Archive for the ‘Black Power’ Category

Black Power Oficial – Video



Black Power Oficial

By: Ktia Pittel

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Black Power Oficial – Video

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Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

As a player in the Black Power and civil rights movements of the 1960s, even at only 25 years old, Maulana Karenga was concerned about legacy. He wanted to leave behind something that would both celebrate the accomplishments of his people and challenge them to go even further.

And so, in 1966, he created Kwanzaa, a seven-day celebration of family, community and culture that is rooted in the traditions of Africa, but just as firmly focused on accomplishments yet to come. Karenga envisioned it as a holiday meant to both celebrate the past and enhance the future, an annual opportunity for people of African descent everywhere to honor their ancestors by ensuring the best possible world for their descendants.

“The question for me, and for other people who left school to join the movement, was, ‘How do I take my knowledge and use it in the interest of my people?'” said Karenga, 72, speaking from his home in Los Angeles. “When I was doing Kwanzaa, I asked, ‘How can I conceive and construct something of enduring value that would serve the interest of our people and the movement?'”

Almost 50 years later, Kwanzaa has become a part of America’s cultural landscape, and celebrating it has become an end-of-year tradition for many African-American families. Karenga will be speaking as the centerpiece of the annual Kwanzaa celebration at Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Dec. 28.

“For most of us, this will probably be the first opportunity to actually listen to and learn from the founder of Kwanzaa,” said A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Lewis museum. “He will probably find a way of adding an extra dimension of depth to why he felt it was so important to make this holiday, and to why it has struck the chord it has among so many people.”

Celebrating Kwanzaa, which begins Thursday and ends on New Year’s Day, involves a combination of private reflection and communal ritual. It includes carefully planned meals, the lighting of candles and the telling of stories. And it offers, Karenga says, the chance for the African diaspora throughout the world to be proud of who they are.

“I created Kwanzaa for three basic reasons,” he says, beginning with, “to reaffirm our rootedness in African culture, because we had been lifted out of that by the holocaust of enslavement.”

The second consideration, he says, was to “give us a time when we, as Africans all over the world, could come together, reaffirm the bonds between us, celebrate ourselves and meditate the awesome meaning of being African in the world.”

And finally, he says, “I created Kwanzaa to introduce and reaffirm the importance of communal African values, values that stress and strengthen family, community and culture.”

The goal, he says, is similarly threefold: “To know our past and honor it, to engage our present and improve it, and to imagine a whole new future and forge it in the most ethical, effective and expansive ways.”

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Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

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TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video



TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance
Next part in the painting of black power armor, almost done.

By: TableTopEverything

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TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video

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black power – Video



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By: Brian Ham

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Black Power GanG-DO MY OWN(SVP) – Video



Black Power GanG-DO MY OWN(SVP)
DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)- #UDNDARKSIDE.

By: UDNDARKSIDE

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Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12 – Video



Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12
Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12 12/18/12 An officer was shot at numerous times by an unknown gunman. What supposed to be a routine…

By: The Best World Fun VIdeos

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Black Power ’72 Jesse Jackson at Wattstax to Disco as a distraction for Government Failure! – Video



Black Power '72 Jesse Jackson at Wattstax to Disco as a distraction for Government Failure!
Jesse Jackson in his natural prime is seen here at his eloquent best with what HE thought was required for his community a few years after he witnessed Marti…

By: Tony Bologne

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Black Power ’72 Jesse Jackson at Wattstax to Disco as a distraction for Government Failure! – Video

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Black Panther Party – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Black Panther Party or BPP (originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was a black revolutionary socialist organization active in the United States from 1966 until 1982. The Black Panther Party achieved national and international notoriety through its involvement in the Black Power movement and U.S. politics of the 1960s and 1970s.[2]

Founded in Oakland, California by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale on October 15, 1966, the organization initially set forth a doctrine calling primarily for the protection of black neighborhoods from police brutality.[3] The leaders of the organization espoused socialist and Marxist doctrines; however, the Party’s early black nationalist reputation attracted a diverse membership.[4] The Black Panther Party’s objectives and philosophy expanded and evolved rapidly during the party’s existence, making ideological consensus within the party difficult to achieve, and causing some prominent members to openly disagree with the views of the leaders.

The organization’s official newspaper, The Black Panther, was first circulated in 1967. Also that year, the Black Panther Party marched on the California State Capitol in Sacramento in protest of a selective ban on weapons. By 1968, the party had expanded into many cities throughout the United States, among them, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Newark, New Orleans, New York City, Omaha, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C.. Peak membership was near 10,000 by 1969, and their newspaper, under the editorial leadership of Eldridge Cleaver, had a circulation of 250,000.[5] The group created a Ten-Point Program, a document that called for “Land, Bread, Housing, Education, Clothing, Justice and Peace”, as well as exemption from conscription for black men, among other demands.[6] With the Ten-Point program, “What We Want, What We Believe”, the Black Panther Party expressed its economic and political grievances.[7]

Gaining national prominence, the Black Panther Party became an icon of the counterculture of the 1960s.[8] Ultimately, the Panthers condemned black nationalism as “black racism” and became more focused on socialism without racial exclusivity.[9] They instituted a variety of community social programs designed to alleviate poverty, improve health among inner city black communities, and soften the Party’s public image.[10] The Black Panther Party’s most widely known programs were its armed citizens’ patrols to evaluate behavior of police officers and its Free Breakfast for Children program. However, the group’s political goals were often overshadowed by the supposed criminality of members and their confrontational, militant, and violent tactics against police.[10][11][12]

Federal Bureau of Investigation Director J. Edgar Hoover called the party “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country,”[13] and he supervised an extensive program (COINTELPRO) of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, police harassment and many other tactics designed to undermine Panther leadership, incriminate party members and drain the organization of resources and manpower. Through these tactics, Hoover hoped to diminish the Party’s threat to the general power structure of the U.S., or even maintain its influence as a strong undercurrent.[14]Angela Davis, Ward Churchill, and others have alleged that federal, state and local law enforcement officials went to great lengths to discredit and destroy the organization, including assassination.[15][16][17] Black Panther Party membership reached a peak of 10,000 by early 1969, then suffered a series of contractions due to legal troubles, incarcerations, internal splits, expulsions and defections. Popular support for the Party declined further after reports appeared detailing the group’s involvement in illegal activities such as drug dealing and extortion schemes directed against Oakland merchants.[18] By 1972 most Panther activity centered on the national headquarters and a school in Oakland, where the party continued to influence local politics. Party contractions continued throughout the 1970s; by 1980 the Black Panther Party comprised just 27 members.[19]

In 1966, Huey P. Newton was released from jail. With his friend Bobby Seale from Oakland City College, he joined a black power group called the Revolutionary Action Movement (RAM). RAM had a chapter in Oakland and followed the writings of Robert F. Williams. Williams had been the president of the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP and later published a newsletter called The Crusader from Cuba, where he fled to escape kidnapping charges.[20]

Newton and Seale worked at the North Oakland Neighborhood Anti-Poverty Center, where they also served on the advisory board. To combat police brutality, the advisory board obtained 5,000 signatures in support of the City Council’s setting up a police review board to review complaints. Newton was also taking classes at the City College and at San Francisco Law School. Both institutions were active in the North Oakland Center. Thus the pair had numerous connections with whom they talked about a new organization. Inspired by the success of the Lowndes County Freedom Organization and Stokely Carmichael’s calls for separate black political organizations,[21] they wrote their initial platform statement, the Ten-Point Program. With the help of Huey’s brother Melvin, they decided on a uniform of blue shirts, black pants, black leather jackets, black berets, and openly displayed loaded shotguns. (In his studies, Newton had discovered a California law that allowed carrying a loaded rifle or shotgun in public, as long as it was publicly displayed and pointed at no one.)[22]

What became standard Black Panther discourse emerged from a long history of urban activism, social criticism and political struggle by African Americans. There is considerable debate about the impact that the Black Panther Party had on the greater society, or even their local environment. Author Jama Lazerow writes: “As inheritors of the discipline, pride, and calm self-assurance preached by Malcolm X, the Panthers became national heroes in black communities by infusing abstract nationalism with street toughnessby joining the rhythms of black working-class youth culture to the interracial lan and effervescence of Bay Area New Left politics… In 1966, the Panthers defined Oakland’s ghetto as a territory, the police as interlopers, and the Panther mission as the defense of community. The Panthers’ famous “policing the police” drew attention to the spatial remove that White Americans enjoyed from the police brutality that had come to characterize life in black urban communities.”[14] In his book Shadow of the Panther: Huey Newton and the Price of Black Power in America journalist Hugh Pearson takes a more jaundiced view, linking Panther criminality and violence to worsening conditions in America’s black ghettos as their influence spread nationwide.[23]

Awareness of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense grew rapidly after their May 2, 1967, protest at the California State Assembly.

In October 1967, Huey Newton was arrested for the murder of Oakland Police Officer John Frey. At the time, Newton claimed that he had been falsely accused, leading to the “Free Huey” campaign. On February 17, 1968, at the “Free Huey” birthday rally in the Oakland Auditorium, several Black Panther Party leaders spoke. H. Rap Brown, Black Panther Party Minister of Justice, declared:

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Black Panther Party – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Black Power Oficial – Video




Black Power Oficial By: Ktia Pittel

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Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

As a player in the Black Power and civil rights movements of the 1960s, even at only 25 years old, Maulana Karenga was concerned about legacy. He wanted to leave behind something that would both celebrate the accomplishments of his people and challenge them to go even further. And so, in 1966, he created Kwanzaa, a seven-day celebration of family, community and culture that is rooted in the traditions of Africa, but just as firmly focused on accomplishments yet to come. Karenga envisioned it as a holiday meant to both celebrate the past and enhance the future, an annual opportunity for people of African descent everywhere to honor their ancestors by ensuring the best possible world for their descendants. “The question for me, and for other people who left school to join the movement, was, ‘How do I take my knowledge and use it in the interest of my people?'” said Karenga, 72, speaking from his home in Los Angeles. “When I was doing Kwanzaa, I asked, ‘How can I conceive and construct something of enduring value that would serve the interest of our people and the movement?'” Almost 50 years later, Kwanzaa has become a part of America’s cultural landscape, and celebrating it has become an end-of-year tradition for many African-American families. Karenga will be speaking as the centerpiece of the annual Kwanzaa celebration at Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Dec. 28. “For most of us, this will probably be the first opportunity to actually listen to and learn from the founder of Kwanzaa,” said A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Lewis museum. “He will probably find a way of adding an extra dimension of depth to why he felt it was so important to make this holiday, and to why it has struck the chord it has among so many people.” Celebrating Kwanzaa, which begins Thursday and ends on New Year’s Day, involves a combination of private reflection and communal ritual. It includes carefully planned meals, the lighting of candles and the telling of stories. And it offers, Karenga says, the chance for the African diaspora throughout the world to be proud of who they are. “I created Kwanzaa for three basic reasons,” he says, beginning with, “to reaffirm our rootedness in African culture, because we had been lifted out of that by the holocaust of enslavement.” The second consideration, he says, was to “give us a time when we, as Africans all over the world, could come together, reaffirm the bonds between us, celebrate ourselves and meditate the awesome meaning of being African in the world.” And finally, he says, “I created Kwanzaa to introduce and reaffirm the importance of communal African values, values that stress and strengthen family, community and culture.” The goal, he says, is similarly threefold: “To know our past and honor it, to engage our present and improve it, and to imagine a whole new future and forge it in the most ethical, effective and expansive ways.”

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TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video




TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance Next part in the painting of black power armor, almost done. By: TableTopEverything

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black power – Video




black power By: Brian Ham

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Black Power GanG-DO MY OWN(SVP) – Video




Black Power GanG-DO MY OWN(SVP) DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)-DO MY OWN(SVP)- #UDNDARKSIDE. By: UDNDARKSIDE

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Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12 – Video




Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12 Officer involved shooting with Black Power Ranger 12-18-12 12/18/12 An officer was shot at numerous times by an unknown gunman. What supposed to be a routine… By: The Best World Fun VIdeos

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Black Power ’72 Jesse Jackson at Wattstax to Disco as a distraction for Government Failure! – Video




Black Power'72 Jesse Jackson at Wattstax to Disco as a distraction for Government Failure! Jesse Jackson in his natural prime is seen here at his eloquent best with what HE thought was required for his community a few years after he witnessed Marti… By: Tony Bologne

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Black Panther Party – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Black Panther Party or BPP (originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was a black revolutionary socialist organization active in the United States from 1966 until 1982. The Black Panther Party achieved national and international notoriety through its involvement in the Black Power movement and U.S. politics of the 1960s and 1970s.[2] Founded in Oakland, California by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale on October 15, 1966, the organization initially set forth a doctrine calling primarily for the protection of black neighborhoods from police brutality.[3] The leaders of the organization espoused socialist and Marxist doctrines; however, the Party’s early black nationalist reputation attracted a diverse membership.[4] The Black Panther Party’s objectives and philosophy expanded and evolved rapidly during the party’s existence, making ideological consensus within the party difficult to achieve, and causing some prominent members to openly disagree with the views of the leaders. The organization’s official newspaper, The Black Panther, was first circulated in 1967. Also that year, the Black Panther Party marched on the California State Capitol in Sacramento in protest of a selective ban on weapons. By 1968, the party had expanded into many cities throughout the United States, among them, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Newark, New Orleans, New York City, Omaha, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C.. Peak membership was near 10,000 by 1969, and their newspaper, under the editorial leadership of Eldridge Cleaver, had a circulation of 250,000.[5] The group created a Ten-Point Program, a document that called for “Land, Bread, Housing, Education, Clothing, Justice and Peace”, as well as exemption from conscription for black men, among other demands.[6] With the Ten-Point program, “What We Want, What We Believe”, the Black Panther Party expressed its economic and political grievances.[7] Gaining national prominence, the Black Panther Party became an icon of the counterculture of the 1960s.[8] Ultimately, the Panthers condemned black nationalism as “black racism” and became more focused on socialism without racial exclusivity.[9] They instituted a variety of community social programs designed to alleviate poverty, improve health among inner city black communities, and soften the Party’s public image.[10] The Black Panther Party’s most widely known programs were its armed citizens’ patrols to evaluate behavior of police officers and its Free Breakfast for Children program. However, the group’s political goals were often overshadowed by the supposed criminality of members and their confrontational, militant, and violent tactics against police.[10][11][12] Federal Bureau of Investigation Director J. Edgar Hoover called the party “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country,”[13] and he supervised an extensive program (COINTELPRO) of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, police harassment and many other tactics designed to undermine Panther leadership, incriminate party members and drain the organization of resources and manpower. Through these tactics, Hoover hoped to diminish the Party’s threat to the general power structure of the U.S., or even maintain its influence as a strong undercurrent.[14]Angela Davis, Ward Churchill, and others have alleged that federal, state and local law enforcement officials went to great lengths to discredit and destroy the organization, including assassination.[15][16][17] Black Panther Party membership reached a peak of 10,000 by early 1969, then suffered a series of contractions due to legal troubles, incarcerations, internal splits, expulsions and defections. Popular support for the Party declined further after reports appeared detailing the group’s involvement in illegal activities such as drug dealing and extortion schemes directed against Oakland merchants.[18] By 1972 most Panther activity centered on the national headquarters and a school in Oakland, where the party continued to influence local politics. Party contractions continued throughout the 1970s; by 1980 the Black Panther Party comprised just 27 members.[19] In 1966, Huey P. Newton was released from jail. With his friend Bobby Seale from Oakland City College, he joined a black power group called the Revolutionary Action Movement (RAM). RAM had a chapter in Oakland and followed the writings of Robert F. Williams. Williams had been the president of the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP and later published a newsletter called The Crusader from Cuba, where he fled to escape kidnapping charges.[20] Newton and Seale worked at the North Oakland Neighborhood Anti-Poverty Center, where they also served on the advisory board. To combat police brutality, the advisory board obtained 5,000 signatures in support of the City Council’s setting up a police review board to review complaints. Newton was also taking classes at the City College and at San Francisco Law School. Both institutions were active in the North Oakland Center. Thus the pair had numerous connections with whom they talked about a new organization. Inspired by the success of the Lowndes County Freedom Organization and Stokely Carmichael’s calls for separate black political organizations,[21] they wrote their initial platform statement, the Ten-Point Program. With the help of Huey’s brother Melvin, they decided on a uniform of blue shirts, black pants, black leather jackets, black berets, and openly displayed loaded shotguns. (In his studies, Newton had discovered a California law that allowed carrying a loaded rifle or shotgun in public, as long as it was publicly displayed and pointed at no one.)[22] What became standard Black Panther discourse emerged from a long history of urban activism, social criticism and political struggle by African Americans. There is considerable debate about the impact that the Black Panther Party had on the greater society, or even their local environment. Author Jama Lazerow writes: “As inheritors of the discipline, pride, and calm self-assurance preached by Malcolm X, the Panthers became national heroes in black communities by infusing abstract nationalism with street toughnessby joining the rhythms of black working-class youth culture to the interracial lan and effervescence of Bay Area New Left politics… In 1966, the Panthers defined Oakland’s ghetto as a territory, the police as interlopers, and the Panther mission as the defense of community. The Panthers’ famous “policing the police” drew attention to the spatial remove that White Americans enjoyed from the police brutality that had come to characterize life in black urban communities.”[14] In his book Shadow of the Panther: Huey Newton and the Price of Black Power in America journalist Hugh Pearson takes a more jaundiced view, linking Panther criminality and violence to worsening conditions in America’s black ghettos as their influence spread nationwide.[23] Awareness of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense grew rapidly after their May 2, 1967, protest at the California State Assembly. In October 1967, Huey Newton was arrested for the murder of Oakland Police Officer John Frey. At the time, Newton claimed that he had been falsely accused, leading to the “Free Huey” campaign. On February 17, 1968, at the “Free Huey” birthday rally in the Oakland Auditorium, several Black Panther Party leaders spoke. H. Rap Brown, Black Panther Party Minister of Justice, declared:

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