Archive for the ‘B’nai B’rith’ Category

The International Jew by Henry Ford the Most Bigoted Book Ever Written Since Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf

Please contact the Internet Archive and ask them to censor this hate book, before bigots download this book and upload it everywhere on the Internet. Please contact The Internet Archive, before bigots download this book and turn it into an audiobook (written in 2015).

https://archive.org/details/TheInternationalJewTheWorldsForemostProblemhenryFord1920s_201510

Hate update 2017: Alex Linder turned this book into a radio program! Do you see what happens when we don’t get these books deleted off the Internet? Let’s hope they don’t start making videos about them!

http://vnnforum.com/forumdisplay.php?s=3dd660968260f84c2845ad3d9f845918&f=177

 

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January 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Semitism, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, White Nationalism, White Supremacism, Zionism  Comments Closed

Donate – B’nai B’rith International

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December 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

The largest and oldest Jewish fraternal organization. It has (1902) a membership of about 30,000, divided into more than 330 lodges and 10 grand lodges, distributed over the United States, Germany, Rumania, Austria-Hungary, Egypt, and Palestine. It was founded at New York in 1843 by a number of German Jews, headed by Henry Jones, for the purpose of instilling the principles of morality among the followers of the Mosaic faithuniting them on a platform upon which all could stand regardless of dogma and ceremonial customand of inculcating charity, benevolence, and brotherly love as the highest virtues. Political and religious discussions were to be barred forever in order that harmony and peace might be preserved in the deliberations of the Order.

A constitution was adopted for the administration of the affairs of the Order; and in 1851, a sufficient number of lodges having been organized, the first grand lodge was established in the city of New York, and in the same year District Grand Lodge No. 2 was founded in the city of Cincinnati. The Order spread rapidly. Lodges were formed in nearly all of the Eastern and Western states; so that in 1856 District Grand Lodge No. 3 was instituted, with its seat in Philadelphia, Pa. The supreme authority was placed in a central body, which met annually and was composed of one representative from each lodge. At the meeting of the supreme body in 1857 a membership of 2,889, with an accumulated capital of $78,000, was reported. At the same session the constitution was remodeled, giving it a more democratic and representative character. A new ritual, the work of Dr. David Einhorn, was also introduced in keeping with the progressive spirit of the age.

A new era of development began in 1868, when, at a convention held in the city of New York, composed of representatives from each lodge, the present constitution was adopted. Meanwhile, three new grand lodges had been instituted: No. 4 in San Francisco, Cal.; No. 5 in Baltimore, Md.; and No. 6 in Chicago, Ill. The Order at that time numbered more than 20,000 members. Under the new constitution the supreme authority was placed in a president, to hold office for five years, and in an executive committee and a court of appeals, each of which was composed of one representative from each district, elected for five years. The first president was Julius Bien of New York, who had been the master-mind of the new constitution. He held the office until 1900, when he declined reelection on account of his advanced years; and Leo N. Levi of New York was unanimously chosen as his successor.

In 1873 another new grand lodge, No. 7, was added, which held jurisdiction over the Southern states. A new sphere opened for the Order in 1882, when Moritz Ellinger, as the deputy of the executive committee, instituted the first lodge in Berlin, Germany.

Meanwhile a number of institutions had arisen in the United States, founded and supported by the Order, such as the Orphan Asylum in Cleveland, housing nearly 1,000 inmates, supported by Districts 2, 6, and 7. Its erection was due to Benjamin F. Peixotto. Another institution is the Home for the Aged and Infirm at Yonkers, N. Y. The Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Asylum was established by District No. 5, through the influence of Simon Wolf of Washington, D. C. The Jewish Widows’ and Orphans’ Home of New Orleans and the Touro Infirmary at the same place are supported by District No. 7. Finally, the Denver National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives was established by District No. 2. The Order also established a public library, known as the Maimonides Library, in New York city; the B’nai B’rith Manual Training School at Philadelphia, and other educational institutions throughout the country. The Order presented to the United States a statue of Liberty, chiseled by Moses Ezekiel, a native of Cincinnati. At the suggestion of the Order, Benjamin F. Peixotto was commissioned to represent the United States as consul in Rumania, in order to influence the Rumanian government on the question of affording protection to its Jewish subjects. As there was no provision in the American budget for the maintenance of a consulate in Rumania, the Order provided the necessary funds.

When, in 1885, a sufficient number of lodges had been founded to warrant the establishment of a grand lodge for Germany, Julius Bien visited that country to inaugurate it. Meanwhile the growth of the Order in Rumania and Austria-Hungary had led to the institution of grand lodges with seats at Bucharest and Prague, and to the establishment of many useful benevolent institutions.

In America the Order established the Menorah, a monthly magazine, edited first by Benjamin F. Peixotto, afterward by Moritz Ellinger, and for a timeby F. de Sola Mendes. In Vienna the Order publishes a quarterly review; in Berlin, a monthly report.

With the spread of the Order its usefulness as an international medium for the relief of the persecuted in various parts of the world has been established; and the principle of self-help has been inculcated in communities which had always looked to others for protection and aid. Of late the Order has established working relations with the great educational and relief associations of Europe, such as the Alliance Isralite Universelle of Paris, the Jewish Colonization Association of London, and the Israelitische Allianz of Vienna. At the Quinquennial Convention of the Order, held in Chicago (April 29 to May 3, 1900), a commission was appointed to invite the cooperation of all European and American kindred associations in instituting measures for the introduction of industries, agricultural employments, and modern education among the Jews of Galicia. The Order has also been active in finding employment for the Rumanian Jews, who through religious intolerance were compelled to leave their native country. This it does through the district lodges, which organize means whereby many individuals may, from time to time, obtain a livelihood by manual labor. Numbers of Rumanian Jews, on arriving in New York, are distributed among the district lodges.

During its existence the Order has expended millions of dollars in aiding the distressed among its members by means of donations to the sick, by loans, and by endowments to widows and orphans.

Immediately after the great storm at Galveston, Texas, Sept. 8, 1900, a fund of over $27,000 was contributed by the various lodges and members, and through the president, Leo N. Levi, it was employed to give a new start in life to Jewish sufferers by the storm. The fund was raised by telegrams in a few days, and the relief was almost immediate.

Following is a list of the district grand lodges, showing the jurisdiction of each, and the number of members:

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B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

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December 7, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

What is the Bnai Brith Justice Unit #5207?

Itis a local chapter of Bnai Brith International. Its members consist of Jewish attorneys and judges, located primarily Broward County, Florida. BBJUhas provided an important avenue for civic and social involvement of our members while carrying out the ideals of Bnai Brith. BBJUsponsors social, educational and charitable programs for its members in conjunction with other Broward County voluntary bar associations and professional organizations.

We focus on Jewish tradition and the Jewish future. We support Bnai Brith ideals and work to promote local, national and international charities. We offer the opportunity to build camaraderie and network with local attorneys and judges. We provide social as well as educational events. ( CLE credit may be available ) We demonstrate leadership by example. We contribute to the communitys needs by assisting Hatikvah House residents in Coral Springs, supporting Jewish Adoption & Foster Care Options (JAFCO), offering mentoring programs for young adults and providing other needed resources to the community. We contribute to the legal professions needs by recognizing excellence in law students at local law schools, participating in Law Day activities, the 17th Judicial Circuit Robing Ceremony and other judicial and bar association functions.

Why Bnai Brith? Click here to find out.

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B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

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November 20, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Israel – B’nai B’rith International

The first Bnai Brith lodge in Israel was established in 1888. Now there are approximately 70 lodges, organized into regional councils. Each lodge plans its own activities, some include: helping schools, kindergartens, hospitals’ clubs for the blind, and recent immigrants; delivering food and clothes to needy people; providing housing for soldiers who have completed military service and wish to attend college; organizing Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrations for boys and girls from deprived families; and assisting special scholarship programs and institutes for special education. Some lodges have kitchens that daily serve hundreds of meals to the needy.

In Haifa, B’nai B’rith Israel sponsors a Parents Home, which provides housing for needy senior citizens.

>Read the Center Stage e-newsletter from the B’nai B’rith World Center – Jerusalem

Through educational programs and well-established relationships with political leaders of all parties, the diplomatic corps, and leading academic institutions, the World Center works to strengthen Israel-Diaspora relations and interprets developments concerning the Jewish state for our members and supporters around the world.

The establishment of the World Center was B’nai B’rith’s answer to United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 that in August 1980 called on all member states to remove their diplomatic missions from Jerusalem. Established that same summer, the World Center is an ongoing expression of B’nai B’rith’s active commitment to the State of Israel.

In advancing its mission, the World Center:

The kits were shipped to Israelby Bnai Brithand the delivery was made by Alan Schneider, Director of the Bnai Brith World Center in Jerusalem and delivered to community leaders in Sderot by Schneider and Aron Katz.Young leaders in Israel added messages of support to the package.

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Israel – B’nai B’rith International

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October 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

BBYO – Wikipedia

BBYO (formerly B’nai B’rith Youth Organization) the leading pluralistic teen movement aspiring to involve more Jewish teens in more meaningful Jewish experiences. For 90 years, BBYO has provided exceptional identity enrichment and leadership development experiences for hundreds of thousands of Jewish teens.[1]

In 2002 the movement split from B’nai B’rith International, which had been its parent organization, to become BBYO, Inc.

BBYO’s mission is, “More Jewish Teens, More Meaningful Jewish Experiences.” The organization emphasizes its youth leadership model, in which teen leaders are elected by their peers on a local, regional and international level, and are given the opportunity to make their own programmatic decisions. Membership to BBYO is open to any high school or 8th grade student who identifies as a Jew. Many local programs also may have programs for teens in grades 6th-8th, called BBYO Connect.

BBYO is unique amongst its peers in being organized into local fraternity- and sorority-like chapters. Male chapters are known as AZA chapters and their members are known as Alephs, and female chapters as BBG chapters, their members known as BBGs. AZA and BBG were independent organizations (beginning in 1924 and 1944 respectively) before becoming brother and sister organizations under B’nai B’rith. In some communities, there are co-ed BBYO chapters which borrow traditions from both organizations.

AZA’s original advisor, Nathan Mnookin, soon left Omaha for his hometown of Kansas City, where he started a similar group with the same name. The Omaha group selected a new advisor, Sam Beber, who soon laid out his plans for an international youth movement based on the local AZA model. In 1924, the Aleph Zadik Aleph for Young Men, now an international Jewish fraternity, was formed according to Beber’s plan, with the Omaha and Kansas City chapters receiving the first two charters. Four chapters were in attendance at the first convention in June 1924, and ten at the second convention the following summer.

By 1925, AZA had expanded east with dozens of chapters across the country. At Beber’s urging, B’nai B’rith took up the issue of officially adopting AZA as its junior auxiliary at their national convention in 1925. Supported by Henry Monsky, who himself was vying for the B’nai B’rith presidency, the convention adopted a committee report affirming its approval of the organization under B’nai B’rith’s jurisdiction. Immediately following the convention, B’nai B’rith Executive Committee met and officially adopted AZA, which then became known as the Aleph Zadik Aleph of B’nai B’rith.

In 1944, after a few past failed attempts to begin a Jewish youth group for young women, B’nai B’rith Girls (BBG) became officially recognized and adopted by B’nai B’rith. Anita Perlman is credited with the development of BBG as Sam Beber is credited with the AZA. For the first time, AZA and BBG were united under a single organization, officially cementing their relationship and brother and sister organizations. Combined, the two youth movements were called the B’nai B’rith Youth Organization, and BBYO was born.

Although the organization has changed greatly behind-the-scenes over the years, its original tenets still remain true: dedication to Jewish life, a pluralistic approach, commitment to community service and social action, and a youth leadership model. BBYO continues to be open to all teenagers that identify themselves as Jews, without exception. Members participate in meeting rituals and sing pep songs that date back to the organization’s earliest days. The organization continues to maintain and contribute to its International Service Fund, initiated at the very first international convention. Although the number of professional staff has risen dramatically, BBYO continues to maintain democratic youth leadership at every level.

Just as the organization changed greatly in its first few years, starting as a local youth group to being adopted as the official youth auxiliary of the world’s largest Jewish organization, it likewise has undergone drastic changes in recent years. After more than 75 years of a general prosperity, B’nai B’rith began a massive restructuring at the turn of the 21st century in response to the changing face of North American Jewry. As a result, what was then the B’nai B’rith Youth Organization split from B’nai B’rith in 2002 and was re-formed as BBYO, Inc., an independent non-profit organization. The new organization received substantial funding from the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation and was chaired by Lynn Schusterman.

Traditionally, BBYO was a conglomeration of many largely independent regions. This was the result of the modification of B’nai B’rith’s long-standing “district” model. As new forms of communication have brought the members and staff of BBYO in closer contact, and as the differences between geographic regions continue to deteriorate, BBYO has become much more of a top-down organization, with standardized marketing materials and directives. BBYO has reached into the online market with its b-linked.org website, into the middle school market with its BBYO Connect programs, and into the adult market with its Friends & Alumni Network.

BBYO has always been the world’s leading pluralistic Jewish youth movement. As the first and the most dynamically inclusive organization of its kind, every Jewish teen, of all backgrounds, anywhere in the world, will find an experience that provides the foundation for a meaningful Jewish life.

BBYO operates at four different levels, each one of which has its own elected teen leaders: international, regional, council and chapter. Depending on the size of and geography of a particular region, it may or may not contain the council level. (Typically, regions that are large in population or spread out geographically are likely to contain councils.) All members are assigned to a chapter, which is part of a region (and sometimes a council). The combined regions make up the international movement.

On the international level, BBYO organizes large-scale programs and offerings for its members, both during the school year and the summer. These programs bring together members from all over North America, and all over the world. Despite the fact that BBYO focuses mostly on activities taking place or originating in North America, the organization nonetheless maintains a presence on five other continents as well. Some of these are affiliate chapters that ascribe to the traditions of BBYO but are not technically under the control of the international office. BBYO programs are known to be active in Israel, UK & Ireland, France, Thailand, Bulgaria, Curaao, South Africa, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and most recently Turkey, Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia, and Argentina due to the new BBYO-JDC partnership.

Districts were a now-defunct organizational unit, that were mostly replaced by regions in the 1980s. The last remaining international districts were disbanded and renamed in 2005 at International Convention.

At the regional level, chapters are brought together on a regular basis for inter-chapter programming and regional programs. All regions have at least one weekend-long convention every year (with some offering as many as a half-dozen). Regions that do not contain councils elect a regional board on a yearly basis. The regional board helps to plan regional events, and supervise their counterparts on the chapter level. There are currently 43 regions in North America. Regions are supervised by professional staff in a regional office.

Larger regions are sometimes split into councils, which operate much the same as regions, with their own council-wide events and elected council boards. A region that has councils will typically have both council events and regional events (encompassing all of the region’s councils) over the course of the year. Councils elect a council board on a year basis; these boards function in the same fashion as do regional boards. Councils are supervised by professional staff, which may be in a regional office or a separate council office depending on the size of the council and region.

Chapters are BBYO’s most basic organizational level, functioning at a local level. There are currently over 600 chapters in operation (roughly 45% B’nai B’rith Girls, 40% Aleph Zadik Aleph and 15% BBYO) across the world. These chapters contain about 48,000 registered members, and their programs reach over 40,000 teens every year.

Chapters regularly engage in self-created programing. Programs are incredibly important and build the relationships among members of a chapter. There are many different programs, and a large bank of ideas can be found at BBYO Program Bank

BBYO each year offers programs in which all regions and councils in the international order come together and gather for various purposes. Through the duration of the school year there are three main programs a member could attend.

A three-day convention in August which the top leaders of the regions: the two presidents and the International Boards, and all regional and council presidents, gather to discuss the goals and objectives of the upcoming programming year.

These leaders meet again in February before the International Convention with the addition of the International Chair Network and discuss how the first half of the year has gone and how to improve off it. They also do some final planning for the 5 days ahead of them.

International convention is a five-day convention in which is open to all members of BBYO. It serves as a weekend to reconnect with those whom youve met over the summer, international execs for a second time, business meetings, elections of the new international board for the next programming year and the state of the order of the International Presidents of the girls and the boys.

This is a trace through the remembrance of the Holocaust. One week of the trip is spent in Poland and the other week in Israel. While in Poland the participants connect to their connection to Judaism. The participants then spend one week in Israel celebrating its independence day. The March of the Living is not a BBYO sponsored program, but does send its own delegation on the trip annually.

BBYO offers a variety of different Summer programs dealing with leadership, Judaism, community service, the business world, and international travels to many different countries. The core of these programs have, for many years, taken place at B’nai B’rith Perlman Camp. These programs include:

This program is a twelve-day program in which incoming sophomores, juniors, and seniors in high school attend to learn about the essentials of leading a chapter. There are eight sessions held during the summer, five of which are held at the Beber Camp in Wisconsin (CLTC 1,3,5,7,8), and the other three at Bethany College in West Virginia (CLTC 2,4,6).

This program is an twenty one-day leadership program in which those on regional board learn how to expand what they knew about how to lead a chapter but now how to lead a region. It is part of the Perlman summer.

This program allows those seeking to find their Jewish identity to do so. It is three weeks of forming your own Jewish Self. It constitutes as half of the Perlman summer along with ILTC.

This program is twenty one-day elite leadership program in Israel that combines educational touring, leadership training, interactive seminars and meaningful community service. ILSI allows Jewish teens to gain an appreciation for the complexity of modern Israel and an enduring connection to the Jewish State and the Jewish People worldwide.

A program offering trips to all 5 continents that BBYO maintains a presence on. These trips include tourism, community service, social education, leadership, and Judaic experiences. One of the activities is tour of Israel. The teens are esorting by local team leader and have a basic introduction to Israel’s geography, history, and culture.

BBYO Michigan Business and Entrepreneurship Institute BBYO UT Austin Sports Management Institute BBYO UCLA Leadership and Entertainment Institute

Impact is two weeks of community service in a chosen location to better make one city at a time. Each program focuses on a different aspect of community service.

BBYO Michigan Business and Entrepreneurship Institute

A two-week course highlighting Jewish business leadership along with teaching teens marketing, finance, and product development.

Both AZA and BBG have a segmented programming model, with each proscribed programming area referred to as a “fold”. For AZA, the five folds are social, athletic, community service/social action, Judaic and educational; for BBG, the six folds are sisterhood, creativity, recreation, Jewish heritage, community service, and social action. Some chapters also have adopted the unofficial seventh fold of Mind, Body, Attitude (MBA). It aims to create a better self-image, and better self-esteem. Programs can be any time, and can involve any number of chapters (including both AZA and BBG together).

The teen leaders elected to office by their peers at various organizational levels have their own set of office titles, derived from Hebrew. Elections are typically held on an annual or semi-annual basis. The titles are often similar for the equivalent AZA and BBG positions, varying slightly due to a word’s gender.

Exact board positions elected can vary slightly between regions and chapters, with some chapters electing additional board positions, and some electing multiple members to a single position (e.g. electing two Aym Ha-Chaverot to expand recruitment). It is also possible for chapters to elect one member to two positions (e.g. electing the same person to serve as Mazkirah and Gizborit). Additionally, chairmanships may be appointed on an as-needed basis at every organizational level.

BBYO chapters typically contain the same positions as would an AZA or BBG chapters, with the exact position name corresponding to the gender of the person elected to the position. Some BBYO chapters may also elect both a male and female officer to certain board positions (e.g., electing both a moreh and a aym ha-chaverot).

However, within BBYO in the UK and Ireland, the leadership positions work differently. Each chapter has an exec of about six people, who are voted on by all the members of that chapter. The positions are (in order):President, Vice-President, Administrator (sometimes split into Secretary and Treasurer), Programmer, Judaism and Zionism Awareness Officer (Referred to as JZA) and Welfare. Each of these positions has a specific role, but work together as a team to run the weekly meetings. On a larger scale, there is a National Executive, consisting of the positions listed above.

The BBYO in Curaao also has its own way of composing a board. Elections are held annually (usually in August), where each member attending that day votes. The board consist of 5 members. The positions are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary and Past-President (the President chosen at the previous elections). One more position that is also voted on, is the one of PR (Public Relations). This position is filled by two members, each representing one of the congregations respectively. The PRs are not part of the board.

More in-depth histories of AZA and BBG are available, as each organization developed independently before being united by B’nai B’rith. In addition, each organization maintains its own customs, traditions, and songs. Likewise, customs, traditions and program vary greatly from region to region, and more information is available on each.

2. BBYO Parties on Spirit of Philadelphia [1] 3. BBYO Expands Impact, Membership [2] 4. BBYO international teen president visits Orlando Jewish community [3]

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BBYO – Wikipedia

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October 15, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Worship | Temple B’nai B’rith

Rabbi Roger Lerner

Worship

Rabbi Roger Lerner has been spiritual leader ofTemple Bnai Brith since July 2008, Rabbi Lerner has sought to exemplify not only some ofthe basic tenets of Reform Judaism, which includes a pluralistic and egalitarian approach to community, but also has heeded the prophetic call heralded on the front of our building; Do Justice, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly with thy God. Under Rabbi Lerners leadership and in concert with our vibrant Social Action Committee, we have taken this message to the heart of our congregation, expressing it in a varity of community-wide social action projects that truly make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate in our small community. In September of 2010, Rabbi Lerner became President of the Wyoming Valley Interfaith Council and has been integral in having spear-headed panel discussions on hate and compassion with the hope of inspiring our community.

Among his many responsibilities, he is also the father of three beautiful children, Lily, Noah, and Ziva. They are beacons of light who continually remind him of the Native American proverb that teaches us, We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children. Rabbi Lerner also enjoys a variety of activities that include, hiking, rafting, cycling, crocheting, movies, books, sports and more. Healso spends time at the JCC Day Camp during the summer leading services as well as facilitating games on the JCCs Holiday House ropes course.

Prior to rabbinic school, Rabbi Lerner was an outdoor adventure therapist in Georgia where he worked with students and adults in a variety of settings. He states, The skills that I learned have proven to be an asset in my life and in my work. I enjoy bringing outdoor experiences to groups wherever I am. A graduate of Brandeis University in 1994, he earned his MA in Hebrew Letters in 2005 and was ordained by Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati, OH in 2007.

Rabbi Lerner is thrilled to be at Temple Bnai Brith. When I interviewed at Temple Bnai Brith, I knew it was the right place for me. The congregation is warm and welcoming and the community is a great place to raise a family. I respect the great history and traditions of Temple Bnai Brith and the Jewish community of Wilkes-Barre and look forward to growing and changing with the congregation, as well.

Rabbi Lerner hopes that those interested in Temple Bnai Brith will join us in the synagogues many activities and share in the warmth of our community. Those who are interested in meeting with the Rabbi are invited to email him at RabbiLerner@tbbwb.com or call him at 287-9606 ext. 104to set up an appointment. Of course you are always more than welcome to stop in for a chat.

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Worship | Temple B’nai B’rith

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October 3, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’nai B’rith Europe | Facebook

On February 3rd 2016, a Bnai Brith delegation, formed by Bnai Brith Europe President, Daniel Citone, Bnai Brith Europe Vice-President, Valerie Achache and Bnai Brith International Director of EU Affairs, Benjamin Naegele met with European Commission Coordinator on combating anti-Semitism Katharina von Schnurbein.

Ms. von Schnurbein has been appointed at the end of 2015 by the European Commission as Coordinator on combating anti-Semitism. A German national, she has bee…n coordinating the Commission’s dialogue with Churches, religions, philosophical and non-confessional organisations and was part of former Commission President Jos Manuel Barroso’s advisory team. She has been appointed at the same time as Mr.David Friggieri who is the Coordinator on combating anti-Muslim hatred

During the meeting, Daniel Citone gave a presentation of Bnai Brith as Ms. von Schnurbein enquired on everyone cultural background. She proved very interested in the young Jewish leaders opinion about how Jews felt and lived nowadays in Europe. The conversation was frank and open.

Among the other issues discussed were the challenges Jewish communities in Europe face as well as ways to combat anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism. The recent labelling of Israeli settlement products, the lack of an official definition of anti-Semitism and hate speech online were also discussed.

The next step in this dialogue will be the organisation of a follow up working meeting, such as the one held in Bnai Brith premises on 1st October 2015, with fellow Jewish and pro-Israel associations. This time the meeting should be presided by Ms. von Schnurbein.

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B’nai B’rith Europe | Facebook

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October 2, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Bienvenue sur le site du B’nai B’rith Europe

Vendredi, 05 Aot 2016

After years of refusing requests by 1972 Munich Olympic Israeli athletes’ widows to mark a moment’s silence for their murdered husbands, IOC inaugurates Place of Mourning for every Olympics and observe moment’s silence in Rio de Janeiro ; Wife: ‘This gives us closure.’

Source Ynet

Widows of two of the 11 Israelis killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics got the recognition that they had so long sought with a ceremony and minute’s silence at the Olympic village in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday.

Ankie Spitzer’s husband Andre, a fencing coach, was killed along with weightlifter Joseph Romano, whose wife Ilana Romano was also at the ceremony led by International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach.

Ilana Romano, center, and Ankie Spitzer, right, widows of Israeli Olympic athletes killed at the 1972 Munich Olympics, attend a memorial in their husbands’ honor, ahead of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro (Photo: AP)

“This is closure for us. This is incredibly important. We waited 44 years to have this remembrance and recognition for our loved ones who were so brutally killed in Munich,” Spitzer told reporters at the newly established Place of Mourning. “That they would be really accepted as members of the Olympic family. It is what we wanted because they were members of the Olympic family.”

A tree filled with ribbons stands as part of a memorial in honor of Israeli Olympic athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics (Photo: AP)

On September 5, 1972, members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage at the poorly secured athletes’ village by Palestinian gunmen from the Black September terror organization.

Within 24 hours, 11 Israelis, five Palestinians and a German policeman were dead after a standoff and subsequent rescue effort erupted into gunfire.

A memorial in honor of Israeli Olympic athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics stands in the Olympic Village ahead of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro (Photo: AP)

Relatives of those killed have long demanded a minute’s silence at the opening ceremonies of Olympics Games, only to be turned down by the IOC.

Instead, Bach inaugurated the Place of Mourning, which will now be a feature at every Olympics, with two stones from ancient Olympia encased in glass in a leafy part of the athletes’ village.

IOC President Thomas Bach inaugurates the memorial (Photo: AP)

“Today, the inauguration of the Place of Mourning give us the opportunity to remember those that have passed away at the Olympic Games,” Bach told a small crowd that included IOC officials, Israeli team officials, athletes and Spitzer and Romano.

“We chose the Olympic village as the location…because it symbolizes the unity of the Olympic family.”

He then read out the 11 names of the Israeli victims, the German policeman as well as the name of Nodar Kumaritashvili, who was killed on the eve of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics in an accident in the sliding centre.

Romano said: “I never believed it was going to come. After 44 years I am happy for this moment of history.”

IOC President Thomas Bach, back to camera, embraces Ilana Romano, right, and Ankie Spitzer (Photo: AP)

Bach, in tears, embraced Romano and Spitzer, who praised the IOC’s decision.

“I cannot explain to you how emotional I am and how much this means for us,” Spitzer said. “We went through a lot. We always got a No (from the IOC) and this time we not only got a Yes but a big Yes.”

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August 8, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

The International Jew by Henry Ford the Most Bigoted Book Ever Written Since Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf

Please contact the Internet Archive and ask them to censor this hate book, before bigots download this book and upload it everywhere on the Internet. Please contact The Internet Archive, before bigots download this book and turn it into an audiobook (written in 2015).https://archive.org/details/TheInternationalJewTheWorldsForemostProblemhenryFord1920s_201510Hate update 2017: Alex Linder turned this book into a radio program! […]

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January 1, 2017   Posted in: Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Semitism, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, White Nationalism, White Supremacism, Zionism  Comments Closed

Donate – B’nai B’rith International

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December 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH – JewishEncyclopedia.com

The largest and oldest Jewish fraternal organization. It has (1902) a membership of about 30,000, divided into more than 330 lodges and 10 grand lodges, distributed over the United States, Germany, Rumania, Austria-Hungary, Egypt, and Palestine. It was founded at New York in 1843 by a number of German Jews, headed by Henry Jones, for the purpose of instilling the principles of morality among the followers of the Mosaic faithuniting them on a platform upon which all could stand regardless of dogma and ceremonial customand of inculcating charity, benevolence, and brotherly love as the highest virtues. Political and religious discussions were to be barred forever in order that harmony and peace might be preserved in the deliberations of the Order. A constitution was adopted for the administration of the affairs of the Order; and in 1851, a sufficient number of lodges having been organized, the first grand lodge was established in the city of New York, and in the same year District Grand Lodge No. 2 was founded in the city of Cincinnati. The Order spread rapidly. Lodges were formed in nearly all of the Eastern and Western states; so that in 1856 District Grand Lodge No. 3 was instituted, with its seat in Philadelphia, Pa. The supreme authority was placed in a central body, which met annually and was composed of one representative from each lodge. At the meeting of the supreme body in 1857 a membership of 2,889, with an accumulated capital of $78,000, was reported. At the same session the constitution was remodeled, giving it a more democratic and representative character. A new ritual, the work of Dr. David Einhorn, was also introduced in keeping with the progressive spirit of the age. A new era of development began in 1868, when, at a convention held in the city of New York, composed of representatives from each lodge, the present constitution was adopted. Meanwhile, three new grand lodges had been instituted: No. 4 in San Francisco, Cal.; No. 5 in Baltimore, Md.; and No. 6 in Chicago, Ill. The Order at that time numbered more than 20,000 members. Under the new constitution the supreme authority was placed in a president, to hold office for five years, and in an executive committee and a court of appeals, each of which was composed of one representative from each district, elected for five years. The first president was Julius Bien of New York, who had been the master-mind of the new constitution. He held the office until 1900, when he declined reelection on account of his advanced years; and Leo N. Levi of New York was unanimously chosen as his successor. In 1873 another new grand lodge, No. 7, was added, which held jurisdiction over the Southern states. A new sphere opened for the Order in 1882, when Moritz Ellinger, as the deputy of the executive committee, instituted the first lodge in Berlin, Germany. Meanwhile a number of institutions had arisen in the United States, founded and supported by the Order, such as the Orphan Asylum in Cleveland, housing nearly 1,000 inmates, supported by Districts 2, 6, and 7. Its erection was due to Benjamin F. Peixotto. Another institution is the Home for the Aged and Infirm at Yonkers, N. Y. The Atlanta Hebrew Orphan Asylum was established by District No. 5, through the influence of Simon Wolf of Washington, D. C. The Jewish Widows’ and Orphans’ Home of New Orleans and the Touro Infirmary at the same place are supported by District No. 7. Finally, the Denver National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives was established by District No. 2. The Order also established a public library, known as the Maimonides Library, in New York city; the B’nai B’rith Manual Training School at Philadelphia, and other educational institutions throughout the country. The Order presented to the United States a statue of Liberty, chiseled by Moses Ezekiel, a native of Cincinnati. At the suggestion of the Order, Benjamin F. Peixotto was commissioned to represent the United States as consul in Rumania, in order to influence the Rumanian government on the question of affording protection to its Jewish subjects. As there was no provision in the American budget for the maintenance of a consulate in Rumania, the Order provided the necessary funds. When, in 1885, a sufficient number of lodges had been founded to warrant the establishment of a grand lodge for Germany, Julius Bien visited that country to inaugurate it. Meanwhile the growth of the Order in Rumania and Austria-Hungary had led to the institution of grand lodges with seats at Bucharest and Prague, and to the establishment of many useful benevolent institutions. In America the Order established the Menorah, a monthly magazine, edited first by Benjamin F. Peixotto, afterward by Moritz Ellinger, and for a timeby F. de Sola Mendes. In Vienna the Order publishes a quarterly review; in Berlin, a monthly report. With the spread of the Order its usefulness as an international medium for the relief of the persecuted in various parts of the world has been established; and the principle of self-help has been inculcated in communities which had always looked to others for protection and aid. Of late the Order has established working relations with the great educational and relief associations of Europe, such as the Alliance Isralite Universelle of Paris, the Jewish Colonization Association of London, and the Israelitische Allianz of Vienna. At the Quinquennial Convention of the Order, held in Chicago (April 29 to May 3, 1900), a commission was appointed to invite the cooperation of all European and American kindred associations in instituting measures for the introduction of industries, agricultural employments, and modern education among the Jews of Galicia. The Order has also been active in finding employment for the Rumanian Jews, who through religious intolerance were compelled to leave their native country. This it does through the district lodges, which organize means whereby many individuals may, from time to time, obtain a livelihood by manual labor. Numbers of Rumanian Jews, on arriving in New York, are distributed among the district lodges. During its existence the Order has expended millions of dollars in aiding the distressed among its members by means of donations to the sick, by loans, and by endowments to widows and orphans. Immediately after the great storm at Galveston, Texas, Sept. 8, 1900, a fund of over $27,000 was contributed by the various lodges and members, and through the president, Leo N. Levi, it was employed to give a new start in life to Jewish sufferers by the storm. The fund was raised by telegrams in a few days, and the relief was almost immediate. Following is a list of the district grand lodges, showing the jurisdiction of each, and the number of members:

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December 7, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’NAI B’RITH JUSTICE UNIT

What is the Bnai Brith Justice Unit #5207? Itis a local chapter of Bnai Brith International. Its members consist of Jewish attorneys and judges, located primarily Broward County, Florida. BBJUhas provided an important avenue for civic and social involvement of our members while carrying out the ideals of Bnai Brith. BBJUsponsors social, educational and charitable programs for its members in conjunction with other Broward County voluntary bar associations and professional organizations. We focus on Jewish tradition and the Jewish future. We support Bnai Brith ideals and work to promote local, national and international charities. We offer the opportunity to build camaraderie and network with local attorneys and judges. We provide social as well as educational events. ( CLE credit may be available ) We demonstrate leadership by example. We contribute to the communitys needs by assisting Hatikvah House residents in Coral Springs, supporting Jewish Adoption & Foster Care Options (JAFCO), offering mentoring programs for young adults and providing other needed resources to the community. We contribute to the legal professions needs by recognizing excellence in law students at local law schools, participating in Law Day activities, the 17th Judicial Circuit Robing Ceremony and other judicial and bar association functions. Why Bnai Brith? Click here to find out.

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November 20, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Israel – B’nai B’rith International

The first Bnai Brith lodge in Israel was established in 1888. Now there are approximately 70 lodges, organized into regional councils. Each lodge plans its own activities, some include: helping schools, kindergartens, hospitals’ clubs for the blind, and recent immigrants; delivering food and clothes to needy people; providing housing for soldiers who have completed military service and wish to attend college; organizing Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrations for boys and girls from deprived families; and assisting special scholarship programs and institutes for special education. Some lodges have kitchens that daily serve hundreds of meals to the needy. In Haifa, B’nai B’rith Israel sponsors a Parents Home, which provides housing for needy senior citizens. > Read the Center Stage e-newsletter from the B’nai B’rith World Center – Jerusalem Through educational programs and well-established relationships with political leaders of all parties, the diplomatic corps, and leading academic institutions, the World Center works to strengthen Israel-Diaspora relations and interprets developments concerning the Jewish state for our members and supporters around the world. The establishment of the World Center was B’nai B’rith’s answer to United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 that in August 1980 called on all member states to remove their diplomatic missions from Jerusalem. Established that same summer, the World Center is an ongoing expression of B’nai B’rith’s active commitment to the State of Israel. In advancing its mission, the World Center: The kits were shipped to Israelby Bnai Brithand the delivery was made by Alan Schneider, Director of the Bnai Brith World Center in Jerusalem and delivered to community leaders in Sderot by Schneider and Aron Katz.Young leaders in Israel added messages of support to the package.

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October 21, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

BBYO – Wikipedia

BBYO (formerly B’nai B’rith Youth Organization) the leading pluralistic teen movement aspiring to involve more Jewish teens in more meaningful Jewish experiences. For 90 years, BBYO has provided exceptional identity enrichment and leadership development experiences for hundreds of thousands of Jewish teens.[1] In 2002 the movement split from B’nai B’rith International, which had been its parent organization, to become BBYO, Inc. BBYO’s mission is, “More Jewish Teens, More Meaningful Jewish Experiences.” The organization emphasizes its youth leadership model, in which teen leaders are elected by their peers on a local, regional and international level, and are given the opportunity to make their own programmatic decisions. Membership to BBYO is open to any high school or 8th grade student who identifies as a Jew. Many local programs also may have programs for teens in grades 6th-8th, called BBYO Connect. BBYO is unique amongst its peers in being organized into local fraternity- and sorority-like chapters. Male chapters are known as AZA chapters and their members are known as Alephs, and female chapters as BBG chapters, their members known as BBGs. AZA and BBG were independent organizations (beginning in 1924 and 1944 respectively) before becoming brother and sister organizations under B’nai B’rith. In some communities, there are co-ed BBYO chapters which borrow traditions from both organizations. AZA’s original advisor, Nathan Mnookin, soon left Omaha for his hometown of Kansas City, where he started a similar group with the same name. The Omaha group selected a new advisor, Sam Beber, who soon laid out his plans for an international youth movement based on the local AZA model. In 1924, the Aleph Zadik Aleph for Young Men, now an international Jewish fraternity, was formed according to Beber’s plan, with the Omaha and Kansas City chapters receiving the first two charters. Four chapters were in attendance at the first convention in June 1924, and ten at the second convention the following summer. By 1925, AZA had expanded east with dozens of chapters across the country. At Beber’s urging, B’nai B’rith took up the issue of officially adopting AZA as its junior auxiliary at their national convention in 1925. Supported by Henry Monsky, who himself was vying for the B’nai B’rith presidency, the convention adopted a committee report affirming its approval of the organization under B’nai B’rith’s jurisdiction. Immediately following the convention, B’nai B’rith Executive Committee met and officially adopted AZA, which then became known as the Aleph Zadik Aleph of B’nai B’rith. In 1944, after a few past failed attempts to begin a Jewish youth group for young women, B’nai B’rith Girls (BBG) became officially recognized and adopted by B’nai B’rith. Anita Perlman is credited with the development of BBG as Sam Beber is credited with the AZA. For the first time, AZA and BBG were united under a single organization, officially cementing their relationship and brother and sister organizations. Combined, the two youth movements were called the B’nai B’rith Youth Organization, and BBYO was born. Although the organization has changed greatly behind-the-scenes over the years, its original tenets still remain true: dedication to Jewish life, a pluralistic approach, commitment to community service and social action, and a youth leadership model. BBYO continues to be open to all teenagers that identify themselves as Jews, without exception. Members participate in meeting rituals and sing pep songs that date back to the organization’s earliest days. The organization continues to maintain and contribute to its International Service Fund, initiated at the very first international convention. Although the number of professional staff has risen dramatically, BBYO continues to maintain democratic youth leadership at every level. Just as the organization changed greatly in its first few years, starting as a local youth group to being adopted as the official youth auxiliary of the world’s largest Jewish organization, it likewise has undergone drastic changes in recent years. After more than 75 years of a general prosperity, B’nai B’rith began a massive restructuring at the turn of the 21st century in response to the changing face of North American Jewry. As a result, what was then the B’nai B’rith Youth Organization split from B’nai B’rith in 2002 and was re-formed as BBYO, Inc., an independent non-profit organization. The new organization received substantial funding from the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation and was chaired by Lynn Schusterman. Traditionally, BBYO was a conglomeration of many largely independent regions. This was the result of the modification of B’nai B’rith’s long-standing “district” model. As new forms of communication have brought the members and staff of BBYO in closer contact, and as the differences between geographic regions continue to deteriorate, BBYO has become much more of a top-down organization, with standardized marketing materials and directives. BBYO has reached into the online market with its b-linked.org website, into the middle school market with its BBYO Connect programs, and into the adult market with its Friends & Alumni Network. BBYO has always been the world’s leading pluralistic Jewish youth movement. As the first and the most dynamically inclusive organization of its kind, every Jewish teen, of all backgrounds, anywhere in the world, will find an experience that provides the foundation for a meaningful Jewish life. BBYO operates at four different levels, each one of which has its own elected teen leaders: international, regional, council and chapter. Depending on the size of and geography of a particular region, it may or may not contain the council level. (Typically, regions that are large in population or spread out geographically are likely to contain councils.) All members are assigned to a chapter, which is part of a region (and sometimes a council). The combined regions make up the international movement. On the international level, BBYO organizes large-scale programs and offerings for its members, both during the school year and the summer. These programs bring together members from all over North America, and all over the world. Despite the fact that BBYO focuses mostly on activities taking place or originating in North America, the organization nonetheless maintains a presence on five other continents as well. Some of these are affiliate chapters that ascribe to the traditions of BBYO but are not technically under the control of the international office. BBYO programs are known to be active in Israel, UK & Ireland, France, Thailand, Bulgaria, Curaao, South Africa, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and most recently Turkey, Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia, and Argentina due to the new BBYO-JDC partnership. Districts were a now-defunct organizational unit, that were mostly replaced by regions in the 1980s. The last remaining international districts were disbanded and renamed in 2005 at International Convention. At the regional level, chapters are brought together on a regular basis for inter-chapter programming and regional programs. All regions have at least one weekend-long convention every year (with some offering as many as a half-dozen). Regions that do not contain councils elect a regional board on a yearly basis. The regional board helps to plan regional events, and supervise their counterparts on the chapter level. There are currently 43 regions in North America. Regions are supervised by professional staff in a regional office. Larger regions are sometimes split into councils, which operate much the same as regions, with their own council-wide events and elected council boards. A region that has councils will typically have both council events and regional events (encompassing all of the region’s councils) over the course of the year. Councils elect a council board on a year basis; these boards function in the same fashion as do regional boards. Councils are supervised by professional staff, which may be in a regional office or a separate council office depending on the size of the council and region. Chapters are BBYO’s most basic organizational level, functioning at a local level. There are currently over 600 chapters in operation (roughly 45% B’nai B’rith Girls, 40% Aleph Zadik Aleph and 15% BBYO) across the world. These chapters contain about 48,000 registered members, and their programs reach over 40,000 teens every year. Chapters regularly engage in self-created programing. Programs are incredibly important and build the relationships among members of a chapter. There are many different programs, and a large bank of ideas can be found at BBYO Program Bank BBYO each year offers programs in which all regions and councils in the international order come together and gather for various purposes. Through the duration of the school year there are three main programs a member could attend. A three-day convention in August which the top leaders of the regions: the two presidents and the International Boards, and all regional and council presidents, gather to discuss the goals and objectives of the upcoming programming year. These leaders meet again in February before the International Convention with the addition of the International Chair Network and discuss how the first half of the year has gone and how to improve off it. They also do some final planning for the 5 days ahead of them. International convention is a five-day convention in which is open to all members of BBYO. It serves as a weekend to reconnect with those whom youve met over the summer, international execs for a second time, business meetings, elections of the new international board for the next programming year and the state of the order of the International Presidents of the girls and the boys. This is a trace through the remembrance of the Holocaust. One week of the trip is spent in Poland and the other week in Israel. While in Poland the participants connect to their connection to Judaism. The participants then spend one week in Israel celebrating its independence day. The March of the Living is not a BBYO sponsored program, but does send its own delegation on the trip annually. BBYO offers a variety of different Summer programs dealing with leadership, Judaism, community service, the business world, and international travels to many different countries. The core of these programs have, for many years, taken place at B’nai B’rith Perlman Camp. These programs include: This program is a twelve-day program in which incoming sophomores, juniors, and seniors in high school attend to learn about the essentials of leading a chapter. There are eight sessions held during the summer, five of which are held at the Beber Camp in Wisconsin (CLTC 1,3,5,7,8), and the other three at Bethany College in West Virginia (CLTC 2,4,6). This program is an twenty one-day leadership program in which those on regional board learn how to expand what they knew about how to lead a chapter but now how to lead a region. It is part of the Perlman summer. This program allows those seeking to find their Jewish identity to do so. It is three weeks of forming your own Jewish Self. It constitutes as half of the Perlman summer along with ILTC. This program is twenty one-day elite leadership program in Israel that combines educational touring, leadership training, interactive seminars and meaningful community service. ILSI allows Jewish teens to gain an appreciation for the complexity of modern Israel and an enduring connection to the Jewish State and the Jewish People worldwide. A program offering trips to all 5 continents that BBYO maintains a presence on. These trips include tourism, community service, social education, leadership, and Judaic experiences. One of the activities is tour of Israel. The teens are esorting by local team leader and have a basic introduction to Israel’s geography, history, and culture. BBYO Michigan Business and Entrepreneurship Institute BBYO UT Austin Sports Management Institute BBYO UCLA Leadership and Entertainment Institute Impact is two weeks of community service in a chosen location to better make one city at a time. Each program focuses on a different aspect of community service. BBYO Michigan Business and Entrepreneurship Institute A two-week course highlighting Jewish business leadership along with teaching teens marketing, finance, and product development. Both AZA and BBG have a segmented programming model, with each proscribed programming area referred to as a “fold”. For AZA, the five folds are social, athletic, community service/social action, Judaic and educational; for BBG, the six folds are sisterhood, creativity, recreation, Jewish heritage, community service, and social action. Some chapters also have adopted the unofficial seventh fold of Mind, Body, Attitude (MBA). It aims to create a better self-image, and better self-esteem. Programs can be any time, and can involve any number of chapters (including both AZA and BBG together). The teen leaders elected to office by their peers at various organizational levels have their own set of office titles, derived from Hebrew. Elections are typically held on an annual or semi-annual basis. The titles are often similar for the equivalent AZA and BBG positions, varying slightly due to a word’s gender. Exact board positions elected can vary slightly between regions and chapters, with some chapters electing additional board positions, and some electing multiple members to a single position (e.g. electing two Aym Ha-Chaverot to expand recruitment). It is also possible for chapters to elect one member to two positions (e.g. electing the same person to serve as Mazkirah and Gizborit). Additionally, chairmanships may be appointed on an as-needed basis at every organizational level. BBYO chapters typically contain the same positions as would an AZA or BBG chapters, with the exact position name corresponding to the gender of the person elected to the position. Some BBYO chapters may also elect both a male and female officer to certain board positions (e.g., electing both a moreh and a aym ha-chaverot). However, within BBYO in the UK and Ireland, the leadership positions work differently. Each chapter has an exec of about six people, who are voted on by all the members of that chapter. The positions are (in order):President, Vice-President, Administrator (sometimes split into Secretary and Treasurer), Programmer, Judaism and Zionism Awareness Officer (Referred to as JZA) and Welfare. Each of these positions has a specific role, but work together as a team to run the weekly meetings. On a larger scale, there is a National Executive, consisting of the positions listed above. The BBYO in Curaao also has its own way of composing a board. Elections are held annually (usually in August), where each member attending that day votes. The board consist of 5 members. The positions are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary and Past-President (the President chosen at the previous elections). One more position that is also voted on, is the one of PR (Public Relations). This position is filled by two members, each representing one of the congregations respectively. The PRs are not part of the board. More in-depth histories of AZA and BBG are available, as each organization developed independently before being united by B’nai B’rith. In addition, each organization maintains its own customs, traditions, and songs. Likewise, customs, traditions and program vary greatly from region to region, and more information is available on each. 2. BBYO Parties on Spirit of Philadelphia [1] 3. BBYO Expands Impact, Membership [2] 4. BBYO international teen president visits Orlando Jewish community [3]

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October 15, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

Worship | Temple B’nai B’rith

Rabbi Roger Lerner Worship Rabbi Roger Lerner has been spiritual leader ofTemple Bnai Brith since July 2008, Rabbi Lerner has sought to exemplify not only some ofthe basic tenets of Reform Judaism, which includes a pluralistic and egalitarian approach to community, but also has heeded the prophetic call heralded on the front of our building; Do Justice, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly with thy God. Under Rabbi Lerners leadership and in concert with our vibrant Social Action Committee, we have taken this message to the heart of our congregation, expressing it in a varity of community-wide social action projects that truly make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate in our small community. In September of 2010, Rabbi Lerner became President of the Wyoming Valley Interfaith Council and has been integral in having spear-headed panel discussions on hate and compassion with the hope of inspiring our community. Among his many responsibilities, he is also the father of three beautiful children, Lily, Noah, and Ziva. They are beacons of light who continually remind him of the Native American proverb that teaches us, We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children. Rabbi Lerner also enjoys a variety of activities that include, hiking, rafting, cycling, crocheting, movies, books, sports and more. Healso spends time at the JCC Day Camp during the summer leading services as well as facilitating games on the JCCs Holiday House ropes course. Prior to rabbinic school, Rabbi Lerner was an outdoor adventure therapist in Georgia where he worked with students and adults in a variety of settings. He states, The skills that I learned have proven to be an asset in my life and in my work. I enjoy bringing outdoor experiences to groups wherever I am. A graduate of Brandeis University in 1994, he earned his MA in Hebrew Letters in 2005 and was ordained by Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati, OH in 2007. Rabbi Lerner is thrilled to be at Temple Bnai Brith. When I interviewed at Temple Bnai Brith, I knew it was the right place for me. The congregation is warm and welcoming and the community is a great place to raise a family. I respect the great history and traditions of Temple Bnai Brith and the Jewish community of Wilkes-Barre and look forward to growing and changing with the congregation, as well. Rabbi Lerner hopes that those interested in Temple Bnai Brith will join us in the synagogues many activities and share in the warmth of our community. Those who are interested in meeting with the Rabbi are invited to email him at RabbiLerner@tbbwb.com or call him at 287-9606 ext. 104to set up an appointment. Of course you are always more than welcome to stop in for a chat.

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October 3, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

B’nai B’rith Europe | Facebook

On February 3rd 2016, a Bnai Brith delegation, formed by Bnai Brith Europe President, Daniel Citone, Bnai Brith Europe Vice-President, Valerie Achache and Bnai Brith International Director of EU Affairs, Benjamin Naegele met with European Commission Coordinator on combating anti-Semitism Katharina von Schnurbein. Ms. von Schnurbein has been appointed at the end of 2015 by the European Commission as Coordinator on combating anti-Semitism. A German national, she has bee…n coordinating the Commission’s dialogue with Churches, religions, philosophical and non-confessional organisations and was part of former Commission President Jos Manuel Barroso’s advisory team. She has been appointed at the same time as Mr.David Friggieri who is the Coordinator on combating anti-Muslim hatred During the meeting, Daniel Citone gave a presentation of Bnai Brith as Ms. von Schnurbein enquired on everyone cultural background. She proved very interested in the young Jewish leaders opinion about how Jews felt and lived nowadays in Europe. The conversation was frank and open. Among the other issues discussed were the challenges Jewish communities in Europe face as well as ways to combat anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism. The recent labelling of Israeli settlement products, the lack of an official definition of anti-Semitism and hate speech online were also discussed. The next step in this dialogue will be the organisation of a follow up working meeting, such as the one held in Bnai Brith premises on 1st October 2015, with fellow Jewish and pro-Israel associations. This time the meeting should be presided by Ms. von Schnurbein.

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October 2, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed

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Vendredi, 05 Aot 2016 After years of refusing requests by 1972 Munich Olympic Israeli athletes’ widows to mark a moment’s silence for their murdered husbands, IOC inaugurates Place of Mourning for every Olympics and observe moment’s silence in Rio de Janeiro ; Wife: ‘This gives us closure.’ Source Ynet Widows of two of the 11 Israelis killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics got the recognition that they had so long sought with a ceremony and minute’s silence at the Olympic village in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday. Ankie Spitzer’s husband Andre, a fencing coach, was killed along with weightlifter Joseph Romano, whose wife Ilana Romano was also at the ceremony led by International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach. Ilana Romano, center, and Ankie Spitzer, right, widows of Israeli Olympic athletes killed at the 1972 Munich Olympics, attend a memorial in their husbands’ honor, ahead of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro (Photo: AP) “This is closure for us. This is incredibly important. We waited 44 years to have this remembrance and recognition for our loved ones who were so brutally killed in Munich,” Spitzer told reporters at the newly established Place of Mourning. “That they would be really accepted as members of the Olympic family. It is what we wanted because they were members of the Olympic family.” A tree filled with ribbons stands as part of a memorial in honor of Israeli Olympic athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics (Photo: AP) On September 5, 1972, members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage at the poorly secured athletes’ village by Palestinian gunmen from the Black September terror organization. Within 24 hours, 11 Israelis, five Palestinians and a German policeman were dead after a standoff and subsequent rescue effort erupted into gunfire. A memorial in honor of Israeli Olympic athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen at the 1972 Munich Olympics stands in the Olympic Village ahead of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro (Photo: AP) Relatives of those killed have long demanded a minute’s silence at the opening ceremonies of Olympics Games, only to be turned down by the IOC. Instead, Bach inaugurated the Place of Mourning, which will now be a feature at every Olympics, with two stones from ancient Olympia encased in glass in a leafy part of the athletes’ village. IOC President Thomas Bach inaugurates the memorial (Photo: AP) “Today, the inauguration of the Place of Mourning give us the opportunity to remember those that have passed away at the Olympic Games,” Bach told a small crowd that included IOC officials, Israeli team officials, athletes and Spitzer and Romano. “We chose the Olympic village as the location…because it symbolizes the unity of the Olympic family.” He then read out the 11 names of the Israeli victims, the German policeman as well as the name of Nodar Kumaritashvili, who was killed on the eve of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics in an accident in the sliding centre. Romano said: “I never believed it was going to come. After 44 years I am happy for this moment of history.” IOC President Thomas Bach, back to camera, embraces Ilana Romano, right, and Ankie Spitzer (Photo: AP) Bach, in tears, embraced Romano and Spitzer, who praised the IOC’s decision. “I cannot explain to you how emotional I am and how much this means for us,” Spitzer said. “We went through a lot. We always got a No (from the IOC) and this time we not only got a Yes but a big Yes.”

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August 8, 2016   Posted in: B'nai B'rith  Comments Closed


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