Archive for the ‘B’nai B’rith’ Category

About Us Congregation B’nai B’rith

About Us2017-12-27T15:31:59+00:00We are the oldest and largest synagogue in Santa Barbara, a congregation rich with memories and tradition, constantly seeking new ways of engaging every one of our members in the ancient and marvelous Jewish way of life. We cherish and honor our elders, with their deep wisdom and varied life experiences, and we are passionately devoted to our children, working unceasingly to provide them with a satisfying and enjoyable Jewish foundation that will last them for their entire lives.

We strive always to welcome newcomers and also to remain a familiar and comfortable Jewish home for those who chose long ago to make this their Jewish community. Whoever you are, and wherever you come from, we hope that you will visit us, learn with us, sing with us, break bread with us, roll up your sleeves and work with us to help make this a better world.

Congregation Bnai Brith is a diverse, inclusive community of individuals and families building together a warm and vibrant house of living Judaism.

We envision CBB as a place where Santa Barbara Jewish people and our familiesfeel welcome and at home, where we are inspired to bring our gifts of energy and creativity, and where we connect to the tradition and community of our Jewish ancestors.

We aspire to be a congregation of knowledgeable and committed Jews, each individual expressing in their own unique way the seven circles of Study, Prayer, Acts of Compassion, Shabbat, the Festival Year, the Cycle of Life, and the Jewish People.

We are constantly growing as a Kehilla Kdosha, a sacred community of people whose lives are enriched with meaning, purpose, connectedness and relationship with God.

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About Us Congregation B’nai B’rith

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New York City – B’nai B’rith International

New York – B’nai B’rith Young Leadership NetworkThe program year in NY kicked off in October 2014 with a joint Shabbat Dinner with Manhattan Jewish Experience-East. The evening provided a traditional Shabbat Dinner with over 85 young Jewish professionals coming together to observe Shabbat and meet new people.

Following that event, on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015, the YLN-NYC met up at the German Consulate for Conversations Around the World. About 18-20 young Jewish leaders came together to hear the Consul General of Germany, Brita Wagener, speak about the current German-Jewish community and the impact of the various anti-Semitic situations in many countries on their community. After she spoke, there was a brief question and answer session, followed by wine and light refreshments. It was a great event and the YLN-NYC plan to have more events at the many consulates and diplomatic missions on the calendar for the spring and summer schedule.

A March event will be a social program in conjunction with the Congregation Agudath Israel- Young Professionals, who have an active group in both NYC and NJ.

Upcoming events will include a fundraising event to benefit the National Mitzvah project, which will be chosen soon by the National Committee of Young Leadership.

NYC young pros gather for one of the Global Round Table events.

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New York City – B’nai B’rith International

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Senior Staff – B’nai B’rith International

Daniel S. Mariaschin has spent nearly all of his professional life working on behalf of Jewish organizations.

As the chief executive officer and executive vice president of Bnai Brith International, he directs and supervises Bnai Brith programs, activities and staff countries around the world where Bnai Brith is organized. Mr. Mariaschin also serves as director of B’nai B’rith’s Center for Human Rights and Public Policy (CHRPP). In that capacity, he presents Bnai Briths perspective to a variety of audiences, including Congress and the media, and coordinates the centers programs and policies on issues of concern to the Jewish community.

In the United States and abroad, Mr. Mariaschin has met with countless heads of state, prime ministers, foreign ministers, opposition leaders, influential members of the media and clerical leaders. Each time, his goal has been to advance human rights, help protect the rights of Jewish communities worldwide and promote better relations with the state of Israel.

Throughout his Bnai Brith career, Mr. Mariaschin has represented the organization as part of numerous influential delegations.

Mr. Mariaschin was a member of the U.S. delegation to the International Conference on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research, and the B’nai B’rith delegation to the State Departments 1998 Washington Conference On Holocaust-Era Assets. He also initiated programs on Holocaust education for teachers with the Lithuanian Ministry of Education and Science.

In 2003 Mr. Mariaschin served as part of the U.S. delegation to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) conference on anti-Semitism in Vienna. He was also a public advisor to the U.S. delegation at the 2004 conference in Berlin, the 2005 conference in Cordoba, Spain, and the 2007 meeting in Bucharest, Romania. In 2009, he was a member of the U.S. delegation to the Warsaw Human Dimension Implementation meeting of the OSCE.

Additionally, he participated in negotiations that achieved the transfer of torah scrolls from the Lithuanian government to Israel for distribution there and to Diaspora Jewish communities. He was a member of the International Advisory Committee of CEANA, the Argentinean commission studying that country’s relations with the Nazi regime; served on the Commission on Property Restitution in Slovakia; and was a member of the International Commission on the Holocaust in Romania.

In recognition of his tireless work in Central and Eastern Europe, Mr. Mariaschin received the Cultural Pluralism Award from the U.S. Commission for the Preservation of Americas Heritage Abroad. He has also received state decorations from the presidents of Latvia, Lithuania and Romania, and the Golden Bough decoration from the Foreign Ministry of Bulgaria.

He began his professional Jewish life in 1973 as community relations associate for the Jewish Community Council of Boston. Two years later, he became director of the New England office of the American Zionist Federation and Zionist House in Boston.

In 1977, Mr. Mariaschin joined the Anti Defamation League (ADL) of B’nai B’rith as director of its Middle East Affairs Department. From 1979 to 1986, he served as assistant to ADL’s national director, the late Nathan Perlmutter, and as director of its National Leadership division, responsible for ADL’s nationwide program of leadership development.

He then became director of the Political Affairs Department of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), where he supervised political action activities and grassroots organization programs.

Prior to joining B’nai B’rith, Mr. Mariaschin served as director of communications and principal spokesman for former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig, Jr. during his 1987-88 presidential campaign.

Mr. Mariaschin has written numerous articles and reviews on foreign affairs and national security issues for such publications as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, The Washington Times and Newsday, and appears frequently as a foreign affairs analyst on television and radio programs. He has lectured on foreign and defense affairs at the U.S. State Department’s Foreign Service Institute, the Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and at other military installations across the country. He has also worked as a radio announcer and news commentator and has lectured widely in the U.S. and abroad.

Raised in Swanzey, New Hampshire, Mr. Mariaschin received his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of New Hampshire and his Master’s degree in Contemporary Jewish Studies from Brandeis University. He was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of New Hampshire and received the American Jewish Communal Leadership Award from Brandeis University.

Olshan has been with B’nai B’rith since 1983. He first served as the director of the Senior Citizens Housing program, which he helped to expand from 12 buildings to more than 40 properties, located in over 25 communities throughout the country.

He holds a doctorate from the University of South Dakota, a master of arts degree from the University of California-Northridge, and a bachelor of arts degree from Rutgers University in New Jersey.

She is responsible for the administration of the B’nai B’rith Disaster Relief Fund, which provides assistance to victims of natural and manmade disasters, and the Communities in Crisis project, which distributes medicines throughout Latin America.

Love has worked for B’nai B’rith since 1977, serving in several capacities, including associate executive vice president of former district one, which provides programming to B’nai B’rith groups in New York and New England.

Love received the B’nai B’rith Julius Bisno Award for Professional Excellence in 2002. She earned her undergraduate degree in political science from Queens College-C.U.N.Y. in 1977, and her master of arts degree in public administration from Baruch College. She works at the B’nai B’rith office in New York City.

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Senior Staff – B’nai B’rith International

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Congregation B’nai B’rith Santa Barbara’s Reform Jewish …

Friday, March 30 at 5:30PM RSVP REQUIRED

Join us for an interactive Seder led by Rabbi Steve Cohen. This year we will celebrate Shabbat and Passover together. CBB will be providing dinner and beverages.

NO SHABBAT SERVICES IN THE SANCTUARY WILL BE HELD ON THIS DAY.

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Congregation B’nai B’rith Santa Barbara’s Reform Jewish …

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Bnai Brith Canada Housing | Lions’ Gate B’nai B’rith …

Bnai Brith Canadas Affordable Housing Program

As an outgrowth of its ongoing historic commitment to serve the needs of the community, Bnai Brith Canada established an Affordable Housing Program in 1979. Its mission is to provide and maintain affordable, attractive, secure, and welcoming housing to low to moderate income residents. These residents now enjoy a decent home in a friendly community free from discrimination.

In Metropolitan Toronto, theBnai Brith Canada Family Housing Programhas provided and currently operates two senior citizens housing complexes on Bathurst Street, facing Earl Bales Park as well as a third project for seniors and families.

Each of these projects is an independent corporation, with its own Board of Directors, Committees and professional staff. At the same time, each project has access to and is able to benefit from the experience and services of the larger framework and resources of Bnai Brith Canada.

Our Other Buildings

Montreal

Bnai Brith House, 8000 Cote St. Luc Road, Montreal, Quebec – This 95 one and two bedroom residence is located in a much sought after area of Montreal at the corner of Cote St. Luc Road and Westminster. A hot, nutritious, kosher, well-balanced and affordable lunch meal is provided daily to the residents.

Toronto

The Dan Family Residence, 15 Torresdale, North York, Ontario – This 61-unit seniors and family residence is Bnai Brith Canadas first fully integrated facility providing housing for all segments of the community.

Bnai Brith Upper Canada Lodge Apartment, 4226 Bathurst Street, North York, Ontario – Comprised of 130 one and two bedroom air-conditioned units, this facility was the first building sponsored by Bnai Brith Canada Upper Canada Lodge.

Bnai Brith Seniors’ Residence, 4300 Bathurst Street, North York, Ontario – This 164-unit one and two bedroom air-conditioned apartment building is directly north of our first building.

Through a combination of our lodges volunteer service program and the resident social committee, various events take place on a regular basis: summer picnics and barbecues, evenings with guest speakers, weekly bingo nights, weekly exercise programs, movie nights, card games, holiday celebrations, and religious services on Shabbat and all holidays.

Bnai Brith International

Bnai Brith Canada, while corporately distinct, is part of Bnai Brith International, which is the largest Jewish sponsor of federally subsidized housing for the elderly in the United States. For more than 30 years, in a cooperative partnership with the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Bnai Brith has made rental apartments available for senior citizens with limited incomes. Bnai Brith senior housing is open to all qualified individuals as defined by HUD, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, or national origin.

The Bnai Brith Senior Housing Network in the United States consists of 37 apartment buildings in 25 communities, encompassing more than 4,000 apartment units and serving more than 6,000 people.

Bnai Brith has also developed a variety of housing alternatives around the globe. The organization sponsors parents homes in Australia, New Zealand, and Israel; senior citizens flatlets in England; an apartment building and a medical residence in Vancouver, British Columbia; and apartment buildings in Toronto. Although funded through their own national programs and tailored to meet the particular needs of the host country, these programs remain a vital component of the international Bnai Brith Senior Housing Network.

Local Bnai Brith volunteers and the senior service staff in the national office plan and complete all Bnai Brith senior housing projects.

For more information on Bnai Brith Internationals Housing network, please consult theirwebsite.

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B’nai B’rith AustraliaNew Zealand – Home

Bnai Brith is the oldest Jewish service organisation in the world, uniting people of the Jewish faith and enhancing Jewish identity through strengthening Jewish family life, providing broad-based services for the benefit of senior citizens, and advocating on behalf of Jews throughout the world. Learn more here

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B’nai B’rith AustraliaNew Zealand – Home

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High Holy Days 2017 Congregation B’nai B’rith

Dear CBB Family,

The time has come to begin thinking about Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. What have these days meant to our people over the centuries, and what might they mean for us today? The season has two different Hebrew names:

The Yamim Noraim, translated as The Awesome Days Aseret Ymei Tshuvah, meaning The Ten Days of Return

Both of these names point toward possible meanings of this sacred season, even for Jews who do not consider themselves religious, or who feel far removed from the rhythms and patterns of Jewish tradition.

The name Yamim Noraim, or Awesome Days, speaks of the universal human longing for transcendence. Even if we do not pray, and even if we do not believe in God, we all remember moments in our past when we suddenly felt ourselves most alive. Watching a baby being born. Or a loved one dying. Falling in love. Or being swept up by an extraordinary piece of music. Or by the power and beauty of a thunder storm, or standing on a mountaintop. We remember these moments of transcendence.

Every September, the ancient voice of the rams horn, the sacred words of Torah, the haunting melodies, the gathering of the people (with all of our marvelous quirks of personality) and the purifying fast of Yom Kippur open for us a 4,000 year old doorway into transcendence.

The second name, Aseret Ymei Tshuvah, or The Days of Return, speaks of our deep human need to return home. All year long, or perhaps for many years, we have been wandering, exploring, seeking new experiences, new friends and teachers, new knowledge. But a time comes to turn ourselves Homeward Bound. I dont know why Jews come back every year at Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur, but like the birds returning in springtime, or like salmon making their way upstream, this is our time of return. To community. To tradition. To God.

I look forward to once again sharing this profound, mysterious, ancient season with you. Iam particularly excited to introduce to the congregation our two new rabbinic interns,Leah Sternberg and Daniel Brenner. Leah will speak to the congregation during the early service on the evening of Rosh HaShanah, Wednesday, September 20, while Daniel will offer the sermon at the late service the same evening.

Marian, Rachel, Zach and Ari join me in wishing you a happy, healthy New Year.

Rabbi Stephen E. Cohen

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High Holy Days 2017 Congregation B’nai B’rith

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Centennial Revival: Leo Frank “Jew Pervert” September 1915: The Most Anti-Semitic Audiobook of 2017 Read by John de Nugent

Publisher Tom Watson (U.S. Senator from Georgia 1920) wrote this article right after the Aug 17, 1915 hanging (conducted by the crème de la crème of the frustrated people of Georgia themselves after two years of spurious legal delays) of the pedophile, rapist, and murderer Leo Frank, a prominent Jewish official and businessman whom major Jewish-owned or influenced newspapers protested was a victim of antisemitism.

Watson defends the “lynching” (which carried out a death sentence supported by three juries and five levels of the court system) and goes beyond this to make his strongest statements yet about the bane of Jewish media sway over America.

He also discusses two other famous cases of that day of supposed “antisemitism,” the Captain Alfred Dreyfus case in France (regarding a Jewish officer convicted of espionage and treason) and the Menachem Beilis case in Ukraine/Russia (about a Jew convicted of ritually murdering and draining the blood from a little Slavic child).

Please ask the Internet Archive to delete this audio book, before people get a chance to download it and upload it to other file sharing websites. This audio book has had more than 6,000 views. We must stop this audio book, we must stop its propagation before people get a chance to back it up.

https://archive.org/details/Thomas-Watson-Leo-Frank-Jew-Pervert-Sept-1915

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Why Do Nazis Hate Jews? – Yahoo News

Newsweekpublished this story under the headline of Again, Anti-Semitism on February 16, 1981. In light of the recent neo-Nazi, white power and alt-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, Newsweekis republishing the story.

Charles Benjamin, a leader of the Jewish community in his quiet, suburban New Jersey town, came home to find bright red swastikas painted on his back door. The outdoor furniture had been dumped into the pool. The mailbox had been looted. “My knees buckled,” Benjamin later told a television interviewer. “I sat down on the ground, not believing that this could happen in… my little patch in the United States. “Anti-Semitism is an ancient story that is suddenly making news across the United States. The Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith reported 377 anti-Semitic “episodes” in 1980, a nearly threefold increase in one year. Most of these sporadic incidents involved little more than scrawled graffiti or vandalism, but there were also 10cases of arson, four fire-bombings and several death threats. No one has been killed or seriously injured, and no evidence suggests a campaign of any scale; most of the incidents have been juvenile pranks. Yet many American Jews are worried. “Hitler started with a handful of people and paint brushes,” says Jeffrey Maas of the ADL in New Jersey. And many government officials agree that the incidents cannot be shrugged off. “There is a tendency… to treat incidents of anti-Semitic or racial vandalism as isolated acts of mischief,” warns New Jersey Attorney General John J. Degnan. “Unfortunately … these acts may represent deep-seated racial and religious hatred.”

To combat the flurry of anti-Semitic incidents, Degnan and other law-enforcement officials around the country have stepped up their investigations, often forming special police and prosecution units. Many Jewish leaders have begun holding seminars on bigotry and rallies against anti-Semitism, such as one that drew 3,000 people in California’s San Fernando Valley a fortnight ago. Not satisfied with these steps, Jewish militants have redoubled their own controversial efforts at self-defensepatrolling Jewish neighborhoods and training Jews in the use of high-powered rifles and pistols.

Some Jewish organizations are reluctant to read too much into the new statistics of anti-Semitism, noting that vandalism and violent crime are on the rise generally. “It will take another year of monitoring to find out what the numbers actually mean,” says a spokesman for the American Jewish Committee in New York. Other Jews see the low-level violence and harassment as part of a larger pattern. With mounting alarm, they note the renewed organizing efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and American Nazi Party, the tone of some of the criticism of Israel in the United Nations and above all the bloody attacks on Jews in several European cities last year. “There is a feeling,” says Murray Wood, an executive of the Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles, “that all roads somehow lead to Auschwitz.”

Anti-Semitism in the United States today hardly compares in virulence with the anti-Jewish attitudes and actions in the 1920s and 1930s. Then, Henry Ford’s Dearborn Independent (circulation: 700,000) ran anti-Semitic diatribes with headlines such as JEWISH GAMBLERS CORRUPT AMERICAN BASEBALL. More damaging, unstated quotas and restrictions kept Jews out of schools, jobs, neighborhoods and hotels. Today, most such barriers have fallen, and many public-opinion polls show a continuing decline in prejudice against Jews. In one survey last year, for example, only 8 percent of those questioned thought Jews had “too much political influence.”

But other polls indicate a persistent suspicion and distaste for Jews as “pushy, clannish, unethical.” In Anti-Semitism in America, published two years ago, authors Charles Y. Glock and Harold E. Quinley reported that a third of Americans share such negative attitudesabout the same number, according to a more recent poll, that suspect Jews of being more loyal to Israel than to the United States.

Alan Sandler and his bride, Zipporah, had just returned from their honeymoon in New York City. The mailbox of their Cranston, R.I. home was brimming with congratulatory cards. One was decorated with two lovebirds on the front. But inside was a swastika and the words. “We are back. ” Many experts blame the nation’s economic problems for the new signs of anti-Semitism. “Times of distress, social unrest and economic depression [are] often preliminary to outbreaks of anti-Semitism,” explains the Rev. Edward H. Flannery, author of another book on the subject, Anguish of the Jews. In hard times people find it comforting to have a scape-goat, Flannery says, “And they always look in the direction of the Jews.” In the spotlight of full media coverage, one episode often leads to others. Says New York City police official Patrick J. Murphy: “The incidents feed off each other. The kids read about themselves…and any dope can see himself immortalized.” In three days last month, officials at the University of Florida in Gainesville found thirteen examples of anti-Semitic graffiti on campus. After the wife of university President Robert Marston spoke out forcefully against such bigotry, her telephone rang. “This is the Florida-wide organization of Hitler,” said the caller. “I am going to kill you.” In fact few of the reported incidents seem directly connected with extremist groups. “If it were more organized,” says Long Island ADL director Melvin Cooperman, “we could zero in and nail them.” But both the Nazi Party and the Klan have run avowedly anti-Semitic candidates for public officewith disturbing success. Harold Covington, 27, chairman of the National Socialist Party of America in North Carolina, won more than 43 percent of the vote in the state’s Republican primary for attorney general last year. The rise of racist groups also seems to create a climate favorable to individual extremists and a certain public tolerance for isolated incidents.

The dramatic growth of Christian fundamentalismand Moral Majority politicsmay also spur anti-Semitism. Just last week, the Rev. Dan C. Fore, Moral Majority leader in New York City, told a reporter: “Jews have a God-given ability to make money, almost a supernatural ability…. They control this city.” Even without such stereotyping, the fundamentalist emphasis on “Christian politics” and efforts to convert Jews are threatening, says William Gralnick of the American Jewish Committee in Atlanta. “What it says is that the Jewish faith is not a valid path to salvation; it tends to separate us from grace.” Last year in Macon, Georgia, says Gralnick, Protestant ministers refused to speak out when the head of the Southern Baptist Convention said, “God Almighty does not hear the prayer of a Jew.” It was shortly after 1 a. m. when two men drove up to the synagogue in Temple City, California.They pried open a window, poured gasoline over a wooden pew and set the synagogue ablaze. Seven stained-glass windows were shattered and other damage to Temple Beth David was estimated at $180, 000. The incident was followed” by nearly 30 more anti-Semitic outbursts in the Los Angeles area over the last eight weeks.

The randomness of anti-Semitic incidents, and the absence of links to organized groups in most cases, makes prosecution difficult. In the 377 cases reported by the ADL last year, only 20 arrests were made. Even when there are arrests, the charge is normally a misdemeanor State assemblymen in California and New Jersey have proposed legislation that would stiffen penalties for religiously motivated vandalism. “When a cross is burned or a swastika is smeared, the terror it generates is as intense as from a bomb threat,” says New Jersey Assemblyman Byron Baer. But some judges prefer to sentence juvenile perpetrators to study Jewish history and the Nazi Holocaust. Said one such youth: “I am beginning to realize through these books the great deal of suffering I must have caused.”

Many Jewish organizations have escalated their own programs of public education. Last week the ADLworking with the Urban League and the U.S. Justice Departmentsponsored a conference in Providence, Rhode Island, on “extremist groups” and another in Boston on “religious and racial harassment.” About 1,500 people attended an anti-Nazi rally last month at the Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles, itself a target of three anti-Semitic attacks earlier this year. But education didn’t seem to do much good at Great Neck North Senior High School in New York. Though the school has offered courses on the Holocaust for five years, vandals spray-painted the walls with “KKK” and “Hi’Hitler” last October, And police in many areas reported a flurry of similar anti-Semitic incidents after the “Holocaust” series on television.

Such incidents have only encouraged militant groups like the Jewish Defense League to expand their often provocative paramilitary operations. The JDL plans to offer 10-week courses in “warfare tactics” at secret sites in southern California, Michigan and upstate New York. Most mainstream Jewish organizations see these steps as an inflammatory overreaction. But equally dangerous, they agree, would be simply to ignore the current upsurge in anti-Semitic incidents. “There’s no reason to panic; the country is not being overrun byanti-Semites,” says Art Teitelbaum of the Anti-Defamation League in Miami. “But it is something to be vigilant about.”

White nationalists carry torches on the grounds of the University of Virginia, on the eve of a planned Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12. Neo-Nazis were among those present. Alejandro Alvarez/News2Share via REUTERS

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Why Do Nazis Hate Jews? – Yahoo News

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About Us Congregation B’nai B’rith

About Us2017-12-27T15:31:59+00:00We are the oldest and largest synagogue in Santa Barbara, a congregation rich with memories and tradition, constantly seeking new ways of engaging every one of our members in the ancient and marvelous Jewish way of life. We cherish and honor our elders, with their deep wisdom and varied life experiences, and we are passionately devoted to our children, working unceasingly to provide them with a satisfying and enjoyable Jewish foundation that will last them for their entire lives. We strive always to welcome newcomers and also to remain a familiar and comfortable Jewish home for those who chose long ago to make this their Jewish community. Whoever you are, and wherever you come from, we hope that you will visit us, learn with us, sing with us, break bread with us, roll up your sleeves and work with us to help make this a better world. Congregation Bnai Brith is a diverse, inclusive community of individuals and families building together a warm and vibrant house of living Judaism. We envision CBB as a place where Santa Barbara Jewish people and our familiesfeel welcome and at home, where we are inspired to bring our gifts of energy and creativity, and where we connect to the tradition and community of our Jewish ancestors. We aspire to be a congregation of knowledgeable and committed Jews, each individual expressing in their own unique way the seven circles of Study, Prayer, Acts of Compassion, Shabbat, the Festival Year, the Cycle of Life, and the Jewish People. We are constantly growing as a Kehilla Kdosha, a sacred community of people whose lives are enriched with meaning, purpose, connectedness and relationship with God.

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New York City – B’nai B’rith International

New York – B’nai B’rith Young Leadership NetworkThe program year in NY kicked off in October 2014 with a joint Shabbat Dinner with Manhattan Jewish Experience-East. The evening provided a traditional Shabbat Dinner with over 85 young Jewish professionals coming together to observe Shabbat and meet new people. Following that event, on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015, the YLN-NYC met up at the German Consulate for Conversations Around the World. About 18-20 young Jewish leaders came together to hear the Consul General of Germany, Brita Wagener, speak about the current German-Jewish community and the impact of the various anti-Semitic situations in many countries on their community. After she spoke, there was a brief question and answer session, followed by wine and light refreshments. It was a great event and the YLN-NYC plan to have more events at the many consulates and diplomatic missions on the calendar for the spring and summer schedule. A March event will be a social program in conjunction with the Congregation Agudath Israel- Young Professionals, who have an active group in both NYC and NJ. Upcoming events will include a fundraising event to benefit the National Mitzvah project, which will be chosen soon by the National Committee of Young Leadership. NYC young pros gather for one of the Global Round Table events.

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May 18, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Senior Staff – B’nai B’rith International

Daniel S. Mariaschin has spent nearly all of his professional life working on behalf of Jewish organizations. As the chief executive officer and executive vice president of Bnai Brith International, he directs and supervises Bnai Brith programs, activities and staff countries around the world where Bnai Brith is organized. Mr. Mariaschin also serves as director of B’nai B’rith’s Center for Human Rights and Public Policy (CHRPP). In that capacity, he presents Bnai Briths perspective to a variety of audiences, including Congress and the media, and coordinates the centers programs and policies on issues of concern to the Jewish community. In the United States and abroad, Mr. Mariaschin has met with countless heads of state, prime ministers, foreign ministers, opposition leaders, influential members of the media and clerical leaders. Each time, his goal has been to advance human rights, help protect the rights of Jewish communities worldwide and promote better relations with the state of Israel. Throughout his Bnai Brith career, Mr. Mariaschin has represented the organization as part of numerous influential delegations. Mr. Mariaschin was a member of the U.S. delegation to the International Conference on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research, and the B’nai B’rith delegation to the State Departments 1998 Washington Conference On Holocaust-Era Assets. He also initiated programs on Holocaust education for teachers with the Lithuanian Ministry of Education and Science. In 2003 Mr. Mariaschin served as part of the U.S. delegation to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) conference on anti-Semitism in Vienna. He was also a public advisor to the U.S. delegation at the 2004 conference in Berlin, the 2005 conference in Cordoba, Spain, and the 2007 meeting in Bucharest, Romania. In 2009, he was a member of the U.S. delegation to the Warsaw Human Dimension Implementation meeting of the OSCE. Additionally, he participated in negotiations that achieved the transfer of torah scrolls from the Lithuanian government to Israel for distribution there and to Diaspora Jewish communities. He was a member of the International Advisory Committee of CEANA, the Argentinean commission studying that country’s relations with the Nazi regime; served on the Commission on Property Restitution in Slovakia; and was a member of the International Commission on the Holocaust in Romania. In recognition of his tireless work in Central and Eastern Europe, Mr. Mariaschin received the Cultural Pluralism Award from the U.S. Commission for the Preservation of Americas Heritage Abroad. He has also received state decorations from the presidents of Latvia, Lithuania and Romania, and the Golden Bough decoration from the Foreign Ministry of Bulgaria. He began his professional Jewish life in 1973 as community relations associate for the Jewish Community Council of Boston. Two years later, he became director of the New England office of the American Zionist Federation and Zionist House in Boston. In 1977, Mr. Mariaschin joined the Anti Defamation League (ADL) of B’nai B’rith as director of its Middle East Affairs Department. From 1979 to 1986, he served as assistant to ADL’s national director, the late Nathan Perlmutter, and as director of its National Leadership division, responsible for ADL’s nationwide program of leadership development. He then became director of the Political Affairs Department of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), where he supervised political action activities and grassroots organization programs. Prior to joining B’nai B’rith, Mr. Mariaschin served as director of communications and principal spokesman for former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig, Jr. during his 1987-88 presidential campaign. Mr. Mariaschin has written numerous articles and reviews on foreign affairs and national security issues for such publications as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, The Washington Times and Newsday, and appears frequently as a foreign affairs analyst on television and radio programs. He has lectured on foreign and defense affairs at the U.S. State Department’s Foreign Service Institute, the Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and at other military installations across the country. He has also worked as a radio announcer and news commentator and has lectured widely in the U.S. and abroad. Raised in Swanzey, New Hampshire, Mr. Mariaschin received his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of New Hampshire and his Master’s degree in Contemporary Jewish Studies from Brandeis University. He was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of New Hampshire and received the American Jewish Communal Leadership Award from Brandeis University. Olshan has been with B’nai B’rith since 1983. He first served as the director of the Senior Citizens Housing program, which he helped to expand from 12 buildings to more than 40 properties, located in over 25 communities throughout the country. He holds a doctorate from the University of South Dakota, a master of arts degree from the University of California-Northridge, and a bachelor of arts degree from Rutgers University in New Jersey. She is responsible for the administration of the B’nai B’rith Disaster Relief Fund, which provides assistance to victims of natural and manmade disasters, and the Communities in Crisis project, which distributes medicines throughout Latin America. Love has worked for B’nai B’rith since 1977, serving in several capacities, including associate executive vice president of former district one, which provides programming to B’nai B’rith groups in New York and New England. Love received the B’nai B’rith Julius Bisno Award for Professional Excellence in 2002. She earned her undergraduate degree in political science from Queens College-C.U.N.Y. in 1977, and her master of arts degree in public administration from Baruch College. She works at the B’nai B’rith office in New York City.

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March 18, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Congregation B’nai B’rith Santa Barbara’s Reform Jewish …

Friday, March 30 at 5:30PM RSVP REQUIRED Join us for an interactive Seder led by Rabbi Steve Cohen. This year we will celebrate Shabbat and Passover together. CBB will be providing dinner and beverages. NO SHABBAT SERVICES IN THE SANCTUARY WILL BE HELD ON THIS DAY.

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March 16, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Bnai Brith Canada Housing | Lions’ Gate B’nai B’rith …

Bnai Brith Canadas Affordable Housing Program As an outgrowth of its ongoing historic commitment to serve the needs of the community, Bnai Brith Canada established an Affordable Housing Program in 1979. Its mission is to provide and maintain affordable, attractive, secure, and welcoming housing to low to moderate income residents. These residents now enjoy a decent home in a friendly community free from discrimination. In Metropolitan Toronto, theBnai Brith Canada Family Housing Programhas provided and currently operates two senior citizens housing complexes on Bathurst Street, facing Earl Bales Park as well as a third project for seniors and families. Each of these projects is an independent corporation, with its own Board of Directors, Committees and professional staff. At the same time, each project has access to and is able to benefit from the experience and services of the larger framework and resources of Bnai Brith Canada. Our Other Buildings Montreal Bnai Brith House, 8000 Cote St. Luc Road, Montreal, Quebec – This 95 one and two bedroom residence is located in a much sought after area of Montreal at the corner of Cote St. Luc Road and Westminster. A hot, nutritious, kosher, well-balanced and affordable lunch meal is provided daily to the residents. Toronto The Dan Family Residence, 15 Torresdale, North York, Ontario – This 61-unit seniors and family residence is Bnai Brith Canadas first fully integrated facility providing housing for all segments of the community. Bnai Brith Upper Canada Lodge Apartment, 4226 Bathurst Street, North York, Ontario – Comprised of 130 one and two bedroom air-conditioned units, this facility was the first building sponsored by Bnai Brith Canada Upper Canada Lodge. Bnai Brith Seniors’ Residence, 4300 Bathurst Street, North York, Ontario – This 164-unit one and two bedroom air-conditioned apartment building is directly north of our first building. Through a combination of our lodges volunteer service program and the resident social committee, various events take place on a regular basis: summer picnics and barbecues, evenings with guest speakers, weekly bingo nights, weekly exercise programs, movie nights, card games, holiday celebrations, and religious services on Shabbat and all holidays. Bnai Brith International Bnai Brith Canada, while corporately distinct, is part of Bnai Brith International, which is the largest Jewish sponsor of federally subsidized housing for the elderly in the United States. For more than 30 years, in a cooperative partnership with the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Bnai Brith has made rental apartments available for senior citizens with limited incomes. Bnai Brith senior housing is open to all qualified individuals as defined by HUD, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, or national origin. The Bnai Brith Senior Housing Network in the United States consists of 37 apartment buildings in 25 communities, encompassing more than 4,000 apartment units and serving more than 6,000 people. Bnai Brith has also developed a variety of housing alternatives around the globe. The organization sponsors parents homes in Australia, New Zealand, and Israel; senior citizens flatlets in England; an apartment building and a medical residence in Vancouver, British Columbia; and apartment buildings in Toronto. Although funded through their own national programs and tailored to meet the particular needs of the host country, these programs remain a vital component of the international Bnai Brith Senior Housing Network. Local Bnai Brith volunteers and the senior service staff in the national office plan and complete all Bnai Brith senior housing projects. For more information on Bnai Brith Internationals Housing network, please consult theirwebsite. Like Loading…

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February 16, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’nai B’rith AustraliaNew Zealand – Home

Bnai Brith is the oldest Jewish service organisation in the world, uniting people of the Jewish faith and enhancing Jewish identity through strengthening Jewish family life, providing broad-based services for the benefit of senior citizens, and advocating on behalf of Jews throughout the world. Learn more here

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December 24, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

High Holy Days 2017 Congregation B’nai B’rith

Dear CBB Family, The time has come to begin thinking about Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. What have these days meant to our people over the centuries, and what might they mean for us today? The season has two different Hebrew names: The Yamim Noraim, translated as The Awesome Days Aseret Ymei Tshuvah, meaning The Ten Days of Return Both of these names point toward possible meanings of this sacred season, even for Jews who do not consider themselves religious, or who feel far removed from the rhythms and patterns of Jewish tradition. The name Yamim Noraim, or Awesome Days, speaks of the universal human longing for transcendence. Even if we do not pray, and even if we do not believe in God, we all remember moments in our past when we suddenly felt ourselves most alive. Watching a baby being born. Or a loved one dying. Falling in love. Or being swept up by an extraordinary piece of music. Or by the power and beauty of a thunder storm, or standing on a mountaintop. We remember these moments of transcendence. Every September, the ancient voice of the rams horn, the sacred words of Torah, the haunting melodies, the gathering of the people (with all of our marvelous quirks of personality) and the purifying fast of Yom Kippur open for us a 4,000 year old doorway into transcendence. The second name, Aseret Ymei Tshuvah, or The Days of Return, speaks of our deep human need to return home. All year long, or perhaps for many years, we have been wandering, exploring, seeking new experiences, new friends and teachers, new knowledge. But a time comes to turn ourselves Homeward Bound. I dont know why Jews come back every year at Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur, but like the birds returning in springtime, or like salmon making their way upstream, this is our time of return. To community. To tradition. To God. I look forward to once again sharing this profound, mysterious, ancient season with you. Iam particularly excited to introduce to the congregation our two new rabbinic interns,Leah Sternberg and Daniel Brenner. Leah will speak to the congregation during the early service on the evening of Rosh HaShanah, Wednesday, September 20, while Daniel will offer the sermon at the late service the same evening. Marian, Rachel, Zach and Ari join me in wishing you a happy, healthy New Year. Rabbi Stephen E. Cohen

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December 23, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Centennial Revival: Leo Frank “Jew Pervert” September 1915: The Most Anti-Semitic Audiobook of 2017 Read by John de Nugent

Publisher Tom Watson (U.S. Senator from Georgia 1920) wrote this article right after the Aug 17, 1915 hanging (conducted by the crème de la crème of the frustrated people of Georgia themselves after two years of spurious legal delays) of the pedophile, rapist, and murderer Leo Frank, a prominent Jewish official and businessman whom major […]

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September 1, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, B'nai B'rith, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Why Do Nazis Hate Jews? – Yahoo News

Newsweekpublished this story under the headline of Again, Anti-Semitism on February 16, 1981. In light of the recent neo-Nazi, white power and alt-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, Newsweekis republishing the story. Charles Benjamin, a leader of the Jewish community in his quiet, suburban New Jersey town, came home to find bright red swastikas painted on his back door. The outdoor furniture had been dumped into the pool. The mailbox had been looted. “My knees buckled,” Benjamin later told a television interviewer. “I sat down on the ground, not believing that this could happen in… my little patch in the United States. “Anti-Semitism is an ancient story that is suddenly making news across the United States. The Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith reported 377 anti-Semitic “episodes” in 1980, a nearly threefold increase in one year. Most of these sporadic incidents involved little more than scrawled graffiti or vandalism, but there were also 10cases of arson, four fire-bombings and several death threats. No one has been killed or seriously injured, and no evidence suggests a campaign of any scale; most of the incidents have been juvenile pranks. Yet many American Jews are worried. “Hitler started with a handful of people and paint brushes,” says Jeffrey Maas of the ADL in New Jersey. And many government officials agree that the incidents cannot be shrugged off. “There is a tendency… to treat incidents of anti-Semitic or racial vandalism as isolated acts of mischief,” warns New Jersey Attorney General John J. Degnan. “Unfortunately … these acts may represent deep-seated racial and religious hatred.” To combat the flurry of anti-Semitic incidents, Degnan and other law-enforcement officials around the country have stepped up their investigations, often forming special police and prosecution units. Many Jewish leaders have begun holding seminars on bigotry and rallies against anti-Semitism, such as one that drew 3,000 people in California’s San Fernando Valley a fortnight ago. Not satisfied with these steps, Jewish militants have redoubled their own controversial efforts at self-defensepatrolling Jewish neighborhoods and training Jews in the use of high-powered rifles and pistols. Some Jewish organizations are reluctant to read too much into the new statistics of anti-Semitism, noting that vandalism and violent crime are on the rise generally. “It will take another year of monitoring to find out what the numbers actually mean,” says a spokesman for the American Jewish Committee in New York. Other Jews see the low-level violence and harassment as part of a larger pattern. With mounting alarm, they note the renewed organizing efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and American Nazi Party, the tone of some of the criticism of Israel in the United Nations and above all the bloody attacks on Jews in several European cities last year. “There is a feeling,” says Murray Wood, an executive of the Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles, “that all roads somehow lead to Auschwitz.” Anti-Semitism in the United States today hardly compares in virulence with the anti-Jewish attitudes and actions in the 1920s and 1930s. Then, Henry Ford’s Dearborn Independent (circulation: 700,000) ran anti-Semitic diatribes with headlines such as JEWISH GAMBLERS CORRUPT AMERICAN BASEBALL. More damaging, unstated quotas and restrictions kept Jews out of schools, jobs, neighborhoods and hotels. Today, most such barriers have fallen, and many public-opinion polls show a continuing decline in prejudice against Jews. In one survey last year, for example, only 8 percent of those questioned thought Jews had “too much political influence.” But other polls indicate a persistent suspicion and distaste for Jews as “pushy, clannish, unethical.” In Anti-Semitism in America, published two years ago, authors Charles Y. Glock and Harold E. Quinley reported that a third of Americans share such negative attitudesabout the same number, according to a more recent poll, that suspect Jews of being more loyal to Israel than to the United States. Alan Sandler and his bride, Zipporah, had just returned from their honeymoon in New York City. The mailbox of their Cranston, R.I. home was brimming with congratulatory cards. One was decorated with two lovebirds on the front. But inside was a swastika and the words. “We are back. ” Many experts blame the nation’s economic problems for the new signs of anti-Semitism. “Times of distress, social unrest and economic depression [are] often preliminary to outbreaks of anti-Semitism,” explains the Rev. Edward H. Flannery, author of another book on the subject, Anguish of the Jews. In hard times people find it comforting to have a scape-goat, Flannery says, “And they always look in the direction of the Jews.” In the spotlight of full media coverage, one episode often leads to others. Says New York City police official Patrick J. Murphy: “The incidents feed off each other. The kids read about themselves…and any dope can see himself immortalized.” In three days last month, officials at the University of Florida in Gainesville found thirteen examples of anti-Semitic graffiti on campus. After the wife of university President Robert Marston spoke out forcefully against such bigotry, her telephone rang. “This is the Florida-wide organization of Hitler,” said the caller. “I am going to kill you.” In fact few of the reported incidents seem directly connected with extremist groups. “If it were more organized,” says Long Island ADL director Melvin Cooperman, “we could zero in and nail them.” But both the Nazi Party and the Klan have run avowedly anti-Semitic candidates for public officewith disturbing success. Harold Covington, 27, chairman of the National Socialist Party of America in North Carolina, won more than 43 percent of the vote in the state’s Republican primary for attorney general last year. The rise of racist groups also seems to create a climate favorable to individual extremists and a certain public tolerance for isolated incidents. The dramatic growth of Christian fundamentalismand Moral Majority politicsmay also spur anti-Semitism. Just last week, the Rev. Dan C. Fore, Moral Majority leader in New York City, told a reporter: “Jews have a God-given ability to make money, almost a supernatural ability…. They control this city.” Even without such stereotyping, the fundamentalist emphasis on “Christian politics” and efforts to convert Jews are threatening, says William Gralnick of the American Jewish Committee in Atlanta. “What it says is that the Jewish faith is not a valid path to salvation; it tends to separate us from grace.” Last year in Macon, Georgia, says Gralnick, Protestant ministers refused to speak out when the head of the Southern Baptist Convention said, “God Almighty does not hear the prayer of a Jew.” It was shortly after 1 a. m. when two men drove up to the synagogue in Temple City, California.They pried open a window, poured gasoline over a wooden pew and set the synagogue ablaze. Seven stained-glass windows were shattered and other damage to Temple Beth David was estimated at $180, 000. The incident was followed” by nearly 30 more anti-Semitic outbursts in the Los Angeles area over the last eight weeks. The randomness of anti-Semitic incidents, and the absence of links to organized groups in most cases, makes prosecution difficult. In the 377 cases reported by the ADL last year, only 20 arrests were made. Even when there are arrests, the charge is normally a misdemeanor State assemblymen in California and New Jersey have proposed legislation that would stiffen penalties for religiously motivated vandalism. “When a cross is burned or a swastika is smeared, the terror it generates is as intense as from a bomb threat,” says New Jersey Assemblyman Byron Baer. But some judges prefer to sentence juvenile perpetrators to study Jewish history and the Nazi Holocaust. Said one such youth: “I am beginning to realize through these books the great deal of suffering I must have caused.” Many Jewish organizations have escalated their own programs of public education. Last week the ADLworking with the Urban League and the U.S. Justice Departmentsponsored a conference in Providence, Rhode Island, on “extremist groups” and another in Boston on “religious and racial harassment.” About 1,500 people attended an anti-Nazi rally last month at the Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles, itself a target of three anti-Semitic attacks earlier this year. But education didn’t seem to do much good at Great Neck North Senior High School in New York. Though the school has offered courses on the Holocaust for five years, vandals spray-painted the walls with “KKK” and “Hi’Hitler” last October, And police in many areas reported a flurry of similar anti-Semitic incidents after the “Holocaust” series on television. Such incidents have only encouraged militant groups like the Jewish Defense League to expand their often provocative paramilitary operations. The JDL plans to offer 10-week courses in “warfare tactics” at secret sites in southern California, Michigan and upstate New York. Most mainstream Jewish organizations see these steps as an inflammatory overreaction. But equally dangerous, they agree, would be simply to ignore the current upsurge in anti-Semitic incidents. “There’s no reason to panic; the country is not being overrun byanti-Semites,” says Art Teitelbaum of the Anti-Defamation League in Miami. “But it is something to be vigilant about.” White nationalists carry torches on the grounds of the University of Virginia, on the eve of a planned Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12. Neo-Nazis were among those present. Alejandro Alvarez/News2Share via REUTERS Related Articles

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed


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