Archive for the ‘Black Power’ Category

Supporters rally to get Colin Kaepernick a job – New York Post

Colin Kaepernick may still be out a job but theres plenty of people who are on his team.

Hundreds of supporters gathered outside NFL Headquarters on Wednesday to voice their outrage over the quarterback not being signed ahead of the 2017 season.

The United We Stand rally was in full swing as of 5 p.m., with countless fans standing along Park Ave, chanting Stay Woke! and holding up signs that said NFL Blackout and Kaepernick We Kneel With You.

Some wore shirts, which showed the former 49ers star taking a knee and portrayed his signature afro as the black power fist.

Many invoked former athletes turned protesters, including Tommie Smith and John Carlos, as well as Muhammad Ali.

The crowd, which was joined by several celebrities and prominent figures including rapper Kurtis Blow and Palestinian-American political activist Linda Sarsour called for a boycott of all things NFL.

As far as Im concerned no fantasy football, no NFL packages, no going to the games which we usually do a couple times a year, said Mitchell Stevenson, a 56-year-old Giants fan who traveled from Hamden, Connecticut, with a crew of family and friends.

Done, he said firmly. Thats it.

NFL owners have been avoiding Kaepernick like the plague after his national anthem stunt last year.

The QB is still seeking work with just two weeks left before the season starts and unless another teams star is injured, wont likely be on a Week 1 roster.

Fans outside the NFL headquarters on Wednesday said they believed Kaepernick is being unfairly blackballed for simply utilizing his first amendment rights.

The rally, which was promoted by Spike Lee and others, was ultimately organized by a group of individuals who believe the 29-year-old deserves to play in the league.

I think Kaepernick getting a job is start, said Eddie Googe, a 50-year-old Cowboys fan from Connecticut who called on the NFL to use its immense power to unite the country.

The league needs to do a better job with social justice issues, he said. Its almost scary how much influence they have. You have these billionaire owners sitting in their offices. Theyre sending a message now that theres a right and wrong time to stand up for social justice issues. Theres never a wrong time. They need to change their message.

Many people have spoken out against Kaepernicks actions saying hes shifted attention away from the issue of police brutality and instead placed it on himself.

What Kaepernick did was stupid, its ineffective, FS1 co-host Jason Whitlock told FOX Business on Wednesday. It started a big conversation about Colin Kapernick and I think hes very happy with that. I think he lvoes the attention, I think he lvoes being a martyr and a celebrity. Theres gonna be a bunch of foolish people right out in front of the NFL headquarters today and protest, not police brutality, but whether some multi-millionaire quarterback has a job. Thats a joke.

Some wore shirts, which showed Kaepernick taking a knee and portrayed his signature afro as the black power fist.

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Supporters rally to get Colin Kaepernick a job – New York Post

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

black power – Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum

The progress made by African Americans in the 1950s and early 1960s at achieving their civil rights was compromised by violence. Frankly, many young blacks rejected the courage and patience displayed by Dr. Martin Luther King in his non-violent response to injustice in American society.

The epitome of the Black Power Movement was the Black Panther Party. Founded by Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale and others, this party justified the use of violence in the accomplishment of black justice. Newton and Seale were harassed by police and Newton was convicted of killing a policeman.

The movement stimulated a number of other blacks to speak out. In 1968, Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver wrote his best selling autobiography, Soul on Ice and the poet Amira Baraka published an anthology of protest writing called Black Fire. And in 1970, Stokely Carmichael and Charles Hamilton wrote Black Power, the book that defined the movement.

Protest during these years extended to sports as well as writing. In 1967, Heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali refused induction into the armed forces on both religious and political grounds. The next year, John Carlos and Tommie Smith raised their gloved fists in a black power salute from the victory stand at the Olympic Games in Mexico City. And two years after that, Curt Flood challenged the reserve clause in professional baseball eventually changing the nature of the sport.

A new generation of black political figures emerged during the 1970s. Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm ran for president in 1972 and Congresswoman Barbara Jordan spoke with eloquence during the Watergate hearings

Benjamin Hooks replaced Roy Wilkins as the head of the NAACP and Andrew Young is elected mayor of Atlanta. Finally, in 1983, the Reverend Jesse Jackson announced his intention to make the first serious attempt by an African American to win the Democratic nomination for president. The torch had been passed to a new generation of leaders.

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Celebrating the Power and Persistence of Black Women Artist Who … – Atlanta Black Star

We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85 Installation Views. (C) Jonathan Dorado.

The female African-American experience is center stage in the Brooklyn Museums art exhibition We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 196585. The exhibit, which the art website Hyperallergic described as perhaps the most important exhibition New York has seen in recent years, highlights the work of Black women during a period of tremendous cultural and sociopolitical upheaval.

The 20-year time frame the exhibit spans notably gave rise to the womens liberation movement, but many Black women felt marginalized by mainstream white feminism. They began to identify as womanists (coined by The Color Purple author Alice Walker) rather than as feminists to embrace their specific take on womens liberation and the double jeopardy they experienced being both Black and female in a white supremacist and patriarchal society. And Black women artists felt sidelined by the art world as well. The marginalization they faced did not prevent them from creating, however. In fact, Black women artists flourished during this time.

The Brooklyn Museum show highlighting their accomplishments is part of a yearlong series of exhibitions marking the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Rujeko Hockley and Catherine Morris co-curated We Wanted a Revolution. The exhibit will run through Sept. 17, and the Brooklyn Museum has described the uniqueness of this assemblage of art, featuring more than 200 works.

It is the first exhibition to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color distinct from the primarily white, middle-class mainstream feminist movement in order to reorient conversations around race, feminism, political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period, the museum states on its website.

Presenting a diverse group of artists and activists who lived and worked at the intersections of avant-garde art worlds, radical political movements, and profound social change, the exhibition features a wide array of work, including conceptual, performance, film, and video art, as well as photography, painting, sculpture, and printmaking.

The exhibit features too many artists to name, but among them are Faith Ringgold, Julie Dash, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, Kay Brown, Susan Robeson and Blondell Cummings. The cultural output of these women and other artists is featured in several galleries at the museum. In addition to individual artists, the exhibit highlights groups of artists, such as the Spiral Artist Collective and the subsequent Black Arts Movement, and how Black women fared in these collectives.

Remarkably, We Wanted a Revolution shows how the social issues of importance to the Black community during the 1965-85 time frame, such as the prison industrial complex, are much the same today. For example, it includes Faith Ringgolds work For the Womens House. In 1971, Ringgold displayed the work, which features a multicultural group of women in various roles doctor, athlete, policewoman, musician in the Womens House of Detention at Rikers Island, where she had taken up an unconventional residency. She created the work at the request of the incarcerated women.

Many of them voiced the opinion that they wanted to be able to see women being things in the world other than some of the things they had gotten arrested for, she told the New Yorker in 2010. They wanted to be able to do things in the world that were important other than being somebodys girlfriend.

Ringgold visited the prison because Angela Davis was incarcerated (in another location) at the time, and the artist became concerned about her and other women inmates. Davis, who famously studied at the Sorbonne, appreciated African-American artists, calling the Black arts movement extremely important. That movement, spearheaded by poet Amiri Baraka, was an outgrowth of the Black power movement. It included poets, writers, playwrights and musicians who embraced a political consciousness shaped by the desire for Black liberation.

Black female friendship is also the subject of the works featured in We Wanted a Revolution, as is the way in which Black artists advocated for other artists by helping to publicize their work. Moreover, historical documents paint a deeper picture of the art world at the time, including its stinging exclusion women of color. As Hyperallergic notes:

Through reams of historical documents and papers, the curators unflinchingly recount instances of racism and exclusion, from the feminist cooperative AIR Gallery to Donald Newmans controversial 1979 Nigger Drawings show at Artists Space and even the Brooklyn Museum itself. During a town hall event at the institution in 1971, its director at the time, Duncan Cameron, appeared open to criticism yet ostensibly defended the museums exclusionary practices regarding the women and minority artists who were vying for representation; there was widespread outcry.

Ringgold and other activist artists helped to hold Cameron accountable. He ended up resigning in 1973.

Artists such as Howardena Pindell were keenly aware of the impact racial microaggressions, such as those suffered by Blacks in the art field, had on African-Americans. Her video installation Free White and 21 explores the minor but persistent racial slights that serve to traumatize Blacks. Other artwork questions what kind of political activism constitutes radicalism, the intersection of race and sexual orientation, and how Black men artists marginalized Black women as well as the white art world. Yet, Black women artists still stood by Black men. The Combahee River Collective, made up of Black LGBT women artists, said as much in its 1974 mission statement.

Although we are feminists and Lesbians, we feel solidarity with progressive Black men and do not advocate the fractionalization that white women who are separatists demand, the statement said. We struggle together with Black men against racism, while we also struggle with Black men about sexism.

Despite the challenges Black women artists faced, they persisted, demanding equality whether it regarded race, sex or gender. Through We Wanted a Revolution, their efforts finally receive the recognition they have long deserved.

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Celebrating the Power and Persistence of Black Women Artist Who … – Atlanta Black Star

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"We Were 8 Years in Power": Ta-Nehisi Coates on Obama, Trump & White Fear of "Good Negro Government" – Democracy Now!

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

JUAN GONZLEZ: In your book thats about to come out, one of the things you talk about is the fear that white America has of “good Negro government.” And you make references to the Civil War, as well, yourI guess its a theme that youve often raised, the lack of attention and study of the lessons of the Civil War. But at the same time, you also say that the Obama administrations “good Negro government” also, in many ways, helped to feed white supremacy. Could you elaborate on that?

TA-NEHISI COATES: Yeah, sure. I mean, the book takes its title, We Were Eight Years in Power, from a gentleman who stood up in 1895, one of the black congressmen appointed duringor who won during Reconstruction, immediately after slavery. And as South Carolina was basically cementing the disenfranchisement of African Americans, he said, you know, “Listen, we were eight years in power.” And he listed all the great things that the African Americans, really, the multiracial government, you know, a tremendous experiment in democracy that followed the Civil War, had accomplishedyou know, reformingreally, forming the first public school system, you know, reforming the penal systemjust a list of governmental accomplishments that they had done. And he struggled to understand why folks would then perpetrate this act of disenfranchisement, given how much South Carolina had advanced during this period.

And the great W.E.B. Du Bois pointed out that the one thing white South Carolinians feared more than bad Negro government was good Negro government. It was precisely the fact of having made all of these accomplishments, because they ran counter to the ideas of white supremacy that gave the disenfranchisement movement and the redeemers their fuel.

And I dont think it was very different under President Barack Obama. I think it was, in fact, you know, his modesty. It was the lack of radicalism. It was the fact that he wasnt out, you know, firebombing or, you know, throwing up the Black Power sign or doing such that made him so scary, because I think what folks ultimately fear is Africansis kind of the ease with which African Americans could be integrated into the system, because it assaults the very ideas of white supremacy in the first place.

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"We Were 8 Years in Power": Ta-Nehisi Coates on Obama, Trump & White Fear of "Good Negro Government" – Democracy Now!

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August Wilson’s Pittsburgh – New York Times

Eventually the Civic Arena, which many came to see as a harbinger of the communitys destruction, was torn down and replaced with the modern PPG Paints Arena. Half a block away, the Freedom Corner was dedicated in 2001, commemorating the civil rights leaders of the 1950s and 1960s who sought to maintain the Hill District. It is also a symbolic gateway to the neighborhood.

In 2006, a proposal to build a casino in the lower Hill District was overwhelmingly rejected by residents. To this day, the sphere of influence from downtown generally stops at Crawford Street, which for me was a jarring reminder of how ghosts from the past dont easily dissipate.

Though much of Wilsons Pittsburgh is gone, you could use his words to tour the district. I did so, led by Kimberly C. Ellis, a digital consultant and founder of the preservation-minded Historic Hill Institute, who is also the playwrights niece. The neighborhood has changed a lot, she said, adding that there is a renewed level of pride.

Ms. Ellis took me to 1727 Bedford Avenue, where Wilson lived with his mother and most of his immediate family until he was almost 13. The brick building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is ringed by scaffolding. After its renovation, the house is slated to be the site of a multidisciplinary arts center, with an artist-in-residency program. We then saw her brother, Paul A. Ellis Jr., the executive director and general counsel of the August Wilson House. This center is going to be an economic anchor for the entire Hill District, which is huge, Mr. Ellis said. It is a significant undertaking.

Wilson used the house as valuable source material: It was the conceptual basis for Seven Guitars, which begins after a death and focuses on character and mortality.

I walked to the back of the house, to orient myself. In the play, the backyard is a meeting point for the characters, including Vera, who has conflicting feelings about the return of her musician ex-boyfriend, Floyd, and the down-to-earth neighbor Louise. I saw the cellar doors leading to the basement that Wilson described as storage space for the always eccentric Hedley.

Set in 1948, during Wilsons early childhood, the play chronicles a time when many African-Americans were returning from serving in World War II but still faced inequality. Wilson never shied away from this sort of commentary, as it honestly tackled the African-American experience in a northern city, something that was often overshadowed by the overt oppression of the Jim Crow South. Being near the cellar reminded me of one of Hedleys monologues, in which he laments the need to constantly defend his self-worth at a time of rigid racial norms.

Everybody say Hedley crazy cause he black. Because he know the place of the black man is not at the foot of the white mans boot. Maybe it is not all right in my head sometimes. Because I dont like the world. I dont like what I see from the people. The people is too small. I always want to be a big man. Hedley, Seven Guitars

The Bedford Hill Apartments, part of the Hope VI redevelopment plan, are across the street from Wilsons home. The apartments were intended to create mixed-use housing in areas where public housing was predominant. It, too, appeared in one of Wilsons plays. In Radio Golf, which focuses on gentrification, the Bedford Hills Redevelopment, Inc. exists.

Skepticism about the durability of minority political power is a theme in the play. In one scene, Harmond Wilks, an African-American real estate developer with mayoral ambitions, is speaking to Elder Joseph Barlow, known as Old Joe. Old Joe doesnt think a presumptive African-American mayor would be allowed to have as much power as a white mayor. Harmond disagrees, but gives a witty retort: Naw, Im going to have all the keys and theyre going to have to make me some new ones. We are going to build up everything.

Ms. Ellis and I headed to the Upper Hill District and 809 Anaheim Street, where Fences, starring Denzel Washington and Viola Davis, was filmed. It is a private residence, so there arent any tours. The facade is enough. Passing the tidy brick house, Mr. Wilsons depiction of Troy echoed in my head, especially in a heated scene with his son Cory over a desire to play football. See you swung at the ball and didnt hit it. Thats strike one. See, you in the batters box now. You swung and you missed. Thats strike one. Dont you strike out!

In the Middle Hill District, mostly along Centre and Wylie Avenues, are the remnants of the neighborhoods golden age. Several buildings are ripe for renovation, but others have been demolished.

The Pittsburgh Weil School, where Wilson created the Black Horizon Theater with the playwright Rob Penny in 1968, continues to operate as a public school. At Black Beautys Lounge, a huge, colorful mural by Kyle Holbrook of Wilson and his plays is painted on the side of the building.

The building that formerly housed Lutzs Meat Market, featured in Two Trains Running, stands vacant. In the play, an intriguing 1960s-era generational divide between Memphis Lee, who runs a diner, and Sterling, an aimless young man, breaks out in the open. Memphis is skeptical about the black power movement, while Sterling is curious about it. Memphis tells Sterling that African-Americans have to use the system thats currently available and work within it, despite its flaws. Freedom is heavy, he says. You got to put your shoulder to freedom. Put your shoulder to it and hope your back hold up. And if you around here looking for justice, you got a long wait.

The New Granada Theater, originally built as a fraternal lodge and designed by Louis A. S. Bellinger, one of Pittsburghs first African-American architects, has been in disrepair for years. Despite this, its a stunning structure, and as Ms. Ellis noted, the theater often hosted musical legends including Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway.

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Black Power – Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica.com

American philosophical movement

THIS IS A DIRECTORY PAGE. Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic.

Black Power became popular in the late 1960s. The slogan was first used by Carmichael in June 1966 during a civil rights march in Mississippi. However, the concept of black power predated the slogan. Essentially, it refers to all the attempts by African Americans to maximize their political and economic power.

The assassination of Malcolm X, eloquent exponent of black nationalism, in 1965 in New York and the espousal of Black Power by previously integrationist civil rights organizations such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) helped to galvanize a generation of young black writers into rethinking the purpose of African…

…in June 1966 during a voting rights march through Mississippi following the wounding of James Meredith, who had desegregated the University of Mississippi in 1962. Carmichaels use of the black power slogan encapsulated the emerging notion of a freedom struggle seeking political, economic, and cultural objectives beyond narrowly defined civil rights reforms. By the late 1960s…

…Malcolm urged his followers to defend themselves by any means necessary. His biting critique of the so-called Negro provided the intellectual foundations for the Black Power and black consciousness movements in the United States in the late 1960s and 70s. Through the influence of the Nation of Islam,…

…Vietnam War for the available money. Despite the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Voting Rights Act (1965), many African Americans became disenchanted with progress on civil rights. Thus, a Black Power movement arose, hitting into Johnsons popularity even among African Americans. A general crime increase and sporadic violence in the cities raised apprehension in white…

…its members faced increased violence. In response, SNCC migrated from a philosophy of nonviolence to one of greater militancy after the mid-1960s, as an advocate of the burgeoning black power movement, a facet of late 20th-century black nationalism. The shift was personified by Stokely Carmichael, who replaced John Lewis as SNCC chairman in 196667. While many…

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Crystal Bridges to Debut ‘Art in the Age of Black Power’ Exhibit … – Arkansas Business Online

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville on Tuesday announced its exhibitions for 2018, including the U.S. debut of “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power.”

Also appearing next year will be the Crystal Bridges-organized exhibitions “Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art” and “Native North America.”

“Our 2018 exhibitions complement the story of American art shared through our permanent collection,” said Rod Bigelow, the museum’s executive director and chief diversity and inclusion officer.

The museum called “Soul of a Nation,” organized by the Tate Modern in London and debuting in the United States at Crystal Bridges, “a look at how American culture was reshaped through the work of Black artists during the tumultuous 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s.”

Crystal Bridges is one of only two American venues to host this exhibition. Following its debut at Crystal Bridges, the exhibition travels to the Brooklyn Museum in New York.

The exhibit will feature artworks by more than 60 black artists, including Romare Bearden, Melvin Edwards, Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, Charles White, Alvin Loving, Alma Thomas and Lorraine O’Grady.

And the art includes a wide range of styles and media, including painting, photography, fashion, sculpture and mixed media work, as well as street art in the form of murals and posters by artists of the AfriCOBRA collective, the graphic art created by Emory Douglas for The Black Panther newspaper and black feminist art.

“Soul of a Nation opens a window into the heart of the Black Power movement in all of its beauty, pride, power, and aspiration,” the museum said.

Soul of a Nation runs Feb. 3 through April 23, 2018.

As for the Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit, Crystal Bridges is building on its collection of major works by O’Keeffe including Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1 and Radiator Building-Night, New York and is bringing together a selection of O’Keeffe’s most important works.

Alongside the works by O’Keeffe, the exhibition will display artworks by emerging contemporary artists “that evoke, investigate, and expand upon O’Keeffe’s artistic legacy,” the museum said. “This exhibition demonstrates the continuing power of O’Keeffe’s work as a touchstone for contemporary art.”

These contemporary artists include Sharona Eliassaf, Monica Kim Garza, Loie Hollowell, Molly Larkey and Matthew Ronay.

This exhibit will run May 26 through Sept. 3, 2018.

The exhibit “Native North America,” which will be on display Oct. 6, 2018, through Jan. 7, 2019, is the first exhibition to chart the development of contemporary indigenous art from the United States and Canada from the 1960s to the present, the museum said.

The exhibition will present about 75 works of art by important native artists such as Kay WalkingStick, Carl Beam, Fritz Scholder, Andrea Carlson and Kent Monkman and features works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, videos, sculpture and sound, installation and performance art.

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The original Black Ranger talks ‘Power Rangers,’ his thoughts on the … – AiPT! Comics

There have been many Power Rangers over the course of 25 years but precious few can say they were a part of the first crew. I was able to chat with Walter Jones, who played the original Black Power Ranger Zack Taylor in season 1 of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. Jones was able to be a part of something new that changed pop culture forever. Even if you werent a fan of the series, when someone mentions Power Rangers, you know exactly what theyre talking about. I talked with Jones about the original series, the 2017 Power Rangers film, and a new film hes a part of featuring an impressive cast of original Power Rangers from previous seasons.

AiPT!:Did you know anything about the original Sentai series prior to auditioning?

Walter Jones: Ihad never seen the show or had any idea about it.

AiPT!:Was Zack the Black Ranger the role you auditioned for? Or was that the role given to you?

Walter Jones:I auditioned for the character Zack. I had no idea what color Ranger I would be. When I saw the costumes the first time I wanted the Red or the Black. I was happy to get the black costume.

AiPT!:Did you ever think that Power Rangers would last as long as it has?

Walter Jones: I never thought that Power Rangers would still be talked about 24 years later, much less that there would be new merchandise about the original series.

AiPT!:What did you enjoy most about the new Power Rangers movie?

Walter Jones:RJ Cyler was super captivating as Billy. I enjoyed all the actors! Great effects.

AiPT!:Was there anything you didnt like about it? And was there anything you would have changed about the film?

Walter Jones:[It had] no Hip Hop Kido! It was a major motivator for so many fans to explore physical arts, dancing, gymnastics, parkour, etc My character was the only character with that ability. It should have been included in some fashion.

AiPT!:Do you ever get tired of talking about Power Rangers? Is there any moment where you just arent in the mood for it?

Walter Jones:Talking about Rangers doesnt bother me. Im proud of its legacy. Of course, theres a time and place for everything.

AiPT!:One of my favorite comedies of all time is Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. While watching this film I noticed that you made a cameo as an angry fan. How did you come across that role?

Walter Jones:I was looping (doing voice over) on the film and the producers decided they wanted to add that part. I auditioned and got it!

AiPT!:Who was the brain behind The Order movie that you and a fantastic cast of former Power Rangers are a part of?

Walter Jones:David Fielding and Karan Ashley are the brains of the order. Its going to be a very exciting project!

AiPT!:When can we see the film and how can fans help support it?

Walter Jones:The Order should be out next year. We still have production to complete.

AiPT!:Youre about to go on a dangerous mission but can only take one other Power Ranger from any season with you. Who do you take?

Walter Jones:The one solid leader has always been Red. Gotta go with the tried and true!

Walter Jones left the Power Ranger series after season 1 and despite never making a return as his character, he did come back to voice various antagonists. Jones was the very first actor to do voice work for any character other than a Ranger (mainly for monsters or villains) on a Power Rangers show after having a role as a Ranger himself. Jones to this day is still acting, dancing and makes Con appearances all over, meeting and greeting the Power Rangers fans that he helped create.

David Fieldinginterviewmighty morphin power rangersThe OrderWalter Jones

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Supporters rally to get Colin Kaepernick a job – New York Post

Colin Kaepernick may still be out a job but theres plenty of people who are on his team. Hundreds of supporters gathered outside NFL Headquarters on Wednesday to voice their outrage over the quarterback not being signed ahead of the 2017 season. The United We Stand rally was in full swing as of 5 p.m., with countless fans standing along Park Ave, chanting Stay Woke! and holding up signs that said NFL Blackout and Kaepernick We Kneel With You. Some wore shirts, which showed the former 49ers star taking a knee and portrayed his signature afro as the black power fist. Many invoked former athletes turned protesters, including Tommie Smith and John Carlos, as well as Muhammad Ali. The crowd, which was joined by several celebrities and prominent figures including rapper Kurtis Blow and Palestinian-American political activist Linda Sarsour called for a boycott of all things NFL. As far as Im concerned no fantasy football, no NFL packages, no going to the games which we usually do a couple times a year, said Mitchell Stevenson, a 56-year-old Giants fan who traveled from Hamden, Connecticut, with a crew of family and friends. Done, he said firmly. Thats it. NFL owners have been avoiding Kaepernick like the plague after his national anthem stunt last year. The QB is still seeking work with just two weeks left before the season starts and unless another teams star is injured, wont likely be on a Week 1 roster. Fans outside the NFL headquarters on Wednesday said they believed Kaepernick is being unfairly blackballed for simply utilizing his first amendment rights. The rally, which was promoted by Spike Lee and others, was ultimately organized by a group of individuals who believe the 29-year-old deserves to play in the league. I think Kaepernick getting a job is start, said Eddie Googe, a 50-year-old Cowboys fan from Connecticut who called on the NFL to use its immense power to unite the country. The league needs to do a better job with social justice issues, he said. Its almost scary how much influence they have. You have these billionaire owners sitting in their offices. Theyre sending a message now that theres a right and wrong time to stand up for social justice issues. Theres never a wrong time. They need to change their message. Many people have spoken out against Kaepernicks actions saying hes shifted attention away from the issue of police brutality and instead placed it on himself. What Kaepernick did was stupid, its ineffective, FS1 co-host Jason Whitlock told FOX Business on Wednesday. It started a big conversation about Colin Kapernick and I think hes very happy with that. I think he lvoes the attention, I think he lvoes being a martyr and a celebrity. Theres gonna be a bunch of foolish people right out in front of the NFL headquarters today and protest, not police brutality, but whether some multi-millionaire quarterback has a job. Thats a joke. Some wore shirts, which showed Kaepernick taking a knee and portrayed his signature afro as the black power fist.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

black power – Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum

The progress made by African Americans in the 1950s and early 1960s at achieving their civil rights was compromised by violence. Frankly, many young blacks rejected the courage and patience displayed by Dr. Martin Luther King in his non-violent response to injustice in American society. The epitome of the Black Power Movement was the Black Panther Party. Founded by Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale and others, this party justified the use of violence in the accomplishment of black justice. Newton and Seale were harassed by police and Newton was convicted of killing a policeman. The movement stimulated a number of other blacks to speak out. In 1968, Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver wrote his best selling autobiography, Soul on Ice and the poet Amira Baraka published an anthology of protest writing called Black Fire. And in 1970, Stokely Carmichael and Charles Hamilton wrote Black Power, the book that defined the movement. Protest during these years extended to sports as well as writing. In 1967, Heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali refused induction into the armed forces on both religious and political grounds. The next year, John Carlos and Tommie Smith raised their gloved fists in a black power salute from the victory stand at the Olympic Games in Mexico City. And two years after that, Curt Flood challenged the reserve clause in professional baseball eventually changing the nature of the sport. A new generation of black political figures emerged during the 1970s. Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm ran for president in 1972 and Congresswoman Barbara Jordan spoke with eloquence during the Watergate hearings Benjamin Hooks replaced Roy Wilkins as the head of the NAACP and Andrew Young is elected mayor of Atlanta. Finally, in 1983, the Reverend Jesse Jackson announced his intention to make the first serious attempt by an African American to win the Democratic nomination for president. The torch had been passed to a new generation of leaders.

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August 16, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Celebrating the Power and Persistence of Black Women Artist Who … – Atlanta Black Star

We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85 Installation Views. (C) Jonathan Dorado. The female African-American experience is center stage in the Brooklyn Museums art exhibition We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 196585. The exhibit, which the art website Hyperallergic described as perhaps the most important exhibition New York has seen in recent years, highlights the work of Black women during a period of tremendous cultural and sociopolitical upheaval. The 20-year time frame the exhibit spans notably gave rise to the womens liberation movement, but many Black women felt marginalized by mainstream white feminism. They began to identify as womanists (coined by The Color Purple author Alice Walker) rather than as feminists to embrace their specific take on womens liberation and the double jeopardy they experienced being both Black and female in a white supremacist and patriarchal society. And Black women artists felt sidelined by the art world as well. The marginalization they faced did not prevent them from creating, however. In fact, Black women artists flourished during this time. The Brooklyn Museum show highlighting their accomplishments is part of a yearlong series of exhibitions marking the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Rujeko Hockley and Catherine Morris co-curated We Wanted a Revolution. The exhibit will run through Sept. 17, and the Brooklyn Museum has described the uniqueness of this assemblage of art, featuring more than 200 works. It is the first exhibition to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color distinct from the primarily white, middle-class mainstream feminist movement in order to reorient conversations around race, feminism, political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period, the museum states on its website. Presenting a diverse group of artists and activists who lived and worked at the intersections of avant-garde art worlds, radical political movements, and profound social change, the exhibition features a wide array of work, including conceptual, performance, film, and video art, as well as photography, painting, sculpture, and printmaking. The exhibit features too many artists to name, but among them are Faith Ringgold, Julie Dash, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, Kay Brown, Susan Robeson and Blondell Cummings. The cultural output of these women and other artists is featured in several galleries at the museum. In addition to individual artists, the exhibit highlights groups of artists, such as the Spiral Artist Collective and the subsequent Black Arts Movement, and how Black women fared in these collectives. Remarkably, We Wanted a Revolution shows how the social issues of importance to the Black community during the 1965-85 time frame, such as the prison industrial complex, are much the same today. For example, it includes Faith Ringgolds work For the Womens House. In 1971, Ringgold displayed the work, which features a multicultural group of women in various roles doctor, athlete, policewoman, musician in the Womens House of Detention at Rikers Island, where she had taken up an unconventional residency. She created the work at the request of the incarcerated women. Many of them voiced the opinion that they wanted to be able to see women being things in the world other than some of the things they had gotten arrested for, she told the New Yorker in 2010. They wanted to be able to do things in the world that were important other than being somebodys girlfriend. Ringgold visited the prison because Angela Davis was incarcerated (in another location) at the time, and the artist became concerned about her and other women inmates. Davis, who famously studied at the Sorbonne, appreciated African-American artists, calling the Black arts movement extremely important. That movement, spearheaded by poet Amiri Baraka, was an outgrowth of the Black power movement. It included poets, writers, playwrights and musicians who embraced a political consciousness shaped by the desire for Black liberation. Black female friendship is also the subject of the works featured in We Wanted a Revolution, as is the way in which Black artists advocated for other artists by helping to publicize their work. Moreover, historical documents paint a deeper picture of the art world at the time, including its stinging exclusion women of color. As Hyperallergic notes: Through reams of historical documents and papers, the curators unflinchingly recount instances of racism and exclusion, from the feminist cooperative AIR Gallery to Donald Newmans controversial 1979 Nigger Drawings show at Artists Space and even the Brooklyn Museum itself. During a town hall event at the institution in 1971, its director at the time, Duncan Cameron, appeared open to criticism yet ostensibly defended the museums exclusionary practices regarding the women and minority artists who were vying for representation; there was widespread outcry. Ringgold and other activist artists helped to hold Cameron accountable. He ended up resigning in 1973. Artists such as Howardena Pindell were keenly aware of the impact racial microaggressions, such as those suffered by Blacks in the art field, had on African-Americans. Her video installation Free White and 21 explores the minor but persistent racial slights that serve to traumatize Blacks. Other artwork questions what kind of political activism constitutes radicalism, the intersection of race and sexual orientation, and how Black men artists marginalized Black women as well as the white art world. Yet, Black women artists still stood by Black men. The Combahee River Collective, made up of Black LGBT women artists, said as much in its 1974 mission statement. Although we are feminists and Lesbians, we feel solidarity with progressive Black men and do not advocate the fractionalization that white women who are separatists demand, the statement said. We struggle together with Black men against racism, while we also struggle with Black men about sexism. Despite the challenges Black women artists faced, they persisted, demanding equality whether it regarded race, sex or gender. Through We Wanted a Revolution, their efforts finally receive the recognition they have long deserved.

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"We Were 8 Years in Power": Ta-Nehisi Coates on Obama, Trump & White Fear of "Good Negro Government" – Democracy Now!

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. JUAN GONZLEZ: In your book thats about to come out, one of the things you talk about is the fear that white America has of “good Negro government.” And you make references to the Civil War, as well, yourI guess its a theme that youve often raised, the lack of attention and study of the lessons of the Civil War. But at the same time, you also say that the Obama administrations “good Negro government” also, in many ways, helped to feed white supremacy. Could you elaborate on that? TA-NEHISI COATES: Yeah, sure. I mean, the book takes its title, We Were Eight Years in Power, from a gentleman who stood up in 1895, one of the black congressmen appointed duringor who won during Reconstruction, immediately after slavery. And as South Carolina was basically cementing the disenfranchisement of African Americans, he said, you know, “Listen, we were eight years in power.” And he listed all the great things that the African Americans, really, the multiracial government, you know, a tremendous experiment in democracy that followed the Civil War, had accomplishedyou know, reformingreally, forming the first public school system, you know, reforming the penal systemjust a list of governmental accomplishments that they had done. And he struggled to understand why folks would then perpetrate this act of disenfranchisement, given how much South Carolina had advanced during this period. And the great W.E.B. Du Bois pointed out that the one thing white South Carolinians feared more than bad Negro government was good Negro government. It was precisely the fact of having made all of these accomplishments, because they ran counter to the ideas of white supremacy that gave the disenfranchisement movement and the redeemers their fuel. And I dont think it was very different under President Barack Obama. I think it was, in fact, you know, his modesty. It was the lack of radicalism. It was the fact that he wasnt out, you know, firebombing or, you know, throwing up the Black Power sign or doing such that made him so scary, because I think what folks ultimately fear is Africansis kind of the ease with which African Americans could be integrated into the system, because it assaults the very ideas of white supremacy in the first place.

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August Wilson’s Pittsburgh – New York Times

Eventually the Civic Arena, which many came to see as a harbinger of the communitys destruction, was torn down and replaced with the modern PPG Paints Arena. Half a block away, the Freedom Corner was dedicated in 2001, commemorating the civil rights leaders of the 1950s and 1960s who sought to maintain the Hill District. It is also a symbolic gateway to the neighborhood. In 2006, a proposal to build a casino in the lower Hill District was overwhelmingly rejected by residents. To this day, the sphere of influence from downtown generally stops at Crawford Street, which for me was a jarring reminder of how ghosts from the past dont easily dissipate. Though much of Wilsons Pittsburgh is gone, you could use his words to tour the district. I did so, led by Kimberly C. Ellis, a digital consultant and founder of the preservation-minded Historic Hill Institute, who is also the playwrights niece. The neighborhood has changed a lot, she said, adding that there is a renewed level of pride. Ms. Ellis took me to 1727 Bedford Avenue, where Wilson lived with his mother and most of his immediate family until he was almost 13. The brick building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is ringed by scaffolding. After its renovation, the house is slated to be the site of a multidisciplinary arts center, with an artist-in-residency program. We then saw her brother, Paul A. Ellis Jr., the executive director and general counsel of the August Wilson House. This center is going to be an economic anchor for the entire Hill District, which is huge, Mr. Ellis said. It is a significant undertaking. Wilson used the house as valuable source material: It was the conceptual basis for Seven Guitars, which begins after a death and focuses on character and mortality. I walked to the back of the house, to orient myself. In the play, the backyard is a meeting point for the characters, including Vera, who has conflicting feelings about the return of her musician ex-boyfriend, Floyd, and the down-to-earth neighbor Louise. I saw the cellar doors leading to the basement that Wilson described as storage space for the always eccentric Hedley. Set in 1948, during Wilsons early childhood, the play chronicles a time when many African-Americans were returning from serving in World War II but still faced inequality. Wilson never shied away from this sort of commentary, as it honestly tackled the African-American experience in a northern city, something that was often overshadowed by the overt oppression of the Jim Crow South. Being near the cellar reminded me of one of Hedleys monologues, in which he laments the need to constantly defend his self-worth at a time of rigid racial norms. Everybody say Hedley crazy cause he black. Because he know the place of the black man is not at the foot of the white mans boot. Maybe it is not all right in my head sometimes. Because I dont like the world. I dont like what I see from the people. The people is too small. I always want to be a big man. Hedley, Seven Guitars The Bedford Hill Apartments, part of the Hope VI redevelopment plan, are across the street from Wilsons home. The apartments were intended to create mixed-use housing in areas where public housing was predominant. It, too, appeared in one of Wilsons plays. In Radio Golf, which focuses on gentrification, the Bedford Hills Redevelopment, Inc. exists. Skepticism about the durability of minority political power is a theme in the play. In one scene, Harmond Wilks, an African-American real estate developer with mayoral ambitions, is speaking to Elder Joseph Barlow, known as Old Joe. Old Joe doesnt think a presumptive African-American mayor would be allowed to have as much power as a white mayor. Harmond disagrees, but gives a witty retort: Naw, Im going to have all the keys and theyre going to have to make me some new ones. We are going to build up everything. Ms. Ellis and I headed to the Upper Hill District and 809 Anaheim Street, where Fences, starring Denzel Washington and Viola Davis, was filmed. It is a private residence, so there arent any tours. The facade is enough. Passing the tidy brick house, Mr. Wilsons depiction of Troy echoed in my head, especially in a heated scene with his son Cory over a desire to play football. See you swung at the ball and didnt hit it. Thats strike one. See, you in the batters box now. You swung and you missed. Thats strike one. Dont you strike out! In the Middle Hill District, mostly along Centre and Wylie Avenues, are the remnants of the neighborhoods golden age. Several buildings are ripe for renovation, but others have been demolished. The Pittsburgh Weil School, where Wilson created the Black Horizon Theater with the playwright Rob Penny in 1968, continues to operate as a public school. At Black Beautys Lounge, a huge, colorful mural by Kyle Holbrook of Wilson and his plays is painted on the side of the building. The building that formerly housed Lutzs Meat Market, featured in Two Trains Running, stands vacant. In the play, an intriguing 1960s-era generational divide between Memphis Lee, who runs a diner, and Sterling, an aimless young man, breaks out in the open. Memphis is skeptical about the black power movement, while Sterling is curious about it. Memphis tells Sterling that African-Americans have to use the system thats currently available and work within it, despite its flaws. Freedom is heavy, he says. You got to put your shoulder to freedom. Put your shoulder to it and hope your back hold up. And if you around here looking for justice, you got a long wait. The New Granada Theater, originally built as a fraternal lodge and designed by Louis A. S. Bellinger, one of Pittsburghs first African-American architects, has been in disrepair for years. Despite this, its a stunning structure, and as Ms. Ellis noted, the theater often hosted musical legends including Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway.

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Black Power – Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica.com

American philosophical movement THIS IS A DIRECTORY PAGE. Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic. Black Power became popular in the late 1960s. The slogan was first used by Carmichael in June 1966 during a civil rights march in Mississippi. However, the concept of black power predated the slogan. Essentially, it refers to all the attempts by African Americans to maximize their political and economic power. The assassination of Malcolm X, eloquent exponent of black nationalism, in 1965 in New York and the espousal of Black Power by previously integrationist civil rights organizations such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) helped to galvanize a generation of young black writers into rethinking the purpose of African… …in June 1966 during a voting rights march through Mississippi following the wounding of James Meredith, who had desegregated the University of Mississippi in 1962. Carmichaels use of the black power slogan encapsulated the emerging notion of a freedom struggle seeking political, economic, and cultural objectives beyond narrowly defined civil rights reforms. By the late 1960s… …Malcolm urged his followers to defend themselves by any means necessary. His biting critique of the so-called Negro provided the intellectual foundations for the Black Power and black consciousness movements in the United States in the late 1960s and 70s. Through the influence of the Nation of Islam,… …Vietnam War for the available money. Despite the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Voting Rights Act (1965), many African Americans became disenchanted with progress on civil rights. Thus, a Black Power movement arose, hitting into Johnsons popularity even among African Americans. A general crime increase and sporadic violence in the cities raised apprehension in white… …its members faced increased violence. In response, SNCC migrated from a philosophy of nonviolence to one of greater militancy after the mid-1960s, as an advocate of the burgeoning black power movement, a facet of late 20th-century black nationalism. The shift was personified by Stokely Carmichael, who replaced John Lewis as SNCC chairman in 196667. While many…

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August 13, 2017   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

‘black power’ Search – XVIDEOS.COM

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Crystal Bridges to Debut ‘Art in the Age of Black Power’ Exhibit … – Arkansas Business Online

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville on Tuesday announced its exhibitions for 2018, including the U.S. debut of “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power.” Also appearing next year will be the Crystal Bridges-organized exhibitions “Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art” and “Native North America.” “Our 2018 exhibitions complement the story of American art shared through our permanent collection,” said Rod Bigelow, the museum’s executive director and chief diversity and inclusion officer. The museum called “Soul of a Nation,” organized by the Tate Modern in London and debuting in the United States at Crystal Bridges, “a look at how American culture was reshaped through the work of Black artists during the tumultuous 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s.” Crystal Bridges is one of only two American venues to host this exhibition. Following its debut at Crystal Bridges, the exhibition travels to the Brooklyn Museum in New York. The exhibit will feature artworks by more than 60 black artists, including Romare Bearden, Melvin Edwards, Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, Charles White, Alvin Loving, Alma Thomas and Lorraine O’Grady. And the art includes a wide range of styles and media, including painting, photography, fashion, sculpture and mixed media work, as well as street art in the form of murals and posters by artists of the AfriCOBRA collective, the graphic art created by Emory Douglas for The Black Panther newspaper and black feminist art. “Soul of a Nation opens a window into the heart of the Black Power movement in all of its beauty, pride, power, and aspiration,” the museum said. Soul of a Nation runs Feb. 3 through April 23, 2018. As for the Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit, Crystal Bridges is building on its collection of major works by O’Keeffe including Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1 and Radiator Building-Night, New York and is bringing together a selection of O’Keeffe’s most important works. Alongside the works by O’Keeffe, the exhibition will display artworks by emerging contemporary artists “that evoke, investigate, and expand upon O’Keeffe’s artistic legacy,” the museum said. “This exhibition demonstrates the continuing power of O’Keeffe’s work as a touchstone for contemporary art.” These contemporary artists include Sharona Eliassaf, Monica Kim Garza, Loie Hollowell, Molly Larkey and Matthew Ronay. This exhibit will run May 26 through Sept. 3, 2018. The exhibit “Native North America,” which will be on display Oct. 6, 2018, through Jan. 7, 2019, is the first exhibition to chart the development of contemporary indigenous art from the United States and Canada from the 1960s to the present, the museum said. The exhibition will present about 75 works of art by important native artists such as Kay WalkingStick, Carl Beam, Fritz Scholder, Andrea Carlson and Kent Monkman and features works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, videos, sculpture and sound, installation and performance art.

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The original Black Ranger talks ‘Power Rangers,’ his thoughts on the … – AiPT! Comics

There have been many Power Rangers over the course of 25 years but precious few can say they were a part of the first crew. I was able to chat with Walter Jones, who played the original Black Power Ranger Zack Taylor in season 1 of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. Jones was able to be a part of something new that changed pop culture forever. Even if you werent a fan of the series, when someone mentions Power Rangers, you know exactly what theyre talking about. I talked with Jones about the original series, the 2017 Power Rangers film, and a new film hes a part of featuring an impressive cast of original Power Rangers from previous seasons. AiPT!:Did you know anything about the original Sentai series prior to auditioning? Walter Jones: Ihad never seen the show or had any idea about it. AiPT!:Was Zack the Black Ranger the role you auditioned for? Or was that the role given to you? Walter Jones:I auditioned for the character Zack. I had no idea what color Ranger I would be. When I saw the costumes the first time I wanted the Red or the Black. I was happy to get the black costume. AiPT!:Did you ever think that Power Rangers would last as long as it has? Walter Jones: I never thought that Power Rangers would still be talked about 24 years later, much less that there would be new merchandise about the original series. AiPT!:What did you enjoy most about the new Power Rangers movie? Walter Jones:RJ Cyler was super captivating as Billy. I enjoyed all the actors! Great effects. AiPT!:Was there anything you didnt like about it? And was there anything you would have changed about the film? Walter Jones:[It had] no Hip Hop Kido! It was a major motivator for so many fans to explore physical arts, dancing, gymnastics, parkour, etc My character was the only character with that ability. It should have been included in some fashion. AiPT!:Do you ever get tired of talking about Power Rangers? Is there any moment where you just arent in the mood for it? Walter Jones:Talking about Rangers doesnt bother me. Im proud of its legacy. Of course, theres a time and place for everything. AiPT!:One of my favorite comedies of all time is Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. While watching this film I noticed that you made a cameo as an angry fan. How did you come across that role? Walter Jones:I was looping (doing voice over) on the film and the producers decided they wanted to add that part. I auditioned and got it! AiPT!:Who was the brain behind The Order movie that you and a fantastic cast of former Power Rangers are a part of? Walter Jones:David Fielding and Karan Ashley are the brains of the order. Its going to be a very exciting project! AiPT!:When can we see the film and how can fans help support it? Walter Jones:The Order should be out next year. We still have production to complete. AiPT!:Youre about to go on a dangerous mission but can only take one other Power Ranger from any season with you. Who do you take? Walter Jones:The one solid leader has always been Red. Gotta go with the tried and true! Walter Jones left the Power Ranger series after season 1 and despite never making a return as his character, he did come back to voice various antagonists. Jones was the very first actor to do voice work for any character other than a Ranger (mainly for monsters or villains) on a Power Rangers show after having a role as a Ranger himself. Jones to this day is still acting, dancing and makes Con appearances all over, meeting and greeting the Power Rangers fans that he helped create. David Fieldinginterviewmighty morphin power rangersThe OrderWalter Jones

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