouflage its race and class character and the human casualties and social chaos and ruin it causes and leaves in its wake.

So, we must continue to rise up and resist in righteous anger these and all the other evils and injustices of oppression and White supremacy. For what do we have to lose except the little space that has been left for us to praise them for their oppression in this citadel of White wealth and power, this self-declared democracy of Whiteness and wealth? And as we continue to rise up in righteous and relentless struggle, let us also remember this lesson also born and reaffirmed in struggle: know that we are our own liberators. Indeed, the oppressor is responsible for our oppression, but we are responsible for our liberation.

Another lesson we bring from the 50 years of righteous and relentless struggle is the important role art (creative production, creativity activity) can play in the struggle. Author and literary critic, Larry Neal, noted that In Watts after the Rebellion, Maulana Karenga welded the Black Arts Movement into a cohesive ideology which owed much to LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka). Neal speaks here of the influence Kawaida had on the works of not only Baraka, but also on a wide range of artists, i.e., Haki Madhubuti, Kalamu ya Salaam, Val Gray Ward and the artists of Kuumba Theatre, later Gwen Brooks and August Wilson and others. Kawaida contended that Black art is not simply art for arts sake, but art for our peoples sake, that it must raise and praise the people, expose and attack the oppressor and open new horizons for our people to be themselves, free themselves and come into the fullness of themselves. In a word, art must be functional, collective and committing.

From our work with Dr. Harry Edwards, chair of the Olympic Project for Human Rights and organizer of the Black Olympic Boycott, we also learned the lesson of the important role Black athletes can play by taking a stand and advancing the interests of the struggle. This is clearly exemplified in the draft resistance by Muhammad Ali, 1966; Tommy Smiths and John Carlos Black Power demonstration at the Olympics in Mexico,1968; Arthur Ashes organization of athletes against apartheid, 1973; and more recently the Black football team members at the University of Missouri who supported the students demands and struggles against campus racism, and Colin Kaepernicks demonstration against the oppression and violence against our people.

Important also was the resistance of Black athletes like Jim Brown, Craig Hodges, and Curt Flood who resisted dehumanizing trading practices and especially Floods struggle which opened the way for free agency and bargaining rights in the sports world and against brutal capitalist profit-making practices. They all paid a heavy price for the sacrifice and struggle and offer a model for all others who decide to join them.

It is Min. Malcolm again who taught us that we are not to act responsibly in the eyes and interests of our oppressor, but be responsible to and acting responsibly for our people. Indeed, we are to act outrageously irresponsible in the eyes and evaluation of the oppressor. For as Malcolm taught, to be responsible in their unjust, immoral and undemocratic judgment is to betray the trust of our people. For we do not come to the battleground to concede, but to confront; not to be silenced and sidelined, but seize the center and speak on behalf of our people, especially, Malcolm says, the downtrodden and dissatisfied. And we are not to compromise at the expense of our people, but to hold the line, build united fronts, rebuild the overarching Movement, fight the good and victorious fight, and lay the basis for a larger broader radical struggle to seriously transform society in the interest of freedom, justice, human good and the well-being of the world.

Dr. Maulana Karenga, Professor and Chair of Africana Studies, California State University-Long Beach; Executive Director, African American Cultural Center (Us); Creator of Kwanzaa; and author of Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture, The Message and Meaning of Kwanzaa: Bringing Good Into the World and Essays on Struggle: Position and Analysis, ww.AfricanAmericanCulturalCenter-LA.org; ww.OfficialKwanzaaWebsite.org; www.MaulanaKarenga.org.

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August 3, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Follow up ‘Detroit’ by streaming these other Black Power movies – Metro US

Summers the time to turn off your brain. But not this weekend. Dropped like an H-bomb into the glut of dumb superhero movies and light entertainments, Detroit, Kathryn Bigelows follow-up to Zero Dark Thirty, brings the 1967 Detroit riot to the multiplex. The focus is largely on the Algiers Motel incident, in which white cops tortured 12 innocent people 10 black, two white leaving three black men dead. Spoiler: They were acquitted. Its a horrific chapter in American race relations, and a stark reminder that not much has changed.

But why stop there? Continue your deep dive into the Civil Rights Era and the Black Power movement online. These films are ready to stream:

I Am Not Your Negro (Amazon Prime) O.J.: Made in America won the Best Documentary Oscar this year, and it deserved it. But it was a photo finish. It could have easily gone to 13th (see below) or Raoul Pecks look at the work of James Baldwin. The latter is no mere 101 primer; think of it as a film essay, which takes the authors unfailingly insightful books on race with heavy use of 1976s film-centric The Devil Finds Work and weaves them with images of Black Lives Matter protests and the like, showing how his work, sadly, refuses to become irrelevant.

13th (Netflix Instant) The era summoned by Detroit only takes up a decent chunk of Ava DuVernays fiery doc. Then again, she Hoovers up the whole of the American black experience since the Emancipation Proclamation. What she finds isnt pretty: Slavery may have ended, but it never really went away. There was Jim Crow, the assault on Black Panthers and the Prison Industrial Complex, which found another way to round up the black populace. Its an alternate history of America thats also the correct one.

Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (Netflix Instant) History is written by the victors, and the story told about the Black Panthers has often been one of menace a violent, gun-toting scourge, their images still used to frighten White America. Stanley Nelsons doc tries to correct all that. The real story is far more complicated, and filled with far more good than bad. He rounds up former members to set the record straight, showing all the good they did for troubled and ignored communities, all the positive vibes they gave a people demonized and menaced by white society.

Black Panthers (FilmStruck) You could also watch the real deal, from the era itself. Filmed in 1969 by the great and peerlessly curious French filmmaker Agnes Varda, this short hangs at a rally to free jailed member Huey P. Newton thats part barnburner, part picnic. Varda makes sure to give the female Panthers, like Kathleen Cleaver, as much screentime as the men, and you get to see the peaceful yet passionate side the media of the time would never show.

The Trials of Muhammad Ali (Netflix Instant) At the height of his celebrity, Cassius Clay decided on two things: He didnt want to be known by what he deemed his white name, and he didnt want to fight in Vietnam. So he converted to Islam, changed his name and became a conscientious objector. This doc zeroes in on his most tumultuous and heroic period, when one of the great shit-talkers put his money where his mouth was, almost destroying his career but for the right cause. If you want more, check out Michael Manns Ali, starring Will Smith, which was just added to Hulu; it, too, sees one of our greatest pugilists through a righteous Black Power perspective.

What Happened, Miss Simone? (Netflix Instant) Nina Simone had plenty of demons, but one thing that definitely got right was her commitment to Black Power. Her political songs didnt just slip real talk into the mainstream; they were five-alarm bonfires, meant to burn everything down. Sometimes she went too far, but only in that she burned personal bridges she never should have torched (including the one with her daughter). This doc grants her the complicated portrait she deserved while claiming her for the sight of justice.

Fruitvale Station (Netflix Instant) Detroit is the true story of white cops who killed innocent black men and didnt go to jail. It arrives only four years after another film about the same thing: the one about Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan), the young man whose shouting match with cops led to his assassination. Dont watch this back-to-back with Detroit; there arent enough tissues in this bad, bad world.

The Spook Who Sat by the Door (YouTube) Its not the ideal way to see it, but if you dont catch it on YouTube, you might not believe a movie like this could have ever been made. In 1973, as Blaxploitation was on the rise, Ivan Dixon, formerly of Hogans Heroes, used his clout entertaining the masses on TV to make a film of Sam Greenlees novel, in which a black nationalist quietly works his way up through the CIA, only so he can dismantle the government from within. Its no-holds-barred filmmaking an almost plotless account of Civil Rights protestors taking on the Man and winning. But thats enough well, that, and a killer score by Herbie Hancock.

Follow Matt Prigge on Twitter @mattprigge

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Follow up ‘Detroit’ by streaming these other Black Power movies – Metro US

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August 2, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

‘It’s not too late to change’ says ex Black Power leader – Stuff.co.nz

BAYLEY MOOR

Last updated11:35, August 2 2017

BAYLEY MOOR/STUFF

Jay Hepi, Pastor Robbie Johnson, Renata Beazley and Steven King.

Renata Beazley was once the president of the Black Power in Kaikohe, now he has turned his back on a life of violence and drugs,thanks to a programme tackling men’s ‘inner demons’.

Man Up is a nationwide non-profit organisation, providingfree programmes encouraging men to change for the better.

Since joining Man Up in Auckland, then Whangarei and now Kaikohe, Beazley, 34, says he is experiencing his longest stint out of prison (11 months) in his entire adult life.

“I’ve been to jail 37 times and have 111 convictions and the programmes [in prison] for drug treatment and violence prevention were good, but they were there to tick boxes,” Beazley says.

“Man Up has been life changing, it’s got to the root of what I’m dealing with. I’m dealing with my inner demons, understanding them and striving to be better.

“I no longer have drugs in my house and I have a better relationship with my partner and kids.”

His message for others: “It’s not too late to change.”

Whangarei pastor Robbie Johnson is facilitating the Kaikohe programme, which 20 men have attended since it’s launch in July, with men still welcome to join.

“We don’t say harden up, we say open up,” Johnson says.

“It’s creating an environment where men can talk about their issues behind closed doors without fear of being judged for their past.”

While Man Up aims to help men overcome family violence, anger, depression, and addiction among other issues, Johnson says these are the “fruit” of root problems.

“We don’t see gang members, we see the heart of the person. They realise they weren’t born a drug addict, or a murderer, they have picked up baggage and become that.”

There will be a graduation at the end of the 15 weeks of sessions, but Johnson hopes the Man Up ‘movement’ will continue.

While Johnson says it is a faith-based programme, you don’t need to belong to a church to attend.

Ex Mongrel Mob member and convicted murderer Steven King says he hadn’t left his house for five years, until a former associate and Man Up participant told him to attend.

“I’ve been coming for three weeks now,” King says.

“I trusted no one, but Man Up is opening me up to see a different way of life.

“It’s positive for our children and our town.”

A women’s programme is also being held. All programmes areat 119 Broadway Kaikohe.

For more information visit: Man Up Northland on Facebook.

-Stuff

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1968 Olympics Black Power salute – Wikipedia

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a political demonstration conducted by African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. After having won gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the 200-meter running event, they turned on the podium to face their flags, and to hear the American national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner”. Each athlete raised a black-gloved fist, and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.[1]

On the morning of 16 October 1968,[2] US athlete Tommie Smith won the 200meter race with a world-record time of 19.83seconds. Australia’s Peter Norman finished second with a time of 20.06seconds, and the US’s John Carlos won third place with a time of 20.10seconds. After the race was completed, the three went to the podium for their medals to be presented by David Cecil, 6th Marquess of Exeter. The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty.[3] Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage.”[4] All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals.[5] Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968[2] were inspired by Edwards’s arguments.[6]

The famous picture of the event was taken by photographer John Dominis.[7]

Both US athletes intended to bring black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his, leaving them in the Olympic Village. It was Peter Norman who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove. For this reason, Carlos raised his left hand as opposed to his right, differing from the traditional Black Power salute.[8] When The Star-Spangled Banner played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd.[9] Smith later said, “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.”[3]

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Avery Brundage deemed it to be a domestic political statement unfit for the apolitical, international forum the Olympic Games were intended to be. In response to their actions, he ordered Smith and Carlos suspended from the US team and banned from the Olympic Village. When the US Olympic Committee refused, Brundage threatened to ban the entire US track team. This threat led to the expulsion of the two athletes from the Games.[10]

A spokesman for the IOC said Smith and Carlos’s actions were “a deliberate and violent breach of the fundamental principles of the Olympic spirit.”[3] Brundage, who was president of the United States Olympic Committee in 1936, had made no objections against Nazi salutes during the Berlin Olympics. He argued that the Nazi salute, being a national salute at the time, was acceptable in a competition of nations, while the athletes’ salute was not of a nation and therefore unacceptable.[11]

Brundage had been accused of being one of the United States’ most prominent Nazi sympathisers even after the outbreak of the Second World War,[12][13] and his removal as president of the IOC had been one of the three stated objectives of the Olympic Project for Human Rights.[14]

In 2013, the official IOC website stated that “Over and above winning medals, the black American athletes made names for themselves by an act of racial protest.”[15]

Smith and Carlos were largely ostracized by the US sporting establishment and they were subject to criticism. Time magazine on 25 October 1968 wrote: “‘Faster, Higher, Stronger’ is the motto of the Olympic Games. ‘Angrier, nastier, uglier’ better describes the scene in Mexico City last week.”[16][17] Back home, both Smith and Carlos were subject to abuse and they and their families received death threats.[18]

Smith continued in athletics, playing in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals[19] before becoming an assistant professor of physical education at Oberlin College. In 1995, he helped coach the US team at the World Indoor Championships at Barcelona. In 1999 he was awarded the California Black Sportsman of the Millennium Award. He is now a public speaker.

Carlos’ career followed a similar path. He tied the 100yard dash world record the following year. Carlos also tried professional football, was a 15th round selection in the 1970 NFL Draft, but a knee injury curtailed his tryout with the Philadelphia Eagles.[20] He then went on to the Canadian Football League where he played one season for the Montreal Alouettes.[21] He fell upon hard times in the late 1970s. In 1977, his ex-wife committed suicide, leading him to a period of depression.[22] In 1982, Carlos was employed by the Organizing Committee for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles to promote the games and act as liaison with the city’s black community. In 1985, he became a track and field coach at Palm Springs High School. As of 2012, Carlos works as a counselor at the school.[23]

Smith and Carlos received an Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the 2008 ESPY Awards honoring their action.[24]

Norman, who was sympathetic to his competitors’ protest, was cautioned by Chef de Mission Julius Patching and criticized by conservatives in the Australian media.[25] He was not picked for the 1972 Summer Olympics, despite having qualified 13 times over.[8] In fact, Australia did not send any male sprinters at all to the 1972 Olympics for the first time since the modern Olympics began in 1896.[26] When Norman died in 2006, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.[27]

Australian officials say they supported Norman at the 1968 games, did not punish him, and always regarded him as “one of our finest Olympians”.[28] Norman represented Australia at the 1970 Commonwealth Games and suffered from a knee injury prior to the 1972 Olympics which severely affected his performance.[29]

Wayne Collett and Vincent Matthews were banned from the Olympics after they staged a similar protest at the 1972 games in Munich.[30]

The 2008 Sydney Film Festival featured a documentary about the protest entitled Salute. The film was written, directed and produced by Matt Norman, a nephew of Peter Norman.[31]

On 9 July 2008, BBC Four broadcast a documentary, Black Power Salute, by Geoff Small, about the protest. In an article, Small noted that the athletes of the British team attending the 2008 Olympics in Beijing had been asked to sign gagging clauses which would have restricted their right to make political statements but that they had refused.[32]

In a 2011 speech to the University of Guelph, Akaash Maharaj, a member of the Canadian Olympic Committee and head of Canada’s Olympic equestrian team, said, “In that moment, Tommie Smith, Peter Norman, and John Carlos became the living embodiments of Olympic idealism. Ever since, they have been inspirations to generations of athletes like myself, who can only aspire to their example of putting principle before personal interest. It was their misfortune to be far greater human beings than the leaders of the IOC of the day.”[33]

In 2016, the newly built National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC also features a statue to honor the athletes’ tribute.

In 2005, San Jose State University honored former students Smith and Carlos with a 22-foot high statue of their protest titled Victory Salute, created by artist Rigo 23.[34] A student, Erik Grotz, initiated the project; “One of my professors was talking about unsung heroes and he mentioned Tommie Smith and John Carlos. He said these men had done a courageous thing to advance civil rights, and, yet, they had never been honored by their own school.” The statues are located in a central part of the campus at 372008N 1215257W / 37.335495N 121.882556W / 37.335495; -121.882556 (Olympic Black Power Statue), next to Robert D. Clark Hall and Tower Hall.

Those who come to view the statue are allowed to participate by standing on the monument. Peter Norman is not included in the monument so viewers can be in his place; there is a plaque in the empty spot inviting those to “Take a Stand.” Norman requested that his space was left empty so visitors could stand in his place and feel what he felt.[35] The bronze figures are shoeless but there are two shoes included at the base of the monument. The right shoe, a bronze, blue Puma, is next to Carlos; while the left shoe is placed behind Smith. The signature of the artist is on the back of Smith’s shoe, and the year 2005 is on Carlos’s shoe.

The faces of the statues are realistic and emotional. “The statue is made of fiberglass stretched over steel supports with an exoskeleton of ceramic tiles.”[36] Rigo 23 used 3D scanning technology and computer-assisted virtual imaging to take full-body scans of the men. Their track pants and jackets are a mosaic of dark blue ceramic tiles while the stripes of the track suits are detailed in red and white.

In January 2007, History San Jose opened a new exhibit called Speed City: From Civil Rights to Black Power, covering the San Jose State athletic program “from which many student athletes became globally recognized figures as the Civil Rights and Black Power movements reshaped American society.”[37]

In Australia, an airbrush mural of the trio on podium was painted in 2000 in the inner-city suburb of Newtown in Sydney. Silvio Offria, who allowed the mural to be painted on his house in Leamington Lane by an artist known only as “Donald,” said that Norman, a short time before he died in 2006, came to see the mural. “He came and had his photo taken; he was very happy,” he said.[38] The monochrome tribute, captioned “THREE PROUD PEOPLE MEXICO 68,” was under threat of demolition in 2010 to make way for a rail tunnel[38] but is now listed as an item of heritage significance.[39]

In the historically African-American neighborhood of West Oakland, California there was a large mural depicting Smith and Carlos on the corner of 12th Street and Mandela Parkway.

Above the life-sized depictions read “Born with insight, raised with a fist” (Rage Against the Machine lyrics); previously it read “It only takes a pair of gloves.”[40] In early February 2015, the mural was razed.[41]

The private lot was once a gas station, and the mural was on the outside wall of an abandoned building or shed. The owner wanted to pay respect to the men and the moment but also wanted a mural to prevent tagging. The State was monitoring water contamination levels at this site; the testing became within normal levels so the state ordered the removal of the tanks, testing equipment, and demolition of the shed.[42]

The song “Mr. John Carlos” by the Swedish group Nationalteatern on their 1974 album Livet r en fest is about the event and its aftermath.

Rage Against the Machine used a cropped photo of the salute on the cover art for the “Testify” single (2000).

The cover art for the single “HiiiPoWeR” (2011) by American rapper Kendrick Lamar features a cropped photo of the salute.

In the song “The Man” (2014) by Aloe Blacc at the end in the right corner can be seen two men standing giving the Black Power Salute.

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1968 Olympics Black Power salute – Wikipedia

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Betye Saar’s gun-totin’ mammies turn stereotype into power at the Craft & Folk Art Museum – Los Angeles Times

They stand as most unusual sentinels around the perimeter of the gallery. A black mammy figure in a red dress holds a broom and a rifle. Another in a dotted apron clutches a high-powered rifle. Yet another, decked out in blue dress and white apron, brandishes a large pistol in each hand, along with a look of total exasperation.

In American popular culture the mammy figure was a depiction of servility. But in the hands of Los Angeles artist Betye Saar, she becomes a warrior, brandishing weapons, contending with injustice, facing the darkest chapters of American history.

A small, taut show at the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles gathers roughly two dozen works made by the artist over the last couple of decades. Betye Saar: Keepin It Clean, as the exhibition is called, focuses on Saars washboard pieces. The works employ vintage washboards as a central motif in exploring aspects of black female identity in U.S. history. (Washboards are a nod to one of the few professional opportunities available to black women at the turn of the 20th century: the grueling work of laundry.)

Many of these assemblages also feature the stereotypical figure of the mammy, most famously personified by Aunt Jemima, of pancake mix fame.

Historically, the mammy was the ultimate image of black female servitude in the American psyche, writes UCLA historian Steven Nelson in the exhibition catalog. She was kind and giving. She cooked and cleaned and did the laundry. She took care of the children. She was harmless.

Saar makes her fierce.

In one assemblage, A Call to Arms, from 1997, the artist takes a mammy crumb brush and gives her rifle bullets for arms. The figure stands before an image of a lynching and atop a washboard bearing a fragment of a poem by Langston Hughes: Ive been a victim: The Belgians cut off my hands in the Congo.

This mammy is no servant. Shes a fighter.

This is something Saar has been doing for decades. The artist, who turns 91 at the end of the month, made the first of these searing assemblages in 1972. The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (now in the collection of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive) features a mammy figurine clutching a rifle and a grenade. A black power fist rises up before her. It remains a key work of American art and of the Black Arts Movement of the 1970s.

In addition to the washboard pieces, the show at the Craft & Folk Art Museum contains some of the works that were on view in the artists retrospective at the Scottsdale Museum of Art in Arizona last year. (The artist remains sorely overlooked in Los Angeles, where her solo museum shows are few and far between.)

This includes a sculptural installation of a seemingly innocent baptismal gown one thats been trimmed with slurs describing black children. Across the gallery, a simple bedsheet and ironing board is anything but. The sheet has been lightly embroidered with the letters KKK, the ironing board stamped with an image of slaves in a ships hold. (This latter work, titled Ill Bend, But I Will Not Break, was made in 1998, though an emboldened KKK makes it feel more urgent than ever.)

Its the simple washboard assemblages, however, and their collective army of militant mammies, ready to battle, that is perhaps most striking toxic kitsch transformed by the hands of an artist into trenchant tokens of power.

Where: Craft & Folk Art Museum, 5814 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

When: Through Aug. 20

Info: cafam.org

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carolina.miranda@latimes.com

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Betye Saar’s gun-totin’ mammies turn stereotype into power at the Craft & Folk Art Museum – Los Angeles Times

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‘I forgive you’ – Chris Crean’s daughter sends message to his New Plymouth Black Power killers 21 years on – TVNZ

The daughter of Christopher Crean says she forgives the men who killed him 21 years ago, her statement coming as a drama recounting the story of his murder aired on TV on Sunday night.

Stephanie Crean.

Source: My life journey/ Facebook

Chris Crean, a 27-year-old father of four, was gunned down by Black Power members at his front door in New Plymouth in 1996.

Mr Crean was due to give evidence against Black Power over an assault he witnessed, and TVNZ1’s Sunday Theatre Resolve told the story of his death.

In a lengthy post on the “My life journey” Facebook page, Mr Crean’s daughter Stephanie Crean wrote that she forgives his killers.

“To all four men and the black power gang that were involved in the murder of my father Christopher Crean, my name is Stephanie Crean and I forgive you for murdering my father,” she wrote in the post which was published on Sunday evening before Resolve went to air at 8.30pm.

“For many years I have not spoken to the media about how I feel about this heart breaking tragedy.

“I forgive you, not because what you did in murdering my father was right, because that was not right.

“I forgive you even though there was mention of shooting me only at the age of two.

“I forgive you so that you may have peace and I too. So that our families may have peace, and so that the community may have peace also. So that the nation may have peace, because that is what is right.”

She continued: “I believe that with justice comes peace. Whether or not you are changed men, I forgive you.”

Ms Crean wrote: “For many years the title above your heads has been of convicted murderers on the tv, in magazines, in newspapers, and even on the internet. But today I write to you as sons of your fathers and mothers, as brothers to your brothers and sisters, as uncles to your nieces and nephews, and fathers to your sons and daughters.

“My dad was not a perfect man, but he was a good man. You too are not perfect men, but you can be good men. You may not be able to start a new beginning, but you can start a new ending. A good ending.”

Ms Crean added: “I’m 22 this year, and what life has taught me the most is to love your enemies.”

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‘I forgive you’ – Chris Crean’s daughter sends message to his New Plymouth Black Power killers 21 years on – TVNZ

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Crystal Bridges to Debut ‘Art in the Age of Black Power’ Exhibit … – Arkansas Business Online

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville on Tuesday announced its exhibitions for 2018, including the U.S. debut of “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power.” Also appearing next year will be the Crystal Bridges-organized exhibitions “Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art” and “Native North America.” “Our 2018 exhibitions complement the story of American art shared through our permanent collection,” said Rod Bigelow, the museum’s executive director and chief diversity and inclusion officer. The museum called “Soul of a Nation,” organized by the Tate Modern in London and debuting in the United States at Crystal Bridges, “a look at how American culture was reshaped through the work of Black artists during the tumultuous 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s.” Crystal Bridges is one of only two American venues to host this exhibition. Following its debut at Crystal Bridges, the exhibition travels to the Brooklyn Museum in New York. The exhibit will feature artworks by more than 60 black artists, including Romare Bearden, Melvin Edwards, Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, Charles White, Alvin Loving, Alma Thomas and Lorraine O’Grady. And the art includes a wide range of styles and media, including painting, photography, fashion, sculpture and mixed media work, as well as street art in the form of murals and posters by artists of the AfriCOBRA collective, the graphic art created by Emory Douglas for The Black Panther newspaper and black feminist art. “Soul of a Nation opens a window into the heart of the Black Power movement in all of its beauty, pride, power, and aspiration,” the museum said. Soul of a Nation runs Feb. 3 through April 23, 2018. As for the Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit, Crystal Bridges is building on its collection of major works by O’Keeffe including Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1 and Radiator Building-Night, New York and is bringing together a selection of O’Keeffe’s most important works. Alongside the works by O’Keeffe, the exhibition will display artworks by emerging contemporary artists “that evoke, investigate, and expand upon O’Keeffe’s artistic legacy,” the museum said. “This exhibition demonstrates the continuing power of O’Keeffe’s work as a touchstone for contemporary art.” These contemporary artists include Sharona Eliassaf, Monica Kim Garza, Loie Hollowell, Molly Larkey and Matthew Ronay. This exhibit will run May 26 through Sept. 3, 2018. The exhibit “Native North America,” which will be on display Oct. 6, 2018, through Jan. 7, 2019, is the first exhibition to chart the development of contemporary indigenous art from the United States and Canada from the 1960s to the present, the museum said. The exhibition will present about 75 works of art by important native artists such as Kay WalkingStick, Carl Beam, Fritz Scholder, Andrea Carlson and Kent Monkman and features works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, videos, sculpture and sound, installation and performance art.

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The original Black Ranger talks ‘Power Rangers,’ his thoughts on the … – AiPT! Comics

There have been many Power Rangers over the course of 25 years but precious few can say they were a part of the first crew. I was able to chat with Walter Jones, who played the original Black Power Ranger Zack Taylor in season 1 of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. Jones was able to be a part of something new that changed pop culture forever. Even if you werent a fan of the series, when someone mentions Power Rangers, you know exactly what theyre talking about. I talked with Jones about the original series, the 2017 Power Rangers film, and a new film hes a part of featuring an impressive cast of original Power Rangers from previous seasons. AiPT!:Did you know anything about the original Sentai series prior to auditioning? Walter Jones: Ihad never seen the show or had any idea about it. AiPT!:Was Zack the Black Ranger the role you auditioned for? Or was that the role given to you? Walter Jones:I auditioned for the character Zack. I had no idea what color Ranger I would be. When I saw the costumes the first time I wanted the Red or the Black. I was happy to get the black costume. AiPT!:Did you ever think that Power Rangers would last as long as it has? Walter Jones: I never thought that Power Rangers would still be talked about 24 years later, much less that there would be new merchandise about the original series. AiPT!:What did you enjoy most about the new Power Rangers movie? Walter Jones:RJ Cyler was super captivating as Billy. I enjoyed all the actors! Great effects. AiPT!:Was there anything you didnt like about it? And was there anything you would have changed about the film? Walter Jones:[It had] no Hip Hop Kido! It was a major motivator for so many fans to explore physical arts, dancing, gymnastics, parkour, etc My character was the only character with that ability. It should have been included in some fashion. AiPT!:Do you ever get tired of talking about Power Rangers? Is there any moment where you just arent in the mood for it? Walter Jones:Talking about Rangers doesnt bother me. Im proud of its legacy. Of course, theres a time and place for everything. AiPT!:One of my favorite comedies of all time is Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. While watching this film I noticed that you made a cameo as an angry fan. How did you come across that role? Walter Jones:I was looping (doing voice over) on the film and the producers decided they wanted to add that part. I auditioned and got it! AiPT!:Who was the brain behind The Order movie that you and a fantastic cast of former Power Rangers are a part of? Walter Jones:David Fielding and Karan Ashley are the brains of the order. Its going to be a very exciting project! AiPT!:When can we see the film and how can fans help support it? Walter Jones:The Order should be out next year. We still have production to complete. AiPT!:Youre about to go on a dangerous mission but can only take one other Power Ranger from any season with you. Who do you take? Walter Jones:The one solid leader has always been Red. Gotta go with the tried and true! Walter Jones left the Power Ranger series after season 1 and despite never making a return as his character, he did come back to voice various antagonists. Jones was the very first actor to do voice work for any character other than a Ranger (mainly for monsters or villains) on a Power Rangers show after having a role as a Ranger himself. Jones to this day is still acting, dancing and makes Con appearances all over, meeting and greeting the Power Rangers fans that he helped create. David Fieldinginterviewmighty morphin power rangersThe OrderWalter Jones

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Revolt, Resistance and Black Power: Lessons From 50 Years of Righteous Struggle – Lasentinel

Part 3. Even as a central lesson of the 60s is the indispensability and obligation of struggle, it is also a central and sustained teaching and lesson of Kawaida that regardless of the other battles we must and might wage, the first and continuing battle is the battle is to win the hearts and minds of our people. And as we said in the 60s and constantly reaffirm, unless we win this battle, we cannot win any other. Thus, we of Us called for a radical revolution in views and values, an overturning of our negro selves and recovering the African within us. We said that inside every negro, there is a Black person, an African, striving to come into being and we must wage a daily struggle to bring into being and sustain the best of what it means to be African and human in the world. For we are American by habit and African by choice. And we must choose every day to be African and to embody the instruction of our ancestors that African means excellence in how we understand and assert ourselves in the world. Thus, we maintained, following Min. Malcolm, that we needed a cultural revolution that precedes, makes possible and sustains the political revolution. Clearly, we need to wage the political struggle to free ourselves, but we cant really free ourselves, if we dont be ourselves, if we deny, diminish or deform who we are as African persons and an African people. And likewise, we cant fully be ourselves, if we dont free ourselves and create space for us to come into the fullness of ourselves as persons and a people. So, we wage a simultaneous double struggle, stressing each aspect in its turn. Again, following Malcolm, we said We are a nation within a nation, a cultural nation striving to come into political existence, a people seeking power over the space it occupies, over its destiny and daily lives. In the call for peace and security, we must not join or mimic the unthoughtful or unjust who talk of peace without justice, a submission to evil and injustice for the sake of calm or the comfort of the ruling race/class. We must refuse and reject calls for a repressive peace imposed by police violence or what Frantz Fanon calls the peaceful violence of the system which uses institutional violence without the show of weapons. Indeed, the policies and practices of its structured domination, deprivation and degradation is daily violence against the body, heart, mind and soul. It is the violence of a degrading and deficient educational system, the denial of access to affordable and adequate housing, healthcare and employment, and the means to make a living and a decent and good life. It is the violence of the media, making us into self-mutilating mascots, blackish caricatures of humanity, and turning our social savaging and suffering into entertainment for the ruling race. And it is the violence of displacing our people from historical living spaces, replacing them with Whites, dispersing us to the winds, destroying community and centralized sites of culture, and calling it gentrification to camouflage its race and class character and the human casualties and social chaos and ruin it causes and leaves in its wake. So, we must continue to rise up and resist in righteous anger these and all the other evils and injustices of oppression and White supremacy. For what do we have to lose except the little space that has been left for us to praise them for their oppression in this citadel of White wealth and power, this self-declared democracy of Whiteness and wealth? And as we continue to rise up in righteous and relentless struggle, let us also remember this lesson also born and reaffirmed in struggle: know that we are our own liberators. Indeed, the oppressor is responsible for our oppression, but we are responsible for our liberation. Another lesson we bring from the 50 years of righteous and relentless struggle is the important role art (creative production, creativity activity) can play in the struggle. Author and literary critic, Larry Neal, noted that In Watts after the Rebellion, Maulana Karenga welded the Black Arts Movement into a cohesive ideology which owed much to LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka). Neal speaks here of the influence Kawaida had on the works of not only Baraka, but also on a wide range of artists, i.e., Haki Madhubuti, Kalamu ya Salaam, Val Gray Ward and the artists of Kuumba Theatre, later Gwen Brooks and August Wilson and others. Kawaida contended that Black art is not simply art for arts sake, but art for our peoples sake, that it must raise and praise the people, expose and attack the oppressor and open new horizons for our people to be themselves, free themselves and come into the fullness of themselves. In a word, art must be functional, collective and committing. From our work with Dr. Harry Edwards, chair of the Olympic Project for Human Rights and organizer of the Black Olympic Boycott, we also learned the lesson of the important role Black athletes can play by taking a stand and advancing the interests of the struggle. This is clearly exemplified in the draft resistance by Muhammad Ali, 1966; Tommy Smiths and John Carlos Black Power demonstration at the Olympics in Mexico,1968; Arthur Ashes organization of athletes against apartheid, 1973; and more recently the Black football team members at the University of Missouri who supported the students demands and struggles against campus racism, and Colin Kaepernicks demonstration against the oppression and violence against our people. Important also was the resistance of Black athletes like Jim Brown, Craig Hodges, and Curt Flood who resisted dehumanizing trading practices and especially Floods struggle which opened the way for free agency and bargaining rights in the sports world and against brutal capitalist profit-making practices. They all paid a heavy price for the sacrifice and struggle and offer a model for all others who decide to join them. It is Min. Malcolm again who taught us that we are not to act responsibly in the eyes and interests of our oppressor, but be responsible to and acting responsibly for our people. Indeed, we are to act outrageously irresponsible in the eyes and evaluation of the oppressor. For as Malcolm taught, to be responsible in their unjust, immoral and undemocratic judgment is to betray the trust of our people. For we do not come to the battleground to concede, but to confront; not to be silenced and sidelined, but seize the center and speak on behalf of our people, especially, Malcolm says, the downtrodden and dissatisfied. And we are not to compromise at the expense of our people, but to hold the line, build united fronts, rebuild the overarching Movement, fight the good and victorious fight, and lay the basis for a larger broader radical struggle to seriously transform society in the interest of freedom, justice, human good and the well-being of the world. Dr. Maulana Karenga, Professor and Chair of Africana Studies, California State University-Long Beach; Executive Director, African American Cultural Center (Us); Creator of Kwanzaa; and author of Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture, The Message and Meaning of Kwanzaa: Bringing Good Into the World and Essays on Struggle: Position and Analysis, ww.AfricanAmericanCulturalCenter-LA.org; ww.OfficialKwanzaaWebsite.org; www.MaulanaKarenga.org.

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Follow up ‘Detroit’ by streaming these other Black Power movies – Metro US

Summers the time to turn off your brain. But not this weekend. Dropped like an H-bomb into the glut of dumb superhero movies and light entertainments, Detroit, Kathryn Bigelows follow-up to Zero Dark Thirty, brings the 1967 Detroit riot to the multiplex. The focus is largely on the Algiers Motel incident, in which white cops tortured 12 innocent people 10 black, two white leaving three black men dead. Spoiler: They were acquitted. Its a horrific chapter in American race relations, and a stark reminder that not much has changed. But why stop there? Continue your deep dive into the Civil Rights Era and the Black Power movement online. These films are ready to stream: I Am Not Your Negro (Amazon Prime) O.J.: Made in America won the Best Documentary Oscar this year, and it deserved it. But it was a photo finish. It could have easily gone to 13th (see below) or Raoul Pecks look at the work of James Baldwin. The latter is no mere 101 primer; think of it as a film essay, which takes the authors unfailingly insightful books on race with heavy use of 1976s film-centric The Devil Finds Work and weaves them with images of Black Lives Matter protests and the like, showing how his work, sadly, refuses to become irrelevant. 13th (Netflix Instant) The era summoned by Detroit only takes up a decent chunk of Ava DuVernays fiery doc. Then again, she Hoovers up the whole of the American black experience since the Emancipation Proclamation. What she finds isnt pretty: Slavery may have ended, but it never really went away. There was Jim Crow, the assault on Black Panthers and the Prison Industrial Complex, which found another way to round up the black populace. Its an alternate history of America thats also the correct one. Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (Netflix Instant) History is written by the victors, and the story told about the Black Panthers has often been one of menace a violent, gun-toting scourge, their images still used to frighten White America. Stanley Nelsons doc tries to correct all that. The real story is far more complicated, and filled with far more good than bad. He rounds up former members to set the record straight, showing all the good they did for troubled and ignored communities, all the positive vibes they gave a people demonized and menaced by white society. Black Panthers (FilmStruck) You could also watch the real deal, from the era itself. Filmed in 1969 by the great and peerlessly curious French filmmaker Agnes Varda, this short hangs at a rally to free jailed member Huey P. Newton thats part barnburner, part picnic. Varda makes sure to give the female Panthers, like Kathleen Cleaver, as much screentime as the men, and you get to see the peaceful yet passionate side the media of the time would never show. The Trials of Muhammad Ali (Netflix Instant) At the height of his celebrity, Cassius Clay decided on two things: He didnt want to be known by what he deemed his white name, and he didnt want to fight in Vietnam. So he converted to Islam, changed his name and became a conscientious objector. This doc zeroes in on his most tumultuous and heroic period, when one of the great shit-talkers put his money where his mouth was, almost destroying his career but for the right cause. If you want more, check out Michael Manns Ali, starring Will Smith, which was just added to Hulu; it, too, sees one of our greatest pugilists through a righteous Black Power perspective. What Happened, Miss Simone? (Netflix Instant) Nina Simone had plenty of demons, but one thing that definitely got right was her commitment to Black Power. Her political songs didnt just slip real talk into the mainstream; they were five-alarm bonfires, meant to burn everything down. Sometimes she went too far, but only in that she burned personal bridges she never should have torched (including the one with her daughter). This doc grants her the complicated portrait she deserved while claiming her for the sight of justice. Fruitvale Station (Netflix Instant) Detroit is the true story of white cops who killed innocent black men and didnt go to jail. It arrives only four years after another film about the same thing: the one about Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan), the young man whose shouting match with cops led to his assassination. Dont watch this back-to-back with Detroit; there arent enough tissues in this bad, bad world. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (YouTube) Its not the ideal way to see it, but if you dont catch it on YouTube, you might not believe a movie like this could have ever been made. In 1973, as Blaxploitation was on the rise, Ivan Dixon, formerly of Hogans Heroes, used his clout entertaining the masses on TV to make a film of Sam Greenlees novel, in which a black nationalist quietly works his way up through the CIA, only so he can dismantle the government from within. Its no-holds-barred filmmaking an almost plotless account of Civil Rights protestors taking on the Man and winning. But thats enough well, that, and a killer score by Herbie Hancock. Follow Matt Prigge on Twitter @mattprigge

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‘It’s not too late to change’ says ex Black Power leader – Stuff.co.nz

BAYLEY MOOR Last updated11:35, August 2 2017 BAYLEY MOOR/STUFF Jay Hepi, Pastor Robbie Johnson, Renata Beazley and Steven King. Renata Beazley was once the president of the Black Power in Kaikohe, now he has turned his back on a life of violence and drugs,thanks to a programme tackling men’s ‘inner demons’. Man Up is a nationwide non-profit organisation, providingfree programmes encouraging men to change for the better. Since joining Man Up in Auckland, then Whangarei and now Kaikohe, Beazley, 34, says he is experiencing his longest stint out of prison (11 months) in his entire adult life. “I’ve been to jail 37 times and have 111 convictions and the programmes [in prison] for drug treatment and violence prevention were good, but they were there to tick boxes,” Beazley says. “Man Up has been life changing, it’s got to the root of what I’m dealing with. I’m dealing with my inner demons, understanding them and striving to be better. “I no longer have drugs in my house and I have a better relationship with my partner and kids.” His message for others: “It’s not too late to change.” Whangarei pastor Robbie Johnson is facilitating the Kaikohe programme, which 20 men have attended since it’s launch in July, with men still welcome to join. “We don’t say harden up, we say open up,” Johnson says. “It’s creating an environment where men can talk about their issues behind closed doors without fear of being judged for their past.” While Man Up aims to help men overcome family violence, anger, depression, and addiction among other issues, Johnson says these are the “fruit” of root problems. “We don’t see gang members, we see the heart of the person. They realise they weren’t born a drug addict, or a murderer, they have picked up baggage and become that.” There will be a graduation at the end of the 15 weeks of sessions, but Johnson hopes the Man Up ‘movement’ will continue. While Johnson says it is a faith-based programme, you don’t need to belong to a church to attend. Ex Mongrel Mob member and convicted murderer Steven King says he hadn’t left his house for five years, until a former associate and Man Up participant told him to attend. “I’ve been coming for three weeks now,” King says. “I trusted no one, but Man Up is opening me up to see a different way of life. “It’s positive for our children and our town.” A women’s programme is also being held. All programmes areat 119 Broadway Kaikohe. For more information visit: Man Up Northland on Facebook. -Stuff

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1968 Olympics Black Power salute – Wikipedia

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a political demonstration conducted by African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. After having won gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the 200-meter running event, they turned on the podium to face their flags, and to hear the American national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner”. Each athlete raised a black-gloved fist, and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.[1] On the morning of 16 October 1968,[2] US athlete Tommie Smith won the 200meter race with a world-record time of 19.83seconds. Australia’s Peter Norman finished second with a time of 20.06seconds, and the US’s John Carlos won third place with a time of 20.10seconds. After the race was completed, the three went to the podium for their medals to be presented by David Cecil, 6th Marquess of Exeter. The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty.[3] Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage.”[4] All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals.[5] Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968[2] were inspired by Edwards’s arguments.[6] The famous picture of the event was taken by photographer John Dominis.[7] Both US athletes intended to bring black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his, leaving them in the Olympic Village. It was Peter Norman who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove. For this reason, Carlos raised his left hand as opposed to his right, differing from the traditional Black Power salute.[8] When The Star-Spangled Banner played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd.[9] Smith later said, “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.”[3] International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Avery Brundage deemed it to be a domestic political statement unfit for the apolitical, international forum the Olympic Games were intended to be. In response to their actions, he ordered Smith and Carlos suspended from the US team and banned from the Olympic Village. When the US Olympic Committee refused, Brundage threatened to ban the entire US track team. This threat led to the expulsion of the two athletes from the Games.[10] A spokesman for the IOC said Smith and Carlos’s actions were “a deliberate and violent breach of the fundamental principles of the Olympic spirit.”[3] Brundage, who was president of the United States Olympic Committee in 1936, had made no objections against Nazi salutes during the Berlin Olympics. He argued that the Nazi salute, being a national salute at the time, was acceptable in a competition of nations, while the athletes’ salute was not of a nation and therefore unacceptable.[11] Brundage had been accused of being one of the United States’ most prominent Nazi sympathisers even after the outbreak of the Second World War,[12][13] and his removal as president of the IOC had been one of the three stated objectives of the Olympic Project for Human Rights.[14] In 2013, the official IOC website stated that “Over and above winning medals, the black American athletes made names for themselves by an act of racial protest.”[15] Smith and Carlos were largely ostracized by the US sporting establishment and they were subject to criticism. Time magazine on 25 October 1968 wrote: “‘Faster, Higher, Stronger’ is the motto of the Olympic Games. ‘Angrier, nastier, uglier’ better describes the scene in Mexico City last week.”[16][17] Back home, both Smith and Carlos were subject to abuse and they and their families received death threats.[18] Smith continued in athletics, playing in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals[19] before becoming an assistant professor of physical education at Oberlin College. In 1995, he helped coach the US team at the World Indoor Championships at Barcelona. In 1999 he was awarded the California Black Sportsman of the Millennium Award. He is now a public speaker. Carlos’ career followed a similar path. He tied the 100yard dash world record the following year. Carlos also tried professional football, was a 15th round selection in the 1970 NFL Draft, but a knee injury curtailed his tryout with the Philadelphia Eagles.[20] He then went on to the Canadian Football League where he played one season for the Montreal Alouettes.[21] He fell upon hard times in the late 1970s. In 1977, his ex-wife committed suicide, leading him to a period of depression.[22] In 1982, Carlos was employed by the Organizing Committee for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles to promote the games and act as liaison with the city’s black community. In 1985, he became a track and field coach at Palm Springs High School. As of 2012, Carlos works as a counselor at the school.[23] Smith and Carlos received an Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the 2008 ESPY Awards honoring their action.[24] Norman, who was sympathetic to his competitors’ protest, was cautioned by Chef de Mission Julius Patching and criticized by conservatives in the Australian media.[25] He was not picked for the 1972 Summer Olympics, despite having qualified 13 times over.[8] In fact, Australia did not send any male sprinters at all to the 1972 Olympics for the first time since the modern Olympics began in 1896.[26] When Norman died in 2006, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.[27] Australian officials say they supported Norman at the 1968 games, did not punish him, and always regarded him as “one of our finest Olympians”.[28] Norman represented Australia at the 1970 Commonwealth Games and suffered from a knee injury prior to the 1972 Olympics which severely affected his performance.[29] Wayne Collett and Vincent Matthews were banned from the Olympics after they staged a similar protest at the 1972 games in Munich.[30] The 2008 Sydney Film Festival featured a documentary about the protest entitled Salute. The film was written, directed and produced by Matt Norman, a nephew of Peter Norman.[31] On 9 July 2008, BBC Four broadcast a documentary, Black Power Salute, by Geoff Small, about the protest. In an article, Small noted that the athletes of the British team attending the 2008 Olympics in Beijing had been asked to sign gagging clauses which would have restricted their right to make political statements but that they had refused.[32] In a 2011 speech to the University of Guelph, Akaash Maharaj, a member of the Canadian Olympic Committee and head of Canada’s Olympic equestrian team, said, “In that moment, Tommie Smith, Peter Norman, and John Carlos became the living embodiments of Olympic idealism. Ever since, they have been inspirations to generations of athletes like myself, who can only aspire to their example of putting principle before personal interest. It was their misfortune to be far greater human beings than the leaders of the IOC of the day.”[33] In 2016, the newly built National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC also features a statue to honor the athletes’ tribute. In 2005, San Jose State University honored former students Smith and Carlos with a 22-foot high statue of their protest titled Victory Salute, created by artist Rigo 23.[34] A student, Erik Grotz, initiated the project; “One of my professors was talking about unsung heroes and he mentioned Tommie Smith and John Carlos. He said these men had done a courageous thing to advance civil rights, and, yet, they had never been honored by their own school.” The statues are located in a central part of the campus at 372008N 1215257W / 37.335495N 121.882556W / 37.335495; -121.882556 (Olympic Black Power Statue), next to Robert D. Clark Hall and Tower Hall. Those who come to view the statue are allowed to participate by standing on the monument. Peter Norman is not included in the monument so viewers can be in his place; there is a plaque in the empty spot inviting those to “Take a Stand.” Norman requested that his space was left empty so visitors could stand in his place and feel what he felt.[35] The bronze figures are shoeless but there are two shoes included at the base of the monument. The right shoe, a bronze, blue Puma, is next to Carlos; while the left shoe is placed behind Smith. The signature of the artist is on the back of Smith’s shoe, and the year 2005 is on Carlos’s shoe. The faces of the statues are realistic and emotional. “The statue is made of fiberglass stretched over steel supports with an exoskeleton of ceramic tiles.”[36] Rigo 23 used 3D scanning technology and computer-assisted virtual imaging to take full-body scans of the men. Their track pants and jackets are a mosaic of dark blue ceramic tiles while the stripes of the track suits are detailed in red and white. In January 2007, History San Jose opened a new exhibit called Speed City: From Civil Rights to Black Power, covering the San Jose State athletic program “from which many student athletes became globally recognized figures as the Civil Rights and Black Power movements reshaped American society.”[37] In Australia, an airbrush mural of the trio on podium was painted in 2000 in the inner-city suburb of Newtown in Sydney. Silvio Offria, who allowed the mural to be painted on his house in Leamington Lane by an artist known only as “Donald,” said that Norman, a short time before he died in 2006, came to see the mural. “He came and had his photo taken; he was very happy,” he said.[38] The monochrome tribute, captioned “THREE PROUD PEOPLE MEXICO 68,” was under threat of demolition in 2010 to make way for a rail tunnel[38] but is now listed as an item of heritage significance.[39] In the historically African-American neighborhood of West Oakland, California there was a large mural depicting Smith and Carlos on the corner of 12th Street and Mandela Parkway. Above the life-sized depictions read “Born with insight, raised with a fist” (Rage Against the Machine lyrics); previously it read “It only takes a pair of gloves.”[40] In early February 2015, the mural was razed.[41] The private lot was once a gas station, and the mural was on the outside wall of an abandoned building or shed. The owner wanted to pay respect to the men and the moment but also wanted a mural to prevent tagging. The State was monitoring water contamination levels at this site; the testing became within normal levels so the state ordered the removal of the tanks, testing equipment, and demolition of the shed.[42] The song “Mr. John Carlos” by the Swedish group Nationalteatern on their 1974 album Livet r en fest is about the event and its aftermath. Rage Against the Machine used a cropped photo of the salute on the cover art for the “Testify” single (2000). The cover art for the single “HiiiPoWeR” (2011) by American rapper Kendrick Lamar features a cropped photo of the salute. In the song “The Man” (2014) by Aloe Blacc at the end in the right corner can be seen two men standing giving the Black Power Salute.

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July 28, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Betye Saar’s gun-totin’ mammies turn stereotype into power at the Craft & Folk Art Museum – Los Angeles Times

They stand as most unusual sentinels around the perimeter of the gallery. A black mammy figure in a red dress holds a broom and a rifle. Another in a dotted apron clutches a high-powered rifle. Yet another, decked out in blue dress and white apron, brandishes a large pistol in each hand, along with a look of total exasperation. In American popular culture the mammy figure was a depiction of servility. But in the hands of Los Angeles artist Betye Saar, she becomes a warrior, brandishing weapons, contending with injustice, facing the darkest chapters of American history. A small, taut show at the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles gathers roughly two dozen works made by the artist over the last couple of decades. Betye Saar: Keepin It Clean, as the exhibition is called, focuses on Saars washboard pieces. The works employ vintage washboards as a central motif in exploring aspects of black female identity in U.S. history. (Washboards are a nod to one of the few professional opportunities available to black women at the turn of the 20th century: the grueling work of laundry.) Many of these assemblages also feature the stereotypical figure of the mammy, most famously personified by Aunt Jemima, of pancake mix fame. Historically, the mammy was the ultimate image of black female servitude in the American psyche, writes UCLA historian Steven Nelson in the exhibition catalog. She was kind and giving. She cooked and cleaned and did the laundry. She took care of the children. She was harmless. Saar makes her fierce. In one assemblage, A Call to Arms, from 1997, the artist takes a mammy crumb brush and gives her rifle bullets for arms. The figure stands before an image of a lynching and atop a washboard bearing a fragment of a poem by Langston Hughes: Ive been a victim: The Belgians cut off my hands in the Congo. This mammy is no servant. Shes a fighter. This is something Saar has been doing for decades. The artist, who turns 91 at the end of the month, made the first of these searing assemblages in 1972. The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (now in the collection of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive) features a mammy figurine clutching a rifle and a grenade. A black power fist rises up before her. It remains a key work of American art and of the Black Arts Movement of the 1970s. In addition to the washboard pieces, the show at the Craft & Folk Art Museum contains some of the works that were on view in the artists retrospective at the Scottsdale Museum of Art in Arizona last year. (The artist remains sorely overlooked in Los Angeles, where her solo museum shows are few and far between.) This includes a sculptural installation of a seemingly innocent baptismal gown one thats been trimmed with slurs describing black children. Across the gallery, a simple bedsheet and ironing board is anything but. The sheet has been lightly embroidered with the letters KKK, the ironing board stamped with an image of slaves in a ships hold. (This latter work, titled Ill Bend, But I Will Not Break, was made in 1998, though an emboldened KKK makes it feel more urgent than ever.) Its the simple washboard assemblages, however, and their collective army of militant mammies, ready to battle, that is perhaps most striking toxic kitsch transformed by the hands of an artist into trenchant tokens of power. Where: Craft & Folk Art Museum, 5814 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles When: Through Aug. 20 Info: cafam.org Sign up for our weekly Essential Arts & Culture newsletter carolina.miranda@latimes.com @cmonstah ALSO For Betye Saar, there’s no dwelling on the past; the almost-90-year-old artist has too much future to think about Betye Saar’s art on race couldn’t be timelier. So why aren’t more museums showing her work? His art centers on African American actors whose film titles ‘Fade to Black’ Inside Alejandro Irritu’s VR border drama at LACMA: What you will see and why you might cry

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‘I forgive you’ – Chris Crean’s daughter sends message to his New Plymouth Black Power killers 21 years on – TVNZ

The daughter of Christopher Crean says she forgives the men who killed him 21 years ago, her statement coming as a drama recounting the story of his murder aired on TV on Sunday night. Stephanie Crean. Source: My life journey/ Facebook Chris Crean, a 27-year-old father of four, was gunned down by Black Power members at his front door in New Plymouth in 1996. Mr Crean was due to give evidence against Black Power over an assault he witnessed, and TVNZ1’s Sunday Theatre Resolve told the story of his death. In a lengthy post on the “My life journey” Facebook page, Mr Crean’s daughter Stephanie Crean wrote that she forgives his killers. “To all four men and the black power gang that were involved in the murder of my father Christopher Crean, my name is Stephanie Crean and I forgive you for murdering my father,” she wrote in the post which was published on Sunday evening before Resolve went to air at 8.30pm. “For many years I have not spoken to the media about how I feel about this heart breaking tragedy. “I forgive you, not because what you did in murdering my father was right, because that was not right. “I forgive you even though there was mention of shooting me only at the age of two. “I forgive you so that you may have peace and I too. So that our families may have peace, and so that the community may have peace also. So that the nation may have peace, because that is what is right.” She continued: “I believe that with justice comes peace. Whether or not you are changed men, I forgive you.” Ms Crean wrote: “For many years the title above your heads has been of convicted murderers on the tv, in magazines, in newspapers, and even on the internet. But today I write to you as sons of your fathers and mothers, as brothers to your brothers and sisters, as uncles to your nieces and nephews, and fathers to your sons and daughters. “My dad was not a perfect man, but he was a good man. You too are not perfect men, but you can be good men. You may not be able to start a new beginning, but you can start a new ending. A good ending.” Ms Crean added: “I’m 22 this year, and what life has taught me the most is to love your enemies.”

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July 26, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed


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