Archive for the ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Category

London attack Twitter tears analysed in Oz – NEWS.com.au

Europe was blanketed in sadness following the London terror attack, according to an Australian analytics tool monitoring emotional expression on Twitter across the globe.

We Feel, built by CSIRO subset Data61, processes up to 45,000 tweets per minute to determine the various sentiments felt in each state and country in near real-time.

British-born Khalid Masood on Wednesday mowed down multiple people in a car on London’s Westminster bridge, killing three and injuring scores more, before stabbing a police officer to death.

Masood was later shot dead.

We Feel logged the impact of the attack as it reverberated across Europe.

Senior principal researcher at Data61, Dr Cecile Paris, says sadness hit a monthly peak.

“We conjecture this is what happened,” she told AAP on Friday.

“In Europe, for sadness, there has certainly been a peak in response to the attack.”

A total of 397,363 tweets processed by the tool within 24 hours contained words associated with sadness.

This was up by more than 80,000 on the previous day, and the second-highest peak of sadness expressed on Twitter in Europe in 2017.

“When I was monitoring the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack in Paris, again I could see some more negative emotion coming out there,” Dr Paris said.

“We also did see a situation around the Sydney siege.”

The researcher said Twitter provides access to one per cent of public posts on its application and We Feel searches for expressive and reactionary tweets using a list of 500 “emotional” words.

“We’re querying with words like sad, happy, angry, annoyed, ashamed,” she said.

We Feel then sorts them into categories: love, joy, surprise, fear, anger, sadness and other.

It showed a “statistically significant” peak of sadness worldwide when actor Robin Williams died in 2014, while there was “some joy” felt in Australia when Malcolm Turnbull won the federal election, Dr Paris said.

Data gathered by the tool is publicly available and aims to assist mental health workers with intervention plans.

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London attack Twitter tears analysed in Oz – NEWS.com.au

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March 24, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Russian Supreme Court upholds sentence to student approving Charlie Hebdo massacre – RAPSI

17:45 21/03/2017

MOSCOW, March 21 (RAPSI) The Supreme Court of Russia had upheld the 2-year prison sentence given to Avaid Mosab, a Palestinian student in the Russian town of Belgorod, for publicly approving an act of terror against the Paris-based Charlie Hebdo magazine, the courts press service told RAPSI on Tuesday.

After examining the appeal filed by the students defense, the Court refused to mitigate the sentence by the Moscow District Military Court passed in December of 2016.

As it has been established by the first-instance court, in January of 2015 Mosab placed photographs of the terrorists in the Charlie Hebdo massacre on his page with a social network with a statement of approval of their actions. Since the Paris incident had been recognized as an act of terror, the court found the student guilty of publicly approving terrorism, an offence punishable under the Russian Criminal code. Mosab had pleaded guilty.

On January 7, French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was attacked as two gunmen forced their way into the office of the magazine in Paris and opened fire, killing 12 and injuring 11.

Most of the victims worked at the magazine, including editors and nationally famous cartoonists Stphane Charbonnier (Charb), Jean Cabut (Cabu) and Georges Wolinski.

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Russian Supreme Court upholds sentence to student approving Charlie Hebdo massacre – RAPSI

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Study: Third of France’s Young Muslims Hold Fundamentalist Religious Views – Breitbart News

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The National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) study involved more than 7,000 students, aged between 14 and 16, who were studying at 21 schools and four academies in France.

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Sociologists who conducted the survey, Anne Muxel and Olivier Galland, stressed the sample is not representative of French youth as a whole.

The schools included in the study are located in poor areas, with overrepresentation in the student body of pupils from working class backgrounds (41 per cent), students with immigrant backgrounds (38 per cent), and Muslims (25 per cent).

The CNRS reported that 11 per cent of respondents overall adhere to religious fundamentalism, which rises to 32 per cent among Muslim youths.

Mr. Galland noted a striking difference between the figure compared with six per cent of Christians and 0.6 per cent of non-Muslims identified by the governmental research organisation as religious absolutists.

However, two-thirds of Muslims do not adhere to these ideas, the sociologist added.

On the topic of the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher Islamist terror attacks, which took place in Paris in 2015, 32 per cent of respondents would not fully condemn the actions.

Just under 25 per cent of the young people questioned said they consider certain violent and deviant behaviours legitimate (stealing a scooter, confronting the police, and taking violent action for ideological reasons).

A third of Muslim schoolchildren (33 per cent) defended such actions, compared to 20 per cent of Christians, and 22 per cent of pupils who declare themselves as irreligious.

44 per cent of the students who were both classed as having fundamentalist religious views and who said they tolerate some forms of violence said its acceptable in some cases in todays society to take up arms and fight for his religion.

70 per cent of this group do not condemn the perpetrators of the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher Islamist terror attacks.

The spread of radical ideas is around three times stronger among young Muslims than in the sample as a whole, said Mr. Galland.

But it is ultimately only a very small proportion: radical absolutism is far from being a majority amongst Muslims! the sociologist emphasised.

A purely economic explanation does not seem valid, said Mr. Gallard on the topic of identifying factors that increase a persons susceptibility to radical beliefs. Membership of the Islamic faith is the biggest predictive factor.

The CNRS also reports that secularism and gender equality were fairly widely recognised by respondents to the study, but noted that 64 per cent of Muslim respondents and pupils with an African background reject the idea that homosexuality is an acceptable lifestyle.

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Study: Third of France’s Young Muslims Hold Fundamentalist Religious Views – Breitbart News

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

US Bans Large Electronics on Flights From 10 Airports in Middle East and North Africa – Fortune

The Trump administration confirmed Tuesday it is imposing new restrictions on electronic devices carried by travelers coming to the United States from 10 airports mainly in the Middle East and North Africa in response to unspecified terror threats.

The Department of Homeland Security will require passengers coming to the United States from airports in Jordan, Egypt, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Morocco and Qatar to check electronic devices larger than a cell phone such as tablets, portable DVD players, laptops and cameras.

The airports affected are in Amman, Cairo, Kuwait City, Doha, Dubai, Istanbul, Abu Dhabi, Casablanca, Morocco; Riyadh and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Officials said the decision had nothing to do with President Donald Trump’s efforts to impose a travel ban of six majority-Muslim nations . A DHS spokeswoman said the government “did not target specific nations. We relied upon evaluated intelligence to determine which airports were affected.”

On March 6, Trump signed a revised executive order banning citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from traveling to the United States for 90 days. Two federal judges have halted parts of the ban, saying it discriminates against Muslims. Trump has vowed to appeal up to the Supreme Court if necessary.

All 10 airports are in majority-Muslim countries.

The airports are served by nine carriers that fly directly from those cities to the United States about 50 times a day and include Royal Jordanian Airlines, Egypt Air, Turkish Airlines, Saudi Arabian Airlines, Kuwait Airways, Royal Air Maroc, Qatar Airways, Emirates and Etihad Airways, senior government officials said.

The airlines have until Friday to comply with the new restrictions that will be in place indefinitely.

No American carriers were affected by the ban, because none fly directly to the United States from the airports, officials said. But it does apply to U.S. citizens traveling on those flights. It does not apply to crew members on those foreign carriers.

Officials did not explain why the restrictions only apply to travelers arriving in the United States and not for those same flights when they leave the United States.

DHS will also allow passengers to use larger approved medical devices. The agency said the procedures would “remain in place until the threat changes” and did not rule out expanding to other airports if circumstances changed.

DHS said in a statement it “seeks to balance risk with impacts to the traveling public and has determined that cell phones and smart phones will be allowed in accessible property at this time.”

The new restrictions were prompted by reports that terror groups want to smuggle explosive devices in consumer electronic devices, officials told reporters on a conference call Monday.

The government said in a statement it is “concerned about terrorists’ ongoing interest in targeting commercial aviation, including transportation hubs over the past two years.”

The group said “intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items.”

The government has been worried about terror groups attempting to bomb a commercial aircraft, but an official on the call repeatedly declined to offer any details about the threat that prompted the move.

Reuters reported Monday that the move had been under consideration since the U.S. government learned of a threat several weeks ago.

U.S. officials have told Reuters that the information gleaned from a U.S. commando raid in January in Yemen which targeted al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula included bomb-making techniques.

AQAP, based in Yemen, has plotted to down U.S. airliners and claimed responsibility for 2015 attacks on the office of Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris. AQAP also has boasted of the world’s most feared bomb makers, Ibrahim Hassan al-Asiri.

In 2010, security officials in Britain and Dubai intercepted parcel bombs being sent from Yemen to the United States.

The group claimed responsibility for a Dec. 25, 2009 failed attempt by a Nigerian Islamist to down an airliner over Detroit. The device, hidden in the underwear of the man, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, failed to detonate.

In July 2014, the Homeland Security Department stepped up security of U.S.-bound flights, requiring tougher screening of mobile phones and other electronic devices and requiring them to be powered up before passengers could board flights to the United States.

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US Bans Large Electronics on Flights From 10 Airports in Middle East and North Africa – Fortune

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

DAVE NEESE’S PROVOCATIONS: New Mafia: ‘fatwas’ instead of ‘hits’ – South Jersey Local News

Just out of curiosity, lets see what Google has to say about religious zealotry running amok.

Does it have any info on, say, mad Methodists rioting and rampaging over unflattering depictions of John Wesley?

Tap, tap, tap…..

Hmmm…. Nothing?

Nuthin.

Then maybe theres some info on, say, crazed Catholics donning suicide vests and detonating themselves in crowded marketplaces, retaliating against cartoons that mocked Pope Francis?

Tap, tap. tap…..

Hmmm…. Nothing again?

Nuthin.

Well then, type in Baptist reprisals. Baptists taking revenge on snide liberals for mocking them as toothless, hillbilly cretins right off the movie set of Deliverance. Whats that get?

Tap. tap, tap…..

Nope. Nothing.

Gosh, it seems the only way to get any Google hits on religion and violence is to type in Islam.

Is Google Islamophobic?

Maybe the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) should be tasked to look into this matter. Maybe the Great Satan xenophobe Donald Trump is behind this sinister phenomenon.

Hopefully, the New York Times is looking into this matter. If not, its major stockholder, Mexican oligarch and telecom monopolist Carlos Slim Helu, might want to exercise his clout and get the paper on the case.

This lopsided state of affairs stands out with a conspicuousness theres no denying. When it comes to examples of Islamic zealotry going berserk, a downpour of Google information practically rains from the sky. Why is that?

Meanwhile, theres nothing on, say, Presbyterian insurgents seizing a territorial enclave by military force and declaring it a universal

Presbytery, while beheading Quakers, burning Unitarians and such.

Alas, nary a single example. How can this possibly be?

Tap. tap, tap.

Wait! Heres something….maybe….. Its a case of anti-Semitic ranting. Maybe this is one of those alt-Right evangelical fundamentalist conservatives were constantly being warned about. Lets see….

Oh, darn! Sorry. False alarm.

This one turns out to involve a leading Egyptian Muslim cleric Dr. Essam Elruby and something he said on his popular TV show (Al-Hayat 2).

He said: No myth, Allah did indeed transform Israelis into pigs and apes as their punishment for acting sinfully and heretically, defying the path of Allah. (See Middle East Research Institute Memri.com for translation of Dr. Elrubys sermon.)

Maybe, then, it should come as no surprise to learn elsewhere from the Google information cornucopia that threats of violence and actual cases of violence abound under the topical heading of Islam.

Which brings us to the inevitable point where the boilerplate acknowledgement must be inserted: Not all Muslims take a supremicist, violent attitude regarding their faith. Most dont.

But except for a thankfully tiny cohort of knuckleheads, nobody takes the contrary position. And as for any who do and who act out their views in a threatening way, let them be dealt with as severely as the law allows. There.

That said, the real issue remains: A persistent and not insignificant number of Muslims clearly do take a menacing, us-or-them attitude regarding their faith.

This ugly reality forced public attention on itself in 1989 when the top Iranian cleric, much like an Islamic Don Vito Corleone, put out a fatwa a contract on British Indian author Salman Rushdie for insulting Islam in his novel, The Satanic Verses.

Issuing such fatwas soon became a sort of Islamist fad. Fatwas began to proliferate like hits in the halcyon of the Five Families

of New York.

As Paul Berman noted in his book, The Flight of the Intellectuals, the Rushdie fatwa metastasized into an entire social class of threatened targets people who survive only because of bodyguards…,because of their own precautions. Berman adds:

This is unprecedented in Western Europe since the fall of the Axis.

Fear mortal fear the fear of getting murdered by fanatics in the grip of a bizarre ideology has become, for significant numbers of intellectuals and artists, a simple fact of modern life.

Many of the intelligentsia of Europe and the United States, nevertheless, reserve their concern for the plight of Muslims. Muslims are perceived as historic victims of colonialism, now swamped by a rising tide of Islamophobia. Theyre cast in the role of latter-day minorities forced to use the gas stations drinking fountain set aside out back for the Colored.

Meanwhile, the list of infidels forced to arrange extraordinary security measures for themselves, or to take the extreme measure of going dark i.e., of disappearing under a new identity, became an ever-lengthening roster of names. The former category includes Somalia-born author Ayaa Hirsi Ali, the latter category American cartoonist Molly Norris.

Some infidels did not succeed in evading their fatwas or hits.

Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh, who made a documentary on Islamist misogyny, was gunned down by a Muslim fanatic on the streets of proudly tolerant Amsterdam.

A pages-long Islamic screed was affixed to Van Goghs body via a knife plunged into his chest. As if to confirm the point of the documentary, the screed included a warning to Hirsi. Her story of abuse under Islamic dogma had been featured in Van Goghs film.

Later, January 2015, the staff of the Paris satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo, came to a similarly bloody end 12 of them gunned down at work.

By then, the Islamist style of voicing disapproval had become firmly established.

In 2005 the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published cartoons satirizing Islamist violence. Again as if to confirm the point, Islamic violence erupted all over Europe. The death toll topped 200 before the Mohammedan mobs finally exhausted their deep reserves of rage.

Meanwhile, Dutch politician Geert Wilders has managed, so far, to dodge the depredations of Islams volunteer fatwa-enforcers. Amid a chorus of progressives urging an accommodationist policy toward Muslim immigrants, Wilders off-key rhetoric against the Islamization of Europe has given him an ascending political profile.

His name when mentioned in the U.S. or European press always comes with the warning label far right attached to it, signifying extreme danger. It was not, however, Wilders who holed up in a building in The Hague and, armed with grenades, kept a police siege at bay hour after hour one day in 2004.

The grenades were in the hands of Wilders would-be Islamic assassins. Wilders, a member of the Dutch House of Representatives and leader of the populist Party for Freedom, now lives under wary security measures, every hour of the day, every day of the year.

The ongoing Genovese-style contract on him literally calls for his head. It specifies not just his death but the means thereof decapitation. Wilders, a lapsed Catholic who lived for several years in Israel, continues to be the one portrayed as the public menace. For some eight months in 2009 he was banned from visiting the United Kingdom as a potential menace to the public peace and dignity thereof.

The ban and other Neville Chamberlain-like measures of appeasement have revealed European authorities to be as much attuned to Islamic sensitivities as to brutal Islamist agendas, despite the ongoing threats and mayhem in the name of Mohammad.

In liberal Denmark, authorities have launched a prosecution under a rarely invoked 1866 blasphemy law of a man who burned a copy of the Koran and posted a video of the act to his Facebook page.

Yes, a stupid act, you could say. It was, however, his own private copy of the Koran, and it was burned in his own private backyard.

Does anybody really believe there would be comparable prosecutorial zeal had the lit match been put to the Torah or New Testament instead?

Roger Kimball observed on PJMedia:

Ever since the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, the West has been increasingly successful in consigning religious violence to the dustbin of history. How strange, then, to find ourselves once again conjuring with demands for the reimposition of laws against blasphemy.

How strange indeed. How strange in the 21st Century Anno Domini,more than a half millennium removed from the heyday of theological squabbling and beheadings, that cries of blasphemy vie to provoke, or stay, the swing of the headsmans ax.

davidneese@verizon.net

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DAVE NEESE’S PROVOCATIONS: New Mafia: ‘fatwas’ instead of ‘hits’ – South Jersey Local News

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Timeline: France’s Three Years of Islamist Terror – Breitbart News

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The shooting is the latest attack in a country reeling from a wave of bloody assaults, including many claimed by the Islamic State group.

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Here is a recap of major assaults and foiled attempts since the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris in January 2015.

2015

January 7-9: Two men armed with Kalashnikov rifles storm the Paris offices of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo killing 12 people. A policewoman is killed just outside Paris the following day, while a gunman takes hostages at a Jewish supermarket, four of whom are killed. The attackers are killed in separate shootouts with police, but not before claiming allegiance to Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (IS).

February 3: A knife-wielding man attacks three soldiers guarding a Jewish community centre in Nice on the French Riviera. The 30-year-old assailant, Moussa Coulibaly, is arrested. In custody, he expresses his hatred for France, the police, the military and Jews.

April 19: Sid Ahmed Ghlam, an Algerian IT student, is arrested on suspicion of killing a woman who was found shot dead in her car, and of planning an attack on a church in the Paris suburb of Villejuif. Prosecutors say they found documents about Al-Qaeda and IS at his home, and that he had been in touch with a suspected jihadist in Syria about an attack on a church.

June 26: Frenchman Yassin Salhi, 35, kills and beheads his boss Herve Cornara and displays the severed head, surrounded by two Islamic flags, on the fence of a gas plant in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier in southeastern France. He tries to blow up the factory, but is arrested. He commits suicide in his jail cell in December.

July 13: Four men aged 16 to 23, including a former soldier, are arrested on charges of planning an attack on a military camp to behead an officer in the name of jihad. They proclaim allegiance to IS.

August 21: Passengers prevent a bloodbath on a high-speed Thalys train from Amsterdam to Paris, tackling a man who opened fire on travellers. He was armed with a Kalashnikov assault rifle, an automatic pistol and a box-cutter. The gunman is identified as 25-year-old Moroccan national Ayoub El Khazzani, known to intelligence services for links to radical Islam.

November 13: IS jihadists armed with assault rifles and explosives strike outside a France-Germany football match at the national stadium, Paris cafes, and the Bataclan concert hall in a coordinated assault that leaves 130 people dead and more than 350 wounded, the deadliest attack of its kind in French history.

2016

January 7: A man wielding a meat cleaver and carrying an IS emblem is shot dead as he tries to attack a police station in Paris. Convicted of theft in 2013, the man identified himself at the time as Moroccan- born Sallah Ali.

June 13: Larossi Abballa, 25, kills police officer Jean-Baptiste Salvaing, 42, and his partner, Jessica Schneider, 36, at their home in Magnanville, west of Paris. Salvaing is stabbed to death, while Schneiders throat is slit in front of their young son. Abballa is killed by a police SWAT team, but has already claimed the murders on social media in the name of the Islamic State group.

July 14: A truck ploughs through a crowd on Nices Promenade des Anglais after a Bastille Day fireworks display, killing 84 people and injuring over 330. The driver, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, 31, is shot dead by security forces. The IS claims responsibility.

July 26: Attackers slit the throat of a priest in a hostage-taking at his church in the Normandy town of Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray.

2017

February 3: a man armed with a machete in each hand attacks four soldiers on patrol at Pariss Louvre Museum, shouting Allah Akbar. The attacker, a 29-year-old Eyptian, was seriously injured.

March 18: A 39-year-old man was killed at Pariss Orly airport after attacking a soldier. The attacker shouted: I am ready to die for Allah, according to the Paris prosecutor, Francois Molins.

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Timeline: France’s Three Years of Islamist Terror – Breitbart News

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March 20, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Is France’s Operation Sentinelle working? – Sky News

Since the Charlie Hebdo attack in January 2015, the soldiers of Operation Sentinelle have become a familiar sight on the streets of France.

The military men and women routinely patrol art galleries, stations, mosques, schools, tourist sites, anywhere people might gather to protect them from terror attack.

Initially a force of 10,000 was deployed across the country but since September 2016 this has been reduced to 7,500.

Half of these are based in Paris – the remainder across the rest of the country.

It is a massive undertaking for the military – the number deployed accounts for around half of all French soldiers on operations.

A Sentinelle mission is two months with no leave. Soldiers receive a medal for “Protection of the Territory” after 60 days of service on the operation.

Operation Sentinelle has not been without criticism. Some do not like the presence of the heavily armed personnel on the streets.

There has been difficulty accommodating such a large force in the capital – some troops have been based in fire stations.

There have also been complaints about living standards, troops spending long periods of time away from their families and missing out on training.

One general has even suggested the operation has failed to deliver – it did not stop the marauding attacks in Paris which left 130 dead in November 2015, or the truck attack in Nice in July.

But the operation is unlikely to be scaled back while France remains in a state of emergency.

Instead, with every change in the terrorists’ tactics, the operation shifts its focus – from key buildings after Hebdo, to street patrols after the Paris attack, to large-scale gatherings after Nice.

It’s a risky job. In February 2015, three soldiers were attacked outside a Jewish Community Centre in Nice, in January 2016 a man drove a car into four soldiers outside a mosque in Valence, last month a man attacked four soldiers with a machete at the Louvre Museum.

In the latest attack, a woman was attacked while on patrol at Orly Airport in Paris.

The troops of Sentinelle may help to make the streets feel safer but their presence has also made them a target.

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Is France’s Operation Sentinelle working? – Sky News

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March 20, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

European Union tightens up gun restrictions – Guns.com

The European Union parliament voted to toughen Europes gun laws this week, closing loopholes said to have been exploited by terrorists in France.

The new revisions to the EU Firearms Directivewere passed on a 491-178 vote Tuesday and will require EU countries to implement tighter restrictions on firearms that fire blanks so those weapons cannot be easily manipulated into firing live rounds, New Europe reports.

The regulations will also add a permit requirement to the purchasing of any such blank-firing firearms.

Over the past 18 months I and colleagues across this Parliament have worked with many different stakeholders, as well as lawenforcement authorities,proof houses and legal experts, in order to protect the interests of legitimate owners whilst also addressing thesecurity issues, said Vicky Ford, Member of the European Parliament from the United Kingdom.

The Parliament text has mademany significant improvements, Ford continued. The changes that we have now agreed will close theloophole and be an important contribution to our security, whilst alsorespecting the rights of legal owners.

The so-called blank-firing acoustic firearms were converted to fire live ammo and used in the 2015 Charlie Hebdo terrorist attacks. Under the current law, they can be sold without licenses in some EU countries, but that is set to change under the revised directive.

The new rules also tighten restrictions on high-capacity semi-automatic weapons and automatic weapons that have been converted to semi-automatics.

Those who lawfullyown such weapons will be able to keep them as long as their member country agrees.

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European Union tightens up gun restrictions – Guns.com

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Cautious hope – The Indian Express

By: Editorial | Published:March 18, 2017 12:27 am Ruttes victory will have a domino effect across the continent is premature

The spectre haunting all of Europe of a far-right, nativist nationalism appears to have been stemmed in the Netherlands. Here, Prime Minister Mark Ruttes liberal, centre-right VVD has emerged as the single largest party, pushing the xenophobic, anti-EU Geert Wilderss Freedom Party to second place.

The Dutch election result is, of course, a welcome development for a liberal, integrated idea of Europe especially as it comes just before the French elections and the German elections later this year. However, assuming that Ruttes victory will have a domino effect across the continent is premature.

The Freedom Party has come in second, but it has gained three seats in the legislature. Wilders, like Marine Le Pens National Front in France and the AfD (Alternative for Germany), has helped mainstream fringe far-right ideas. The election of Donald Trump and Brexit have also given a greater political legitimacy to nativist populism. The centre has held its ground in the Netherlands, but only just. In France, repeated attacks from the Charlie Hebdo attack to the Christmas killings in Nice have strengthened the anti-Muslim, anti-migrant discourse. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been amongst the most vocal defenders of liberal ideas. While this has cemented her position globally, her stand on accepting refugees from West Asia has cost her political points at home.

Ruttes victory is proof of the fact that the far rights surge is neither inevitable nor unstoppable. The Netherlands poll-bound neighbours must take heart from it, but equally, be cautious of the portents from his rivals growth.

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Cautious hope – The Indian Express

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London attack Twitter tears analysed in Oz – NEWS.com.au

Europe was blanketed in sadness following the London terror attack, according to an Australian analytics tool monitoring emotional expression on Twitter across the globe. We Feel, built by CSIRO subset Data61, processes up to 45,000 tweets per minute to determine the various sentiments felt in each state and country in near real-time. British-born Khalid Masood on Wednesday mowed down multiple people in a car on London’s Westminster bridge, killing three and injuring scores more, before stabbing a police officer to death. Masood was later shot dead. We Feel logged the impact of the attack as it reverberated across Europe. Senior principal researcher at Data61, Dr Cecile Paris, says sadness hit a monthly peak. “We conjecture this is what happened,” she told AAP on Friday. “In Europe, for sadness, there has certainly been a peak in response to the attack.” A total of 397,363 tweets processed by the tool within 24 hours contained words associated with sadness. This was up by more than 80,000 on the previous day, and the second-highest peak of sadness expressed on Twitter in Europe in 2017. “When I was monitoring the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack in Paris, again I could see some more negative emotion coming out there,” Dr Paris said. “We also did see a situation around the Sydney siege.” The researcher said Twitter provides access to one per cent of public posts on its application and We Feel searches for expressive and reactionary tweets using a list of 500 “emotional” words. “We’re querying with words like sad, happy, angry, annoyed, ashamed,” she said. We Feel then sorts them into categories: love, joy, surprise, fear, anger, sadness and other. It showed a “statistically significant” peak of sadness worldwide when actor Robin Williams died in 2014, while there was “some joy” felt in Australia when Malcolm Turnbull won the federal election, Dr Paris said. Data gathered by the tool is publicly available and aims to assist mental health workers with intervention plans.

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Russian Supreme Court upholds sentence to student approving Charlie Hebdo massacre – RAPSI

17:45 21/03/2017 MOSCOW, March 21 (RAPSI) The Supreme Court of Russia had upheld the 2-year prison sentence given to Avaid Mosab, a Palestinian student in the Russian town of Belgorod, for publicly approving an act of terror against the Paris-based Charlie Hebdo magazine, the courts press service told RAPSI on Tuesday. After examining the appeal filed by the students defense, the Court refused to mitigate the sentence by the Moscow District Military Court passed in December of 2016. As it has been established by the first-instance court, in January of 2015 Mosab placed photographs of the terrorists in the Charlie Hebdo massacre on his page with a social network with a statement of approval of their actions. Since the Paris incident had been recognized as an act of terror, the court found the student guilty of publicly approving terrorism, an offence punishable under the Russian Criminal code. Mosab had pleaded guilty. On January 7, French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was attacked as two gunmen forced their way into the office of the magazine in Paris and opened fire, killing 12 and injuring 11. Most of the victims worked at the magazine, including editors and nationally famous cartoonists Stphane Charbonnier (Charb), Jean Cabut (Cabu) and Georges Wolinski.

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Study: Third of France’s Young Muslims Hold Fundamentalist Religious Views – Breitbart News

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER The National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) study involved more than 7,000 students, aged between 14 and 16, who were studying at 21 schools and four academies in France. SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Sociologists who conducted the survey, Anne Muxel and Olivier Galland, stressed the sample is not representative of French youth as a whole. The schools included in the study are located in poor areas, with overrepresentation in the student body of pupils from working class backgrounds (41 per cent), students with immigrant backgrounds (38 per cent), and Muslims (25 per cent). The CNRS reported that 11 per cent of respondents overall adhere to religious fundamentalism, which rises to 32 per cent among Muslim youths. Mr. Galland noted a striking difference between the figure compared with six per cent of Christians and 0.6 per cent of non-Muslims identified by the governmental research organisation as religious absolutists. However, two-thirds of Muslims do not adhere to these ideas, the sociologist added. On the topic of the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher Islamist terror attacks, which took place in Paris in 2015, 32 per cent of respondents would not fully condemn the actions. Just under 25 per cent of the young people questioned said they consider certain violent and deviant behaviours legitimate (stealing a scooter, confronting the police, and taking violent action for ideological reasons). A third of Muslim schoolchildren (33 per cent) defended such actions, compared to 20 per cent of Christians, and 22 per cent of pupils who declare themselves as irreligious. 44 per cent of the students who were both classed as having fundamentalist religious views and who said they tolerate some forms of violence said its acceptable in some cases in todays society to take up arms and fight for his religion. 70 per cent of this group do not condemn the perpetrators of the Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher Islamist terror attacks. The spread of radical ideas is around three times stronger among young Muslims than in the sample as a whole, said Mr. Galland. But it is ultimately only a very small proportion: radical absolutism is far from being a majority amongst Muslims! the sociologist emphasised. A purely economic explanation does not seem valid, said Mr. Gallard on the topic of identifying factors that increase a persons susceptibility to radical beliefs. Membership of the Islamic faith is the biggest predictive factor. The CNRS also reports that secularism and gender equality were fairly widely recognised by respondents to the study, but noted that 64 per cent of Muslim respondents and pupils with an African background reject the idea that homosexuality is an acceptable lifestyle.

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

US Bans Large Electronics on Flights From 10 Airports in Middle East and North Africa – Fortune

The Trump administration confirmed Tuesday it is imposing new restrictions on electronic devices carried by travelers coming to the United States from 10 airports mainly in the Middle East and North Africa in response to unspecified terror threats. The Department of Homeland Security will require passengers coming to the United States from airports in Jordan, Egypt, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Morocco and Qatar to check electronic devices larger than a cell phone such as tablets, portable DVD players, laptops and cameras. The airports affected are in Amman, Cairo, Kuwait City, Doha, Dubai, Istanbul, Abu Dhabi, Casablanca, Morocco; Riyadh and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Officials said the decision had nothing to do with President Donald Trump’s efforts to impose a travel ban of six majority-Muslim nations . A DHS spokeswoman said the government “did not target specific nations. We relied upon evaluated intelligence to determine which airports were affected.” On March 6, Trump signed a revised executive order banning citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from traveling to the United States for 90 days. Two federal judges have halted parts of the ban, saying it discriminates against Muslims. Trump has vowed to appeal up to the Supreme Court if necessary. All 10 airports are in majority-Muslim countries. The airports are served by nine carriers that fly directly from those cities to the United States about 50 times a day and include Royal Jordanian Airlines, Egypt Air, Turkish Airlines, Saudi Arabian Airlines, Kuwait Airways, Royal Air Maroc, Qatar Airways, Emirates and Etihad Airways, senior government officials said. The airlines have until Friday to comply with the new restrictions that will be in place indefinitely. No American carriers were affected by the ban, because none fly directly to the United States from the airports, officials said. But it does apply to U.S. citizens traveling on those flights. It does not apply to crew members on those foreign carriers. Officials did not explain why the restrictions only apply to travelers arriving in the United States and not for those same flights when they leave the United States. DHS will also allow passengers to use larger approved medical devices. The agency said the procedures would “remain in place until the threat changes” and did not rule out expanding to other airports if circumstances changed. DHS said in a statement it “seeks to balance risk with impacts to the traveling public and has determined that cell phones and smart phones will be allowed in accessible property at this time.” The new restrictions were prompted by reports that terror groups want to smuggle explosive devices in consumer electronic devices, officials told reporters on a conference call Monday. The government said in a statement it is “concerned about terrorists’ ongoing interest in targeting commercial aviation, including transportation hubs over the past two years.” The group said “intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items.” The government has been worried about terror groups attempting to bomb a commercial aircraft, but an official on the call repeatedly declined to offer any details about the threat that prompted the move. Reuters reported Monday that the move had been under consideration since the U.S. government learned of a threat several weeks ago. U.S. officials have told Reuters that the information gleaned from a U.S. commando raid in January in Yemen which targeted al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula included bomb-making techniques. AQAP, based in Yemen, has plotted to down U.S. airliners and claimed responsibility for 2015 attacks on the office of Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris. AQAP also has boasted of the world’s most feared bomb makers, Ibrahim Hassan al-Asiri. In 2010, security officials in Britain and Dubai intercepted parcel bombs being sent from Yemen to the United States. The group claimed responsibility for a Dec. 25, 2009 failed attempt by a Nigerian Islamist to down an airliner over Detroit. The device, hidden in the underwear of the man, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, failed to detonate. In July 2014, the Homeland Security Department stepped up security of U.S.-bound flights, requiring tougher screening of mobile phones and other electronic devices and requiring them to be powered up before passengers could board flights to the United States.

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

DAVE NEESE’S PROVOCATIONS: New Mafia: ‘fatwas’ instead of ‘hits’ – South Jersey Local News

Just out of curiosity, lets see what Google has to say about religious zealotry running amok. Does it have any info on, say, mad Methodists rioting and rampaging over unflattering depictions of John Wesley? Tap, tap, tap….. Hmmm…. Nothing? Nuthin. Then maybe theres some info on, say, crazed Catholics donning suicide vests and detonating themselves in crowded marketplaces, retaliating against cartoons that mocked Pope Francis? Tap, tap. tap….. Hmmm…. Nothing again? Nuthin. Well then, type in Baptist reprisals. Baptists taking revenge on snide liberals for mocking them as toothless, hillbilly cretins right off the movie set of Deliverance. Whats that get? Tap. tap, tap….. Nope. Nothing. Gosh, it seems the only way to get any Google hits on religion and violence is to type in Islam. Is Google Islamophobic? Maybe the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) should be tasked to look into this matter. Maybe the Great Satan xenophobe Donald Trump is behind this sinister phenomenon. Hopefully, the New York Times is looking into this matter. If not, its major stockholder, Mexican oligarch and telecom monopolist Carlos Slim Helu, might want to exercise his clout and get the paper on the case. This lopsided state of affairs stands out with a conspicuousness theres no denying. When it comes to examples of Islamic zealotry going berserk, a downpour of Google information practically rains from the sky. Why is that? Meanwhile, theres nothing on, say, Presbyterian insurgents seizing a territorial enclave by military force and declaring it a universal Presbytery, while beheading Quakers, burning Unitarians and such. Alas, nary a single example. How can this possibly be? Tap. tap, tap. Wait! Heres something….maybe….. Its a case of anti-Semitic ranting. Maybe this is one of those alt-Right evangelical fundamentalist conservatives were constantly being warned about. Lets see…. Oh, darn! Sorry. False alarm. This one turns out to involve a leading Egyptian Muslim cleric Dr. Essam Elruby and something he said on his popular TV show (Al-Hayat 2). He said: No myth, Allah did indeed transform Israelis into pigs and apes as their punishment for acting sinfully and heretically, defying the path of Allah. (See Middle East Research Institute Memri.com for translation of Dr. Elrubys sermon.) Maybe, then, it should come as no surprise to learn elsewhere from the Google information cornucopia that threats of violence and actual cases of violence abound under the topical heading of Islam. Which brings us to the inevitable point where the boilerplate acknowledgement must be inserted: Not all Muslims take a supremicist, violent attitude regarding their faith. Most dont. But except for a thankfully tiny cohort of knuckleheads, nobody takes the contrary position. And as for any who do and who act out their views in a threatening way, let them be dealt with as severely as the law allows. There. That said, the real issue remains: A persistent and not insignificant number of Muslims clearly do take a menacing, us-or-them attitude regarding their faith. This ugly reality forced public attention on itself in 1989 when the top Iranian cleric, much like an Islamic Don Vito Corleone, put out a fatwa a contract on British Indian author Salman Rushdie for insulting Islam in his novel, The Satanic Verses. Issuing such fatwas soon became a sort of Islamist fad. Fatwas began to proliferate like hits in the halcyon of the Five Families of New York. As Paul Berman noted in his book, The Flight of the Intellectuals, the Rushdie fatwa metastasized into an entire social class of threatened targets people who survive only because of bodyguards…,because of their own precautions. Berman adds: This is unprecedented in Western Europe since the fall of the Axis. Fear mortal fear the fear of getting murdered by fanatics in the grip of a bizarre ideology has become, for significant numbers of intellectuals and artists, a simple fact of modern life. Many of the intelligentsia of Europe and the United States, nevertheless, reserve their concern for the plight of Muslims. Muslims are perceived as historic victims of colonialism, now swamped by a rising tide of Islamophobia. Theyre cast in the role of latter-day minorities forced to use the gas stations drinking fountain set aside out back for the Colored. Meanwhile, the list of infidels forced to arrange extraordinary security measures for themselves, or to take the extreme measure of going dark i.e., of disappearing under a new identity, became an ever-lengthening roster of names. The former category includes Somalia-born author Ayaa Hirsi Ali, the latter category American cartoonist Molly Norris. Some infidels did not succeed in evading their fatwas or hits. Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh, who made a documentary on Islamist misogyny, was gunned down by a Muslim fanatic on the streets of proudly tolerant Amsterdam. A pages-long Islamic screed was affixed to Van Goghs body via a knife plunged into his chest. As if to confirm the point of the documentary, the screed included a warning to Hirsi. Her story of abuse under Islamic dogma had been featured in Van Goghs film. Later, January 2015, the staff of the Paris satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo, came to a similarly bloody end 12 of them gunned down at work. By then, the Islamist style of voicing disapproval had become firmly established. In 2005 the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published cartoons satirizing Islamist violence. Again as if to confirm the point, Islamic violence erupted all over Europe. The death toll topped 200 before the Mohammedan mobs finally exhausted their deep reserves of rage. Meanwhile, Dutch politician Geert Wilders has managed, so far, to dodge the depredations of Islams volunteer fatwa-enforcers. Amid a chorus of progressives urging an accommodationist policy toward Muslim immigrants, Wilders off-key rhetoric against the Islamization of Europe has given him an ascending political profile. His name when mentioned in the U.S. or European press always comes with the warning label far right attached to it, signifying extreme danger. It was not, however, Wilders who holed up in a building in The Hague and, armed with grenades, kept a police siege at bay hour after hour one day in 2004. The grenades were in the hands of Wilders would-be Islamic assassins. Wilders, a member of the Dutch House of Representatives and leader of the populist Party for Freedom, now lives under wary security measures, every hour of the day, every day of the year. The ongoing Genovese-style contract on him literally calls for his head. It specifies not just his death but the means thereof decapitation. Wilders, a lapsed Catholic who lived for several years in Israel, continues to be the one portrayed as the public menace. For some eight months in 2009 he was banned from visiting the United Kingdom as a potential menace to the public peace and dignity thereof. The ban and other Neville Chamberlain-like measures of appeasement have revealed European authorities to be as much attuned to Islamic sensitivities as to brutal Islamist agendas, despite the ongoing threats and mayhem in the name of Mohammad. In liberal Denmark, authorities have launched a prosecution under a rarely invoked 1866 blasphemy law of a man who burned a copy of the Koran and posted a video of the act to his Facebook page. Yes, a stupid act, you could say. It was, however, his own private copy of the Koran, and it was burned in his own private backyard. Does anybody really believe there would be comparable prosecutorial zeal had the lit match been put to the Torah or New Testament instead? Roger Kimball observed on PJMedia: Ever since the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, the West has been increasingly successful in consigning religious violence to the dustbin of history. How strange, then, to find ourselves once again conjuring with demands for the reimposition of laws against blasphemy. How strange indeed. How strange in the 21st Century Anno Domini,more than a half millennium removed from the heyday of theological squabbling and beheadings, that cries of blasphemy vie to provoke, or stay, the swing of the headsmans ax. davidneese@verizon.net

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March 22, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Timeline: France’s Three Years of Islamist Terror – Breitbart News

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER The shooting is the latest attack in a country reeling from a wave of bloody assaults, including many claimed by the Islamic State group. SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER Here is a recap of major assaults and foiled attempts since the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris in January 2015. 2015 January 7-9: Two men armed with Kalashnikov rifles storm the Paris offices of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo killing 12 people. A policewoman is killed just outside Paris the following day, while a gunman takes hostages at a Jewish supermarket, four of whom are killed. The attackers are killed in separate shootouts with police, but not before claiming allegiance to Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (IS). February 3: A knife-wielding man attacks three soldiers guarding a Jewish community centre in Nice on the French Riviera. The 30-year-old assailant, Moussa Coulibaly, is arrested. In custody, he expresses his hatred for France, the police, the military and Jews. April 19: Sid Ahmed Ghlam, an Algerian IT student, is arrested on suspicion of killing a woman who was found shot dead in her car, and of planning an attack on a church in the Paris suburb of Villejuif. Prosecutors say they found documents about Al-Qaeda and IS at his home, and that he had been in touch with a suspected jihadist in Syria about an attack on a church. June 26: Frenchman Yassin Salhi, 35, kills and beheads his boss Herve Cornara and displays the severed head, surrounded by two Islamic flags, on the fence of a gas plant in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier in southeastern France. He tries to blow up the factory, but is arrested. He commits suicide in his jail cell in December. July 13: Four men aged 16 to 23, including a former soldier, are arrested on charges of planning an attack on a military camp to behead an officer in the name of jihad. They proclaim allegiance to IS. August 21: Passengers prevent a bloodbath on a high-speed Thalys train from Amsterdam to Paris, tackling a man who opened fire on travellers. He was armed with a Kalashnikov assault rifle, an automatic pistol and a box-cutter. The gunman is identified as 25-year-old Moroccan national Ayoub El Khazzani, known to intelligence services for links to radical Islam. November 13: IS jihadists armed with assault rifles and explosives strike outside a France-Germany football match at the national stadium, Paris cafes, and the Bataclan concert hall in a coordinated assault that leaves 130 people dead and more than 350 wounded, the deadliest attack of its kind in French history. 2016 January 7: A man wielding a meat cleaver and carrying an IS emblem is shot dead as he tries to attack a police station in Paris. Convicted of theft in 2013, the man identified himself at the time as Moroccan- born Sallah Ali. June 13: Larossi Abballa, 25, kills police officer Jean-Baptiste Salvaing, 42, and his partner, Jessica Schneider, 36, at their home in Magnanville, west of Paris. Salvaing is stabbed to death, while Schneiders throat is slit in front of their young son. Abballa is killed by a police SWAT team, but has already claimed the murders on social media in the name of the Islamic State group. July 14: A truck ploughs through a crowd on Nices Promenade des Anglais after a Bastille Day fireworks display, killing 84 people and injuring over 330. The driver, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, 31, is shot dead by security forces. The IS claims responsibility. July 26: Attackers slit the throat of a priest in a hostage-taking at his church in the Normandy town of Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray. 2017 February 3: a man armed with a machete in each hand attacks four soldiers on patrol at Pariss Louvre Museum, shouting Allah Akbar. The attacker, a 29-year-old Eyptian, was seriously injured. March 18: A 39-year-old man was killed at Pariss Orly airport after attacking a soldier. The attacker shouted: I am ready to die for Allah, according to the Paris prosecutor, Francois Molins.

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March 20, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Is France’s Operation Sentinelle working? – Sky News

Since the Charlie Hebdo attack in January 2015, the soldiers of Operation Sentinelle have become a familiar sight on the streets of France. The military men and women routinely patrol art galleries, stations, mosques, schools, tourist sites, anywhere people might gather to protect them from terror attack. Initially a force of 10,000 was deployed across the country but since September 2016 this has been reduced to 7,500. Half of these are based in Paris – the remainder across the rest of the country. It is a massive undertaking for the military – the number deployed accounts for around half of all French soldiers on operations. A Sentinelle mission is two months with no leave. Soldiers receive a medal for “Protection of the Territory” after 60 days of service on the operation. Operation Sentinelle has not been without criticism. Some do not like the presence of the heavily armed personnel on the streets. There has been difficulty accommodating such a large force in the capital – some troops have been based in fire stations. There have also been complaints about living standards, troops spending long periods of time away from their families and missing out on training. One general has even suggested the operation has failed to deliver – it did not stop the marauding attacks in Paris which left 130 dead in November 2015, or the truck attack in Nice in July. But the operation is unlikely to be scaled back while France remains in a state of emergency. Instead, with every change in the terrorists’ tactics, the operation shifts its focus – from key buildings after Hebdo, to street patrols after the Paris attack, to large-scale gatherings after Nice. It’s a risky job. In February 2015, three soldiers were attacked outside a Jewish Community Centre in Nice, in January 2016 a man drove a car into four soldiers outside a mosque in Valence, last month a man attacked four soldiers with a machete at the Louvre Museum. In the latest attack, a woman was attacked while on patrol at Orly Airport in Paris. The troops of Sentinelle may help to make the streets feel safer but their presence has also made them a target.

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March 20, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

European Union tightens up gun restrictions – Guns.com

The European Union parliament voted to toughen Europes gun laws this week, closing loopholes said to have been exploited by terrorists in France. The new revisions to the EU Firearms Directivewere passed on a 491-178 vote Tuesday and will require EU countries to implement tighter restrictions on firearms that fire blanks so those weapons cannot be easily manipulated into firing live rounds, New Europe reports. The regulations will also add a permit requirement to the purchasing of any such blank-firing firearms. Over the past 18 months I and colleagues across this Parliament have worked with many different stakeholders, as well as lawenforcement authorities,proof houses and legal experts, in order to protect the interests of legitimate owners whilst also addressing thesecurity issues, said Vicky Ford, Member of the European Parliament from the United Kingdom. The Parliament text has mademany significant improvements, Ford continued. The changes that we have now agreed will close theloophole and be an important contribution to our security, whilst alsorespecting the rights of legal owners. The so-called blank-firing acoustic firearms were converted to fire live ammo and used in the 2015 Charlie Hebdo terrorist attacks. Under the current law, they can be sold without licenses in some EU countries, but that is set to change under the revised directive. The new rules also tighten restrictions on high-capacity semi-automatic weapons and automatic weapons that have been converted to semi-automatics. Those who lawfullyown such weapons will be able to keep them as long as their member country agrees.

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Cautious hope – The Indian Express

By: Editorial | Published:March 18, 2017 12:27 am Ruttes victory will have a domino effect across the continent is premature The spectre haunting all of Europe of a far-right, nativist nationalism appears to have been stemmed in the Netherlands. Here, Prime Minister Mark Ruttes liberal, centre-right VVD has emerged as the single largest party, pushing the xenophobic, anti-EU Geert Wilderss Freedom Party to second place. The Dutch election result is, of course, a welcome development for a liberal, integrated idea of Europe especially as it comes just before the French elections and the German elections later this year. However, assuming that Ruttes victory will have a domino effect across the continent is premature. The Freedom Party has come in second, but it has gained three seats in the legislature. Wilders, like Marine Le Pens National Front in France and the AfD (Alternative for Germany), has helped mainstream fringe far-right ideas. The election of Donald Trump and Brexit have also given a greater political legitimacy to nativist populism. The centre has held its ground in the Netherlands, but only just. In France, repeated attacks from the Charlie Hebdo attack to the Christmas killings in Nice have strengthened the anti-Muslim, anti-migrant discourse. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been amongst the most vocal defenders of liberal ideas. While this has cemented her position globally, her stand on accepting refugees from West Asia has cost her political points at home. Ruttes victory is proof of the fact that the far rights surge is neither inevitable nor unstoppable. The Netherlands poll-bound neighbours must take heart from it, but equally, be cautious of the portents from his rivals growth. For all the latest India News, download Indian Express App now

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed


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