Archive for the ‘Brother Nathanael’ Category

New Mary Poppins Returns images have been released – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

Brand new pictures of Mary Poppins Returns have been unveiled ahead of the film release in 2018.

The sequel to one of the most dearly loved Disney classics will land in cinemas in December 2018 and the follow-up film will see the practically perfect nanny return to the Banks children for a second time. However, setmore than 20 years after their first adventure, Jane and Michael are no longer children any more and now have families of their own.

Written by Life of Pis David Magee, the film sees Mary Poppins come to theBanks rescue once again as she helps the family rediscover joy after Michael suffers a personal loss.

Emily Blunt will be following in the footsteps of Julie Andrews as the films lead and the pictures show herholding hands with the new Banks children Annabel (Pixie Davies), Georgie (Joel Dawson) and John (Nathanael Saleh) and Jack the lamplighter (Lin-Manuel Miranda) for the big musical number, Trip a Little Light Fantastic.

Speaking to Entertainment Weekly, director Rob Marshall said: The bar is so high for this.

But to be able to walk in the footsteps of this beautiful story about a woman who brings magic to this family thats looking for wonder and hope and joy in their lives, I feel a great responsibility and reverence every day.

We all feel it. Were just lifting it up to get there with the right intentions behind it.

Thestar-studded cast also includesBen Whishaw and Emily Mortimer, wholl play the older versions of Jane and Michael Banks, and Colin Firth, who will take on the role of Fidelity Fiduciary Bank boss William Weatherall Wilkins. Julie Walters is playing loyal housekeeper Ellen and Mary Poppins cousin Topsy will be none other than Meryl Streep.

Mary Poppins Returns will land incinemas December 2018.

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New Mary Poppins Returns images have been released – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

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June 12, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Meet the contestants of new Blind Date series coming to Channel 5 – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

Blind Date is making a comebackand the first batch of contestants hasbeen announced. The dating show, which originally aired on ITV between 1985 and 2003, will be revamped for read more

Blind Date is making a comebackand the first batch of contestants hasbeen announced.

The dating show, which originally aired on ITV between 1985 and 2003, will be revamped for a brand new serieson Channel 5 later this month.

Paul OGrady is taking over from the beloved Cilla Black as host and, to give us a taster of what is to come, Channel 5 has announced the line-up for the very first episode.

The first singleton hoping to find the perfect match is 29-year-old Debbie from Southport.

Girl-next-door Debbie is an insurance company manager and is hoping to find aloyalman to whisk her off her feet.

Her suitors:

Ryan, 36, from London

Damian is a fitness salesman and adventurer about to enter a national beard competition who would like to meet a woman who appreciates the artistry of his 8 inch-long beard.

His suitors:

Blind Date returnsSaturday, June 17 at 7pm on Channel 5.

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Meet the contestants of new Blind Date series coming to Channel 5 – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

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June 12, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Brother Nathanael Kapner Page 5 JAMES EDWARDS

Brother Nathanael offers his answer.

Nathanael Kapner is a regular guest on The Political Cesspool Radio Program.

Learn more about his work here.

Dont believe Brother Nathanael?

Well, then how about Jewish columnist Joel Stein, who wrote the following in his column for the Los Angeles Times:

I have never been so upset by a poll in my life. Only 22% of Americans now believe the movie and television industries are pretty much run by Jews, down from nearly 50% in 1964. The Anti-Defamation League, which released the poll results last month, sees in these numbers a victory against stereotyping. Actually, it just shows how dumb America has gotten. Jews totally run Hollywood.

How deeply Jewish is Hollywood? When the studio chiefs took out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Times a few weeks ago to demand that the Screen Actors Guild settle its contract, the open letter was signed by: News Corp. President Peter Chernin (Jewish), Paramount Pictures Chairman Brad Grey (Jewish), Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Robert Iger (Jewish), Sony Pictures Chairman Michael Lynton (surprise, Dutch Jew), Warner Bros. Chairman Barry Meyer (Jewish), CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves (so Jewish his great uncle was the first prime minister of Israel), MGM Chairman Harry Sloan (Jewish) and NBC Universal Chief Executive Jeff Zucker (mega-Jewish). If either of the Weinstein brothers had signed, this group would have not only the power to shut down all film production but to form a minyan with enough Fiji water on hand to fill a mikvah.

The person they were yelling at in that ad was SAG President Alan Rosenberg (take a guess). The scathing rebuttal to the ad was written by entertainment super-agent Ari Emanuel (Jew with Israeli parents) on the Huffington Post, which is owned by Arianna Huffington (not Jewish and has never worked in Hollywood.)

The Jews are so dominant, I had to scour the trades to come up with six Gentiles in high positions at entertainment companies. When I called them to talk about their incredible advancement, five of them refused to talk to me, apparently out of fear of insulting Jews. The sixth, AMC President Charlie Collier, turned out to be Jewish.

As a proud Jew, I want America to know about our accomplishment. Yes, we control Hollywood. Without us, youd be flipping between The 700 Club and Davey and Goliath on TV all day.

(Snip)

I dont care if Americans think were running the news media, Hollywood, Wall Street or the government. I just care that we get to keep running them.

You can read his entire article here.

Jewish actress Rachel Weisz add this:

Hollywoods run by Jews. I was advised by an American agent when I was about 19 to change my surname. And I said Why? Jews run Hollywood. He said Exactly. He had a theory that all the executives think actings a job for shiksas. In some way acting is prostitution, and Hollywood Jews dont want their own women to participate. Also, theres an element of Portnoys Complaint they all fancy Aryan blondes.

It is, of course, anti-Semitic for a Gentile to point out any of these truths.

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The rise of Ted Lieu: South Bay congressman emerges as a national leader of the Trump opposition – Easy Reader

Added on June 8, 2017 Ryan McDonald newsletter , South Bay

Congressman Ted Lieu at the Redondo Beach Memorial Day Celebration in Veterans Park. Photo by Paul Roustan

by Ryan McDonald

Every two years, a lengthy tome entitled Constitution, Jeffersons Manual and Rules of the House of Representatives, lands with a thud in the bays of the United States Government Publishing Office. The book contains the law of making laws in the lower chamber of Congress. And as a few days in Washington, D.C. makes clear, congress is not only an action and a place but also a duration.

Each volume is modified to reflect input from members of that particular Congress, but the resolution authorizing the document is usually approved at the end of the term. Thus, although the 115th Congress began Jan. 3, 2017, its rule book has not yet been released. The 1,488-page version currently in use is of the United States 114th Congress but is in fact House Document No. 181 of the second session of the 113th Congress.

In Cannon House Office Building No. 236, those wispy 1,488 pages sit on a shelf behind the desk of Marc Cevasco, chief of staff for Rep. Ted Lieu of Californias 33rd Congressional District, which includes much of the South Bay. I began thumbing through it on the first of several days recently spent with Rep. Lieu. People in the nations capital spend more time looking at screens than people just about anywhere else, and there are not many other books in Lieus office to keep it company. But the sparseness of the shelf gave the rulebook the look of that increasingly rare item whose printed version endures not merely because of nostalgia but because it is easier to use than its digital counterpart.

Rule IV governs the Hall of the House, otherwise known as the House Chamber. It includes a clause laying out who may be admitted to the Hall of the House or rooms leading thereto. Other than the actual voting members, entrance is limited to rather select company. The list includes the President, Supreme Court justices, governors and, somewhat randomly, the Architect of the Capitol. On the afternoon of May 17, I followed Lieu through the bowels of the Capitol on his way to the Chamber and, observing this bit of decorum, stood outside the entrance to the House Democratic Cloakroom while Lieu voted.

There was a reporter from Congressional Quarterly there too, skulking around, waiting for members of Congress to come and go. He said that for journalists assigned to cover a particular beat like the budget or the environment, this was usually the only place to catch a representative for comment. Members of Congress are constantly surrounded by staffers and assistants, but they go into the House Chamber as they come into this world: alone.

Lieu had been in the Chamber for about five minutes when it became clear that something unusually important was going on. More reporters gathered outside the door to the cloakroom, nervously circulating and clutching their tape recorders like tickets to a sold-out concert. A few minutes later, voting completed, Lieu emerged with a smile on his face. Cameras and reporters approached him as he exited the building and walked down the steps of the Capitol. Lieu told the assembled media he was over the moon.

His excitement, and the eagerness with which reporters now seek him out, stemmed from the fact that Lieu has become among the most assertive members of Congress in challenging perceived abuses of power in the not-quite-five-month-old presidency of Donald Trump. The week prior, the President had fired FBI Director James Comey; the bureau, along with multiple congressional committees, was investigating Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election, including possible coordination with the Trump campaign. Shortly after Comeys firing, Lieu and two other representatives sent a letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein demanding the appointment of a special counsel under Title XXVIII of the Code of Federal Regulations, which is intended to prevent conflicts of interest within the Justice Department. While Lieu had been in the chamber voting, this was precisely what Rosenstein had done, appointing former FBI Director Robert Mueller. (Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who as head of the Justice Department would typically make the decision to appoint a special counsel, had already recused himself from the Russia investigation because of false statements he made in his confirmation hearing about meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the 2016 campaign.)

I did not set out to oppose this president, was a phrase I heard several times from Lieu over the days I spent with him. His record immediately following the election bears this out. Lieu issued a statement on Veterans Day that acknowledged Trumps boorish campaign trail personality but essentially asked voters to give him a chance. We were offended when many Republicans did not act as Americans first and opposed President Obama from day oneNow that the situation is reversed, we should not be hypocritical and reflexively oppose our next President, he wrote. A little over a week later, at a meeting in Hermosa Beach hosted by Councilmember Hany Fangary, Lieu again refrained from judgment. Well see what he does. I dont know what hes going to do. I dont know if he even knows what hes going to do, Lieu said of Trump.

Eventually though, things changed. A drumbeat of news, including revelations on Russia, cabinet secretaries from Wall Street, and the Presidents refusal to divest from his sprawling array of businesses, challenged the administration before it began. Around the time Trump insulted Congressman and Civil Rights icon John Lewis, Lieu announced he was boycotting the Inauguration.

I realized after a while, that he is a danger to the republic. Not because I disagree with his tax policy or health care policy, but because he was attacking the foundations of American democracy, Lieu told me.

Lieus claim to be standing on principle in resisting Trump, as a matter beyond party or policy, can be hard to swallow in a time of fake news and alternative facts, of stark partisan division and enormous cynicism about politicians. Though Trumps approval ratings are lower at this early point than any other administrations since modern polling began, he remains far more popular than Congress. The May Gallup poll found that just 20 percent of Americans approve of the job Congress is doing.

Lieus popularity, on the other hand, is soaring, thanks in part to his Twitter feed. He relentlessly tweaks Trump on the Presidents favorite medium, using humor, bluntness and, occasionally, coarse language. (As of this writing, Lieu had more than 240,000 Twitter followers.) His Twitter usage has been the focus of profiles in the Washington Post and Cosmopolitan. And Lieu makes frequent appearances on national news programs: as the Mueller announcement made clear, he is a sought-after voice on the administrations missteps.

Lieus rise is wrapped up in the surge of interest in politics that has swept the country since Trumps election. Though they are the failing New York Times, in Trumps dactylic hexameter, the Times and other papers have racked up readers since Trumps election. The Times added 308,000 digital subscribers between January 1 and March 31 of this year, the highest-growth quarter in company history. Given how much of this digital ink has been spilled on stories that are unfavorable or embarrassing to the administration, a significant segment of the country appears to fixate on Trump the way passing motorists do on a car crash: revulsion combined with overwhelming interest, a thing too gruesome from which to turn away.

Unlike the rest of the country, though, it is literally Lieus job not to turn away. He fears that the administrations purported corruption and dissembling constitute the first steps, as he said, on the road toward authoritarianism. That this concern does not come off as hyperbole is rooted in Lieus background, and his deeply personal reverence for American ideals.

I didnt set out to have a national profile. Id much rather have had Hillary Clinton win and still have a Twitter following of 9,000 people. Thats not what happened, Lieu said.

Called to serve

Lieus political biography reads like that of a character in A Cool Million, Nathanael Wests cartoonish send-up of Horatio Alger stories. He and his parents immigrated from Taiwan when he was a child, and the family settled in Cleveland. (Lieu remains a Browns fan.) The family had nothing when they arrived. The lived in a rented basement and scraped together a meager existence selling trinkets at flea markets.

His parents finally gathered enough money to open their own store. They put Lieu and his brother to work, he often deadpans, so that they would not have to pay their employees a salary. He went to Stanford, where he studied political science and computer science. Lieu attended college in part with the help of the U.S. Air Force, and committed to serve on active duty in exchange. But before graduating, a physical evaluation revealed deterioration of his vision. The Air Force forgave his obligation, but Lieu wrote a series of letters to high-ranking officers pleading with them to let him enlist. His persistence paid off. Lieu attended Georgetown Law School, then began active duty at the Los Angeles Air Force base, where he worked in JAG (Judge Advocate Generals) Corps.

I believed I could never fully give back what this country had given me, Lieu said of his eagerness to enlist.

Military service left a deep impression on Lieu, who remains a frequent booster of the armed forces. (Lieu is a member of the Air Force Reserves, holding the rank of Colonel.) Shortly after arriving in Congress, he authored a bill to revitalize the Veterans Administration campus in West Los Angeles.

While I was in Washington, Lieu was the keynote speaker at an event designed to encourage Asian Americans participation and leadership in the military. He began his remarks by discussing Operation Pacific Haven, which he helped oversee while enlisted. Following the Gulf War, the United States rescued thousands of Iraqi Kurds, airlifting them to Guam before a looming attack from Iraqi forces under Saddam Hussein. The operation helped cement an alliance between Kurds and the United States that continues to benefit U.S. interests abroad. Kurdish forces have proven to be crucial allies in the battle against Islamic State.

But for Lieu, the value of something like Operation Pacific Haven went beyond mere strategy.

Years later, during his first term in Congress, Lieu went to Iraqi Kurdistan on an official visit, where he met with President Masoud Barzani. During Lieus time there, one of Barzanis young staffers approached him. The staffer had been a child during Operation Pacific Haven, and had relocated to the East Coast of the United States, gotten an education, then returned to his homeland to work in government. He thanked Lieu for making it possible.

The story made clear why Lieu believes well-intentioned, government efforts can produce tangible results. Rooted in his up-from-poverty background, this philosophy, more or less out of vogue since Reagan, shapes how he tends to think of political solutions. For him, foreign aid, the social safety net, environmentalism and the like are not abstract government money pits, but real, particular people, living safer lives and breathing cleaner air.

The young cadets set rapt as Lieu paused to reflect on Pacific Haven before moving on with his address. Very few countries would have done that, he said.

In the Committee Room

Lieu prepares for a television interview in a room near the Capitols National Statuary Hall. Photo by Ryan McDonald

The House Judiciary Committee meets in an expansive, windowless chamber, illuminated by a massive panel of fluorescent lights, clinging to a ceiling at least 30 feet high and arranged in the shape of a bodysurfing handplane. The committee has jurisdiction over courts and law enforcement. And, as was mentioned frequently during the time I spent with Lieu, it also considers charges of impeachment against sitting presidents.

Judiciary, along with Foreign Affairs, is one of two committees Lieu sits on. Lieu was there the morning after the announcement of the special counsel for a session devoted to markup, a process of debating and amending bills and resolutions before they reach the floor. The resolution being considered expanded protections against sexual abuse for young athletes on national sports teams. It was spurred by a recent criminal investigation into Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, who allegedly abused at least seven young members of USA Gymnastics he was treating at his clinic at Michigan State University.

After some initial comments from Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican and the chairman of House Judiciary Committee, and John Conyers, the ranking Democrat on the committee, Goodlatte recognized Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a Democrat from Houston.

Jackson Lee began by addressing the bill at hand, but quickly turned to Trump, and the need for further action by the House Judiciary Committee. The seats for committee members, mostly empty when the hearing began, began filling, at least on the Democrat side, and the members followed Jackson Lees lead. Recognized for five minutes, various Democrats devoted perhaps 20 seconds to the resolution at hand, then turned to Trump. When it got to be Lieus turn, he too began by expressing support for the bill, then spoke on Trump and the special counsel. We need to make sure the Department of Justice has the resources they need to conduct this investigation, he said.

Though vigorously delivered, these speeches appeared to have almost no effect on the Republican side of the committee, which was mostly empty. Those who were there barely looked up from their phones. (A notable exception was Rep. Darrell Issa, a Republican from a contested San Diego district, who spoke to support the appointment of Mueller.)

When Goodlatte finally closed off discussion, Jackson Lee raised a question about the effect of a proposed amendment to the resolution. She had questions on the amendments impact on the statute of limitations and reporting requirements for victims of sexual abuse. Her words hung in the air as Goodlatte called for a voice vote, sending it on to the broader House, where it passed 415-3 on May 25. It now awaits consideration by the Senate.

The focus on Trump is a reflection of constituent concerns. General congressional call volume statistics are kept secret, but Kathryn Schulz, of the New Yorker, reported that the two-week period following Trumps Inauguration included the three busiest days ever for the Capitol telephone switchboard. Nicolas Rodriguez, Lieus district director, told me that constituent call volume has jumped 100 to 150 percent over the same period two years ago, and that a narrow majority of all calls to the Congressmans office concern Trump.

But after the mornings events, I wondered whether farm bills, road bills, and other important but unsexy topics were being neglected if the fires of outrage over Trump controversies were burning so bright as to consume all political oxygen. When I asked Lieu whether the display was typical of what committee work had become under Trump, he laughed.

Judiciary is just more partisan. The makeup of members and the issues we deal with make it more partisan. But it also happens to be the committee that has oversight over the FBI and the Department of Justice. Not all hearings are like that, but when stuff like this happens he trailed off. I guarantee you, the Energy and Commerce Committee is not like that.

The next week, I was going over Lieus Tweets from the time I was there. I came upon a black and white photo taken from Lieus desk in the Judiciary Committee, posted the morning I spent there. It was captioned, This is the House Judiciary Committee. Fun fact: if there are impeachment proceedings, this is where it would start. Just sayin.

The Climb

Lieu began getting involved in politics shortly after completing his military service. He served on the City of Torrances Environmental Quality and Energy Efficiency committees, and in 2002, won a seat on the city council. In 2005, State Assemblymember Mike Gordon died, creating a vacancy in the district covering the South Bay. Lieu jumped into the race.

Manhattan Beach Mayor pro tem Amy Howorth, then a school district board member, first met Lieu at a teacher appreciation event where she was speaking. A mutual connection subsequently arranged for Howorth to host a fundraiser for Lieu at her home, the first she had ever held. Though the fundraiser was not exactly a bonanza I think I probably raised all of $200, maybe $400, Howorth laughed looking back she was impressed by Lieus reserve and straightforward demeanor.

He was soft-spoken. He had this impressive background, but he was very humble about it, very kind and patient with everybody there, Howorth said.

After being elected to the Assembly, Lieu quickly got a preview of legislative life under a brash executive with Hollywood ideas: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was swept into office following the 2003 recall of Gov. Gray Davis.

We saw this same thing happen under Schwarzenegger in the first few years. He had no governing experience when he came in. He attacked the legislature, saying he was going to do all this, and then nothing got accomplished, Lieu said.

The difference between Schwarzenegger and Trump, Lieu said, is that the Governor appeared to learn from his mistakes. After calling a special election in 2005, in which he sponsored a raft of ballot propositions, many of which went down in defeat, the governor began working with legislators and started to accomplish things, Lieu said.

Among the major pieces of legislation the governor approved was AB 32, the landmark Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, which required reductions in the volume of greenhouse gases produced in the state. Lieu was a co-author. The law has served as a model for other states and countries around the world, and subsequent California legislation has set still-more aggressive targets.

Rep. Karen Bass, whose Los Angeles Congressional district borders Lieus, was Lieus colleague in the Assembly, where she spent four years as Speaker. She recalled the difficult decisions the legislature had to make to balance the budget at the height of the Great Recession, and said Lieu was willing to make unpopular decisions, even as he was running for a vacant state Senate seat.

Some of the votes he took on the budget couldve had negative effects on his race, but Mr. Lieu never hesitated to do what was right for his constituents, and what was right for California, Bass said in an email.

Lieu won the spot in the state Senate in 2011 and then, with the retirement of Henry Waxman, made his first run for Congress in 2014. He faced a crowded field of some two dozen candidates, which included spiritual writer Marianne Williamson and former Los Angeles City Councilmember Wendy Greuel. Fresh from a bruising loss to Eric Garcetti in the Los Angeles mayoral race, Gruel had snagged the endorsements of many leading Democrats, including then-Attorney General Kamala Harris and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Lieu beat Gruel in the Californias open primary by fewer than 3,000 votes, then trounced Republican challenger Elan Carr in the general election. He was elected president of the freshman Congressional class of 2015.

Today, Lieus district, which runs from the Palos Verdes Peninsula north to the edge of Leo Carrillo State Park in Malibu and is among the wealthiest in the country, is considered safely Democratic. In 2016, he doubled the vote total of Republican challenger Kenneth Wright.

Best Laid Plans

Lieu, a Colonel in the Air Force Reserves, has made veterans issues a priority in his time in Congress. Photo by Paul Roustan

Theres always another flight, Lieu sighed.

It was Friday afternoon, and Lieu was scheduled to return home to Torrance on a 7:30 p.m flight. But the deluge of Trump news had prompted an invitation to appear on All in with Chris Hayes, an hour-long panel discussion program on MSNBC. The program began at 8 p.m. EDT. Jackie Conley, Lieus scheduler, began looking for later flights, and found one leaving out of Dulles Airport that would put him in Los Angeles around 1 a.m. Lieu greeted this news with considerably less enthusiasm than his staff, but agreed to appear in deference to the importance of the weeks news.

The demand for time with a member of Congress is so high that Conley is considered responsible for ensuring that Lieu gets enough sleep. The Congressman had an event in Culver City the next morning, and his staff were worried that the late flight would leave him overly tired. Lieu assured them that it would be alright, reminding his staff that L.A. traffic would be light on Saturday morning.

Ive gotten pretty good at saying no. Id like to say yes to everyone. And I think Ted would too. Unfortunately, he just physically does not have the time, Conley said.

Every minute of Lieus day in Washington is plotted out. But as detailed as it is, the daily schedule is aspirational at best, and frequent changes are a given. Some are due to the fact that certain duties of a member of Congress take precedence over everything else. (My interview with Lieu had to be rescheduled because of a hastily announced, classified briefing from Rosenstein to the House Judiciary Committee.) But others are just exaggerated versions of the same sort of things that cause missed appointments and cancelled plans in the world outside of Washington. After Lieus speech to young service members, I counted 14 attempted exits from the Capitol Hilton ballroom, each hamstrung by a request for a selfie that Lieu simply could not refuse.

The days schedule is maintained on an app. The mornings rough guess is posted, and senior staff have access to the constantly updated version. In between votes, speaking events and committee work, Lieus staff squeeze in a growing number of television appearances. Jack DAnnibale, a senior advisor and Lieus director of communications, described Lieu as the most media-active member of Congress he has worked with.

One of the most common interview locations for members of Congress is a small room on the second floor of the Capitol, in between the rotunda and the entrance to the House Chamber. The room is known among both media and staffers as Will Rogers for the large statue of the famous comedian that stands in the corner. (The statue is part of the National Statuary Hall Collection and was donated by Oklahoma, Rogers birthplace.) His smirking visage looks down on people as they come and go from the House, and it is thought to be good luck to rub his feet as one passes.

Lieu was talking about the appointment of Mueller. Unlike many politicians, Lieu does not have a television voice. He speaks in the same tone, whether he is talking to one person or 500. When he is addressing a crowd in person, his hand and arm motions are better indicators of emotional excitement than his voice. They move in a set of rotating patterns that sometimes feel too early or too late to accentuate the point he is making, like an out-of-rhythm conductor. Perhaps aware of this tendency, he keeps his arms glued to his sides when speaking on television. They hang with shoulders drawn down his back, an echo of the posture of his military service.

After eight years of Barack Obama, one could be forgiven for thinking of his modest speechmaking as a fatal flaw for a politician, but Lieu proves otherwise. Amy Howorth, who served as emcee for Lieus district swearing-in ceremony in 2015, sees him as carving out an essential niche in the opposition.

He sees that, to fight this person, the old rules dont apply. You dont usually see congresspeople making puns, attaining celebrity status, Howorth said. Ted is really, really smart. Hes going to out-Trump Trump. He was a computer science major at Stanford and hes a colonel in the Air Force: the crisis we find ourselves in was made for Ted Lieu to navigate for us.

After the interview, Lieu, DAnnibale and I left Will Rogers and wound through the halls of the Capitol on our way back to the office. As we passed several banks of elevators and ascended a staircase, Lieu looked at me and said, as if in explanation, By the way, this is my only exercise.

Why he does it

Although the Russia investigation and other Trump news has Democrats hopeful that they will be able to pick up seats in the 2018 midterms, the party has wounds of its own to mend. The Democratic National Committee endured a soul-searching battle after Trumps election, pitting factions that mirrored the ones that divided the party during the primary contest between Sen. Bernie Sanders and eventual nominee Hillary Clinton. Obama Administration Labor Secretary Tom Perez became DNC Chairman in February, beating out Sanders-backed Rep. Keith Ellison, of Minnesota.

Less than two weeks earlier, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee had elected Lieu as one of five regional vice chairs. From this position, Lieu will oversee efforts to capture House seats in the western United States. Lieu denied that the infighting that took place at the DNC was hindering the work of the congressional campaign, but he conceded that his new role was a reflection what happened in November. The DCCC voted to elect, rather than appoint, the chairperson, and created the five elected vice-chair positions to provide more diversity in the guidance and views of the party.

We actually picked up seats, but the Democratic caucus was not happy with the performance.

Were doing a deep dive into what didnt go well, looking at polls and evaluating consultants, Lieu said.

As a result of his position with the DCCC, Lieu is a sought-out visitor by those considering a run for Congress. In exchange for agreeing not to disclose details about the people he met with, I was allowed to observe some of these conversations. The people Lieu spoke with were highly qualified and intelligent, with ready answers about fundraising and endorsements. What stood out was that that Lieu kept returning to the question of why they wanted to run.

Thats the first question I ask any candidate. If they cant answer it, that raises all sorts of red flags, Lieu said. To win, you need to know why youre running. Youre going to have some good days, and some awful, awful days. It makes it easier to get through those bad days if you know why youre running.

The rise of Trump has made the work of a member of Congress even more political than it already was. There is a non-trivial faction of Democrats that believes any idea of Trumps ought to be resisted solely because the President supports it. And while Lieus position has clearly evolved since he warned against this kind of obstructionism in his Veterans Day statement, he is not in this camp. He agrees, for example, with Trumps support for the Export-Import Bank, saying it can help small manufacturers. And he is linked to a stable of bipartisan bills, including the PATCH Act, introduced while I was there, which seeks upgrades to the nations cybersecurity following the WannaCry ransomware attacks.

For Lieu, the choice of which priorities to pursue with limited time and political capital comes down to the same question he asks candidates: why do you want to be here? What purpose do you want to serve by serving?Anybody can do my job if what you want to do is help WalMart, he said. They will write the legislation for you. They have an army of lobbyists that will lobby all your colleagues on both sides of the aisle. They will lobby the executive branch, and your legislation will get signed without you having to do anything other than dropping in to vote. Its much harder to help people who dont have lobbyists or massive bank accounts. How many homeless people can hire a lobbyist? How many homeless people even know how to call their member of congress? (Just before heading back to his district for Memorial Day, Lieu introduced legislation that would enhance access to pro bono legal services for homeless veterans.)

Lieus willingness to stand firmly on principle brought me back to the steps of the Capitol, following Rosensteins announcement. It had been a long day, with more events to come, but Lieu was still visibly energized by Muellers appointment. After Lieu concluded interviews that day, we were by ourselves as we waited for his car, not a staffer in sight.

House Rule IV, the reason Lieu emerged from the House Chamber by himself, is a small procedural rule, and it probably has not changed in decades, if ever. But the overlapping authority of the book in which it is contained a document drafted by people elected in 2012, intended to govern those elected in 2014, and still in force for those serving in 2017 evoked the kind of structural check on power that Lieu has accused Trump of regularly flouting, and that Comeys firing endangers. This lingering of institutional norms would surely have pleased the Founding Fathers: if the rule of law meant anything to them, it meant that no one gets to set his own rules.

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The rise of Ted Lieu: South Bay congressman emerges as a national leader of the Trump opposition – Easy Reader

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Daniel F. Harrington: The Empire vs. the Rhode Islander – The Providence Journal

By Daniel F. Harrington

Second of two parts.

On Christmas Eve 1776, a group of desperate men George Washington, James Monroe, Alexander Hamilton and Henry Knox assembled for a strategy session over dinner in Pennsylvania. Their host was Rhode Island native Nathanael Greene.

After the American army was decimated in New York, it looked as if the agenda of the evening would include the uncomfortable topic of surrender. Days earlier, in a letter to his brother, a dispirited George Washington candidly admitted: I think the game is pretty near up.

Nathanael Greene also penned a letter that week,to his wife Caty: Be of good courage: dont be distressed. All things will turn out for the best.

The day after dining with Greene Christmas Day Washington crossed the Delaware and launched a shocking surprise attack on the British, instantly reversing the course of the war.

Soon, with the help of the French, the Americans steadily collected victories in the North.

Greene played his part: He saved the Continental Army at the Battle of Brandywine (1777), was appointed Quartermaster General by Congress in recognition of his dazzling organizational skills (1778), commanded the only African-American unit of troops in the Battle of Rhode Island (1778), and helped ease political tensions between French and American officers.

But in the South the situation was dire. Three American generals each hand-picked by Congress had failed miserably there. By 1780, talk of abandoning the southern colonies was on the table. Unless Washington could stem the tide, the South would remain British.

Wisely, in October 1780, Congress let Washington choose the next commander of his Southern Army. He chose Nathanael Greene.

Even before he stepped on southern soil, Greenes unconventional plan for victory commenced. He had officers meticulously detail the topography of the Carolinas, including measuring the depths, currents and even the size of rocks in the major rivers!

Still, no rational observer would have thought Greene stood a chance. The British were led by Lord Charles Cornwallis, the aristocratic veteran of the Seven Years War. To be sure, the regal general thought little of the Quaker anchor maker or the thrice defeated army he inherited.

That soon changed.

Outnumbered five to one, Greene did the unthinkable: He split his tiny army in two and had each pursue the British, tiring their complacent soldiers while masking his own weaknesses. Greenes forces engaged Cornwallis nearly a dozen times over a year and, despite setbacks, eventually wore out the British.

Greenes personal stamina was astounding. He went for days without sleeping and briefly went blind from lack of sleep. Once, when Greene asked one of his officers why he was sleeping, the man replied, Why, general, I knew youd be awake!

When the British finally surrendered in 1781, Greenes sobriquet became: The Savior of the South.

Without him, the United States of America, as we know it today, would not exist.

Incredibly, Greene was hounded by creditors (and threatened with prison) after the war because he personally helped pay for the uniforms that kept his troops alive. Too ravished by war, his beloved Rhode Island offered him no financial assistance. Neither did Congress.

Mercifully, South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia offered Greene generous land grants to help restart his life. He moved to Georgia in October 1785. Eight months later, he died of heat stroke, at 44.

General Greene was buried in an unmarked crypt in Savannah and initially forgotten. When his remains were rediscovered in 1901, a genteel contest for the privilege of hosting him ensued. Georgia was chosen over Rhode Island. He was then reinterred with full honors, never again to be forgotten.

So be slow, dear Rhode Islanders, to bridle the ambitions of our young sons and daughters. And do remind them that dominions of all sizes have crumbled under the feet of Rhode Islanders set upon a noble purpose Rhode Islanders like Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, and the asthmatic, limping general who throttled an Empire: Nathanael Greene.

Daniel F. Harrington (danielfharrington@yahoo.com), a monthly contributor, is president of Chartwell Wealth Management in Rumford.

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Popular pastor set to retire from Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church – Herald-Mail Media

SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. The Rev. Randy Tremba is stepping down from the pulpit after ministering to the congregation at Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church through 41 years of emphasizing social justice and the teachings of the Bible.

Tremba, 69, grew up in a fundamental Baptist church family in Youngstown, Ohio.

His father was a railroad brakeman, and his mother was a clerk in the shoe department at a retail store. His only brother died nine years ago.

In an essay that Tremba wrote in the spring edition of the Good Shepherd Good Town Good News Paper community newspaper, Tremba spoke of his brother, who held onto his fundamentalism while Tremba veered to the left.

We lived in the same house and read the same Bible, but we lived in different worlds,” Tremba wrote. “He loved Doris Day, Perry Como and the Kingston Trio. I loved Janis Joplin, John Lennon and the Rolling Stones. He supported the Vietnam War. I did not.

Tremba went to Wheaton College, a liberal-arts school in Illinois.

I majored in philosophy (and) minored in rabble rousing, he said. I graduated in 1969, and somewhat to my surprise, I learned that they turned out ministers.

He accepted an internship at a nearby Baptist church, but the minister, after interviewing him, refused to hire him.

He told me: Son, you are not a Baptist. Im not sure youre even a Christian, Tremba recalled.

Tremba then went to Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. There, he found that the Presbyterian Church’s philosophy matched his convictions on liberalism, social justice and Christian faith.

After he was ordained, he was hired as an intern at Mount Olive Presbyterian Church in Whittier, Calif.

They wanted someone with a liberal outlook, he said.

Tremba lost interest after a year, and drifted for nine months before landing in Harpers Ferry, W.Va.

I found an apartment and a job pruning apple trees, he said. I started doing some spot preaching, and filled in for six months in 1975 at the Presbyterian church in Shepherdstown. I liked the church and its congregation.”

He was hired as the church’s pastor in 1976.

Free, but not cheap

Tremba and Ed Zahniser, a church member, founded the Good Shepherd newspaper in 1979 to promote the towns eight churches and fill a news void, since Shepherdstown had no local paper.

We started with typewritten folded pages and printed 1,000 copies. It evolved into a 24-page newsprint tabloid with 13,000 copies and 20,000 regular readers,” he said.

The papers motto is Free, but not cheap.

A second venture was The Rumsey Radio Hour, a live radio show set on a stage modeled after A Prairie Home Companion.

Local actors, musicians and performers starred in skits, poetry readings, stories, dramas and mysteries.

It remained successful for a number of years, and still runs once a year as a fundraiser for the Shepherdstown Public Library.

Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church has evolved during Trembas tenure.

The church has welcomed the LGBT community, and Tremba married six gay couples. Rainbow decals are at each of the churchs entrances.

In 1975, the church had about 100 members about 40 of whom attended services Tremba said.

Today, we have about 350 members with about 180 attending two services, he said.

He said it will be awkward not being able to participate in church activities and enjoy the friendships of the many people he met over the decades.

Presbyterian rules ban pastors from participating once they leave a church. They have to remain separate, Tremba said.

Tremba and his wife, Paula, married 40 years ago. The couple has three grown children Jonah, Nathanael and Amanda and four grandchildren.

Paula is retiring from teaching fourth grade at Wright Denny Intermediate School.

Were going to live out our days in Shepherdstown, Tremba said.

Three special events are scheduled for this week at Shepherdstown (W.Va.) Presbyterian Church at 100 W. Washington St. to honor the retirement of the Rev. Randy Tremba.

Thursday at 7:30 p.m.: Tremba will share stories from his 41 years ministering at the church

Saturday at 10 a.m.: A public reception recognizing Trembas efforts, including the creation of the Good Shepherd newspaper and “The Rumsey Radio Hour”

Sunday at 10 a.m.: Tremba’s farewell convocation

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Pastor Hernandez of Rochester’s first bilingual church is retiring – Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Gino Fanelli Published 7:49 p.m. ET June 3, 2017 | Updated 11:09 p.m. ET June 3, 2017

The Lake Avenue Baptist Church has been revitalized by the coming of Burmese refugees. Video by Lauren Petracca.

Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez of Light of the World Church to retire in June 2017, after 38 years of service.(Photo: GINO FANELLI)

A longstanding staple of the Rochester faith community is set to take his leave this weekend. Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez of Light of the World Assembly of God on Child Street will kick off his retirement with a final sermon on Sunday, closing a 38-year chapter of dedication to the community.

Sitting in his office, Hernandez recounted his life’s mission, from leading interdenominational worship groups in his native New York City to the twilight of his career.

He had planned on leaving when the first pastor, Charles Molina, left. Here I am, 38 years later, says the 66-year-old Rochester resident.

Race and religion, downtown church celebrates diversity

A prodigious giver is celebrated on his 100th birthday

From the ministrys humble roots as a storefront Pentecostal church, with locations moving across the city, from Flower Street to North Clinton to their permanent home on Child Street, Hernandez has had open arms in bringing together the community.

We are called the Light of the World because our doors are always open, Hernandez said. We welcome everyone, of every color or culture.

It is known as the first bilingual church in Rochester, and the need for a continuation of bilingual churches is particularly important in Rochester. According to public record aggregation site US Data, 19.8 percent of the population of Rochester speaks a language other than English; Spanish being the most common.

Pastor Hernandez has always made a point to build relationships with churches across the city, said Raquel Serrano, 47, of Rochester, a former youth minister and sister of incoming Senior Pastor Ruben Serrano.

From left: Son Nathanael Hernandez, Light of the World Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez and incoming Senior Pastor Ruben Serrano.(Photo: Abraham Hernandez)

There was certainly that element of a fatherly figure, Raquel said of the retiring pastor, especially with how involved he was with the youth congregation.

For Pastor Hernandez, his mission, beginning in the 1960s, was fueled by a need he saw for faith in the community, in a time of Watergate, the Vietnam War, the flower child movement and a blooming drug culture.

At that time, what I saw was a real spiritual hunger, Hernandez said. Actually, during that time, I was almost arrested for taking over a U.N. chapel. What we saw as a moment of prayer was 25 interdenominational guys taking over a building.

Hernandez is set to be replaced by Serrano’s brother, Ruben Serrano, 45, of Greece, who presently serves as associate pastor at the church. He will give his first sermon on Sunday, June 11,the week after Hernandez’s final one. Serrano remarked that the start of his pastoral career comes in a time of similar turmoil and social division.

What I think is important now is a lot of outreach to the community, Ruben Serrano said. In this community in particular, we have a lot of black and Hispanic residents, and my goal is to get people to come together, reach out to the community and be a real positive voice.

The new leader hopes to adopt the legacy of outreach, such as Hernandez’s open door missions, community meals and the special services that take place at Charlotte’s Harbortown Home and Seneca Manor.

Even the mayor has stopped by our Seneca Manor special service to see what we were doing, Hernandez said.

Originally from Rochester, Serrano spent 25 years as a youth minister in Chicago before returning to the city, a timing that Rachel found serendipitous.

When Ruben came here about four years ago from Chicago, Pastor Hernandez really took him under his wing, Rachel said. I don’t know if at the time the retirement was planned, but the timing now seems right to pass the baton from father to father.

Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez and others in ministry at Light of the World Assembly of God pray for people in a crowd at the alter during worship.(Photo: Abraham Hernandez)

Filling the shoes of Hernandez, Serrano inherits a church dedicated to open arms, where English-speaking and Spanish-speaking parishioners, as well as those visiting from around the world, are welcomed.

It’s something that’s a bit unique, especially when it comes to Hispanic churches, Serrano said. We’ have had people come from Africa for sermons, and that’s something that [Hernandez] has made a part of the mission; to be a place where all are welcome.

Hernandez pointed to the diversity of his congregation as evidence that his open-door policy was effective.

We have Africans, people from India, people from all around Latin America, Hernandez said. We have a lot of different cultures coming together that make this a really special place. My view has always been that faith, not religion, but faith in God, in your fellow man, was the most important thing.

This image of a man dedicated to his community and life’s mission was not lost on his son, Nathanael Hernandez, 35. Fresh off a plane from Beijing where he teaches English, Nathanael painted a picture of his father as a man of unwavering compassion and modesty.

I just light up thinking about what he’s done here, Hernandez said. He’s never tried to be in the limelight. He’s a very humble person, and when I see people crying about him leaving, that shows the impact he’s had here. Not what he says about himself, but the reaction from the community. I think a lot of people here just thought he’d be here until he was 100.

Though often dropping everything to fulfill his pastoral duties during his childhood, Nathanael grew to see a man driven by his life’s calling, yet always finding time for his family.

I can’t tell you how many times he’d be called out at two or three in the morning for a house call or to a hospital, or the times he’s missed a birthday party, Hernandez said. This wasn’t a job or a career to him, this was his life. And still, he found time to be an amazing father and husband.

As Hernandez’s chapter at Light of the World comes to a close, he looks to the future, hoping to take his time off to tackle the growing heroin epidemic in the Rochester area through community outreach. This dedication picks up on a mission of his youth, when he worked with the faith-based rehabilitation program Teen Challenge in New York City.

Reminiscing on his life’s work and passion, Hernandez looks to the future with simple, youthful optimism.

I’m leaving, but I’m not resting, Hernandez said.

Gino Fanelli is a Rochester-area freelance writer.

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Obit: Pastor Robert E. Berger – NorthcentralPa.com

Pastor Robert E. Berger, 87, of Wolf Twp. died Monday, May 29, 2017 at home. His wife of 56 years, Eileen Mae (Berger) Berger, preceded him in death on October 21, 2011.

Born August 11, 1929, in Muncy, he is the son of the late Charles and Martha (Harpster) Berger. Robert was a graduate of Temple University and received a masters degree at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Philadelphia. Pastor Berger pursued his doctoral degree at Colgate-Rochester Divinity School, and also studied at Regents Park College, Oxford and Baptist Seminary, London, England. He was pastor at Hughesville Baptist Church from 1951 to 1986, and also at Picture Rocks Baptist Church. After his retirement he served as interim pastor at Calvary Baptist Church, Williamsport, and was interim area minister for Wilkes-Barre, Scranton Churches. He was Pastor Emeritus at Hughesville Baptist Church and celebrated his 60th Anniversary of Ordination in 2014. He was an avid reader and life-long student of history, and continued to take college courses at Bucknell University up to this past spring. He planned and organized approximately 12 trips to Israel.

He is survived by a son, William C. (Leslie) Berger of Millville; a daughter-In-Law, Sarah Berger of Hughesville; grandchildren, Nathanael Mailleue, Isaac (Katybeth) Mailleue, Samuel (Brittany) Mailleue, Karl Berger, Mackenzie (Dylan) Berger Farr, Katherine Berger, Dorothy Berger; and 2 Great Grandchildren, Malcolm and Ian Mailleue.

In addition to his wife and parents, he was predeceased by a Son, James R. Berger; a Daughter, Victoria E. Mailleue; a Brother, Richard Berger; and Sister, Bonnie Berger Stengel.

Funeral services will be held 11a.m. on Saturday, June 3, 2017 at Hughesville Baptist Church, 37 North Third Street, Hughesville, with Pastor Thomas M. Brokaw officiating. Burial will be private in White Deer Valley Baptist Church Cemetery, Allenwood. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, June 2, at Hughesville Baptist Church.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to Hughesville Baptist Church Scholarship Fund, 37 N. Third Street, Hughesville, PA 17737.

Services are entrusted to McCarty-Thomas Funeral Home, Hughesville.

Arrangements are entrusted to McCarty-Thomas Funeral Home, Hughesville.

Expressions of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.mccartythomas.com

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"Sing Along with Brother Nathanael" Graphic T-Shirts by …

Sing Along with Brother Nathanael . . Ready For The Times To Get Better Adapted By Brother Nathanael

Ive got to tell you Its been rackin my brain I have to find a way out Ive had enough of this continual rain A change is comin, no doubt Its been a too long time With no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better A long lonely time with no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better

You try to take from me what I cannot give No happiness can I find And I have a dream that Ive been trying to live Its burnin holes in their minds Its been a too long time With no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better A long lonely time with no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better

Ive got to tell you Its been rackin my brain I have to find a way out Ive had enough of this continual rain A change is comin, no doubt Its been a too long time With no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better A long lonely time with no peace of mind And Im ready for the times To get better

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New Mary Poppins Returns images have been released – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

Brand new pictures of Mary Poppins Returns have been unveiled ahead of the film release in 2018. The sequel to one of the most dearly loved Disney classics will land in cinemas in December 2018 and the follow-up film will see the practically perfect nanny return to the Banks children for a second time. However, setmore than 20 years after their first adventure, Jane and Michael are no longer children any more and now have families of their own. Written by Life of Pis David Magee, the film sees Mary Poppins come to theBanks rescue once again as she helps the family rediscover joy after Michael suffers a personal loss. Emily Blunt will be following in the footsteps of Julie Andrews as the films lead and the pictures show herholding hands with the new Banks children Annabel (Pixie Davies), Georgie (Joel Dawson) and John (Nathanael Saleh) and Jack the lamplighter (Lin-Manuel Miranda) for the big musical number, Trip a Little Light Fantastic. Speaking to Entertainment Weekly, director Rob Marshall said: The bar is so high for this. But to be able to walk in the footsteps of this beautiful story about a woman who brings magic to this family thats looking for wonder and hope and joy in their lives, I feel a great responsibility and reverence every day. We all feel it. Were just lifting it up to get there with the right intentions behind it. Thestar-studded cast also includesBen Whishaw and Emily Mortimer, wholl play the older versions of Jane and Michael Banks, and Colin Firth, who will take on the role of Fidelity Fiduciary Bank boss William Weatherall Wilkins. Julie Walters is playing loyal housekeeper Ellen and Mary Poppins cousin Topsy will be none other than Meryl Streep. Mary Poppins Returns will land incinemas December 2018.

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Meet the contestants of new Blind Date series coming to Channel 5 – TVguide.co.uk (blog)

Blind Date is making a comebackand the first batch of contestants hasbeen announced. The dating show, which originally aired on ITV between 1985 and 2003, will be revamped for read more Blind Date is making a comebackand the first batch of contestants hasbeen announced. The dating show, which originally aired on ITV between 1985 and 2003, will be revamped for a brand new serieson Channel 5 later this month. Paul OGrady is taking over from the beloved Cilla Black as host and, to give us a taster of what is to come, Channel 5 has announced the line-up for the very first episode. The first singleton hoping to find the perfect match is 29-year-old Debbie from Southport. Girl-next-door Debbie is an insurance company manager and is hoping to find aloyalman to whisk her off her feet. Her suitors: Ryan, 36, from London Damian is a fitness salesman and adventurer about to enter a national beard competition who would like to meet a woman who appreciates the artistry of his 8 inch-long beard. His suitors: Blind Date returnsSaturday, June 17 at 7pm on Channel 5.

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Brother Nathanael Kapner Page 5 JAMES EDWARDS

Brother Nathanael offers his answer. Nathanael Kapner is a regular guest on The Political Cesspool Radio Program. Learn more about his work here. Dont believe Brother Nathanael? Well, then how about Jewish columnist Joel Stein, who wrote the following in his column for the Los Angeles Times: I have never been so upset by a poll in my life. Only 22% of Americans now believe the movie and television industries are pretty much run by Jews, down from nearly 50% in 1964. The Anti-Defamation League, which released the poll results last month, sees in these numbers a victory against stereotyping. Actually, it just shows how dumb America has gotten. Jews totally run Hollywood. How deeply Jewish is Hollywood? When the studio chiefs took out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Times a few weeks ago to demand that the Screen Actors Guild settle its contract, the open letter was signed by: News Corp. President Peter Chernin (Jewish), Paramount Pictures Chairman Brad Grey (Jewish), Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Robert Iger (Jewish), Sony Pictures Chairman Michael Lynton (surprise, Dutch Jew), Warner Bros. Chairman Barry Meyer (Jewish), CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves (so Jewish his great uncle was the first prime minister of Israel), MGM Chairman Harry Sloan (Jewish) and NBC Universal Chief Executive Jeff Zucker (mega-Jewish). If either of the Weinstein brothers had signed, this group would have not only the power to shut down all film production but to form a minyan with enough Fiji water on hand to fill a mikvah. The person they were yelling at in that ad was SAG President Alan Rosenberg (take a guess). The scathing rebuttal to the ad was written by entertainment super-agent Ari Emanuel (Jew with Israeli parents) on the Huffington Post, which is owned by Arianna Huffington (not Jewish and has never worked in Hollywood.) The Jews are so dominant, I had to scour the trades to come up with six Gentiles in high positions at entertainment companies. When I called them to talk about their incredible advancement, five of them refused to talk to me, apparently out of fear of insulting Jews. The sixth, AMC President Charlie Collier, turned out to be Jewish. As a proud Jew, I want America to know about our accomplishment. Yes, we control Hollywood. Without us, youd be flipping between The 700 Club and Davey and Goliath on TV all day. (Snip) I dont care if Americans think were running the news media, Hollywood, Wall Street or the government. I just care that we get to keep running them. You can read his entire article here. Jewish actress Rachel Weisz add this: Hollywoods run by Jews. I was advised by an American agent when I was about 19 to change my surname. And I said Why? Jews run Hollywood. He said Exactly. He had a theory that all the executives think actings a job for shiksas. In some way acting is prostitution, and Hollywood Jews dont want their own women to participate. Also, theres an element of Portnoys Complaint they all fancy Aryan blondes. It is, of course, anti-Semitic for a Gentile to point out any of these truths.

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The rise of Ted Lieu: South Bay congressman emerges as a national leader of the Trump opposition – Easy Reader

Added on June 8, 2017 Ryan McDonald newsletter , South Bay Congressman Ted Lieu at the Redondo Beach Memorial Day Celebration in Veterans Park. Photo by Paul Roustan by Ryan McDonald Every two years, a lengthy tome entitled Constitution, Jeffersons Manual and Rules of the House of Representatives, lands with a thud in the bays of the United States Government Publishing Office. The book contains the law of making laws in the lower chamber of Congress. And as a few days in Washington, D.C. makes clear, congress is not only an action and a place but also a duration. Each volume is modified to reflect input from members of that particular Congress, but the resolution authorizing the document is usually approved at the end of the term. Thus, although the 115th Congress began Jan. 3, 2017, its rule book has not yet been released. The 1,488-page version currently in use is of the United States 114th Congress but is in fact House Document No. 181 of the second session of the 113th Congress. In Cannon House Office Building No. 236, those wispy 1,488 pages sit on a shelf behind the desk of Marc Cevasco, chief of staff for Rep. Ted Lieu of Californias 33rd Congressional District, which includes much of the South Bay. I began thumbing through it on the first of several days recently spent with Rep. Lieu. People in the nations capital spend more time looking at screens than people just about anywhere else, and there are not many other books in Lieus office to keep it company. But the sparseness of the shelf gave the rulebook the look of that increasingly rare item whose printed version endures not merely because of nostalgia but because it is easier to use than its digital counterpart. Rule IV governs the Hall of the House, otherwise known as the House Chamber. It includes a clause laying out who may be admitted to the Hall of the House or rooms leading thereto. Other than the actual voting members, entrance is limited to rather select company. The list includes the President, Supreme Court justices, governors and, somewhat randomly, the Architect of the Capitol. On the afternoon of May 17, I followed Lieu through the bowels of the Capitol on his way to the Chamber and, observing this bit of decorum, stood outside the entrance to the House Democratic Cloakroom while Lieu voted. There was a reporter from Congressional Quarterly there too, skulking around, waiting for members of Congress to come and go. He said that for journalists assigned to cover a particular beat like the budget or the environment, this was usually the only place to catch a representative for comment. Members of Congress are constantly surrounded by staffers and assistants, but they go into the House Chamber as they come into this world: alone. Lieu had been in the Chamber for about five minutes when it became clear that something unusually important was going on. More reporters gathered outside the door to the cloakroom, nervously circulating and clutching their tape recorders like tickets to a sold-out concert. A few minutes later, voting completed, Lieu emerged with a smile on his face. Cameras and reporters approached him as he exited the building and walked down the steps of the Capitol. Lieu told the assembled media he was over the moon. His excitement, and the eagerness with which reporters now seek him out, stemmed from the fact that Lieu has become among the most assertive members of Congress in challenging perceived abuses of power in the not-quite-five-month-old presidency of Donald Trump. The week prior, the President had fired FBI Director James Comey; the bureau, along with multiple congressional committees, was investigating Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election, including possible coordination with the Trump campaign. Shortly after Comeys firing, Lieu and two other representatives sent a letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein demanding the appointment of a special counsel under Title XXVIII of the Code of Federal Regulations, which is intended to prevent conflicts of interest within the Justice Department. While Lieu had been in the chamber voting, this was precisely what Rosenstein had done, appointing former FBI Director Robert Mueller. (Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who as head of the Justice Department would typically make the decision to appoint a special counsel, had already recused himself from the Russia investigation because of false statements he made in his confirmation hearing about meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the 2016 campaign.) I did not set out to oppose this president, was a phrase I heard several times from Lieu over the days I spent with him. His record immediately following the election bears this out. Lieu issued a statement on Veterans Day that acknowledged Trumps boorish campaign trail personality but essentially asked voters to give him a chance. We were offended when many Republicans did not act as Americans first and opposed President Obama from day oneNow that the situation is reversed, we should not be hypocritical and reflexively oppose our next President, he wrote. A little over a week later, at a meeting in Hermosa Beach hosted by Councilmember Hany Fangary, Lieu again refrained from judgment. Well see what he does. I dont know what hes going to do. I dont know if he even knows what hes going to do, Lieu said of Trump. Eventually though, things changed. A drumbeat of news, including revelations on Russia, cabinet secretaries from Wall Street, and the Presidents refusal to divest from his sprawling array of businesses, challenged the administration before it began. Around the time Trump insulted Congressman and Civil Rights icon John Lewis, Lieu announced he was boycotting the Inauguration. I realized after a while, that he is a danger to the republic. Not because I disagree with his tax policy or health care policy, but because he was attacking the foundations of American democracy, Lieu told me. Lieus claim to be standing on principle in resisting Trump, as a matter beyond party or policy, can be hard to swallow in a time of fake news and alternative facts, of stark partisan division and enormous cynicism about politicians. Though Trumps approval ratings are lower at this early point than any other administrations since modern polling began, he remains far more popular than Congress. The May Gallup poll found that just 20 percent of Americans approve of the job Congress is doing. Lieus popularity, on the other hand, is soaring, thanks in part to his Twitter feed. He relentlessly tweaks Trump on the Presidents favorite medium, using humor, bluntness and, occasionally, coarse language. (As of this writing, Lieu had more than 240,000 Twitter followers.) His Twitter usage has been the focus of profiles in the Washington Post and Cosmopolitan. And Lieu makes frequent appearances on national news programs: as the Mueller announcement made clear, he is a sought-after voice on the administrations missteps. Lieus rise is wrapped up in the surge of interest in politics that has swept the country since Trumps election. Though they are the failing New York Times, in Trumps dactylic hexameter, the Times and other papers have racked up readers since Trumps election. The Times added 308,000 digital subscribers between January 1 and March 31 of this year, the highest-growth quarter in company history. Given how much of this digital ink has been spilled on stories that are unfavorable or embarrassing to the administration, a significant segment of the country appears to fixate on Trump the way passing motorists do on a car crash: revulsion combined with overwhelming interest, a thing too gruesome from which to turn away. Unlike the rest of the country, though, it is literally Lieus job not to turn away. He fears that the administrations purported corruption and dissembling constitute the first steps, as he said, on the road toward authoritarianism. That this concern does not come off as hyperbole is rooted in Lieus background, and his deeply personal reverence for American ideals. I didnt set out to have a national profile. Id much rather have had Hillary Clinton win and still have a Twitter following of 9,000 people. Thats not what happened, Lieu said. Called to serve Lieus political biography reads like that of a character in A Cool Million, Nathanael Wests cartoonish send-up of Horatio Alger stories. He and his parents immigrated from Taiwan when he was a child, and the family settled in Cleveland. (Lieu remains a Browns fan.) The family had nothing when they arrived. The lived in a rented basement and scraped together a meager existence selling trinkets at flea markets. His parents finally gathered enough money to open their own store. They put Lieu and his brother to work, he often deadpans, so that they would not have to pay their employees a salary. He went to Stanford, where he studied political science and computer science. Lieu attended college in part with the help of the U.S. Air Force, and committed to serve on active duty in exchange. But before graduating, a physical evaluation revealed deterioration of his vision. The Air Force forgave his obligation, but Lieu wrote a series of letters to high-ranking officers pleading with them to let him enlist. His persistence paid off. Lieu attended Georgetown Law School, then began active duty at the Los Angeles Air Force base, where he worked in JAG (Judge Advocate Generals) Corps. I believed I could never fully give back what this country had given me, Lieu said of his eagerness to enlist. Military service left a deep impression on Lieu, who remains a frequent booster of the armed forces. (Lieu is a member of the Air Force Reserves, holding the rank of Colonel.) Shortly after arriving in Congress, he authored a bill to revitalize the Veterans Administration campus in West Los Angeles. While I was in Washington, Lieu was the keynote speaker at an event designed to encourage Asian Americans participation and leadership in the military. He began his remarks by discussing Operation Pacific Haven, which he helped oversee while enlisted. Following the Gulf War, the United States rescued thousands of Iraqi Kurds, airlifting them to Guam before a looming attack from Iraqi forces under Saddam Hussein. The operation helped cement an alliance between Kurds and the United States that continues to benefit U.S. interests abroad. Kurdish forces have proven to be crucial allies in the battle against Islamic State. But for Lieu, the value of something like Operation Pacific Haven went beyond mere strategy. Years later, during his first term in Congress, Lieu went to Iraqi Kurdistan on an official visit, where he met with President Masoud Barzani. During Lieus time there, one of Barzanis young staffers approached him. The staffer had been a child during Operation Pacific Haven, and had relocated to the East Coast of the United States, gotten an education, then returned to his homeland to work in government. He thanked Lieu for making it possible. The story made clear why Lieu believes well-intentioned, government efforts can produce tangible results. Rooted in his up-from-poverty background, this philosophy, more or less out of vogue since Reagan, shapes how he tends to think of political solutions. For him, foreign aid, the social safety net, environmentalism and the like are not abstract government money pits, but real, particular people, living safer lives and breathing cleaner air. The young cadets set rapt as Lieu paused to reflect on Pacific Haven before moving on with his address. Very few countries would have done that, he said. In the Committee Room Lieu prepares for a television interview in a room near the Capitols National Statuary Hall. Photo by Ryan McDonald The House Judiciary Committee meets in an expansive, windowless chamber, illuminated by a massive panel of fluorescent lights, clinging to a ceiling at least 30 feet high and arranged in the shape of a bodysurfing handplane. The committee has jurisdiction over courts and law enforcement. And, as was mentioned frequently during the time I spent with Lieu, it also considers charges of impeachment against sitting presidents. Judiciary, along with Foreign Affairs, is one of two committees Lieu sits on. Lieu was there the morning after the announcement of the special counsel for a session devoted to markup, a process of debating and amending bills and resolutions before they reach the floor. The resolution being considered expanded protections against sexual abuse for young athletes on national sports teams. It was spurred by a recent criminal investigation into Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, who allegedly abused at least seven young members of USA Gymnastics he was treating at his clinic at Michigan State University. After some initial comments from Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican and the chairman of House Judiciary Committee, and John Conyers, the ranking Democrat on the committee, Goodlatte recognized Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a Democrat from Houston. Jackson Lee began by addressing the bill at hand, but quickly turned to Trump, and the need for further action by the House Judiciary Committee. The seats for committee members, mostly empty when the hearing began, began filling, at least on the Democrat side, and the members followed Jackson Lees lead. Recognized for five minutes, various Democrats devoted perhaps 20 seconds to the resolution at hand, then turned to Trump. When it got to be Lieus turn, he too began by expressing support for the bill, then spoke on Trump and the special counsel. We need to make sure the Department of Justice has the resources they need to conduct this investigation, he said. Though vigorously delivered, these speeches appeared to have almost no effect on the Republican side of the committee, which was mostly empty. Those who were there barely looked up from their phones. (A notable exception was Rep. Darrell Issa, a Republican from a contested San Diego district, who spoke to support the appointment of Mueller.) When Goodlatte finally closed off discussion, Jackson Lee raised a question about the effect of a proposed amendment to the resolution. She had questions on the amendments impact on the statute of limitations and reporting requirements for victims of sexual abuse. Her words hung in the air as Goodlatte called for a voice vote, sending it on to the broader House, where it passed 415-3 on May 25. It now awaits consideration by the Senate. The focus on Trump is a reflection of constituent concerns. General congressional call volume statistics are kept secret, but Kathryn Schulz, of the New Yorker, reported that the two-week period following Trumps Inauguration included the three busiest days ever for the Capitol telephone switchboard. Nicolas Rodriguez, Lieus district director, told me that constituent call volume has jumped 100 to 150 percent over the same period two years ago, and that a narrow majority of all calls to the Congressmans office concern Trump. But after the mornings events, I wondered whether farm bills, road bills, and other important but unsexy topics were being neglected if the fires of outrage over Trump controversies were burning so bright as to consume all political oxygen. When I asked Lieu whether the display was typical of what committee work had become under Trump, he laughed. Judiciary is just more partisan. The makeup of members and the issues we deal with make it more partisan. But it also happens to be the committee that has oversight over the FBI and the Department of Justice. Not all hearings are like that, but when stuff like this happens he trailed off. I guarantee you, the Energy and Commerce Committee is not like that. The next week, I was going over Lieus Tweets from the time I was there. I came upon a black and white photo taken from Lieus desk in the Judiciary Committee, posted the morning I spent there. It was captioned, This is the House Judiciary Committee. Fun fact: if there are impeachment proceedings, this is where it would start. Just sayin. The Climb Lieu began getting involved in politics shortly after completing his military service. He served on the City of Torrances Environmental Quality and Energy Efficiency committees, and in 2002, won a seat on the city council. In 2005, State Assemblymember Mike Gordon died, creating a vacancy in the district covering the South Bay. Lieu jumped into the race. Manhattan Beach Mayor pro tem Amy Howorth, then a school district board member, first met Lieu at a teacher appreciation event where she was speaking. A mutual connection subsequently arranged for Howorth to host a fundraiser for Lieu at her home, the first she had ever held. Though the fundraiser was not exactly a bonanza I think I probably raised all of $200, maybe $400, Howorth laughed looking back she was impressed by Lieus reserve and straightforward demeanor. He was soft-spoken. He had this impressive background, but he was very humble about it, very kind and patient with everybody there, Howorth said. After being elected to the Assembly, Lieu quickly got a preview of legislative life under a brash executive with Hollywood ideas: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was swept into office following the 2003 recall of Gov. Gray Davis. We saw this same thing happen under Schwarzenegger in the first few years. He had no governing experience when he came in. He attacked the legislature, saying he was going to do all this, and then nothing got accomplished, Lieu said. The difference between Schwarzenegger and Trump, Lieu said, is that the Governor appeared to learn from his mistakes. After calling a special election in 2005, in which he sponsored a raft of ballot propositions, many of which went down in defeat, the governor began working with legislators and started to accomplish things, Lieu said. Among the major pieces of legislation the governor approved was AB 32, the landmark Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, which required reductions in the volume of greenhouse gases produced in the state. Lieu was a co-author. The law has served as a model for other states and countries around the world, and subsequent California legislation has set still-more aggressive targets. Rep. Karen Bass, whose Los Angeles Congressional district borders Lieus, was Lieus colleague in the Assembly, where she spent four years as Speaker. She recalled the difficult decisions the legislature had to make to balance the budget at the height of the Great Recession, and said Lieu was willing to make unpopular decisions, even as he was running for a vacant state Senate seat. Some of the votes he took on the budget couldve had negative effects on his race, but Mr. Lieu never hesitated to do what was right for his constituents, and what was right for California, Bass said in an email. Lieu won the spot in the state Senate in 2011 and then, with the retirement of Henry Waxman, made his first run for Congress in 2014. He faced a crowded field of some two dozen candidates, which included spiritual writer Marianne Williamson and former Los Angeles City Councilmember Wendy Greuel. Fresh from a bruising loss to Eric Garcetti in the Los Angeles mayoral race, Gruel had snagged the endorsements of many leading Democrats, including then-Attorney General Kamala Harris and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Lieu beat Gruel in the Californias open primary by fewer than 3,000 votes, then trounced Republican challenger Elan Carr in the general election. He was elected president of the freshman Congressional class of 2015. Today, Lieus district, which runs from the Palos Verdes Peninsula north to the edge of Leo Carrillo State Park in Malibu and is among the wealthiest in the country, is considered safely Democratic. In 2016, he doubled the vote total of Republican challenger Kenneth Wright. Best Laid Plans Lieu, a Colonel in the Air Force Reserves, has made veterans issues a priority in his time in Congress. Photo by Paul Roustan Theres always another flight, Lieu sighed. It was Friday afternoon, and Lieu was scheduled to return home to Torrance on a 7:30 p.m flight. But the deluge of Trump news had prompted an invitation to appear on All in with Chris Hayes, an hour-long panel discussion program on MSNBC. The program began at 8 p.m. EDT. Jackie Conley, Lieus scheduler, began looking for later flights, and found one leaving out of Dulles Airport that would put him in Los Angeles around 1 a.m. Lieu greeted this news with considerably less enthusiasm than his staff, but agreed to appear in deference to the importance of the weeks news. The demand for time with a member of Congress is so high that Conley is considered responsible for ensuring that Lieu gets enough sleep. The Congressman had an event in Culver City the next morning, and his staff were worried that the late flight would leave him overly tired. Lieu assured them that it would be alright, reminding his staff that L.A. traffic would be light on Saturday morning. Ive gotten pretty good at saying no. Id like to say yes to everyone. And I think Ted would too. Unfortunately, he just physically does not have the time, Conley said. Every minute of Lieus day in Washington is plotted out. But as detailed as it is, the daily schedule is aspirational at best, and frequent changes are a given. Some are due to the fact that certain duties of a member of Congress take precedence over everything else. (My interview with Lieu had to be rescheduled because of a hastily announced, classified briefing from Rosenstein to the House Judiciary Committee.) But others are just exaggerated versions of the same sort of things that cause missed appointments and cancelled plans in the world outside of Washington. After Lieus speech to young service members, I counted 14 attempted exits from the Capitol Hilton ballroom, each hamstrung by a request for a selfie that Lieu simply could not refuse. The days schedule is maintained on an app. The mornings rough guess is posted, and senior staff have access to the constantly updated version. In between votes, speaking events and committee work, Lieus staff squeeze in a growing number of television appearances. Jack DAnnibale, a senior advisor and Lieus director of communications, described Lieu as the most media-active member of Congress he has worked with. One of the most common interview locations for members of Congress is a small room on the second floor of the Capitol, in between the rotunda and the entrance to the House Chamber. The room is known among both media and staffers as Will Rogers for the large statue of the famous comedian that stands in the corner. (The statue is part of the National Statuary Hall Collection and was donated by Oklahoma, Rogers birthplace.) His smirking visage looks down on people as they come and go from the House, and it is thought to be good luck to rub his feet as one passes. Lieu was talking about the appointment of Mueller. Unlike many politicians, Lieu does not have a television voice. He speaks in the same tone, whether he is talking to one person or 500. When he is addressing a crowd in person, his hand and arm motions are better indicators of emotional excitement than his voice. They move in a set of rotating patterns that sometimes feel too early or too late to accentuate the point he is making, like an out-of-rhythm conductor. Perhaps aware of this tendency, he keeps his arms glued to his sides when speaking on television. They hang with shoulders drawn down his back, an echo of the posture of his military service. After eight years of Barack Obama, one could be forgiven for thinking of his modest speechmaking as a fatal flaw for a politician, but Lieu proves otherwise. Amy Howorth, who served as emcee for Lieus district swearing-in ceremony in 2015, sees him as carving out an essential niche in the opposition. He sees that, to fight this person, the old rules dont apply. You dont usually see congresspeople making puns, attaining celebrity status, Howorth said. Ted is really, really smart. Hes going to out-Trump Trump. He was a computer science major at Stanford and hes a colonel in the Air Force: the crisis we find ourselves in was made for Ted Lieu to navigate for us. After the interview, Lieu, DAnnibale and I left Will Rogers and wound through the halls of the Capitol on our way back to the office. As we passed several banks of elevators and ascended a staircase, Lieu looked at me and said, as if in explanation, By the way, this is my only exercise. Why he does it Although the Russia investigation and other Trump news has Democrats hopeful that they will be able to pick up seats in the 2018 midterms, the party has wounds of its own to mend. The Democratic National Committee endured a soul-searching battle after Trumps election, pitting factions that mirrored the ones that divided the party during the primary contest between Sen. Bernie Sanders and eventual nominee Hillary Clinton. Obama Administration Labor Secretary Tom Perez became DNC Chairman in February, beating out Sanders-backed Rep. Keith Ellison, of Minnesota. Less than two weeks earlier, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee had elected Lieu as one of five regional vice chairs. From this position, Lieu will oversee efforts to capture House seats in the western United States. Lieu denied that the infighting that took place at the DNC was hindering the work of the congressional campaign, but he conceded that his new role was a reflection what happened in November. The DCCC voted to elect, rather than appoint, the chairperson, and created the five elected vice-chair positions to provide more diversity in the guidance and views of the party. We actually picked up seats, but the Democratic caucus was not happy with the performance. Were doing a deep dive into what didnt go well, looking at polls and evaluating consultants, Lieu said. As a result of his position with the DCCC, Lieu is a sought-out visitor by those considering a run for Congress. In exchange for agreeing not to disclose details about the people he met with, I was allowed to observe some of these conversations. The people Lieu spoke with were highly qualified and intelligent, with ready answers about fundraising and endorsements. What stood out was that that Lieu kept returning to the question of why they wanted to run. Thats the first question I ask any candidate. If they cant answer it, that raises all sorts of red flags, Lieu said. To win, you need to know why youre running. Youre going to have some good days, and some awful, awful days. It makes it easier to get through those bad days if you know why youre running. The rise of Trump has made the work of a member of Congress even more political than it already was. There is a non-trivial faction of Democrats that believes any idea of Trumps ought to be resisted solely because the President supports it. And while Lieus position has clearly evolved since he warned against this kind of obstructionism in his Veterans Day statement, he is not in this camp. He agrees, for example, with Trumps support for the Export-Import Bank, saying it can help small manufacturers. And he is linked to a stable of bipartisan bills, including the PATCH Act, introduced while I was there, which seeks upgrades to the nations cybersecurity following the WannaCry ransomware attacks. For Lieu, the choice of which priorities to pursue with limited time and political capital comes down to the same question he asks candidates: why do you want to be here? What purpose do you want to serve by serving?Anybody can do my job if what you want to do is help WalMart, he said. They will write the legislation for you. They have an army of lobbyists that will lobby all your colleagues on both sides of the aisle. They will lobby the executive branch, and your legislation will get signed without you having to do anything other than dropping in to vote. Its much harder to help people who dont have lobbyists or massive bank accounts. How many homeless people can hire a lobbyist? How many homeless people even know how to call their member of congress? (Just before heading back to his district for Memorial Day, Lieu introduced legislation that would enhance access to pro bono legal services for homeless veterans.) Lieus willingness to stand firmly on principle brought me back to the steps of the Capitol, following Rosensteins announcement. It had been a long day, with more events to come, but Lieu was still visibly energized by Muellers appointment. After Lieu concluded interviews that day, we were by ourselves as we waited for his car, not a staffer in sight. House Rule IV, the reason Lieu emerged from the House Chamber by himself, is a small procedural rule, and it probably has not changed in decades, if ever. But the overlapping authority of the book in which it is contained a document drafted by people elected in 2012, intended to govern those elected in 2014, and still in force for those serving in 2017 evoked the kind of structural check on power that Lieu has accused Trump of regularly flouting, and that Comeys firing endangers. This lingering of institutional norms would surely have pleased the Founding Fathers: if the rule of law meant anything to them, it meant that no one gets to set his own rules. comments so far. Comments posted to EasyReaderNews.com may be reprinted in the Easy Reader print edition, which is published each Thursday.

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Daniel F. Harrington: The Empire vs. the Rhode Islander – The Providence Journal

By Daniel F. Harrington Second of two parts. On Christmas Eve 1776, a group of desperate men George Washington, James Monroe, Alexander Hamilton and Henry Knox assembled for a strategy session over dinner in Pennsylvania. Their host was Rhode Island native Nathanael Greene. After the American army was decimated in New York, it looked as if the agenda of the evening would include the uncomfortable topic of surrender. Days earlier, in a letter to his brother, a dispirited George Washington candidly admitted: I think the game is pretty near up. Nathanael Greene also penned a letter that week,to his wife Caty: Be of good courage: dont be distressed. All things will turn out for the best. The day after dining with Greene Christmas Day Washington crossed the Delaware and launched a shocking surprise attack on the British, instantly reversing the course of the war. Soon, with the help of the French, the Americans steadily collected victories in the North. Greene played his part: He saved the Continental Army at the Battle of Brandywine (1777), was appointed Quartermaster General by Congress in recognition of his dazzling organizational skills (1778), commanded the only African-American unit of troops in the Battle of Rhode Island (1778), and helped ease political tensions between French and American officers. But in the South the situation was dire. Three American generals each hand-picked by Congress had failed miserably there. By 1780, talk of abandoning the southern colonies was on the table. Unless Washington could stem the tide, the South would remain British. Wisely, in October 1780, Congress let Washington choose the next commander of his Southern Army. He chose Nathanael Greene. Even before he stepped on southern soil, Greenes unconventional plan for victory commenced. He had officers meticulously detail the topography of the Carolinas, including measuring the depths, currents and even the size of rocks in the major rivers! Still, no rational observer would have thought Greene stood a chance. The British were led by Lord Charles Cornwallis, the aristocratic veteran of the Seven Years War. To be sure, the regal general thought little of the Quaker anchor maker or the thrice defeated army he inherited. That soon changed. Outnumbered five to one, Greene did the unthinkable: He split his tiny army in two and had each pursue the British, tiring their complacent soldiers while masking his own weaknesses. Greenes forces engaged Cornwallis nearly a dozen times over a year and, despite setbacks, eventually wore out the British. Greenes personal stamina was astounding. He went for days without sleeping and briefly went blind from lack of sleep. Once, when Greene asked one of his officers why he was sleeping, the man replied, Why, general, I knew youd be awake! When the British finally surrendered in 1781, Greenes sobriquet became: The Savior of the South. Without him, the United States of America, as we know it today, would not exist. Incredibly, Greene was hounded by creditors (and threatened with prison) after the war because he personally helped pay for the uniforms that kept his troops alive. Too ravished by war, his beloved Rhode Island offered him no financial assistance. Neither did Congress. Mercifully, South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia offered Greene generous land grants to help restart his life. He moved to Georgia in October 1785. Eight months later, he died of heat stroke, at 44. General Greene was buried in an unmarked crypt in Savannah and initially forgotten. When his remains were rediscovered in 1901, a genteel contest for the privilege of hosting him ensued. Georgia was chosen over Rhode Island. He was then reinterred with full honors, never again to be forgotten. So be slow, dear Rhode Islanders, to bridle the ambitions of our young sons and daughters. And do remind them that dominions of all sizes have crumbled under the feet of Rhode Islanders set upon a noble purpose Rhode Islanders like Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, and the asthmatic, limping general who throttled an Empire: Nathanael Greene. Daniel F. Harrington (danielfharrington@yahoo.com), a monthly contributor, is president of Chartwell Wealth Management in Rumford.

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June 7, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Popular pastor set to retire from Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church – Herald-Mail Media

SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. The Rev. Randy Tremba is stepping down from the pulpit after ministering to the congregation at Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church through 41 years of emphasizing social justice and the teachings of the Bible. Tremba, 69, grew up in a fundamental Baptist church family in Youngstown, Ohio. His father was a railroad brakeman, and his mother was a clerk in the shoe department at a retail store. His only brother died nine years ago. In an essay that Tremba wrote in the spring edition of the Good Shepherd Good Town Good News Paper community newspaper, Tremba spoke of his brother, who held onto his fundamentalism while Tremba veered to the left. We lived in the same house and read the same Bible, but we lived in different worlds,” Tremba wrote. “He loved Doris Day, Perry Como and the Kingston Trio. I loved Janis Joplin, John Lennon and the Rolling Stones. He supported the Vietnam War. I did not. Tremba went to Wheaton College, a liberal-arts school in Illinois. I majored in philosophy (and) minored in rabble rousing, he said. I graduated in 1969, and somewhat to my surprise, I learned that they turned out ministers. He accepted an internship at a nearby Baptist church, but the minister, after interviewing him, refused to hire him. He told me: Son, you are not a Baptist. Im not sure youre even a Christian, Tremba recalled. Tremba then went to Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. There, he found that the Presbyterian Church’s philosophy matched his convictions on liberalism, social justice and Christian faith. After he was ordained, he was hired as an intern at Mount Olive Presbyterian Church in Whittier, Calif. They wanted someone with a liberal outlook, he said. Tremba lost interest after a year, and drifted for nine months before landing in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. I found an apartment and a job pruning apple trees, he said. I started doing some spot preaching, and filled in for six months in 1975 at the Presbyterian church in Shepherdstown. I liked the church and its congregation.” He was hired as the church’s pastor in 1976. Free, but not cheap Tremba and Ed Zahniser, a church member, founded the Good Shepherd newspaper in 1979 to promote the towns eight churches and fill a news void, since Shepherdstown had no local paper. We started with typewritten folded pages and printed 1,000 copies. It evolved into a 24-page newsprint tabloid with 13,000 copies and 20,000 regular readers,” he said. The papers motto is Free, but not cheap. A second venture was The Rumsey Radio Hour, a live radio show set on a stage modeled after A Prairie Home Companion. Local actors, musicians and performers starred in skits, poetry readings, stories, dramas and mysteries. It remained successful for a number of years, and still runs once a year as a fundraiser for the Shepherdstown Public Library. Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church has evolved during Trembas tenure. The church has welcomed the LGBT community, and Tremba married six gay couples. Rainbow decals are at each of the churchs entrances. In 1975, the church had about 100 members about 40 of whom attended services Tremba said. Today, we have about 350 members with about 180 attending two services, he said. He said it will be awkward not being able to participate in church activities and enjoy the friendships of the many people he met over the decades. Presbyterian rules ban pastors from participating once they leave a church. They have to remain separate, Tremba said. Tremba and his wife, Paula, married 40 years ago. The couple has three grown children Jonah, Nathanael and Amanda and four grandchildren. Paula is retiring from teaching fourth grade at Wright Denny Intermediate School. Were going to live out our days in Shepherdstown, Tremba said. Three special events are scheduled for this week at Shepherdstown (W.Va.) Presbyterian Church at 100 W. Washington St. to honor the retirement of the Rev. Randy Tremba. Thursday at 7:30 p.m.: Tremba will share stories from his 41 years ministering at the church Saturday at 10 a.m.: A public reception recognizing Trembas efforts, including the creation of the Good Shepherd newspaper and “The Rumsey Radio Hour” Sunday at 10 a.m.: Tremba’s farewell convocation

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June 5, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Pastor Hernandez of Rochester’s first bilingual church is retiring – Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Gino Fanelli Published 7:49 p.m. ET June 3, 2017 | Updated 11:09 p.m. ET June 3, 2017 The Lake Avenue Baptist Church has been revitalized by the coming of Burmese refugees. Video by Lauren Petracca. Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez of Light of the World Church to retire in June 2017, after 38 years of service.(Photo: GINO FANELLI) A longstanding staple of the Rochester faith community is set to take his leave this weekend. Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez of Light of the World Assembly of God on Child Street will kick off his retirement with a final sermon on Sunday, closing a 38-year chapter of dedication to the community. Sitting in his office, Hernandez recounted his life’s mission, from leading interdenominational worship groups in his native New York City to the twilight of his career. He had planned on leaving when the first pastor, Charles Molina, left. Here I am, 38 years later, says the 66-year-old Rochester resident. Race and religion, downtown church celebrates diversity A prodigious giver is celebrated on his 100th birthday From the ministrys humble roots as a storefront Pentecostal church, with locations moving across the city, from Flower Street to North Clinton to their permanent home on Child Street, Hernandez has had open arms in bringing together the community. We are called the Light of the World because our doors are always open, Hernandez said. We welcome everyone, of every color or culture. It is known as the first bilingual church in Rochester, and the need for a continuation of bilingual churches is particularly important in Rochester. According to public record aggregation site US Data, 19.8 percent of the population of Rochester speaks a language other than English; Spanish being the most common. Pastor Hernandez has always made a point to build relationships with churches across the city, said Raquel Serrano, 47, of Rochester, a former youth minister and sister of incoming Senior Pastor Ruben Serrano. From left: Son Nathanael Hernandez, Light of the World Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez and incoming Senior Pastor Ruben Serrano.(Photo: Abraham Hernandez) There was certainly that element of a fatherly figure, Raquel said of the retiring pastor, especially with how involved he was with the youth congregation. For Pastor Hernandez, his mission, beginning in the 1960s, was fueled by a need he saw for faith in the community, in a time of Watergate, the Vietnam War, the flower child movement and a blooming drug culture. At that time, what I saw was a real spiritual hunger, Hernandez said. Actually, during that time, I was almost arrested for taking over a U.N. chapel. What we saw as a moment of prayer was 25 interdenominational guys taking over a building. Hernandez is set to be replaced by Serrano’s brother, Ruben Serrano, 45, of Greece, who presently serves as associate pastor at the church. He will give his first sermon on Sunday, June 11,the week after Hernandez’s final one. Serrano remarked that the start of his pastoral career comes in a time of similar turmoil and social division. What I think is important now is a lot of outreach to the community, Ruben Serrano said. In this community in particular, we have a lot of black and Hispanic residents, and my goal is to get people to come together, reach out to the community and be a real positive voice. The new leader hopes to adopt the legacy of outreach, such as Hernandez’s open door missions, community meals and the special services that take place at Charlotte’s Harbortown Home and Seneca Manor. Even the mayor has stopped by our Seneca Manor special service to see what we were doing, Hernandez said. Originally from Rochester, Serrano spent 25 years as a youth minister in Chicago before returning to the city, a timing that Rachel found serendipitous. When Ruben came here about four years ago from Chicago, Pastor Hernandez really took him under his wing, Rachel said. I don’t know if at the time the retirement was planned, but the timing now seems right to pass the baton from father to father. Senior Pastor Luis Hernandez and others in ministry at Light of the World Assembly of God pray for people in a crowd at the alter during worship.(Photo: Abraham Hernandez) Filling the shoes of Hernandez, Serrano inherits a church dedicated to open arms, where English-speaking and Spanish-speaking parishioners, as well as those visiting from around the world, are welcomed. It’s something that’s a bit unique, especially when it comes to Hispanic churches, Serrano said. We’ have had people come from Africa for sermons, and that’s something that [Hernandez] has made a part of the mission; to be a place where all are welcome. Hernandez pointed to the diversity of his congregation as evidence that his open-door policy was effective. We have Africans, people from India, people from all around Latin America, Hernandez said. We have a lot of different cultures coming together that make this a really special place. My view has always been that faith, not religion, but faith in God, in your fellow man, was the most important thing. This image of a man dedicated to his community and life’s mission was not lost on his son, Nathanael Hernandez, 35. Fresh off a plane from Beijing where he teaches English, Nathanael painted a picture of his father as a man of unwavering compassion and modesty. I just light up thinking about what he’s done here, Hernandez said. He’s never tried to be in the limelight. He’s a very humble person, and when I see people crying about him leaving, that shows the impact he’s had here. Not what he says about himself, but the reaction from the community. I think a lot of people here just thought he’d be here until he was 100. Though often dropping everything to fulfill his pastoral duties during his childhood, Nathanael grew to see a man driven by his life’s calling, yet always finding time for his family. I can’t tell you how many times he’d be called out at two or three in the morning for a house call or to a hospital, or the times he’s missed a birthday party, Hernandez said. This wasn’t a job or a career to him, this was his life. And still, he found time to be an amazing father and husband. As Hernandez’s chapter at Light of the World comes to a close, he looks to the future, hoping to take his time off to tackle the growing heroin epidemic in the Rochester area through community outreach. This dedication picks up on a mission of his youth, when he worked with the faith-based rehabilitation program Teen Challenge in New York City. Reminiscing on his life’s work and passion, Hernandez looks to the future with simple, youthful optimism. I’m leaving, but I’m not resting, Hernandez said. Gino Fanelli is a Rochester-area freelance writer. Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/2sqYY3r

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June 5, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

Obit: Pastor Robert E. Berger – NorthcentralPa.com

Pastor Robert E. Berger, 87, of Wolf Twp. died Monday, May 29, 2017 at home. His wife of 56 years, Eileen Mae (Berger) Berger, preceded him in death on October 21, 2011. Born August 11, 1929, in Muncy, he is the son of the late Charles and Martha (Harpster) Berger. Robert was a graduate of Temple University and received a masters degree at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Philadelphia. Pastor Berger pursued his doctoral degree at Colgate-Rochester Divinity School, and also studied at Regents Park College, Oxford and Baptist Seminary, London, England. He was pastor at Hughesville Baptist Church from 1951 to 1986, and also at Picture Rocks Baptist Church. After his retirement he served as interim pastor at Calvary Baptist Church, Williamsport, and was interim area minister for Wilkes-Barre, Scranton Churches. He was Pastor Emeritus at Hughesville Baptist Church and celebrated his 60th Anniversary of Ordination in 2014. He was an avid reader and life-long student of history, and continued to take college courses at Bucknell University up to this past spring. He planned and organized approximately 12 trips to Israel. He is survived by a son, William C. (Leslie) Berger of Millville; a daughter-In-Law, Sarah Berger of Hughesville; grandchildren, Nathanael Mailleue, Isaac (Katybeth) Mailleue, Samuel (Brittany) Mailleue, Karl Berger, Mackenzie (Dylan) Berger Farr, Katherine Berger, Dorothy Berger; and 2 Great Grandchildren, Malcolm and Ian Mailleue. In addition to his wife and parents, he was predeceased by a Son, James R. Berger; a Daughter, Victoria E. Mailleue; a Brother, Richard Berger; and Sister, Bonnie Berger Stengel. Funeral services will be held 11a.m. on Saturday, June 3, 2017 at Hughesville Baptist Church, 37 North Third Street, Hughesville, with Pastor Thomas M. Brokaw officiating. Burial will be private in White Deer Valley Baptist Church Cemetery, Allenwood. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, June 2, at Hughesville Baptist Church. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to Hughesville Baptist Church Scholarship Fund, 37 N. Third Street, Hughesville, PA 17737. Services are entrusted to McCarty-Thomas Funeral Home, Hughesville. Arrangements are entrusted to McCarty-Thomas Funeral Home, Hughesville. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.mccartythomas.com

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June 3, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed

"Sing Along with Brother Nathanael" Graphic T-Shirts by …

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June 1, 2017   Posted in: Brother Nathanael  Comments Closed


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