Archive for the ‘B’nai B’rith’ Category

Springfield chapter of B’nai B’rith marks 150 years – The State Journal-Register

Steven Spearie Correspondent

Les Eastep got a “gift membership” to the Springfield B’nai B’rith lodge in 1990.

He’s stayed with it ever since.

“It’s about being part of a large group and appreciating what they do on a national and international level,” said Eastep. “B’nai B’rith touches Jewish lives around the world.”

Closer to home, about 100 group members hold an annual chilli dinner fundraiser, provide a monthly meal Chaverim, literally, “friends” for senior citizens and support local causes, like the Jewish School of Religion, a combined effort between Temple B’rith Sholom and Temple Israel.

The Emes Lodge No. 67 (Emes is Yiddish for “true” or “truth”) celebrated the 150th anniversary of its founding with a dinner in December. That makes it one of the oldest B’nai B’rith lodges in central Illinois, the founding dating to a time shortly after Jews started arriving in Springfield.

Lodge histories point out that B’nai B’rith members here were involved in everything from responding to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 to organizing war bond sales during World War II to assisting Russian immigrants in the 1980s and 1990s.

Numbers and activities have declined in more recent times, admitted Patrick Chesley, but, noting the anniversary, “there is certainly an obligation to keep the organization operating because it does a number of good things for the Springfield community and the Jewish community.”

The 19th century was big on lodges, like the Masons, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Elks, said Rabbi Barry Marks of Temple Israel, but some excluded Jews, leading to B’nai B’rith’s international founding in 1843 in New York City.

“This was a fraternal organization,” added Marks, who became a member of the local lodge when he arrived in Springfield in 1973. Auxiliary groups for women, young men and young women eventually developed but faded, added Marks.

Both temples have sisterhood groups and there is a local chapter of Hadassah, an American Jewish volunteer women’s organization that raises funds for community programs and health initiatives in Israel.

While many other B’nai B’rith lodges have allowed women, Chesley pointed out that locally there wasn’t an organization for men at the time of its founding. Chesley said while he isn’t personally opposed to allowing women in the lodge, most other Jewish organizations are facing the same membership decline and “aging out” as B’nai B’rith.

“Most of the Jewish children born in Springfield move out of the city,” said Chesley, a former federal prosecutor. “My wife (Nancy) and I have three children and none of them live in Springfield. Some of the kids stayed, but it’s a fairly small percentage.

“Many (young) Jewish professionals want more of a Jewish community than what we have here (about 1,000 Jews.) The generations that have followed us aren’t joiners. They don’t seem to have the same interests getting involved in groups and providing the next set of leaders. They have their own sets of interests.

“They don’t necessarily want to do what their parents did or be as committed (to these types of groups.)”

Eastep, who lives in Rochester, was part of a congress that looked at the decline fraternal organizations in Illinois.

“The demand that culture puts on people’s time,” said Eastep. “The first thing I do in the morning is look at the calendar. What am I doing today?”

Fraternal organizations, added Eastep, “will never go away entirely.” Some organizations that may be forced to merge may lose part of their identity, he added.

“To be honest and fair, B’nai B’rith is going through what every organization is going through (in terms of membership),” said Jeri Schwarz Atleson, vice-chairman of B’nai B’rith’s Midwest Board, who spoke to the Springfield group at its anniversary dinner. “It’s a big topic of conversation, how to recruit new members.

“Given the current environment, I hope we become as well known as we once were and people can go to in times of need.”

It was B’nai B’rith, pointed out Atleson, that gave birth to the Anti-Defamation League which sought to “stop the defamation of Jewish people,” according to its original 1913 charter.

Any issues of anti-Semitism locally, said Chesley, would be taken up by the Jewish Community Relations Council which is comprised of representatives from all the Springfield Jewish organizations: the Jewish Federation of Springfield; Temple B’rith Sholom and Temple Israel and their sisterhoods and the Springfield Chapter of Hadassah in addition to B’nai B’rith.

Chesley said that one of the activities the local lodge was known for was its Christmas Substitution program. Members would staff especially social service organizations, like the Mini O’Beirne Crisis Nursery and Sojourn Shelter, so workers could spend Christmas Day with their families.

Eastep said B’nai B’rith helped Russian immigrants who came to Springfield in the late 1980s and early 1990s find housing, jobs and education.

“It was done quietly,” he said. “It was like taking care of family and B’nai B’rith is a big family.”

Atleson, who lives in Lake County, near the Wisconsin border, said she was happy to spend time in Springfield helping the lodge celebrated such an important milestone.

“It is remarkable that any organization survives that long,” said Atleson. “What I know about this local lodge is that their generosity, time, money, spirit, service to the community and commitment to the organization is tremendous.

“I hope they don’t change the spirit of who they are.”

Chesley said the purpose of the anniversary wasn’t necessarily to get new members, but several people did ask for applications.

“I get a lot of self-satisfaction from being able to help other people and keep a tradition like B’nai B’rith going here in Springfield,” he said. “I find it fulfilling and worthwhile.”

For more information on the Emes Lodge No. 67 of the B’nai B’rith, contact Patrick Chesley at 210-1920.

–Steven Spearie contact: spearie@hotmail.com or follow on Facebook or Twitter (@StevenSpearie)

Go here to read the rest:
Springfield chapter of B’nai B’rith marks 150 years – The State Journal-Register

Fair Usage Law

February 18, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Hell Storm Documentary Post Hitler Nazi Germany 1945 — Hiter Nazi Revisionism

SHUT IT DOWN, NOW!

BIG VICTORY!! We got this video censored in 25% of the world’s countries by relentlessly pressuring YouTube and Governments around the world to Censor and suppress this video. 25% down, 75% to go, help us get this video deleted, blocked and banned everywhere in the world, we have had great success so far!!

Please contact YouTube and get this video deleted, before someone uses www.ClipConverter.cc to download this video and upload it to all the video sharing web sites on the Internet.

Link: Hell Storm documentary

Please go to IMDB, create an account and write a negative review of this film http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4661358/

Fair Usage Law

February 4, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, AIPAC, Anti Racism, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism Lobby, Anti-Semitism News, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Censorship, Discrimination News, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Crimes, Hate Speech, Hitler, Holocaust, Holocaust Denial, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust Revisionism, Hush Crimes, Israel, Israeli Lobby, Jewish, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Judaism, Misc, Multicultural News, Neo Nazi, Race Relations, Racism News, Racist News, Simon Wiesenthal, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC, White Nationalism, White Power, White Privilege, White Racism, White Supremacism, World War II, Zionism  Comments Closed

Charity Report – B’nai B’rith International – give.org

B’nai B’rith International meets the 20 Standards for Charity Accountability.

Year, State Incorporated

1936, District of Columbia

Stated Purpose

“to unite persons of the Jewish faith and to enhance Jewish identity through strengthening Jewish family life and the education and training of youth, broad-based services for the benefit of senior citizens, and advocacy and action on behalf of Jews throughout the world.”

BBI operates 3 centers aimed at strengthening and advocating on behalf of the Jewish community. Through its Center for Human Rights and Public Policy (CHRPP), BBI brings a Jewish voice to international and domestic policy and in defense of Israel. In the United States, CHRPP coordinates the organizations advocacy for the safety, security, and rights of the Jewish people and the State of Israel. In Latin America, it works to build tolerance and to promote social justice. BBI strives to fight against all forms of racism and discrimination, including anti-Semitism. Furthermore, BBIs CHRPP is an advocate for Holocaust restitution in Central and Eastern Europe. BBIs Center for Senior Services (CSS) provides housing and information on aging as well as advocacy and national leadership on issues affecting Jewish seniors. The organization reports being the largest national Jewish sponsor of senior housing in the United States and that it operates more than 50 fixed-income housing facilities worldwide. Through its Center for Community Action (CCA), BBI serves local communities, provides food and clothing, and aids victims of disasters.

Chief Executive

Daniel S. Mariaschin, Executive Vice President

Compensation*

$400,967

Chair of the Board

Gary P. Saltzman

Chair’s Profession / Business Affiliation

Certified Public Accountant (CPA)

Board Size

46

Paid Staff Size

35

Method(s) Used:

Direct mail, telemarketing, special events, print advertisements, grant proposals, Internet appeals, planned giving, cause-related marketing and membership appeals.

Fund raising costs were 30% of related contributions. (Related contributions, which totaled $6,554,000, are donations received as a result of fund raising activities.)

BBI incurred joint costs of $26,172 for informational materials and activities that included fund raising materials. Of those costs $9,815 was allocated to program expenses, $8,724 was allocated to fund raising expenses, and $8,173 was allocated to administrative expenses.

This organization is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. It is eligible to receive contributions deductible as charitable donations for federal income tax purposes.

The following information is based on BBI’s audited financial statements – consolidated – for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.

Note: For the year ended June 30, 2014, BBI reported in-kind medical supplies of $1,194,000.

Visit link:
Charity Report – B’nai B’rith International – give.org

Fair Usage Law

January 26, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Wilshire Boulevard Temple – Wikipedia

Wilshire Boulevard Temple, known from 1862 to 1933 as Congregation B’nai B’rith, is the oldest Jewish congregation in Los Angeles, California.[3][4] Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s main building, its sanctuary topped by a large Byzantine revival dome and decorated with interior murals, is a City of Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[2][3][5][6][7] The Moorish-style building, located on Wilshire Boulevard in the Wilshire Center district, was completed in 1929 and was designed by architect Abram M. Edelman (son of the congregation’s first rabbi, Abraham Edelman).

Wilshire Boulevard Temple is one of the largest Jewish congregations in Los Angeles, and has been led by several influential rabbis, especially Edgar Magnin, who has been described as the “John Wayne” of rabbis[8] and who served for 69 years from 1915 to 1984. A second campus, on the Westside, opened in 1998. Despite repeated reports that the congregation might sell its older, landmark building, the temple began extensive renovations of the historic facility in 2008, and the remodeled sanctuary reopened in 2013.

Wilshire Boulevard Temple traces its origins to the first Jewish worship service in Los Angeles, held in 1851. In 1862, a small community of Los Angeles Jews received its charter from the state to found Congregation Bnai Brith. Worship was led by a layman, Joseph Newmark, until Abraham Wolf Edelman was hired as the first rabbi.[9] Long overshadowed by the more prosperous San Francisco Jewish community, L.A.’s Jews managed to erect the congregation’s first building, an impressive brick Gothic Revival style synagogue built in 1873 at the corner of Temple and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.[10] It was described by the Los Angeles Star as the most superior church edifice in Southern California.[3]

By 1885 much of the congregation was pushing to move away from Orthodox practice, and Rabbi Edelman eventually resigned. Ephraim Schreiber was hired as rabbi in 1885 and adopted some reforms, but soon left. Abraham Blum was hired in 1889, but was forced out in 1895 and replaced by Moses G. Solomon.[9]

In 1896, the B’nai B’rith congregation moved to a larger brick Victorian synagogue at 9th and Hope. It was also designed by A.M. Edelman, and had tall flanking towers capped with large onion domes.

Sigmund Hecht became rabbi in 1899, and in 1903 the congregation joined the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the national organization of the Reform movement. Edgar Magnin was hired as an assistant rabbi in 1915, and took over as senior rabbi upon Hecht’s retirement in 1919. Both Hecht and Magnin implemented the Reform practice of the time, including heavier use of the English language and organ and choir music.[9]

The current Wilshire Boulevard Temple opened in 1929, built among other significant places of worship in the Wilshire Center area. The new temple was the dream of Rabbi Edgar Magnin who, over a career of seven decades, forged a Jewish identity for Los Angeles that joined pioneers and Hollywood moguls. Known as the “Rabbi to the stars”,[8] Magnin came to B’nai B’rith as assistant rabbi in 1915 and from that time on he championed a new synagogue building. The involvement of the Hollywood moviemakers after World War I and Magnin’s promotion to senior rabbi in 1919 allowed the building to go forward. Mostly displaced New Yorkers with marginal religious interest, the Hollywood producers were attracted to Magnin’s image of a popular modern Judaism. Rabbi Magnin also foresaw the movement of the city, and especially its Jewish population, westward. In this, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple was both typical and prescient in anticipating the increased suburbanization of American Jewish life. Because the new synagogue was beyond the “car line,” it presaged L.A.’s near-total dependence on the automobile, an urban-suburban transformation that would affect most Jewish communities only after World War II.[10]

The artistic highlights of the temple include the Biblically-themed Warner Memorial Murals, painted by Hugo Ballin and commissioned by the Warner Brothers (who founded the movie studio of the same name), Jack, Harry, and Albert.[3][5][11][12] Ballins murals consist of 320-foot-long (98m), 7-foot-tall (2.1m) murals depicting key moments in Jewish history.[3][5] The murals are atypical of Judaism’s traditional avoidance of figurative synagogue art.[13] In deciding to include murals in the new temple, Magnin was inspired by his recent visits to great European cathedrals; the particular role of Los Angeles as the capital of the movie industry; and archaeological discoveries of the time that suggested that ancient synagogues used figurative art.[14]

Modeled after Rome’s Pantheon,[8] the immense Byzantine revival dome stands at 100 feet in diameter with its top 135 feet from the street. Its base is flanked by 28 buttresses, or small towers, rising from the ring girder for support. Funding for the dome’s interior decoration was donated by MGM studio production head Irving Thalberg. The prayer inscribed in Hebrew around the Oculus, at the apex of the interior coffered dome, comes from the shm’a prayer, a centerpiece of all Jewish prayer services. The words read: Shm’a Yisroael, Adonoi Eloheinu, Adonaoi Echad; which translates to “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One.”

Designed in the Gothic tradition by the Oliver Smith Studios of Pennsylvania, the Temple’s distinctive rose window on the south wall of the sanctuary, and stained glass windows on the east and west walls, have been described as being among the finest examples of this art form in the United States. During the recent renovation, the rose window was removed and repaired at the Judson Studios in Los Angeles. The Rose Window depicts a Torah Scroll and a Star of David in the center and symbols of the Twelve Tribes of Israel in the outer circle. The triple lancet windows on the east and west walls are each made up of some 5,000-6,000 pieces of glass and are the symbolic representation of the 12 tribes of Israel. Funding for the east and west lancet windows was donated by film producer and studio head Louis B. Mayer.

The Temples immense dome immediately became a landmark in Wilshire Center and throughout Los Angeles. Its imposing marble columns were also a form of Hollywood magic: they are hollow columns of plaster painted to mimic marble. And unlike many synagogues, the temple has no center aisle, in part because the temple builders’ wanted it to mimic a movie theater.[8]

The construction of the temple was completed by the Herbert M. Baruch Corporation and cost $1.5 million in 1929 dollars. It was dedicated in a three-day celebration in June 1929 presided over by Rabbi Magnin.

The congregation adopted its present name, Wilshire Boulevard Temple, in 1933. Magnin went on to head the temple until his death in 1984,[9] during which time he was widely considered as a spokesman on community and religious matters.[15] The block of Wilshire Boulevard where the temple sits was named Edgar F. Magnin Square in 1980 by the City of Los Angeles. In 1984, the Temple building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

One year after Rabbi Magnin’s death, Harvey Fields became senior rabbi and led the congregation for 18 years. He reinstituted some more traditional ritual practices that had not been used under Magnin. The use of music was increased and the temple hired its first trained cantor. Fields was also founding chair of the Interfaith Coalition to Heal L.A. and “Hands Across L.A.”, interfaith responses to the 1992 Los Angeles riots.[16]

In response to membership growth on the Westside of Los Angeles, the temple built a second campus at Olympic Boulevard and Barrington Avenue in West Los Angeles. It opened in 1998 as the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Campus, with a new Jewish day school and other educational and community facilities.[17] Despite repeated reports that the temple would leave its historic building, Rabbi Fields restated the congregation’s commitment to the location.[18]

Over the years the temple has hosted many notable speakers, dignitaries and singers including the Dalai Lama, who received the Bodhi Award and addressed the American Buddhist Congress at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple in 1999.[19]

In July 2000, the J. Paul Getty Trust awarded a “Preserve L.A.” grant to the temple as part of its effort to preserve the city’s cultural heritage.[20]

Rabbi Fields retired in 2003 and was succeeded by Steven Leder.[21] In 2004, the congregation celebrated the 75th anniversary of the historic structure on Wilshire Boulevard. As the area surrounding its historic building changed dramatically (becoming part of the rapidly expanding Koreatown district), the temple faced the decision whether to sell the property and refocus its operations on the Westside, where most of Los Angeles’ Jewish population had moved. Instead, because of a desire to maintain its landmark facilities and commit to its surrounding community, and also noting a trend for younger Jews to move into neighborhoods further east (such as Los Feliz and Silver Lake), the congregation decided to begin a major restoration of the sanctuary and redevelopment of the surrounding city block.[22] The renovations began in 2008.[23] The temple began working with architect Brenda Levin in 2005, developing an expansive master plan for what was envisioned as a campus, including a renovated synagogue, a new pre-school and elementary school, the Karsh Social Service Center, athletic and community facilities.[24]

After the end of the 2011 High Holy Days, the auditorium was closed for a renovation project that lasted two years.[25][26] In 2013, philanthropist Erika Glazer pledged $30 million through 2028 for ongoing restoration and redevelopment of the synagogue,[27] and the Wilshire Center facility is now called the Erika J. Glazer Family Campus. The sanctuary reopened in September 2013 for Rosh Hashanah services, as the temple stated its intentions to provide services for the non-Jewish, mainly Korean and Hispanic residents of the area, as well for the Jewish community.[22][28] The community outreach has been recognized by local leaders, who hope it will become a model for other organizations as well.

In 2009 the temple and its rabbi, Steven Leder, became participants in the Rabbinic Vision Initiative (RVI), a group of rabbis from large Reform congregations who became vocal critics of the Reform movement’s central organization, the Union for Reform Judaism (URJ). In 2011, Wilshire Boulevard Temple resigned from the URJ in what was perceived as a protest of the organization’s perceived ineffectiveness.[29]

In 2015, a committee made up of congregation members, including such prominent philanthropists as Glazer, Bruce Karatz, Eli Broad and Anthony Pritzker, considered more than a dozen architectural firms and commissioned four of them to submit detailed proposals. The subsequently recommended Rem Koolhaas and his Office for Metropolitan Architecture for the project; Koolhaas had proposed a trapezoidal five-story building including office spaces and a large, vaulted ground-level banquet hall.[30]

More here:
Wilshire Boulevard Temple – Wikipedia

Fair Usage Law

January 25, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

The International Jew by Henry Ford the Most Bigoted Book Ever Written Since Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf

Please contact the Internet Archive and ask them to censor this hate book, before bigots download this book and upload it everywhere on the Internet. Please contact The Internet Archive, before bigots download this book and turn it into an audiobook (written in 2015).

https://archive.org/details/TheInternationalJewTheWorldsForemostProblemhenryFord1920s_201510

Hate update 2017: Alex Linder turned this book into a radio program! Do you see what happens when we don’t get these books deleted off the Internet? Let’s hope they don’t start making videos about them!

http://vnnforum.com/forumdisplay.php?s=3dd660968260f84c2845ad3d9f845918&f=177

 

Fair Usage Law

January 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Semitism, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, White Nationalism, White Supremacism, Zionism  Comments Closed

Donate – B’nai B’rith International

State Alabama Alaska American Samoa Arizona Arkansas Armed Forces Africa Armed Forces Americas Armed Forces Canada Armed Forces Europe Armed Forces Middle East Armed Forces Pacific California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Federated States of Micronesia Florida Georgia Guam Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Marshall Islands Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Northern Mariana Islands Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

Country Afghanistan land Islands Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cte d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territory, Occupied Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Runion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthlemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City State Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Viet Nam Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

Read more:
Donate – B’nai B’rith International

Fair Usage Law

December 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

The largest and oldest Jewish fraternal organization. It has (1902) a membership of about 30,000, divided into more than 330 lodges and 10 grand lodges, distributed over the United States, Germany, Rumania, Austria-Hungary, Egypt, and Palestine. It was founded at New York in 1843 by a number of German Jews, headed by Henry Jones, for the purpose of instilling the principles of morality among the followers of the Mosaic faithuniting them on a platform upon which all could stand regardless of dogma and ceremonial customand of inculcating charity, benevolence, and brotherly love as the highest virtues. Political and religious discussions were to be barred forever in order that harmony and peace might be preserved in the deliberations of the Order.

A constitution was adopted for the administration of the affairs of the Order; and in 1851, a sufficient number of lodges having been organized, the first grand lodge was established in the city of New York, and in the same year District Grand Lodge No. 2 was founded in the city of Cincinnati. The Order spread rapidly. Lodges were formed in nearly all of the Eastern and Western states; so that in 1856 District Grand Lodge No. 3 was instituted, with its seat in Philadelphia, Pa. The supreme authority was placed in a central body, which met annually and was composed of one representative from each lodge. At the meeting of the supreme body in 1857 a membership of 2,889, with an accumulated capital of $78,000, was reported. At the same session the constitution was remodeled, giving it a more democratic and representative character. A new ritual, the work of Dr. David Einhorn, was also introduced in keeping with the progressive spirit of the age.

A new era of development began in 1868, when, at a convention held in the city of New York, composed of representatives from each lodge, the present constitution was adopted. Meanwhile, three new grand lodges had been instituted: No. 4 in San Francisco, Cal.; No. 5 in Baltimore, Md.; and No. 6 in Chicago, Ill. The Order at that time numbered more than 20,000 members. Under the new constitution the supreme authority was placed in a president, to hold office for five years, and in an executive committee and a court of appeals, each of which was composed of one representative from each district, elected for five years. The first president was Julius Bien of New York, who had been the master-mind of the new constitution. He held the office until 1900, when he declined reelection on account of his advanced years; and Leo N. Levi of New York was unanimously chosen as his successor.

In 1873 another new grand lodge, No. 7, was added, which held jurisdiction over the Southern states. A new sphere opened for the Order in 1882, when Moritz Ellinger, as the deputy of the executive committee, instituted the first lodge in Berlin, Germany.

Meanwhile a number of institutions had arisen in the United States, founded and supported by the Order, such as the Orphan Asylum in Cleveland, housing nearly 1,000 inmates, supported by Districts 2, 6, and 7. Its erection was due to Benjamin F. Peixotto. Another institution is the Home for the Aged and Infirm at Yonkers, N. Y. The Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Asylum was established by District No. 5, through the influence of Simon Wolf of Washington, D. C. The Jewish Widows’ and Orphans’ Home of New Orleans and the Touro Infirmary at the same place are supported by District No. 7. Finally, the Denver National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives was established by District No. 2. The Order also established a public library, known as the Maimonides Library, in New York city; the B’nai B’rith Manual Training School at Philadelphia, and other educational institutions throughout the country. The Order presented to the United States a statue of Liberty, chiseled by Moses Ezekiel, a native of Cincinnati. At the suggestion of the Order, Benjamin F. Peixotto was commissioned to represent the United States as consul in Rumania, in order to influence the Rumanian government on the question of affording protection to its Jewish subjects. As there was no provision in the American budget for the maintenance of a consulate in Rumania, the Order provided the necessary funds.

When, in 1885, a sufficient number of lodges had been founded to warrant the establishment of a grand lodge for Germany, Julius Bien visited that country to inaugurate it. Meanwhile the growth of the Order in Rumania and Austria-Hungary had led to the institution of grand lodges with seats at Bucharest and Prague, and to the establishment of many useful benevolent institutions.

In America the Order established the Menorah, a monthly magazine, edited first by Benjamin F. Peixotto, afterward by Moritz Ellinger, and for a timeby F. de Sola Mendes. In Vienna the Order publishes a quarterly review; in Berlin, a monthly report.

With the spread of the Order its usefulness as an international medium for the relief of the persecuted in various parts of the world has been established; and the principle of self-help has been inculcated in communities which had always looked to others for protection and aid. Of late the Order has established working relations with the great educational and relief associations of Europe, such as the Alliance Isralite Universelle of Paris, the Jewish Colonization Association of London, and the Israelitische Allianz of Vienna. At the Quinquennial Convention of the Order, held in Chicago (April 29 to May 3, 1900), a commission was appointed to invite the cooperation of all European and American kindred associations in instituting measures for the introduction of industries, agricultural employments, and modern education among the Jews of Galicia. The Order has also been active in finding employment for the Rumanian Jews, who through religious intolerance were compelled to leave their native country. This it does through the district lodges, which organize means whereby many individuals may, from time to time, obtain a livelihood by manual labor. Numbers of Rumanian Jews, on arriving in New York, are distributed among the district lodges.

During its existence the Order has expended millions of dollars in aiding the distressed among its members by means of donations to the sick, by loans, and by endowments to widows and orphans.

Immediately after the great storm at Galveston, Texas, Sept. 8, 1900, a fund of over $27,000 was contributed by the various lodges and members, and through the president, Leo N. Levi, it was employed to give a new start in life to Jewish sufferers by the storm. The fund was raised by telegrams in a few days, and the relief was almost immediate.

Following is a list of the district grand lodges, showing the jurisdiction of each, and the number of members:

Link:
B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

Fair Usage Law

December 7, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

What is the Bnai Brith Justice Unit #5207?

Itis a local chapter of Bnai Brith International. Its members consist of Jewish attorneys and judges, located primarily Broward County, Florida. BBJUhas provided an important avenue for civic and social involvement of our members while carrying out the ideals of Bnai Brith. BBJUsponsors social, educational and charitable programs for its members in conjunction with other Broward County voluntary bar associations and professional organizations.

We focus on Jewish tradition and the Jewish future. We support Bnai Brith ideals and work to promote local, national and international charities. We offer the opportunity to build camaraderie and network with local attorneys and judges. We provide social as well as educational events. ( CLE credit may be available ) We demonstrate leadership by example. We contribute to the communitys needs by assisting Hatikvah House residents in Coral Springs, supporting Jewish Adoption & Foster Care Options (JAFCO), offering mentoring programs for young adults and providing other needed resources to the community. We contribute to the legal professions needs by recognizing excellence in law students at local law schools, participating in Law Day activities, the 17th Judicial Circuit Robing Ceremony and other judicial and bar association functions.

Why Bnai Brith? Click here to find out.

Go here to read the rest:
B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

Fair Usage Law

November 20, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Israel – B’nai B’rith International

The first Bnai Brith lodge in Israel was established in 1888. Now there are approximately 70 lodges, organized into regional councils. Each lodge plans its own activities, some include: helping schools, kindergartens, hospitals’ clubs for the blind, and recent immigrants; delivering food and clothes to needy people; providing housing for soldiers who have completed military service and wish to attend college; organizing Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrations for boys and girls from deprived families; and assisting special scholarship programs and institutes for special education. Some lodges have kitchens that daily serve hundreds of meals to the needy.

In Haifa, B’nai B’rith Israel sponsors a Parents Home, which provides housing for needy senior citizens.

>Read the Center Stage e-newsletter from the B’nai B’rith World Center – Jerusalem

Through educational programs and well-established relationships with political leaders of all parties, the diplomatic corps, and leading academic institutions, the World Center works to strengthen Israel-Diaspora relations and interprets developments concerning the Jewish state for our members and supporters around the world.

The establishment of the World Center was B’nai B’rith’s answer to United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 that in August 1980 called on all member states to remove their diplomatic missions from Jerusalem. Established that same summer, the World Center is an ongoing expression of B’nai B’rith’s active commitment to the State of Israel.

In advancing its mission, the World Center:

The kits were shipped to Israelby Bnai Brithand the delivery was made by Alan Schneider, Director of the Bnai Brith World Center in Jerusalem and delivered to community leaders in Sderot by Schneider and Aron Katz.Young leaders in Israel added messages of support to the package.

Link:
Israel – B’nai B’rith International

Fair Usage Law

October 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Springfield chapter of B’nai B’rith marks 150 years – The State Journal-Register

Steven Spearie Correspondent Les Eastep got a “gift membership” to the Springfield B’nai B’rith lodge in 1990. He’s stayed with it ever since. “It’s about being part of a large group and appreciating what they do on a national and international level,” said Eastep. “B’nai B’rith touches Jewish lives around the world.” Closer to home, about 100 group members hold an annual chilli dinner fundraiser, provide a monthly meal Chaverim, literally, “friends” for senior citizens and support local causes, like the Jewish School of Religion, a combined effort between Temple B’rith Sholom and Temple Israel. The Emes Lodge No. 67 (Emes is Yiddish for “true” or “truth”) celebrated the 150th anniversary of its founding with a dinner in December. That makes it one of the oldest B’nai B’rith lodges in central Illinois, the founding dating to a time shortly after Jews started arriving in Springfield. Lodge histories point out that B’nai B’rith members here were involved in everything from responding to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 to organizing war bond sales during World War II to assisting Russian immigrants in the 1980s and 1990s. Numbers and activities have declined in more recent times, admitted Patrick Chesley, but, noting the anniversary, “there is certainly an obligation to keep the organization operating because it does a number of good things for the Springfield community and the Jewish community.” The 19th century was big on lodges, like the Masons, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Elks, said Rabbi Barry Marks of Temple Israel, but some excluded Jews, leading to B’nai B’rith’s international founding in 1843 in New York City. “This was a fraternal organization,” added Marks, who became a member of the local lodge when he arrived in Springfield in 1973. Auxiliary groups for women, young men and young women eventually developed but faded, added Marks. Both temples have sisterhood groups and there is a local chapter of Hadassah, an American Jewish volunteer women’s organization that raises funds for community programs and health initiatives in Israel. While many other B’nai B’rith lodges have allowed women, Chesley pointed out that locally there wasn’t an organization for men at the time of its founding. Chesley said while he isn’t personally opposed to allowing women in the lodge, most other Jewish organizations are facing the same membership decline and “aging out” as B’nai B’rith. “Most of the Jewish children born in Springfield move out of the city,” said Chesley, a former federal prosecutor. “My wife (Nancy) and I have three children and none of them live in Springfield. Some of the kids stayed, but it’s a fairly small percentage. “Many (young) Jewish professionals want more of a Jewish community than what we have here (about 1,000 Jews.) The generations that have followed us aren’t joiners. They don’t seem to have the same interests getting involved in groups and providing the next set of leaders. They have their own sets of interests. “They don’t necessarily want to do what their parents did or be as committed (to these types of groups.)” Eastep, who lives in Rochester, was part of a congress that looked at the decline fraternal organizations in Illinois. “The demand that culture puts on people’s time,” said Eastep. “The first thing I do in the morning is look at the calendar. What am I doing today?” Fraternal organizations, added Eastep, “will never go away entirely.” Some organizations that may be forced to merge may lose part of their identity, he added. “To be honest and fair, B’nai B’rith is going through what every organization is going through (in terms of membership),” said Jeri Schwarz Atleson, vice-chairman of B’nai B’rith’s Midwest Board, who spoke to the Springfield group at its anniversary dinner. “It’s a big topic of conversation, how to recruit new members. “Given the current environment, I hope we become as well known as we once were and people can go to in times of need.” It was B’nai B’rith, pointed out Atleson, that gave birth to the Anti-Defamation League which sought to “stop the defamation of Jewish people,” according to its original 1913 charter. Any issues of anti-Semitism locally, said Chesley, would be taken up by the Jewish Community Relations Council which is comprised of representatives from all the Springfield Jewish organizations: the Jewish Federation of Springfield; Temple B’rith Sholom and Temple Israel and their sisterhoods and the Springfield Chapter of Hadassah in addition to B’nai B’rith. Chesley said that one of the activities the local lodge was known for was its Christmas Substitution program. Members would staff especially social service organizations, like the Mini O’Beirne Crisis Nursery and Sojourn Shelter, so workers could spend Christmas Day with their families. Eastep said B’nai B’rith helped Russian immigrants who came to Springfield in the late 1980s and early 1990s find housing, jobs and education. “It was done quietly,” he said. “It was like taking care of family and B’nai B’rith is a big family.” Atleson, who lives in Lake County, near the Wisconsin border, said she was happy to spend time in Springfield helping the lodge celebrated such an important milestone. “It is remarkable that any organization survives that long,” said Atleson. “What I know about this local lodge is that their generosity, time, money, spirit, service to the community and commitment to the organization is tremendous. “I hope they don’t change the spirit of who they are.” Chesley said the purpose of the anniversary wasn’t necessarily to get new members, but several people did ask for applications. “I get a lot of self-satisfaction from being able to help other people and keep a tradition like B’nai B’rith going here in Springfield,” he said. “I find it fulfilling and worthwhile.” For more information on the Emes Lodge No. 67 of the B’nai B’rith, contact Patrick Chesley at 210-1920. –Steven Spearie contact: spearie@hotmail.com or follow on Facebook or Twitter (@StevenSpearie)

Fair Usage Law

February 18, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Hell Storm Documentary Post Hitler Nazi Germany 1945 — Hiter Nazi Revisionism

SHUT IT DOWN, NOW!BIG VICTORY!! We got this video censored in 25% of the world’s countries by relentlessly pressuring YouTube and Governments around the world to Censor and suppress this video. 25% down, 75% to go, help us get this video deleted, blocked and banned everywhere in the world, we have had great success so […]

Fair Usage Law

February 4, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, AIPAC, Anti Racism, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism Lobby, Anti-Semitism News, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Censorship, Discrimination News, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Crimes, Hate Speech, Hitler, Holocaust, Holocaust Denial, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust Revisionism, Hush Crimes, Israel, Israeli Lobby, Jewish, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Judaism, Misc, Multicultural News, Neo Nazi, Race Relations, Racism News, Racist News, Simon Wiesenthal, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC, White Nationalism, White Power, White Privilege, White Racism, White Supremacism, World War II, Zionism  Comments Closed

Charity Report – B’nai B’rith International – give.org

B’nai B’rith International meets the 20 Standards for Charity Accountability. Year, State Incorporated 1936, District of Columbia Stated Purpose “to unite persons of the Jewish faith and to enhance Jewish identity through strengthening Jewish family life and the education and training of youth, broad-based services for the benefit of senior citizens, and advocacy and action on behalf of Jews throughout the world.” BBI operates 3 centers aimed at strengthening and advocating on behalf of the Jewish community. Through its Center for Human Rights and Public Policy (CHRPP), BBI brings a Jewish voice to international and domestic policy and in defense of Israel. In the United States, CHRPP coordinates the organizations advocacy for the safety, security, and rights of the Jewish people and the State of Israel. In Latin America, it works to build tolerance and to promote social justice. BBI strives to fight against all forms of racism and discrimination, including anti-Semitism. Furthermore, BBIs CHRPP is an advocate for Holocaust restitution in Central and Eastern Europe. BBIs Center for Senior Services (CSS) provides housing and information on aging as well as advocacy and national leadership on issues affecting Jewish seniors. The organization reports being the largest national Jewish sponsor of senior housing in the United States and that it operates more than 50 fixed-income housing facilities worldwide. Through its Center for Community Action (CCA), BBI serves local communities, provides food and clothing, and aids victims of disasters. Chief Executive Daniel S. Mariaschin, Executive Vice President Compensation* $400,967 Chair of the Board Gary P. Saltzman Chair’s Profession / Business Affiliation Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Board Size 46 Paid Staff Size 35 Method(s) Used: Direct mail, telemarketing, special events, print advertisements, grant proposals, Internet appeals, planned giving, cause-related marketing and membership appeals. Fund raising costs were 30% of related contributions. (Related contributions, which totaled $6,554,000, are donations received as a result of fund raising activities.) BBI incurred joint costs of $26,172 for informational materials and activities that included fund raising materials. Of those costs $9,815 was allocated to program expenses, $8,724 was allocated to fund raising expenses, and $8,173 was allocated to administrative expenses. This organization is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. It is eligible to receive contributions deductible as charitable donations for federal income tax purposes. The following information is based on BBI’s audited financial statements – consolidated – for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014. Note: For the year ended June 30, 2014, BBI reported in-kind medical supplies of $1,194,000.

Fair Usage Law

January 26, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Wilshire Boulevard Temple – Wikipedia

Wilshire Boulevard Temple, known from 1862 to 1933 as Congregation B’nai B’rith, is the oldest Jewish congregation in Los Angeles, California.[3][4] Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s main building, its sanctuary topped by a large Byzantine revival dome and decorated with interior murals, is a City of Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[2][3][5][6][7] The Moorish-style building, located on Wilshire Boulevard in the Wilshire Center district, was completed in 1929 and was designed by architect Abram M. Edelman (son of the congregation’s first rabbi, Abraham Edelman). Wilshire Boulevard Temple is one of the largest Jewish congregations in Los Angeles, and has been led by several influential rabbis, especially Edgar Magnin, who has been described as the “John Wayne” of rabbis[8] and who served for 69 years from 1915 to 1984. A second campus, on the Westside, opened in 1998. Despite repeated reports that the congregation might sell its older, landmark building, the temple began extensive renovations of the historic facility in 2008, and the remodeled sanctuary reopened in 2013. Wilshire Boulevard Temple traces its origins to the first Jewish worship service in Los Angeles, held in 1851. In 1862, a small community of Los Angeles Jews received its charter from the state to found Congregation Bnai Brith. Worship was led by a layman, Joseph Newmark, until Abraham Wolf Edelman was hired as the first rabbi.[9] Long overshadowed by the more prosperous San Francisco Jewish community, L.A.’s Jews managed to erect the congregation’s first building, an impressive brick Gothic Revival style synagogue built in 1873 at the corner of Temple and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.[10] It was described by the Los Angeles Star as the most superior church edifice in Southern California.[3] By 1885 much of the congregation was pushing to move away from Orthodox practice, and Rabbi Edelman eventually resigned. Ephraim Schreiber was hired as rabbi in 1885 and adopted some reforms, but soon left. Abraham Blum was hired in 1889, but was forced out in 1895 and replaced by Moses G. Solomon.[9] In 1896, the B’nai B’rith congregation moved to a larger brick Victorian synagogue at 9th and Hope. It was also designed by A.M. Edelman, and had tall flanking towers capped with large onion domes. Sigmund Hecht became rabbi in 1899, and in 1903 the congregation joined the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the national organization of the Reform movement. Edgar Magnin was hired as an assistant rabbi in 1915, and took over as senior rabbi upon Hecht’s retirement in 1919. Both Hecht and Magnin implemented the Reform practice of the time, including heavier use of the English language and organ and choir music.[9] The current Wilshire Boulevard Temple opened in 1929, built among other significant places of worship in the Wilshire Center area. The new temple was the dream of Rabbi Edgar Magnin who, over a career of seven decades, forged a Jewish identity for Los Angeles that joined pioneers and Hollywood moguls. Known as the “Rabbi to the stars”,[8] Magnin came to B’nai B’rith as assistant rabbi in 1915 and from that time on he championed a new synagogue building. The involvement of the Hollywood moviemakers after World War I and Magnin’s promotion to senior rabbi in 1919 allowed the building to go forward. Mostly displaced New Yorkers with marginal religious interest, the Hollywood producers were attracted to Magnin’s image of a popular modern Judaism. Rabbi Magnin also foresaw the movement of the city, and especially its Jewish population, westward. In this, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple was both typical and prescient in anticipating the increased suburbanization of American Jewish life. Because the new synagogue was beyond the “car line,” it presaged L.A.’s near-total dependence on the automobile, an urban-suburban transformation that would affect most Jewish communities only after World War II.[10] The artistic highlights of the temple include the Biblically-themed Warner Memorial Murals, painted by Hugo Ballin and commissioned by the Warner Brothers (who founded the movie studio of the same name), Jack, Harry, and Albert.[3][5][11][12] Ballins murals consist of 320-foot-long (98m), 7-foot-tall (2.1m) murals depicting key moments in Jewish history.[3][5] The murals are atypical of Judaism’s traditional avoidance of figurative synagogue art.[13] In deciding to include murals in the new temple, Magnin was inspired by his recent visits to great European cathedrals; the particular role of Los Angeles as the capital of the movie industry; and archaeological discoveries of the time that suggested that ancient synagogues used figurative art.[14] Modeled after Rome’s Pantheon,[8] the immense Byzantine revival dome stands at 100 feet in diameter with its top 135 feet from the street. Its base is flanked by 28 buttresses, or small towers, rising from the ring girder for support. Funding for the dome’s interior decoration was donated by MGM studio production head Irving Thalberg. The prayer inscribed in Hebrew around the Oculus, at the apex of the interior coffered dome, comes from the shm’a prayer, a centerpiece of all Jewish prayer services. The words read: Shm’a Yisroael, Adonoi Eloheinu, Adonaoi Echad; which translates to “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One.” Designed in the Gothic tradition by the Oliver Smith Studios of Pennsylvania, the Temple’s distinctive rose window on the south wall of the sanctuary, and stained glass windows on the east and west walls, have been described as being among the finest examples of this art form in the United States. During the recent renovation, the rose window was removed and repaired at the Judson Studios in Los Angeles. The Rose Window depicts a Torah Scroll and a Star of David in the center and symbols of the Twelve Tribes of Israel in the outer circle. The triple lancet windows on the east and west walls are each made up of some 5,000-6,000 pieces of glass and are the symbolic representation of the 12 tribes of Israel. Funding for the east and west lancet windows was donated by film producer and studio head Louis B. Mayer. The Temples immense dome immediately became a landmark in Wilshire Center and throughout Los Angeles. Its imposing marble columns were also a form of Hollywood magic: they are hollow columns of plaster painted to mimic marble. And unlike many synagogues, the temple has no center aisle, in part because the temple builders’ wanted it to mimic a movie theater.[8] The construction of the temple was completed by the Herbert M. Baruch Corporation and cost $1.5 million in 1929 dollars. It was dedicated in a three-day celebration in June 1929 presided over by Rabbi Magnin. The congregation adopted its present name, Wilshire Boulevard Temple, in 1933. Magnin went on to head the temple until his death in 1984,[9] during which time he was widely considered as a spokesman on community and religious matters.[15] The block of Wilshire Boulevard where the temple sits was named Edgar F. Magnin Square in 1980 by the City of Los Angeles. In 1984, the Temple building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. One year after Rabbi Magnin’s death, Harvey Fields became senior rabbi and led the congregation for 18 years. He reinstituted some more traditional ritual practices that had not been used under Magnin. The use of music was increased and the temple hired its first trained cantor. Fields was also founding chair of the Interfaith Coalition to Heal L.A. and “Hands Across L.A.”, interfaith responses to the 1992 Los Angeles riots.[16] In response to membership growth on the Westside of Los Angeles, the temple built a second campus at Olympic Boulevard and Barrington Avenue in West Los Angeles. It opened in 1998 as the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Campus, with a new Jewish day school and other educational and community facilities.[17] Despite repeated reports that the temple would leave its historic building, Rabbi Fields restated the congregation’s commitment to the location.[18] Over the years the temple has hosted many notable speakers, dignitaries and singers including the Dalai Lama, who received the Bodhi Award and addressed the American Buddhist Congress at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple in 1999.[19] In July 2000, the J. Paul Getty Trust awarded a “Preserve L.A.” grant to the temple as part of its effort to preserve the city’s cultural heritage.[20] Rabbi Fields retired in 2003 and was succeeded by Steven Leder.[21] In 2004, the congregation celebrated the 75th anniversary of the historic structure on Wilshire Boulevard. As the area surrounding its historic building changed dramatically (becoming part of the rapidly expanding Koreatown district), the temple faced the decision whether to sell the property and refocus its operations on the Westside, where most of Los Angeles’ Jewish population had moved. Instead, because of a desire to maintain its landmark facilities and commit to its surrounding community, and also noting a trend for younger Jews to move into neighborhoods further east (such as Los Feliz and Silver Lake), the congregation decided to begin a major restoration of the sanctuary and redevelopment of the surrounding city block.[22] The renovations began in 2008.[23] The temple began working with architect Brenda Levin in 2005, developing an expansive master plan for what was envisioned as a campus, including a renovated synagogue, a new pre-school and elementary school, the Karsh Social Service Center, athletic and community facilities.[24] After the end of the 2011 High Holy Days, the auditorium was closed for a renovation project that lasted two years.[25][26] In 2013, philanthropist Erika Glazer pledged $30 million through 2028 for ongoing restoration and redevelopment of the synagogue,[27] and the Wilshire Center facility is now called the Erika J. Glazer Family Campus. The sanctuary reopened in September 2013 for Rosh Hashanah services, as the temple stated its intentions to provide services for the non-Jewish, mainly Korean and Hispanic residents of the area, as well for the Jewish community.[22][28] The community outreach has been recognized by local leaders, who hope it will become a model for other organizations as well. In 2009 the temple and its rabbi, Steven Leder, became participants in the Rabbinic Vision Initiative (RVI), a group of rabbis from large Reform congregations who became vocal critics of the Reform movement’s central organization, the Union for Reform Judaism (URJ). In 2011, Wilshire Boulevard Temple resigned from the URJ in what was perceived as a protest of the organization’s perceived ineffectiveness.[29] In 2015, a committee made up of congregation members, including such prominent philanthropists as Glazer, Bruce Karatz, Eli Broad and Anthony Pritzker, considered more than a dozen architectural firms and commissioned four of them to submit detailed proposals. The subsequently recommended Rem Koolhaas and his Office for Metropolitan Architecture for the project; Koolhaas had proposed a trapezoidal five-story building including office spaces and a large, vaulted ground-level banquet hall.[30]

Fair Usage Law

January 25, 2017   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

The International Jew by Henry Ford the Most Bigoted Book Ever Written Since Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf

Please contact the Internet Archive and ask them to censor this hate book, before bigots download this book and upload it everywhere on the Internet. Please contact The Internet Archive, before bigots download this book and turn it into an audiobook (written in 2015).https://archive.org/details/TheInternationalJewTheWorldsForemostProblemhenryFord1920s_201510Hate update 2017: Alex Linder turned this book into a radio program! […]

Fair Usage Law

January 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Semitism, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, White Nationalism, White Supremacism, Zionism  Comments Closed

Donate – B’nai B’rith International

State Alabama Alaska American Samoa Arizona Arkansas Armed Forces Africa Armed Forces Americas Armed Forces Canada Armed Forces Europe Armed Forces Middle East Armed Forces Pacific California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Federated States of Micronesia Florida Georgia Guam Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Marshall Islands Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Northern Mariana Islands Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Country Afghanistan land Islands Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cte d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territory, Occupied Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Runion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthlemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City State Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Viet Nam Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

Fair Usage Law

December 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

The largest and oldest Jewish fraternal organization. It has (1902) a membership of about 30,000, divided into more than 330 lodges and 10 grand lodges, distributed over the United States, Germany, Rumania, Austria-Hungary, Egypt, and Palestine. It was founded at New York in 1843 by a number of German Jews, headed by Henry Jones, for the purpose of instilling the principles of morality among the followers of the Mosaic faithuniting them on a platform upon which all could stand regardless of dogma and ceremonial customand of inculcating charity, benevolence, and brotherly love as the highest virtues. Political and religious discussions were to be barred forever in order that harmony and peace might be preserved in the deliberations of the Order. A constitution was adopted for the administration of the affairs of the Order; and in 1851, a sufficient number of lodges having been organized, the first grand lodge was established in the city of New York, and in the same year District Grand Lodge No. 2 was founded in the city of Cincinnati. The Order spread rapidly. Lodges were formed in nearly all of the Eastern and Western states; so that in 1856 District Grand Lodge No. 3 was instituted, with its seat in Philadelphia, Pa. The supreme authority was placed in a central body, which met annually and was composed of one representative from each lodge. At the meeting of the supreme body in 1857 a membership of 2,889, with an accumulated capital of $78,000, was reported. At the same session the constitution was remodeled, giving it a more democratic and representative character. A new ritual, the work of Dr. David Einhorn, was also introduced in keeping with the progressive spirit of the age. A new era of development began in 1868, when, at a convention held in the city of New York, composed of representatives from each lodge, the present constitution was adopted. Meanwhile, three new grand lodges had been instituted: No. 4 in San Francisco, Cal.; No. 5 in Baltimore, Md.; and No. 6 in Chicago, Ill. The Order at that time numbered more than 20,000 members. Under the new constitution the supreme authority was placed in a president, to hold office for five years, and in an executive committee and a court of appeals, each of which was composed of one representative from each district, elected for five years. The first president was Julius Bien of New York, who had been the master-mind of the new constitution. He held the office until 1900, when he declined reelection on account of his advanced years; and Leo N. Levi of New York was unanimously chosen as his successor. In 1873 another new grand lodge, No. 7, was added, which held jurisdiction over the Southern states. A new sphere opened for the Order in 1882, when Moritz Ellinger, as the deputy of the executive committee, instituted the first lodge in Berlin, Germany. Meanwhile a number of institutions had arisen in the United States, founded and supported by the Order, such as the Orphan Asylum in Cleveland, housing nearly 1,000 inmates, supported by Districts 2, 6, and 7. Its erection was due to Benjamin F. Peixotto. Another institution is the Home for the Aged and Infirm at Yonkers, N. Y. The Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Asylum was established by District No. 5, through the influence of Simon Wolf of Washington, D. C. The Jewish Widows’ and Orphans’ Home of New Orleans and the Touro Infirmary at the same place are supported by District No. 7. Finally, the Denver National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives was established by District No. 2. The Order also established a public library, known as the Maimonides Library, in New York city; the B’nai B’rith Manual Training School at Philadelphia, and other educational institutions throughout the country. The Order presented to the United States a statue of Liberty, chiseled by Moses Ezekiel, a native of Cincinnati. At the suggestion of the Order, Benjamin F. Peixotto was commissioned to represent the United States as consul in Rumania, in order to influence the Rumanian government on the question of affording protection to its Jewish subjects. As there was no provision in the American budget for the maintenance of a consulate in Rumania, the Order provided the necessary funds. When, in 1885, a sufficient number of lodges had been founded to warrant the establishment of a grand lodge for Germany, Julius Bien visited that country to inaugurate it. Meanwhile the growth of the Order in Rumania and Austria-Hungary had led to the institution of grand lodges with seats at Bucharest and Prague, and to the establishment of many useful benevolent institutions. In America the Order established the Menorah, a monthly magazine, edited first by Benjamin F. Peixotto, afterward by Moritz Ellinger, and for a timeby F. de Sola Mendes. In Vienna the Order publishes a quarterly review; in Berlin, a monthly report. With the spread of the Order its usefulness as an international medium for the relief of the persecuted in various parts of the world has been established; and the principle of self-help has been inculcated in communities which had always looked to others for protection and aid. Of late the Order has established working relations with the great educational and relief associations of Europe, such as the Alliance Isralite Universelle of Paris, the Jewish Colonization Association of London, and the Israelitische Allianz of Vienna. At the Quinquennial Convention of the Order, held in Chicago (April 29 to May 3, 1900), a commission was appointed to invite the cooperation of all European and American kindred associations in instituting measures for the introduction of industries, agricultural employments, and modern education among the Jews of Galicia. The Order has also been active in finding employment for the Rumanian Jews, who through religious intolerance were compelled to leave their native country. This it does through the district lodges, which organize means whereby many individuals may, from time to time, obtain a livelihood by manual labor. Numbers of Rumanian Jews, on arriving in New York, are distributed among the district lodges. During its existence the Order has expended millions of dollars in aiding the distressed among its members by means of donations to the sick, by loans, and by endowments to widows and orphans. Immediately after the great storm at Galveston, Texas, Sept. 8, 1900, a fund of over $27,000 was contributed by the various lodges and members, and through the president, Leo N. Levi, it was employed to give a new start in life to Jewish sufferers by the storm. The fund was raised by telegrams in a few days, and the relief was almost immediate. Following is a list of the district grand lodges, showing the jurisdiction of each, and the number of members:

Fair Usage Law

December 7, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

What is the Bnai Brith Justice Unit #5207? Itis a local chapter of Bnai Brith International. Its members consist of Jewish attorneys and judges, located primarily Broward County, Florida. BBJUhas provided an important avenue for civic and social involvement of our members while carrying out the ideals of Bnai Brith. BBJUsponsors social, educational and charitable programs for its members in conjunction with other Broward County voluntary bar associations and professional organizations. We focus on Jewish tradition and the Jewish future. We support Bnai Brith ideals and work to promote local, national and international charities. We offer the opportunity to build camaraderie and network with local attorneys and judges. We provide social as well as educational events. ( CLE credit may be available ) We demonstrate leadership by example. We contribute to the communitys needs by assisting Hatikvah House residents in Coral Springs, supporting Jewish Adoption & Foster Care Options (JAFCO), offering mentoring programs for young adults and providing other needed resources to the community. We contribute to the legal professions needs by recognizing excellence in law students at local law schools, participating in Law Day activities, the 17th Judicial Circuit Robing Ceremony and other judicial and bar association functions. Why Bnai Brith? Click here to find out.

Fair Usage Law

November 20, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Israel – B’nai B’rith International

The first Bnai Brith lodge in Israel was established in 1888. Now there are approximately 70 lodges, organized into regional councils. Each lodge plans its own activities, some include: helping schools, kindergartens, hospitals’ clubs for the blind, and recent immigrants; delivering food and clothes to needy people; providing housing for soldiers who have completed military service and wish to attend college; organizing Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrations for boys and girls from deprived families; and assisting special scholarship programs and institutes for special education. Some lodges have kitchens that daily serve hundreds of meals to the needy. In Haifa, B’nai B’rith Israel sponsors a Parents Home, which provides housing for needy senior citizens. > Read the Center Stage e-newsletter from the B’nai B’rith World Center – Jerusalem Through educational programs and well-established relationships with political leaders of all parties, the diplomatic corps, and leading academic institutions, the World Center works to strengthen Israel-Diaspora relations and interprets developments concerning the Jewish state for our members and supporters around the world. The establishment of the World Center was B’nai B’rith’s answer to United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 that in August 1980 called on all member states to remove their diplomatic missions from Jerusalem. Established that same summer, the World Center is an ongoing expression of B’nai B’rith’s active commitment to the State of Israel. In advancing its mission, the World Center: The kits were shipped to Israelby Bnai Brithand the delivery was made by Alan Schneider, Director of the Bnai Brith World Center in Jerusalem and delivered to community leaders in Sderot by Schneider and Aron Katz.Young leaders in Israel added messages of support to the package.

Fair Usage Law

October 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."