Archive for the ‘Black Power’ Category

Amar Y Querer – Black Power – Video



Amar Y Querer – Black Power
Saludos a Ometoxtla.! Buenisima Rola! http://www.facebook.com/sangabrielometoxtla http://www.youtube.com/sangabrielometoxtla.

By: vanhelsingsms

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Amar Y Querer – Black Power – Video

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Gears Of War: Black Power – Video



Gears Of War: Black Power
Enjoy The gameplay! Leave a thumbs up, comment, or like if you found this video awesome. -Frugal Gamers -No Music.

By: FrugalGamers

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Gears Of War: Black Power – Video

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BLACK POWER en santiago xonacatlan puebla – Video



BLACK POWER en santiago xonacatlan puebla
Este vdeo se ha subido desde un telfono con Android.

By: DJ IORI

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BLACK POWER en santiago xonacatlan puebla – Video

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Ya No Me Perteneces Black Power 2013 – Video



Ya No Me Perteneces Black Power 2013
ya no mas…

By: TheSonidofenix

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Ya No Me Perteneces Black Power 2013 – Video

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360° Video Callout™ – Ultra GPB400S-B LS450 Black Power Supply U12-415281266 – Video



360 Video Callout – Ultra GPB400S-B LS450 Black Power Supply U12-415281266

By: mariankresha48241285

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360° Video Callout™ – Ultra GPB400S-B LS450 Black Power Supply U12-415281266 – Video

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December 26, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Grupo Black power!. Solo pienso en ti – Video



Grupo Black power!. Solo pienso en ti
Vdeo subido desde un telfono Android.

By: Daniela Morales

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Grupo Black power!. Solo pienso en ti – Video

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December 24, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Black Power Oficial – Video



Black Power Oficial

By: Ktia Pittel

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Black Power Oficial – Video

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December 21, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

As a player in the Black Power and civil rights movements of the 1960s, even at only 25 years old, Maulana Karenga was concerned about legacy. He wanted to leave behind something that would both celebrate the accomplishments of his people and challenge them to go even further.

And so, in 1966, he created Kwanzaa, a seven-day celebration of family, community and culture that is rooted in the traditions of Africa, but just as firmly focused on accomplishments yet to come. Karenga envisioned it as a holiday meant to both celebrate the past and enhance the future, an annual opportunity for people of African descent everywhere to honor their ancestors by ensuring the best possible world for their descendants.

“The question for me, and for other people who left school to join the movement, was, ‘How do I take my knowledge and use it in the interest of my people?'” said Karenga, 72, speaking from his home in Los Angeles. “When I was doing Kwanzaa, I asked, ‘How can I conceive and construct something of enduring value that would serve the interest of our people and the movement?'”

Almost 50 years later, Kwanzaa has become a part of America’s cultural landscape, and celebrating it has become an end-of-year tradition for many African-American families. Karenga will be speaking as the centerpiece of the annual Kwanzaa celebration at Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Dec. 28.

“For most of us, this will probably be the first opportunity to actually listen to and learn from the founder of Kwanzaa,” said A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Lewis museum. “He will probably find a way of adding an extra dimension of depth to why he felt it was so important to make this holiday, and to why it has struck the chord it has among so many people.”

Celebrating Kwanzaa, which begins Thursday and ends on New Year’s Day, involves a combination of private reflection and communal ritual. It includes carefully planned meals, the lighting of candles and the telling of stories. And it offers, Karenga says, the chance for the African diaspora throughout the world to be proud of who they are.

“I created Kwanzaa for three basic reasons,” he says, beginning with, “to reaffirm our rootedness in African culture, because we had been lifted out of that by the holocaust of enslavement.”

The second consideration, he says, was to “give us a time when we, as Africans all over the world, could come together, reaffirm the bonds between us, celebrate ourselves and meditate the awesome meaning of being African in the world.”

And finally, he says, “I created Kwanzaa to introduce and reaffirm the importance of communal African values, values that stress and strengthen family, community and culture.”

The goal, he says, is similarly threefold: “To know our past and honor it, to engage our present and improve it, and to imagine a whole new future and forge it in the most ethical, effective and expansive ways.”

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Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

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December 21, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video



TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance
Next part in the painting of black power armor, almost done.

By: TableTopEverything

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TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video

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December 20, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Amar Y Querer – Black Power – Video




Amar Y Querer – Black Power Saludos a Ometoxtla.! Buenisima Rola! http://www.facebook.com/sangabrielometoxtla http://www.youtube.com/sangabrielometoxtla. By: vanhelsingsms

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December 28, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Gears Of War: Black Power – Video




Gears Of War: Black Power Enjoy The gameplay! Leave a thumbs up, comment, or like if you found this video awesome. -Frugal Gamers -No Music. By: FrugalGamers

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December 28, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

BLACK POWER en santiago xonacatlan puebla – Video




BLACK POWER en santiago xonacatlan puebla Este vdeo se ha subido desde un telfono con Android. By: DJ IORI

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December 28, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Ya No Me Perteneces Black Power 2013 – Video




Ya No Me Perteneces Black Power 2013 ya no mas… By: TheSonidofenix

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December 28, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

360° Video Callout™ – Ultra GPB400S-B LS450 Black Power Supply U12-415281266 – Video




360 Video Callout – Ultra GPB400S-B LS450 Black Power Supply U12-415281266 By: mariankresha48241285

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December 26, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Grupo Black power!. Solo pienso en ti – Video




Grupo Black power!. Solo pienso en ti Vdeo subido desde un telfono Android. By: Daniela Morales

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December 24, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Black Power Oficial – Video




Black Power Oficial By: Ktia Pittel

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December 21, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

Kwanzaa creator Maulana Karenga will speak at Lewis Museum

As a player in the Black Power and civil rights movements of the 1960s, even at only 25 years old, Maulana Karenga was concerned about legacy. He wanted to leave behind something that would both celebrate the accomplishments of his people and challenge them to go even further. And so, in 1966, he created Kwanzaa, a seven-day celebration of family, community and culture that is rooted in the traditions of Africa, but just as firmly focused on accomplishments yet to come. Karenga envisioned it as a holiday meant to both celebrate the past and enhance the future, an annual opportunity for people of African descent everywhere to honor their ancestors by ensuring the best possible world for their descendants. “The question for me, and for other people who left school to join the movement, was, ‘How do I take my knowledge and use it in the interest of my people?'” said Karenga, 72, speaking from his home in Los Angeles. “When I was doing Kwanzaa, I asked, ‘How can I conceive and construct something of enduring value that would serve the interest of our people and the movement?'” Almost 50 years later, Kwanzaa has become a part of America’s cultural landscape, and celebrating it has become an end-of-year tradition for many African-American families. Karenga will be speaking as the centerpiece of the annual Kwanzaa celebration at Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Dec. 28. “For most of us, this will probably be the first opportunity to actually listen to and learn from the founder of Kwanzaa,” said A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Lewis museum. “He will probably find a way of adding an extra dimension of depth to why he felt it was so important to make this holiday, and to why it has struck the chord it has among so many people.” Celebrating Kwanzaa, which begins Thursday and ends on New Year’s Day, involves a combination of private reflection and communal ritual. It includes carefully planned meals, the lighting of candles and the telling of stories. And it offers, Karenga says, the chance for the African diaspora throughout the world to be proud of who they are. “I created Kwanzaa for three basic reasons,” he says, beginning with, “to reaffirm our rootedness in African culture, because we had been lifted out of that by the holocaust of enslavement.” The second consideration, he says, was to “give us a time when we, as Africans all over the world, could come together, reaffirm the bonds between us, celebrate ourselves and meditate the awesome meaning of being African in the world.” And finally, he says, “I created Kwanzaa to introduce and reaffirm the importance of communal African values, values that stress and strengthen family, community and culture.” The goal, he says, is similarly threefold: “To know our past and honor it, to engage our present and improve it, and to imagine a whole new future and forge it in the most ethical, effective and expansive ways.”

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December 21, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed

TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance – Video




TableTopEverything – Painting Black power armor PART 4 Angels of Vengeance Next part in the painting of black power armor, almost done. By: TableTopEverything

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December 20, 2013   Posted in: Black Power  Comments Closed


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