Archive for the ‘Charles Krauthammer’ Category

Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post: Hey, democracy is surviving Trump nicely – Waco Tribune-Herald

A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar.

At three separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a fine hour for American democracy:

What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Till he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored.

In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed.

The brass framed their inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness.

Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president. Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke. Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher.

Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well.

Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far.

Charles Krauthammer is also a Fox News commentator and author of Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Politics.

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Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post: Hey, democracy is surviving Trump nicely – Waco Tribune-Herald

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August 6, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer column: Once again, the guardrails hold – Richmond.com

WASHINGTON

A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. (Working title: The Pompadours of 1600 Pennsylvania.) But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar.

At five separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy:

(1) The military says no to Trump on the transgender ban.

Well, not directly thats insubordination but with rather elegant circumspection.

The president tweeted out a total ban on transgender people serving in the military. It came practically out of nowhere.

The military brass, not consulted, was not amused. Defense Secretary James Mattis, in the middle of a six-month review of the issue, was reportedly appalled.

What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Until he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored.

In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control.

It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed.

The brass framed its inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness.

(2) The Senate saves Sessions.

Trumps relentless public humiliation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions was clearly intended to get him to resign. He didnt, in part because of increasing support from Congress.

Sessions former colleagues came out strongly in his defense and some openly criticized the presidents shabby treatment of his first and most fervent senatorial supporter.

Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president.

Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch.

(3) Senate Republicans reject the Obamacare repeal.

The causes here are multiple, most having nothing to do with Trump. Republicans are deeply divided on the proper role of government in health care. This division is compounded by the sea change in public opinion as, over seven years, Obamacare has become part of the fabric of American medicine, and health care has come to be seen as a right rather than a commodity.

Nonetheless, the stunning Senate rejection of repeal was also a pointed rejection of Trumps health care hectoring. And a show of senatorial disdain for Trump craving a personal legislative win on an issue about whose policy choices he knew nothing and cared less.

(4) The Boy Scouts protest.

In a rebuke not as earthshaking but still telling, the chief executive of the Boy Scouts found it necessary to apologize for the presidents speech last week to their quadrennial jamboree. It was a wildly inappropriate confection, at once whining, self-referential, partisan and political.

How do you blow a speech to the Boy Scouts? No merit badge for the big guy.

(5) The police chiefs chide.

In an address to law enforcement officials, Trump gave a wink and a nod to cops roughing up suspects. Several police chiefs subsequently reprimanded Trump for encouraging police brutality a mild form, perhaps, but brutality still.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke.

Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher.

Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the Scouts, from the senators to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well.

Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far.

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Charles Krauthammer column: Once again, the guardrails hold – Richmond.com

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August 5, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Mueller’s Fishing Expedition Threatens … – National Review

Charles Krauthammer worr[ies] for the country after news breaks of Special Counsel Robert Muellers new grand jury. That, he said on Fox News, along with the bills introduced in the Senate to protect Mueller from being fired, could bring President Trump, Congress, and the Supreme Court into conflict. Krauthammer explains:

Tonights news is not just a threat to Trump and his entourage but it is [a threat] to constitutional stability. The president has said that hes got a red line. If they want to go on a fishing expedition that is unrelated, essentially, to the Russia probe, thats where he draws a line. Now, he didnt say what he would do but you know what he would have in mind. When you get members of his own party in the Senate trying to pass laws probably unconstitutional to restrict his ability to fire Mueller, you know that we are possibly headed to a cliff. Look, the problem with special prosecutors is you assemble a team of the best of the best in search of a crime. Normally, you have a crime and then the prosecutors go out and try to prove it. With a special prosecutor, you start with Whitewater and you end up with a blue dress. Thats a long journey. Here, the Russia thing obviously is a pretext, and its going to be a subject of the investigation. But it appears to be going into the territory that Trump has wanted to protect, namely his business. At some point, we could come to a crisis. And I worry for the country because this is not good that the presidency, the judiciary, and Congress would be at loggerheads when you really dont have anybody that ultimately would adjudicate. It would be the Supreme Court but we know that can cause real reverberations for decades.

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Charles Krauthammer: Mueller’s Fishing Expedition Threatens … – National Review

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Krauthammer: DOJ Targeting Press in Leak Crackdown Is a ‘Losing … – Fox News Insider

Report: Mueller Impanels Grand Jury in Russia Probe

Lisa Boothe: Left Cries ‘Racism, Sexism’ on Everything in Trump Era

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Friday that the Justice Department will review its policies on subpoenaing news organizations as part of its crackdown on government leaks.

We respect the important role that the press plays, and we’ll give them respect, but it is not unlimited, Sessions said. They cannot place lives at risk with impunity. We must balance the press role with protecting our national security and the lives of those who serve in the intelligence community, the armed forces and all law-abiding Americans.

On “Special Report” tonight, Charles Krauthammer explained why he thinks this is a “losing proposition.”

Stephen Miller Rips CNN’s Acosta for Revealing His ‘Cosmopolitan Bias’

Boy Writes Letter to Trump Asking If He Can Mow the White House Lawn

“I thought we adjudicated this in Watergate days,” he said. “We have an odd system, but it is a traditional one, where if there’s an unauthorized leak of classified information, it’s illegal [and] the person who goes to jail is the leaker, not the receiver.”

He said that protects the First Amendment by protecting the press, even if some of the leaks appear unwarranted.

“I think this is a losing proposition. I think in the end the Supreme Court will likely rule as it did 30, 40 years ago and uphold the prerogatives of the press,” Krauthammer said.

Watch more above.

Cortes on ‘Treasonous’ New Leaks of Trump’s Calls: ‘The Swamp Is Hard to Kill’

‘Prosecutors Would Be Interested in This’: Judicial Watch Reveals More Clinton-Abedin Emails

Report: Al Gore’s Home Uses 21x More Energy Than Average US Household

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Krauthammer: DOJ Targeting Press in Leak Crackdown Is a ‘Losing … – Fox News Insider

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August 5, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: US Institutions Holding Up Under ‘Careening … – Mediaite

Donald Trumps presidency is something of a stress test on American institutions according to conservative pundit Charles Krauthammer. And for the moment, in his view, the institutions are holding up.

In a column for the National Review, Krauthammer wrote that five different developments last week tested various American institutions. Specifically, he focused on Trumps announcement of a transgender military ban, the increased pressure on Attorney Jeff Sessions to resign, the Senate rejecting the Obamacare repeal, Trumps politically charged speech to the Boy Scouts, and Trump encouraging police officers to rough up people theyve arrested.

But Krauthammer believes the various institutions withstood pressure from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy, Krauthammer wrote.

Take, for instance, the military which refused to act on Trumps Twitter decree banning transgender people from service.

[T]he military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake, Krauthammer wrote. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed.

Krauthammer went on to bash Trump whining, self-referential, partisan, and political address to the Boy Scouts.

How do you blow a speech to Boy Scouts? Krauthammer wrote. No merit badge for the big guy.

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Krauthammer: US Institutions Holding Up Under ‘Careening … – Mediaite

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August 5, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Once again, the guardrails hold – Elko Daily Free Press

WASHINGTON A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. (Working title: The Pompadours of 1600 Pennsylvania.) But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar.

At five separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy:

(1) The military says no to Trump on the transgender ban.

Well, not directly thats insubordination but with rather elegant circumspection. The president tweeted out a total ban on transgender people serving in the military. It came practically out of nowhere. The military brass, not consulted, was not amused. Defense Secretary James Mattis, in the middle of a six-month review of the issue, was reportedly appalled.

What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Until he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored.

In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed.

The brass framed their inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness.

(2) The Senate saves Sessions.

Trumps relentless public humiliation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions was clearly intended to get him to resign. He didnt, in part because of increasing support from Congress. Sessions former colleagues came out strongly in his defense and some openly criticized the presidents shabby treatment of his first and most fervent senatorial supporter.

Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president. Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch.

(3) Senate Republicans reject the Obamacare repeal.

The causes here are multiple, most having nothing to do with Trump. Republicans are deeply divided on the proper role of government in health care. This division is compounded by the sea change in public opinion as, over seven years, Obamacare has become part of the fabric of American medicine, and health care has come to be seen as a right rather than a commodity.

Nonetheless, the stunning Senate rejection of repeal was also a pointed rejection of Trumps health care hectoring. And a show of senatorial disdain for Trump craving a personal legislative win on an issue about whose policy choices he knew nothing and cared less.

(4) The Boy Scouts protest.

In a rebuke not as earthshaking but still telling, the chief executive of the Boy Scouts found it necessary to apologize for the presidents speech last week to their quadrennial jamboree. It was a wildly inappropriate confection, at once whining, self-referential, partisan and political.

How do you blow a speech to Boy Scouts? No merit badge for the big guy.

(5) The police chiefs chide.

In an address to law enforcement officials, Trump gave a wink and a nod to cops roughing up suspects. Several police chiefs subsequently reprimanded Trump for encouraging police brutality a mild form, perhaps, but brutality still.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke. Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher.

Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the Scouts, from the senators to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well.

Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far.

Read more:

Charles Krauthammer: Once again, the guardrails hold – Elko Daily Free Press

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August 4, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Impeachment would be ‘a catastrophic mistake’ | TheHill – The Hill

Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer called the idea of impeaching President Trump “a catastrophic mistake” on Thursday, warning that there’s no evidence Trump has committed a crime.

“Collusion is unseemly but it ain’t a crime,” Krauthammer said in an interview with Fox News’s Tucker Carlson. “You’ve got a political establishment, mostly Democratic but there are some Republicans, that would like to see him taken out of office.”

“I think that would be a catastrophic mistake,” he added.

Krauthammer warned that impeaching Trump would cause millions that voted for him to question the stability of American democracy.

“It would cause a rupture in the country where people would say, ‘when we people, the ones who have been abandoned elect someone we like, our guy gets taken out? I thought we had a stable democracy,'” he said.

“Again, I think he’s unfit,” Krauthammer said, “but that’s not the grounds for removal.”

“If you think a man is unfit, you vote against him,” Krauthammer added. “But you don’t remove him from office. And that’s where I’m afraidweare headed, given the forces that surround the president.”

In July, it was reported that as many as 25 House Democratsare workingon a bill to begin impeachment proceedings for the president, but no Democratic leaders have signed on to the proposal.

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Krauthammer: Impeachment would be ‘a catastrophic mistake’ | TheHill – The Hill

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Krauthammer on Grand Jury: ‘At Some Point, We Could Come to a Crisis’ – Mediaite

On Thursday night, the Special Report panel weighed in on the breaking news that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has impaneled a grand jury for his ongoing Russia investigation.

Laura Ingrahamsaid that this is not good for the [Donald] Trump legal team and how they have to be deadly serious with how they handle the investigation from here on out.

Is it routine? I guess, she told Fox News anchor Chris Wallace. But this is an investigation by all indication is going to be sprawling and its going to reach into aspects of the Trump business empire, his family business interests way beyond what people initially thought would be covered by this.

Charles Krauthammer believed that the news isnt just a threat to Trump and his entourage but to constitutional stability as well.

The president said that he has got a red line, Krauthammer continued. If they want to go on a fishing expedition that is unrelated essentially to the Russia probe, thats where he draws the line When you get members of his own party in the Senate trying to pass laws- probably unconstitutional- to restrict his ability to fire Mueller, you know we are possibly heading to a cliff.

He was referring to the bipartisan proposal that would limit the presidents power to terminate the special counsel.

He pointed out that the special counsel is in search for a crime rather than just proving the crime and reiterated Ingrahams point that it what you start with isnt always what you end up with by invoking Former President Bill Clinton.

With a special prosecutor, you start out with Whitewater, you end up with a blue dress. That is a long journey, he stated.

Krauthammer then gave a grim forecast as to what may happen next.

At some point, we could come to a crisis, he warned. And I worry for the country because this is not good that the presidency, the judiciary, and the Congress would be at laggers heads when you really dont have any body that would ultimately adjudicate.

He added that if the Supreme Court got involved, it could cause real reverberations for decades.

Watch the clip above, via Fox News.

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Krauthammer on Grand Jury: ‘At Some Point, We Could Come to a Crisis’ – Mediaite

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Krauthammer on Trump Signing Russia Sanctions: ‘He Did This in the Name of Not Being Humiliated’ – Mediaite

After six days of deliberation, President Donald Trump reluctantly signed the Russia sanctions bill into law on Wednesday.

By limiting the Executives flexibility, this bill makes it harder for the United States to strike good deals for the American people, and will drive China, Russia, and North Korea much closer together, Trump said in a statement. The Framers of our Constitution put foreign affairs in the hands of the President. This bill will prove the wisdom of that choice.

Conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer doesnt think Trump had much of a choice in the matter, though. According to Krauthammer, a veto all but certainly wouldve been overridden.

He did this in the name of not being humiliated, Krauthammer said, and overridden by a Congress thatthat when I think of the Senate, 97-2he had no choice. He had to do it.

But that doesnt mean that Krauthammer thinks Trump made the wrong move in signing the measure.

He ended up in the right place, Krauthammer said. The president wants to relax sanctions in the deal. Hell have to go to Congress and negotiate it. Theres nothing wrong with that.

Watch above, via Fox News.

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Krauthammer on Trump Signing Russia Sanctions: ‘He Did This in the Name of Not Being Humiliated’ – Mediaite

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Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post: Hey, democracy is surviving Trump nicely – Waco Tribune-Herald

A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar. At three separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a fine hour for American democracy: What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Till he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored. In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed. The brass framed their inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness. Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president. Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke. Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher. Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well. Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far. Charles Krauthammer is also a Fox News commentator and author of Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Politics.

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August 6, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer column: Once again, the guardrails hold – Richmond.com

WASHINGTON A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. (Working title: The Pompadours of 1600 Pennsylvania.) But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar. At five separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy: (1) The military says no to Trump on the transgender ban. Well, not directly thats insubordination but with rather elegant circumspection. The president tweeted out a total ban on transgender people serving in the military. It came practically out of nowhere. The military brass, not consulted, was not amused. Defense Secretary James Mattis, in the middle of a six-month review of the issue, was reportedly appalled. What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Until he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored. In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed. The brass framed its inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness. (2) The Senate saves Sessions. Trumps relentless public humiliation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions was clearly intended to get him to resign. He didnt, in part because of increasing support from Congress. Sessions former colleagues came out strongly in his defense and some openly criticized the presidents shabby treatment of his first and most fervent senatorial supporter. Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president. Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch. (3) Senate Republicans reject the Obamacare repeal. The causes here are multiple, most having nothing to do with Trump. Republicans are deeply divided on the proper role of government in health care. This division is compounded by the sea change in public opinion as, over seven years, Obamacare has become part of the fabric of American medicine, and health care has come to be seen as a right rather than a commodity. Nonetheless, the stunning Senate rejection of repeal was also a pointed rejection of Trumps health care hectoring. And a show of senatorial disdain for Trump craving a personal legislative win on an issue about whose policy choices he knew nothing and cared less. (4) The Boy Scouts protest. In a rebuke not as earthshaking but still telling, the chief executive of the Boy Scouts found it necessary to apologize for the presidents speech last week to their quadrennial jamboree. It was a wildly inappropriate confection, at once whining, self-referential, partisan and political. How do you blow a speech to the Boy Scouts? No merit badge for the big guy. (5) The police chiefs chide. In an address to law enforcement officials, Trump gave a wink and a nod to cops roughing up suspects. Several police chiefs subsequently reprimanded Trump for encouraging police brutality a mild form, perhaps, but brutality still. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke. Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher. Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the Scouts, from the senators to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well. Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far.

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Charles Krauthammer: Mueller’s Fishing Expedition Threatens … – National Review

Charles Krauthammer worr[ies] for the country after news breaks of Special Counsel Robert Muellers new grand jury. That, he said on Fox News, along with the bills introduced in the Senate to protect Mueller from being fired, could bring President Trump, Congress, and the Supreme Court into conflict. Krauthammer explains: Tonights news is not just a threat to Trump and his entourage but it is [a threat] to constitutional stability. The president has said that hes got a red line. If they want to go on a fishing expedition that is unrelated, essentially, to the Russia probe, thats where he draws a line. Now, he didnt say what he would do but you know what he would have in mind. When you get members of his own party in the Senate trying to pass laws probably unconstitutional to restrict his ability to fire Mueller, you know that we are possibly headed to a cliff. Look, the problem with special prosecutors is you assemble a team of the best of the best in search of a crime. Normally, you have a crime and then the prosecutors go out and try to prove it. With a special prosecutor, you start with Whitewater and you end up with a blue dress. Thats a long journey. Here, the Russia thing obviously is a pretext, and its going to be a subject of the investigation. But it appears to be going into the territory that Trump has wanted to protect, namely his business. At some point, we could come to a crisis. And I worry for the country because this is not good that the presidency, the judiciary, and Congress would be at loggerheads when you really dont have anybody that ultimately would adjudicate. It would be the Supreme Court but we know that can cause real reverberations for decades.

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Krauthammer: DOJ Targeting Press in Leak Crackdown Is a ‘Losing … – Fox News Insider

Report: Mueller Impanels Grand Jury in Russia Probe Lisa Boothe: Left Cries ‘Racism, Sexism’ on Everything in Trump Era Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Friday that the Justice Department will review its policies on subpoenaing news organizations as part of its crackdown on government leaks. We respect the important role that the press plays, and we’ll give them respect, but it is not unlimited, Sessions said. They cannot place lives at risk with impunity. We must balance the press role with protecting our national security and the lives of those who serve in the intelligence community, the armed forces and all law-abiding Americans. On “Special Report” tonight, Charles Krauthammer explained why he thinks this is a “losing proposition.” Stephen Miller Rips CNN’s Acosta for Revealing His ‘Cosmopolitan Bias’ Boy Writes Letter to Trump Asking If He Can Mow the White House Lawn “I thought we adjudicated this in Watergate days,” he said. “We have an odd system, but it is a traditional one, where if there’s an unauthorized leak of classified information, it’s illegal [and] the person who goes to jail is the leaker, not the receiver.” He said that protects the First Amendment by protecting the press, even if some of the leaks appear unwarranted. “I think this is a losing proposition. I think in the end the Supreme Court will likely rule as it did 30, 40 years ago and uphold the prerogatives of the press,” Krauthammer said. Watch more above. Cortes on ‘Treasonous’ New Leaks of Trump’s Calls: ‘The Swamp Is Hard to Kill’ ‘Prosecutors Would Be Interested in This’: Judicial Watch Reveals More Clinton-Abedin Emails Report: Al Gore’s Home Uses 21x More Energy Than Average US Household

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August 5, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: US Institutions Holding Up Under ‘Careening … – Mediaite

Donald Trumps presidency is something of a stress test on American institutions according to conservative pundit Charles Krauthammer. And for the moment, in his view, the institutions are holding up. In a column for the National Review, Krauthammer wrote that five different developments last week tested various American institutions. Specifically, he focused on Trumps announcement of a transgender military ban, the increased pressure on Attorney Jeff Sessions to resign, the Senate rejecting the Obamacare repeal, Trumps politically charged speech to the Boy Scouts, and Trump encouraging police officers to rough up people theyve arrested. But Krauthammer believes the various institutions withstood pressure from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy, Krauthammer wrote. Take, for instance, the military which refused to act on Trumps Twitter decree banning transgender people from service. [T]he military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake, Krauthammer wrote. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed. Krauthammer went on to bash Trump whining, self-referential, partisan, and political address to the Boy Scouts. How do you blow a speech to Boy Scouts? Krauthammer wrote. No merit badge for the big guy. [image via screengrab] Follow Joe DePaolo (@joe_depaolo) on Twitter Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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August 5, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Charles Krauthammer: Once again, the guardrails hold – Elko Daily Free Press

WASHINGTON A future trivia question and historical footnote, the spectacular 10-day flameout of Anthony Scaramucci qualifies as the most entertaining episode yet of the ongoing reality show that is the Trump presidency. (Working title: The Pompadours of 1600 Pennsylvania.) But even as the cocksure sycophants gobsmacking spectacle stole the show, something of real importance took place a bit lower on the radar. At five separate junctures, the sinews of our democracy held against the careening recklessness of this presidency. Consequently, Donald Trumps worst week proved a particularly fine hour for American democracy: (1) The military says no to Trump on the transgender ban. Well, not directly thats insubordination but with rather elegant circumspection. The president tweeted out a total ban on transgender people serving in the military. It came practically out of nowhere. The military brass, not consulted, was not amused. Defense Secretary James Mattis, in the middle of a six-month review of the issue, was reportedly appalled. What was done? Nothing. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs simply declared that a tweet is not an order. Until he receives a formal command and develops new guidelines, the tweet will be ignored. In other words, the military told the commander in chief to go jump in a lake. Generally speaking, this is not a healthy state of affairs in a nation of civilian control. It does carry a whiff of insubordination. But under a president so uniquely impulsive and chronically irrational, a certain vigilance, even prickliness, on the part of the military is to be welcomed. The brass framed their inaction as a matter of procedure. But the refusal carried with it a reminder of institutional prerogatives. In this case, the military offered resistance to mere whimsy. Next time, it could be resistance to unlawfulness. (2) The Senate saves Sessions. Trumps relentless public humiliation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions was clearly intended to get him to resign. He didnt, in part because of increasing support from Congress. Sessions former colleagues came out strongly in his defense and some openly criticized the presidents shabby treatment of his first and most fervent senatorial supporter. Indeed, Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, warned Trump not to fire Sessions because he wouldnt get another attorney general the committees entire 2017 schedule was set and there would be no hearings to approve a new AG. That was a finger to the eye of the president. Every once in a while, the Senate seems to remember that it is a coequal branch. (3) Senate Republicans reject the Obamacare repeal. The causes here are multiple, most having nothing to do with Trump. Republicans are deeply divided on the proper role of government in health care. This division is compounded by the sea change in public opinion as, over seven years, Obamacare has become part of the fabric of American medicine, and health care has come to be seen as a right rather than a commodity. Nonetheless, the stunning Senate rejection of repeal was also a pointed rejection of Trumps health care hectoring. And a show of senatorial disdain for Trump craving a personal legislative win on an issue about whose policy choices he knew nothing and cared less. (4) The Boy Scouts protest. In a rebuke not as earthshaking but still telling, the chief executive of the Boy Scouts found it necessary to apologize for the presidents speech last week to their quadrennial jamboree. It was a wildly inappropriate confection, at once whining, self-referential, partisan and political. How do you blow a speech to Boy Scouts? No merit badge for the big guy. (5) The police chiefs chide. In an address to law enforcement officials, Trump gave a wink and a nod to cops roughing up suspects. Several police chiefs subsequently reprimanded Trump for encouraging police brutality a mild form, perhaps, but brutality still. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was all a joke. Nonsense. It was an ugly sentiment, expressed coyly enough to be waved away as humor but with the thuggish undertone of a man who, heckled at a campaign rally, once said approvingly that in the old days guys like that would be carried out on a stretcher. Whatever your substantive position on the various issues involved above, we should all be grateful that from the generals to the Scouts, from the senators to the cops, the institutions of both political and civil society are holding up well. Trump is a systemic stress test. The results are good, thus far.

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August 4, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer: Impeachment would be ‘a catastrophic mistake’ | TheHill – The Hill

Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer called the idea of impeaching President Trump “a catastrophic mistake” on Thursday, warning that there’s no evidence Trump has committed a crime. “Collusion is unseemly but it ain’t a crime,” Krauthammer said in an interview with Fox News’s Tucker Carlson. “You’ve got a political establishment, mostly Democratic but there are some Republicans, that would like to see him taken out of office.” “I think that would be a catastrophic mistake,” he added. Krauthammer warned that impeaching Trump would cause millions that voted for him to question the stability of American democracy. “It would cause a rupture in the country where people would say, ‘when we people, the ones who have been abandoned elect someone we like, our guy gets taken out? I thought we had a stable democracy,'” he said. “Again, I think he’s unfit,” Krauthammer said, “but that’s not the grounds for removal.” “If you think a man is unfit, you vote against him,” Krauthammer added. “But you don’t remove him from office. And that’s where I’m afraidweare headed, given the forces that surround the president.” In July, it was reported that as many as 25 House Democratsare workingon a bill to begin impeachment proceedings for the president, but no Democratic leaders have signed on to the proposal.

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August 4, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer on Grand Jury: ‘At Some Point, We Could Come to a Crisis’ – Mediaite

On Thursday night, the Special Report panel weighed in on the breaking news that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has impaneled a grand jury for his ongoing Russia investigation. Laura Ingrahamsaid that this is not good for the [Donald] Trump legal team and how they have to be deadly serious with how they handle the investigation from here on out. Is it routine? I guess, she told Fox News anchor Chris Wallace. But this is an investigation by all indication is going to be sprawling and its going to reach into aspects of the Trump business empire, his family business interests way beyond what people initially thought would be covered by this. Charles Krauthammer believed that the news isnt just a threat to Trump and his entourage but to constitutional stability as well. The president said that he has got a red line, Krauthammer continued. If they want to go on a fishing expedition that is unrelated essentially to the Russia probe, thats where he draws the line When you get members of his own party in the Senate trying to pass laws- probably unconstitutional- to restrict his ability to fire Mueller, you know we are possibly heading to a cliff. He was referring to the bipartisan proposal that would limit the presidents power to terminate the special counsel. He pointed out that the special counsel is in search for a crime rather than just proving the crime and reiterated Ingrahams point that it what you start with isnt always what you end up with by invoking Former President Bill Clinton. With a special prosecutor, you start out with Whitewater, you end up with a blue dress. That is a long journey, he stated. Krauthammer then gave a grim forecast as to what may happen next. At some point, we could come to a crisis, he warned. And I worry for the country because this is not good that the presidency, the judiciary, and the Congress would be at laggers heads when you really dont have any body that would ultimately adjudicate. He added that if the Supreme Court got involved, it could cause real reverberations for decades. Watch the clip above, via Fox News. Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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August 4, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed

Krauthammer on Trump Signing Russia Sanctions: ‘He Did This in the Name of Not Being Humiliated’ – Mediaite

After six days of deliberation, President Donald Trump reluctantly signed the Russia sanctions bill into law on Wednesday. By limiting the Executives flexibility, this bill makes it harder for the United States to strike good deals for the American people, and will drive China, Russia, and North Korea much closer together, Trump said in a statement. The Framers of our Constitution put foreign affairs in the hands of the President. This bill will prove the wisdom of that choice. Conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer doesnt think Trump had much of a choice in the matter, though. According to Krauthammer, a veto all but certainly wouldve been overridden. He did this in the name of not being humiliated, Krauthammer said, and overridden by a Congress thatthat when I think of the Senate, 97-2he had no choice. He had to do it. But that doesnt mean that Krauthammer thinks Trump made the wrong move in signing the measure. He ended up in the right place, Krauthammer said. The president wants to relax sanctions in the deal. Hell have to go to Congress and negotiate it. Theres nothing wrong with that. Watch above, via Fox News. [featured image via screengrab] Follow Joe DePaolo (@joe_depaolo) on Twitter Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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August 3, 2017   Posted in: Charles Krauthammer  Comments Closed


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