Archive for the ‘Charles Krauthammer’ Category

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: Pondering the agony of defeat – The Mercury

In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

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In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at?

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye!

Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game.

Baker left him in.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

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CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: Pondering the agony of defeat – The Mercury

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July 3, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why even play the game? – Lincoln Journal Star

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers — yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees.

In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused.

“I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed.

And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes — not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling — yes, like a hungry tiger — at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

“He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.”

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?”

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the [expletive] brown eye!”

“That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi: “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.”

To which I add — conjecture — yes, but losing is worse.

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Charles Krauthammer: Why even play the game? – Lincoln Journal Star

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Is a shot at winning worth risking loss? – The Daily Herald

By Charles Krauthammer

In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomsons shot heard round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees.

In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong I still got one more hitter in me.

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at?

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye!

Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game.

Baker left him in.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

Charles Krauthammers email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

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Krauthammer: Is a shot at winning worth risking loss? – The Daily Herald

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

From the Right: Charles Krauthammer Why do they even play the game? – SouthCoastToday.com

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees.

In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. “I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

“He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.”

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?”

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the [expletive] brown eye!”

“That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game.

Baker left him in.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi, “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.” To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.(c) 2017, Washington Post Writers Group

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From the Right: Charles Krauthammer Why do they even play the game? – SouthCoastToday.com

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why do they even play the game? – New Haven Register

In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

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Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers — yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomsons shot heard round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees.

In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes — not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling — yes, like a hungry tiger — at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at?

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye!

Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game.

Baker left him in.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add — conjecture — yes, but losing is worse.

Charles Krauthammers email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

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Charles Krauthammer: Why do they even play the game? – New Haven Register

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July 1, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Trump’s MSNBC Tweet’ What It Sounds Like When You’re Living in a Banana Republic’ – Breitbart News

On Thursdays broadcast of the Fox News Channels Special Report, columnist Charles Krauthammer stated that President Trumps tweet about MSNBC hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski sounds like something from a banana republic and is how Venezuelas Hugo Chavez and the Philippines Rodrigo Duterte would talk about their opponents.

Krauthammer said, [I]t degrades the political discourse and it embarrasses the country. Presidents [Senator] Dianne Feinstein(D-CA) I think, was right. Presidents dont talk like this. They never have. This is what it sounds like when youre living in a banana republic. This is how Hugo Chavez would talk about his opponents. This is how the worst dictator, Duterte, in the Philippines, would talk about opponents. Its degrading and it sort reduces the United States from a grand republic to a banana republic.

Fellow panelist Mercedes Schlapp responded that while she didnt like the tweet, Trump isnt sending in the military to shut down the press, Trump has a right to state his opinion, and Morning Joeisnt objective.

Krauthammer countered, When you defend the president of the United States by pointing out that he hasnt sent the tanks out in the streets to shut down the media, youve reached a fairly low level of defense. Im talking about the tone and the degrading of the politics, and that is on the level of Hugo Chavez.

He added, [T]weeting is the most direct avenue to the id. Theres no more uncensored, unfiltered avenue from the id to tweeting, and what were seeing is were getting a look into the psyche of the president. And what were seeing is a vindictiveness, a cruelty, a lack of temperateness, a lack of self-control, which is truly shocking.

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Krauthammer: Trump’s MSNBC Tweet’ What It Sounds Like When You’re Living in a Banana Republic’ – Breitbart News

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July 1, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: The great Muslim civil war and us … – Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

The U.S. shoots down a Syrian fighter-bomber. Iran launches missiles into eastern Syria. Russia threatens to attack coalition aircraft west of the Euphrates. What is going on?

It might appear a mindless mess, but the outlines are clear. The great Muslim civil war, centered in Syria, is approaching its post-Islamic State phase. The parties are maneuvering to shape whats next.

Its Europe, 1945, when the war was still raging against Nazi Germany, but everyone already knew the outcome. The maneuvering was largely between the approaching victors the Soviet Union and the Western democracies to determine boundaries and influence.

So it is today in Syria. Everyone knows that the Islamic State is finished. Not that it will disappear as an ideology, insurgency and source of continuing terrorism both in the region and the West. But it will disappear as an independent, organized, territorial entity in the heart of the Middle East.

It is being squeezed out of existence. Its hold on Mosul, its last major redoubt in Iraq, is nearly gone. Raqqa, its stronghold in Syria and de facto capital, is next. When it falls it is already surrounded on three sides the caliphate dies.

Much of the fighting today is about who inherits. Take the Syrian jet the U.S. shot down. It had been attacking a pro-Western Kurdish and Arab force (the Syrian Democratic Forces) not far from Islamic State territory.

Why? Because the Bashar Assad regime, backed by Iran, Hezbollah and Russia, having gained the upper hand on the non-jihadist rebels in the Syrian heartland (most notably in Aleppo), feels secure enough to set its sights on eastern Syria. If it hopes to restore its authority over the whole country, it will need to control Raqqa and surrounding Islamic State areas. But the forces near Raqqa are pro-Western and anti-regime. Hence the Syrian fighter-bomber attack.

Hence the U.S. shoot-down. We are protecting our friends. Hence the Russian threats to now target U.S. planes. The Russians are protecting their friends.

On the same day as the shoot-down, Iran launched six surface-to-surface missiles into Syrian territory controlled by the Islamic State. Why? Ostensibly to punish the jihadists for terrorist attacks two weeks ago inside Iran.

Perhaps. But one obvious objective was to demonstrate to Saudi Arabia and the other Sunni Arabs the considerable reach of both Irans arms and territorial ambitions.

For Iran, Syria is the key, the central theater of a Shiite-Sunni war for regional hegemony. Iran (which is non-Arab) leads the Shiite side, attended by its Arab auxiliaries Hezbollah in Lebanon, the Shiite militias in Iraq and the highly penetrated government of Iraq, and Assads Alawite regime. (Alawites being a non-Sunni sect, often associated with Shiism.)

Taken together, they comprise a vast arc the Shiite Crescent stretching from Iran through Iraq, Syria and Lebanon to the Mediterranean. If consolidated, it gives the Persians a Mediterranean reach they have not had in 2,300 years.

This alliance operates under the patronage and protection of Russia, which supplies the Iranian-allied side with cash, weapons and, since 2015, air cover from its new bases in Syria.

Arrayed on the other side of the great Muslim civil war are the Sunnis, moderate and Western-allied, led by Saudi Arabia, the Gulf states, Egypt and Jordan with their Great Power patron, the United States, now (post-Obama) back in action.

At stake is consolidation of the Shiite Crescent. Its already underway. As the Islamic State is driven out of Mosul, Iranian-controlled militias are taking over crucial roads and other strategic assets in western Iraq. Next target: eastern Syria (Raqqa and environs).

Imagine the scenario: a unified Syria under Assad, the ever more pliant client of Iran and Russia; Hezbollah, tip of the Iranian spear, dominant in Lebanon; Iran, the regional arbiter; and Russia, with its Syrian bases, the outside hegemon.

Our preferred outcome is radically different: a loosely federated Syria, partitioned and cantonized, in which Assad might be left in charge of an Alawite rump.

The Iranian-Russian strategy is a nightmare for the entire Sunni Middle East. And for us too. The Pentagon seems bent on preventing it.

A reasonable U.S. strategy, given the alternatives. But not without risk.

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CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: The great Muslim civil war and us … – Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

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July 1, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer on Trump’s Tweets: This Is What It’s Like in a Banana Republic – Fox News Insider

Jamiel Shaw Sr: Illegal Who Killed Son Raised ‘Like a Rabid Pitbull’

Mark Steyn: ‘I’m In Favor of Replacing Jim Acosta With Elmo’ on CNN

On Thursday, President Donald Trump went after MSNBC show Morning Joe and its hosts, former Congressman Joe Scarborough and commentator Mika Brzezinski.

Trump wrote on Twitter that Scarborough is “Psycho Joe,” while Brzezinski is “low-I.Q., Crazy Mika.”

He also took a shot at Brzezinski over a supposed face-lift.

On “Special Report” tonight, Charles Krauthammer said that Trump’s rhetoric “degrades the political discourse” and “embarrasses the country.”

Female Kurdish Fighter Smiles, Sticks Her Tongue Out After ISIS Bullet Misses Her Head

Trump: Chuck Schumer ‘Doesn’t Seem Like a Serious Person’

“Presidents don’t talk like this. They never have,” Krauthammer said. “This is what it sounds like when you’re living in a banana republic. This is how Hugo Chavez would talk about his opponents. This is how the worst dictator, Duterte in the Philippines, would talk about opponents.”

Mercedes Schlapp pushed back, pointing out that Trump is not shutting down the press or using military force to silence his critics, as those dictators did.

“When you defend the president of the United States by pointing out that he hasn’t sent the tanks out in the streets to shut down the media, you’ve reached a fairly low level of defense,” Krauthammer replied.

He added it’s not just the fact that Trump’s Twitter remarks are an embarrassment and a distraction, but also that they give an unfiltered, uncensored look at Trump’s psyche.

“What we’re seeing is a vindictiveness, a cruelty, a lack of temperedness, a lack of self-control which is truly shocking,” Krauthammer said. “And that’s what I think people are reacting to.”

A brand-new Fox News poll found that many Americans agree with Krauthammer’s assessment of Trump’s Twitter habits.

Watch more above, and share your reaction in the comments.

Limbaugh: CNN, ‘Little Jim Acosta’ Humiliating Themselves

Hannity Blasts ‘Liberal Joe’ Scarborough for ‘Petulant & Arrogant’ Coverage of Trump

‘It’s Not Worth It:’ Parent of Child Killed by Illegal Immigrant Speaks Out

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Krauthammer on Trump’s Tweets: This Is What It’s Like in a Banana Republic – Fox News Insider

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why Do They Even Play The Game? – Investor’s Business Daily

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached.

In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all.

Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause).

But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer.

Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees.

In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. “I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.)

For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus.

And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins.

Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions.

I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best.

Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon.

On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen.

When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared.

“He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.”

Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?”

Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the (expletive) brown eye!”

“That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game.

Baker left him in.

After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that.

Said Vince Lombardi, “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.” To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

Read more:

Charles Krauthammer: Why Do They Even Play The Game? – Investor’s Business Daily

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: Pondering the agony of defeat – The Mercury

In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Advertisement In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me. Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at? Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye! Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game. Baker left him in. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

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July 3, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why even play the game? – Lincoln Journal Star

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers — yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees. In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. “I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes — not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling — yes, like a hungry tiger — at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. “He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.” Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?” Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the [expletive] brown eye!” “That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi: “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.” To which I add — conjecture — yes, but losing is worse.

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Is a shot at winning worth risking loss? – The Daily Herald

By Charles Krauthammer In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomsons shot heard round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees. In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong I still got one more hitter in me. Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at? Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye! Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game. Baker left him in. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse. Charles Krauthammers email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

From the Right: Charles Krauthammer Why do they even play the game? – SouthCoastToday.com

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees. In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. “I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. “He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.” Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?” Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the [expletive] brown eye!” “That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game. Baker left him in. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi, “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.” To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.(c) 2017, Washington Post Writers Group

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why do they even play the game? – New Haven Register

In mathematics, when youre convinced of some eternal truth but cant quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, theres nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Advertisement Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers — yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomsons shot heard round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees. In 1986, the Today Show commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. I aint flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out, he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes — not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I dont feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if hes just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling — yes, like a hungry tiger — at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. It was beautiful, was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Posts Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him hes done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. He asked me how I was feeling, Scherzer recounted, and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me. Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: Which eye should I look at? Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: Look in the [expletive] brown eye! Thats the pitching one, he jokingly told reporters after the game. Baker left him in. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, Im like, Im nothing. It doesnt get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi, Winning isnt everything. Its the only thing. To which I add — conjecture — yes, but losing is worse. Charles Krauthammers email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

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July 1, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Trump’s MSNBC Tweet’ What It Sounds Like When You’re Living in a Banana Republic’ – Breitbart News

On Thursdays broadcast of the Fox News Channels Special Report, columnist Charles Krauthammer stated that President Trumps tweet about MSNBC hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski sounds like something from a banana republic and is how Venezuelas Hugo Chavez and the Philippines Rodrigo Duterte would talk about their opponents. Krauthammer said, [I]t degrades the political discourse and it embarrasses the country. Presidents [Senator] Dianne Feinstein(D-CA) I think, was right. Presidents dont talk like this. They never have. This is what it sounds like when youre living in a banana republic. This is how Hugo Chavez would talk about his opponents. This is how the worst dictator, Duterte, in the Philippines, would talk about opponents. Its degrading and it sort reduces the United States from a grand republic to a banana republic. Fellow panelist Mercedes Schlapp responded that while she didnt like the tweet, Trump isnt sending in the military to shut down the press, Trump has a right to state his opinion, and Morning Joeisnt objective. Krauthammer countered, When you defend the president of the United States by pointing out that he hasnt sent the tanks out in the streets to shut down the media, youve reached a fairly low level of defense. Im talking about the tone and the degrading of the politics, and that is on the level of Hugo Chavez. He added, [T]weeting is the most direct avenue to the id. Theres no more uncensored, unfiltered avenue from the id to tweeting, and what were seeing is were getting a look into the psyche of the president. And what were seeing is a vindictiveness, a cruelty, a lack of temperateness, a lack of self-control, which is truly shocking. Follow IanHanchett on Twitter@IanHanchett P.S. DO YOU WANT MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS ONE DELIVERED RIGHT TO YOUR INBOX?SIGN UP FOR THE DAILY BREITBART NEWSLETTER.

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CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER: The great Muslim civil war and us … – Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

The U.S. shoots down a Syrian fighter-bomber. Iran launches missiles into eastern Syria. Russia threatens to attack coalition aircraft west of the Euphrates. What is going on? It might appear a mindless mess, but the outlines are clear. The great Muslim civil war, centered in Syria, is approaching its post-Islamic State phase. The parties are maneuvering to shape whats next. Its Europe, 1945, when the war was still raging against Nazi Germany, but everyone already knew the outcome. The maneuvering was largely between the approaching victors the Soviet Union and the Western democracies to determine boundaries and influence. So it is today in Syria. Everyone knows that the Islamic State is finished. Not that it will disappear as an ideology, insurgency and source of continuing terrorism both in the region and the West. But it will disappear as an independent, organized, territorial entity in the heart of the Middle East. It is being squeezed out of existence. Its hold on Mosul, its last major redoubt in Iraq, is nearly gone. Raqqa, its stronghold in Syria and de facto capital, is next. When it falls it is already surrounded on three sides the caliphate dies. Much of the fighting today is about who inherits. Take the Syrian jet the U.S. shot down. It had been attacking a pro-Western Kurdish and Arab force (the Syrian Democratic Forces) not far from Islamic State territory. Why? Because the Bashar Assad regime, backed by Iran, Hezbollah and Russia, having gained the upper hand on the non-jihadist rebels in the Syrian heartland (most notably in Aleppo), feels secure enough to set its sights on eastern Syria. If it hopes to restore its authority over the whole country, it will need to control Raqqa and surrounding Islamic State areas. But the forces near Raqqa are pro-Western and anti-regime. Hence the Syrian fighter-bomber attack. Hence the U.S. shoot-down. We are protecting our friends. Hence the Russian threats to now target U.S. planes. The Russians are protecting their friends. On the same day as the shoot-down, Iran launched six surface-to-surface missiles into Syrian territory controlled by the Islamic State. Why? Ostensibly to punish the jihadists for terrorist attacks two weeks ago inside Iran. Perhaps. But one obvious objective was to demonstrate to Saudi Arabia and the other Sunni Arabs the considerable reach of both Irans arms and territorial ambitions. For Iran, Syria is the key, the central theater of a Shiite-Sunni war for regional hegemony. Iran (which is non-Arab) leads the Shiite side, attended by its Arab auxiliaries Hezbollah in Lebanon, the Shiite militias in Iraq and the highly penetrated government of Iraq, and Assads Alawite regime. (Alawites being a non-Sunni sect, often associated with Shiism.) Taken together, they comprise a vast arc the Shiite Crescent stretching from Iran through Iraq, Syria and Lebanon to the Mediterranean. If consolidated, it gives the Persians a Mediterranean reach they have not had in 2,300 years. This alliance operates under the patronage and protection of Russia, which supplies the Iranian-allied side with cash, weapons and, since 2015, air cover from its new bases in Syria. Arrayed on the other side of the great Muslim civil war are the Sunnis, moderate and Western-allied, led by Saudi Arabia, the Gulf states, Egypt and Jordan with their Great Power patron, the United States, now (post-Obama) back in action. At stake is consolidation of the Shiite Crescent. Its already underway. As the Islamic State is driven out of Mosul, Iranian-controlled militias are taking over crucial roads and other strategic assets in western Iraq. Next target: eastern Syria (Raqqa and environs). Imagine the scenario: a unified Syria under Assad, the ever more pliant client of Iran and Russia; Hezbollah, tip of the Iranian spear, dominant in Lebanon; Iran, the regional arbiter; and Russia, with its Syrian bases, the outside hegemon. Our preferred outcome is radically different: a loosely federated Syria, partitioned and cantonized, in which Assad might be left in charge of an Alawite rump. The Iranian-Russian strategy is a nightmare for the entire Sunni Middle East. And for us too. The Pentagon seems bent on preventing it. A reasonable U.S. strategy, given the alternatives. But not without risk.

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July 1, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer on Trump’s Tweets: This Is What It’s Like in a Banana Republic – Fox News Insider

Jamiel Shaw Sr: Illegal Who Killed Son Raised ‘Like a Rabid Pitbull’ Mark Steyn: ‘I’m In Favor of Replacing Jim Acosta With Elmo’ on CNN On Thursday, President Donald Trump went after MSNBC show Morning Joe and its hosts, former Congressman Joe Scarborough and commentator Mika Brzezinski. Trump wrote on Twitter that Scarborough is “Psycho Joe,” while Brzezinski is “low-I.Q., Crazy Mika.” He also took a shot at Brzezinski over a supposed face-lift. On “Special Report” tonight, Charles Krauthammer said that Trump’s rhetoric “degrades the political discourse” and “embarrasses the country.” Female Kurdish Fighter Smiles, Sticks Her Tongue Out After ISIS Bullet Misses Her Head Trump: Chuck Schumer ‘Doesn’t Seem Like a Serious Person’ “Presidents don’t talk like this. They never have,” Krauthammer said. “This is what it sounds like when you’re living in a banana republic. This is how Hugo Chavez would talk about his opponents. This is how the worst dictator, Duterte in the Philippines, would talk about opponents.” Mercedes Schlapp pushed back, pointing out that Trump is not shutting down the press or using military force to silence his critics, as those dictators did. “When you defend the president of the United States by pointing out that he hasn’t sent the tanks out in the streets to shut down the media, you’ve reached a fairly low level of defense,” Krauthammer replied. He added it’s not just the fact that Trump’s Twitter remarks are an embarrassment and a distraction, but also that they give an unfiltered, uncensored look at Trump’s psyche. “What we’re seeing is a vindictiveness, a cruelty, a lack of temperedness, a lack of self-control which is truly shocking,” Krauthammer said. “And that’s what I think people are reacting to.” A brand-new Fox News poll found that many Americans agree with Krauthammer’s assessment of Trump’s Twitter habits. Watch more above, and share your reaction in the comments. Limbaugh: CNN, ‘Little Jim Acosta’ Humiliating Themselves Hannity Blasts ‘Liberal Joe’ Scarborough for ‘Petulant & Arrogant’ Coverage of Trump ‘It’s Not Worth It:’ Parent of Child Killed by Illegal Immigrant Speaks Out

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Why Do They Even Play The Game? – Investor’s Business Daily

In mathematics, when you’re convinced of some eternal truth but can’t quite prove it, you offer it as a hypothesis (with a portentous capital H) and invite the world, future generations if need be, to prove you right or wrong. Often, a cash prize is attached. In that spirit, but without the cash, I offer the Krauthammer Conjecture: In sports, the pleasure of winning is less than the pain of losing. By any Benthamite pleasure/pain calculation, the sum is less than zero. A net negative of suffering. Which makes you wonder why anybody plays at all. Winning is great. You get to hoot and holler, hoist the trophy, shower in champagne, ride the open parade car and boycott the White House victory ceremony (choose your cause). But, as most who have engaged in competitive sports know, there’s nothing to match the amplitude of emotion brought by losing. When the Cleveland Cavaliers lost the 2015 NBA Finals to Golden State, LeBron James sat motionless in the locker room, staring straight ahead, still wearing his game jersey, for 45 minutes after the final buzzer. Here was a guy immensely wealthy, widely admired, at the peak of his powers yet stricken, inconsolable. So it was for Ralph Branca, who gave up Bobby Thomson’s shot heard ’round the world in 1951. So too for Royals shortstop Freddie Patek, a (literal) picture of dejection sitting alone in the dugout with his head down after his team lost the 1977 pennant to the New York Yankees. In 1986, the “Today Show” commemorated the 30th anniversary of Don Larsen pitching the only perfect game in World Series history. They invited Larsen and his battery mate, Yogi Berra. And Dale Mitchell, the man who made the last out. Mitchell was not amused. “I ain’t flying 2,000 miles to talk about striking out,” he fumed. And anyway, the called third strike was high and outside. It had been 30 years and Mitchell was still mad. (Justly so. Even the Yankee fielders acknowledged that the final pitch was outside the strike zone.) For every moment of triumph, there is an unequal and opposite feeling of despair. Take that iconic photograph of Muhammad Ali standing triumphantly over the prostrate, semiconscious wreckage of Sonny Liston. Great photo. Now think of Liston. Do the pleasure/pain calculus. And we are talking here about professional athletes not even the legions of Little Leaguers, freshly eliminated from the playoffs, sobbing and sniffling their way home, assuaged only by gallons of Baskin-Robbins. Any parent can attest to the Krauthammer Conjecture. What surprises is how often it applies to battle-hardened professionals making millions. I don’t feel sorry for them. They can drown their sorrows in the Olympic-sized infinity pool that graces their Florida estate. (No state income tax.) I am merely fascinated that, despite their other substantial compensations, some of them really do care. Most interestingly, often the very best. Max Scherzer, ace pitcher for the Washington Nationals, makes $30 million a year. On the mound, forget the money. His will to win is scary. Every time he registers a strikeout, he stalks off the mound, circling, head down, as if he’s just brought down a mastodon. On June 6, tiring as he approached victory, he began growling yes, like a hungry tiger at Chase Utley as he came to the plate. “It was beautiful,” was the headline of the blog entry by The Washington Post’s Scott Allen. When Scherzer gets like that, managers are actually afraid to go out and tell him he’s done. He goes Mad Max. In one such instance last year, as Scherzer labored, manager Dusty Baker came out to the mound. Scherzer glared. “He asked me how I was feeling,” Scherzer recounted, “and I said I still feel strong … I still got one more hitter in me.” Asked Baker, demanding visual confirmation: “Which eye should I look at?” Scherzer, who famously has one blue and one brown eye, shot back: “Look in the (expletive) brown eye!” “That’s the pitching one,” he jokingly told reporters after the game. Baker left him in. After losing her first ever UFC match, mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey confessed that she was in the corner of the medical room, “literally sitting there thinking about killing myself. In that exact second, I’m like, ‘I’m nothing.'” It doesn’t get lower than that. Said Vince Lombardi, “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.” To which I add conjecture yes, but losing is worse.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed


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