Archive for the ‘Boycott Israel’ Category

Boycott Israel – INMINDS

Marking the anniversary of the Gaza massacre and its fallen victims, the Islamic Human Rights Commission organised Genocide Memorial Day. A day to remember man’s inhumanity to man, to commemorate genocides and genocidal acts throughout history, and to make a commitment to prevent further acts of genocide.

Amongst the speakers were Massoud Shadjareh (IHRC), Ramdeep Ramesh (Indian War of Independence 1857), Hasan Nuhanovic (Srebrenica Genocide), Lee Jasper (Transatlantic Slave Trade), Ward Churchill (Genocide of the Indigenous Americans), Rabbi Beck (Nazi Holocaust survivor), Sameh Habeeb (Gaza) and Imam Achmad Cassiem (Modernity, Genocide and Genocidal Acts)

Our report includes full video of all the speakers and special featured articles on “Genocide of the Indigenous Americans”, “African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas” and “Lessons from the Warsaw Ghetto”. [More..]

On 4th December 2009, the British Committee for the Universities of Palestine (BRICUP) and SOAS Palestine Society organised a public meeting putting forward the case for sanctions and boycott of Israel.

Amongst the speakers were several from the South African struggle against apartheid including Ronnie Kasrils – former minister in Nelson Mandelas ANC government and Bongani Masuku – International Secretary of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU).

Other speakers included Omar Barghouti from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), Steven Rose of BRICUP, Yasmin Khan from War on Want, and Tarek Mustafa from Egypt’s first independent trade union.

Report included full streaming video and mp3 podcast. [More..]

On 19 November 2009 the London School of Economics (LSE) hosted a seminar on “Israel’s Occupation of Palestine: Who profits and who doesn’t”. It featured two activists from Israel.

Salwa Alenat – a Palestinian with Israeli citizenship, reported on the abuse of Palestinian workers in the Israeli settlements in the West Bank.

Dr Dalit Baum runs the research project ‘Who Profits from the Occupation’ which exposes the companies profiting from the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.

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Boycott Israel – INMINDS

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US academics back Israel boycott

Israeli soldiers arrest two Palestinian boys during clashes after Palestinians reportedly tried to reach Al tour area for a snowball fight near the Jewish settlement of Brakha, near Nablus, West Bank, last week. Seven Palestinians were reportedly arrested and five wounded. Phorograph: EPA/Alaa Badarneh

A prestigious US academic body has joined a growing movement to boycott Israel in protest at its treatment of Palestinians, in a move both welcomed and condemned in a bitterly divisive international arena.

The American Studies Association (ASA), which has more than 5,000 members, is the most significant US academic organisation to back a boycott of Israeli educational institutions following a two-thirds majority vote. Around a quarter of members took part in the ballot.

The ASA resolution was in solidarity with scholars and students deprived of their academic freedom, the organisation said in a statement. It cited Israels violation of international law and UN resolutions; the documented impact of the Israeli occupation on Palestinian scholars and students; (and)the extent to which Israeli institutions of higher education are a party to state policies that violate human rights.

The resolution bans formal collaborations with Israeli academic institutions, or with scholars who are expressly serving as representatives or ambassadors of those institutions.

The vote came amid renewed calls in the aftermath of Nelson Mandelas death for an international boycott drive against Israel similar to the anti-apartheid campaign.

Last week the major Dutch drinking water firm Vitens announced that it was severing commercial links, including joint projects agreed just weeks earlier, with Israels national water company, Mekorot, in protest at its activities in Israeli settlements in the West Bank. The company concluded that it would be very difficult to develop joint ventures together, considering the fact that they cannot be seen as divorced from their political context. We follow international law, Vitens said in a statement.

At the same time, the UK government issued an explicit warning to British businesses over the risks of involvement in Israeli settlements in the West Bank, including potential damage to a companys reputation. There were clear risks related to economic and financial activities in the settlements, and we do not encourage or offer support to such activity, it said.

Earlier this year, the EU established new guidelines that prohibit giving funds, grants, prizes or scholarships to Israeli bodies with links to settlements in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, prompting a furious response by the Israeli government.

The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, drew a distinction last week between boycotting products and companies connected to settlements and a more widespread boycott of Israeli institutions and goods. We do not ask anyone to boycott Israel itself, he said in South Africa. We have relations with Israel, we have mutual recognition of Israel. But, he added, we ask everyone to boycott the products of the settlements.

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US academics back Israel boycott

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Academic Backers of Boycott Israel Movement Take Aim at Bigger Targets

Modern Language Association Next After ASA Win

thinkstock

Washington Fresh off their recent success, supporters of an academic boycott against Israel are hoping to parlay their first high-profile American victory into momentum toward wider support for the movement to boycott, divest from and sanction the Jewish state.

A December 16 vote by the American Studies Association approving a boycott resolution in protest of Israels policies towards the Palestinians has drawn dismissive responses from many in the pro-Israel community. Among other things, pro-Israel advocates emphasized the small size of the ASA, which has about 5,000 members.

But partisans on both sides of the battle lines are now gearing up for the annual conference of the 30,000-member Modern Language Association, which meets in Chicago for its annual conference, starting January 9. Both sides agree the stakes then will be much higher.

The debate at ASA breached a taboo that existed about how people discuss Israel and Palestine, said David Lloyd, an English professor at the University of California, Riverside and one of the scholars who will speak in favor of an academic boycott at the upcoming MLA meeting. ASA has paved the way for MLA and other associations.

Though no boycott resolution is currently on the groups agenda, the conference will vote on a resolution critical of Israels policies regarding freedom of access to Palestinian scholars in the occupied West Bank.

Pro-Israel advocates remain confident about their prospects in such larger settings. The broad mainstream of academics oppose boycotts, said Geri Palast, managing director of the Israel Action Network, a joint project of the Jewish Federations of North America and the Jewish Council for Public Affairs that coordinates communal anti-BDS activity.

But the ASAs approval of a boycott resolution against Israeli academic institutions albeit much watered down from the language of the proposal originally presented to it is driving pro-Israel activists to fine-tune their approach to battling BDS. After gaining support from large academic groups in opposing academic boycott moves, advocates for Israel are now starting to pay special attention to smaller groups whose actions may carry more symbolic importance than practical impact.

The ASAs vote to adopt a boycott resolution passed with a 66% majority of the 1,252 members who took part in the online referendum. Supporters of the move highlighted the impressive margin of the vote. But those opposed to the move argued that the boycott resolution won affirmative backing from only 16.5% of the groups total 5,000 members.

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Academic Backers of Boycott Israel Movement Take Aim at Bigger Targets

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Boycott Israel – INMINDS

Marking the anniversary of the Gaza massacre and its fallen victims, the Islamic Human Rights Commission organised Genocide Memorial Day. A day to remember man’s inhumanity to man, to commemorate genocides and genocidal acts throughout history, and to make a commitment to prevent further acts of genocide. Amongst the speakers were Massoud Shadjareh (IHRC), Ramdeep Ramesh (Indian War of Independence 1857), Hasan Nuhanovic (Srebrenica Genocide), Lee Jasper (Transatlantic Slave Trade), Ward Churchill (Genocide of the Indigenous Americans), Rabbi Beck (Nazi Holocaust survivor), Sameh Habeeb (Gaza) and Imam Achmad Cassiem (Modernity, Genocide and Genocidal Acts) Our report includes full video of all the speakers and special featured articles on “Genocide of the Indigenous Americans”, “African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas” and “Lessons from the Warsaw Ghetto”. [More..] On 4th December 2009, the British Committee for the Universities of Palestine (BRICUP) and SOAS Palestine Society organised a public meeting putting forward the case for sanctions and boycott of Israel. Amongst the speakers were several from the South African struggle against apartheid including Ronnie Kasrils – former minister in Nelson Mandelas ANC government and Bongani Masuku – International Secretary of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). Other speakers included Omar Barghouti from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), Steven Rose of BRICUP, Yasmin Khan from War on Want, and Tarek Mustafa from Egypt’s first independent trade union. Report included full streaming video and mp3 podcast. [More..] On 19 November 2009 the London School of Economics (LSE) hosted a seminar on “Israel’s Occupation of Palestine: Who profits and who doesn’t”. It featured two activists from Israel. Salwa Alenat – a Palestinian with Israeli citizenship, reported on the abuse of Palestinian workers in the Israeli settlements in the West Bank. Dr Dalit Baum runs the research project ‘Who Profits from the Occupation’ which exposes the companies profiting from the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.

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US academics back Israel boycott

Israeli soldiers arrest two Palestinian boys during clashes after Palestinians reportedly tried to reach Al tour area for a snowball fight near the Jewish settlement of Brakha, near Nablus, West Bank, last week. Seven Palestinians were reportedly arrested and five wounded. Phorograph: EPA/Alaa Badarneh A prestigious US academic body has joined a growing movement to boycott Israel in protest at its treatment of Palestinians, in a move both welcomed and condemned in a bitterly divisive international arena. The American Studies Association (ASA), which has more than 5,000 members, is the most significant US academic organisation to back a boycott of Israeli educational institutions following a two-thirds majority vote. Around a quarter of members took part in the ballot. The ASA resolution was in solidarity with scholars and students deprived of their academic freedom, the organisation said in a statement. It cited Israels violation of international law and UN resolutions; the documented impact of the Israeli occupation on Palestinian scholars and students; (and)the extent to which Israeli institutions of higher education are a party to state policies that violate human rights. The resolution bans formal collaborations with Israeli academic institutions, or with scholars who are expressly serving as representatives or ambassadors of those institutions. The vote came amid renewed calls in the aftermath of Nelson Mandelas death for an international boycott drive against Israel similar to the anti-apartheid campaign. Last week the major Dutch drinking water firm Vitens announced that it was severing commercial links, including joint projects agreed just weeks earlier, with Israels national water company, Mekorot, in protest at its activities in Israeli settlements in the West Bank. The company concluded that it would be very difficult to develop joint ventures together, considering the fact that they cannot be seen as divorced from their political context. We follow international law, Vitens said in a statement. At the same time, the UK government issued an explicit warning to British businesses over the risks of involvement in Israeli settlements in the West Bank, including potential damage to a companys reputation. There were clear risks related to economic and financial activities in the settlements, and we do not encourage or offer support to such activity, it said. Earlier this year, the EU established new guidelines that prohibit giving funds, grants, prizes or scholarships to Israeli bodies with links to settlements in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, prompting a furious response by the Israeli government. The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, drew a distinction last week between boycotting products and companies connected to settlements and a more widespread boycott of Israeli institutions and goods. We do not ask anyone to boycott Israel itself, he said in South Africa. We have relations with Israel, we have mutual recognition of Israel. But, he added, we ask everyone to boycott the products of the settlements.

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December 20, 2013   Posted in: Boycott Israel  Comments Closed

Academic Backers of Boycott Israel Movement Take Aim at Bigger Targets

Modern Language Association Next After ASA Win thinkstock Washington Fresh off their recent success, supporters of an academic boycott against Israel are hoping to parlay their first high-profile American victory into momentum toward wider support for the movement to boycott, divest from and sanction the Jewish state. A December 16 vote by the American Studies Association approving a boycott resolution in protest of Israels policies towards the Palestinians has drawn dismissive responses from many in the pro-Israel community. Among other things, pro-Israel advocates emphasized the small size of the ASA, which has about 5,000 members. But partisans on both sides of the battle lines are now gearing up for the annual conference of the 30,000-member Modern Language Association, which meets in Chicago for its annual conference, starting January 9. Both sides agree the stakes then will be much higher. The debate at ASA breached a taboo that existed about how people discuss Israel and Palestine, said David Lloyd, an English professor at the University of California, Riverside and one of the scholars who will speak in favor of an academic boycott at the upcoming MLA meeting. ASA has paved the way for MLA and other associations. Though no boycott resolution is currently on the groups agenda, the conference will vote on a resolution critical of Israels policies regarding freedom of access to Palestinian scholars in the occupied West Bank. Pro-Israel advocates remain confident about their prospects in such larger settings. The broad mainstream of academics oppose boycotts, said Geri Palast, managing director of the Israel Action Network, a joint project of the Jewish Federations of North America and the Jewish Council for Public Affairs that coordinates communal anti-BDS activity. But the ASAs approval of a boycott resolution against Israeli academic institutions albeit much watered down from the language of the proposal originally presented to it is driving pro-Israel activists to fine-tune their approach to battling BDS. After gaining support from large academic groups in opposing academic boycott moves, advocates for Israel are now starting to pay special attention to smaller groups whose actions may carry more symbolic importance than practical impact. The ASAs vote to adopt a boycott resolution passed with a 66% majority of the 1,252 members who took part in the online referendum. Supporters of the move highlighted the impressive margin of the vote. But those opposed to the move argued that the boycott resolution won affirmative backing from only 16.5% of the groups total 5,000 members.

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