Archive for the ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Category

Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine – Video



Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine
Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine Aklama. Alex Jones takes calls and hears from a caller who says he was told by someone in the know that at least one of the Charlie Hebdo shooters…

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Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine – Video

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3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec – Video



3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec
3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec 3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec 3 …

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Charlie Hebdo attack two gunmen firing shots – Video



Charlie Hebdo attack two gunmen firing shots
Footage taken from a rooftop in Paris shows two gunmen firing shotsThe police car's windscreen was riddled with bullets but the officers escaped unhurt.The black Citroen is thought to have…

By: Channel 58

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Charlie Hebdo attack two gunmen firing shots – Video

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Paris Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related …

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The Kosher supermarket targeted after Januarys attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reopened here Sunday amid heavy security.

We have reopened, Laurent Mimoun, one of Hyper Cacher supermarkets owners, said. It has been two months. As you can imagine we are thinking of the victims. Yesterday night when we were alone in the shop we were thinking of the victims. This was the motivation behind the reopening and we couldn’t wait to reopen and to rebuild what could be rebuilt – the physical things.

Inside, there was little sign of the carnage that left four people dead that day in January. The damage was repaired and a steady crowd of young and old lined up to buy groceries.

I am not afraid, Annie Boukobza, one of the shoppers, said as she purchased boxes of matzo.

We need to reflect on what happened. It was a tragic event. We are all close to what happened. We live here and now we are coming back to shop here again because this is where we used to come regularly and we are not afraid.

The attacks left four people dead at the market, in addition to a policewoman who was shot and 12 people killed at Charlie Hebdos office.

Outside the market, a memorial to the victims, flowers and faded signs, remains. One sign read, We are all Jews, We are all Police, We are all Charlie.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Paris Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related …

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How Charlie Brown Influenced ‘Charlie Hebdo’ The Atlantic

The French satirical weekly took its nameand morefrom Charles Schulz’ roundheaded hero.

A week after the massacre at the Paris offices of the magazine Charlie Hebdo, a story ran on the satirical website The Daily Currant:

A confused Sarah Palin appeared on Fox News this morning and blasted Islamic extremists for killing the cartoonists who draw the Charlie Brown comic strip: I just dont get why Muslims hate Charlie Brown so much, she proclaimed. Its good wholesome, family entertainment. I would think religious conservatives would enjoy that kind of thing. But I mean you just cant win with these people. Every little thing you do offends them. First it was burning the Quran Now its Snoopy, Lucy, Pigpen and the whole gang. Well guess what? I dont care if you dont like Snoopy … I can’t stand Dilbert. And don’t even get me started on The Boondocks. But that doesn’t mean I go round shootin’ up the place.

The funny thing is that there’s a kernel of truth within that bold mockery: Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine that two months ago lost nine of its employees in a terrorist attack, and Peanuts, the beloved American comic strip, have a deeper bond than might seem plausible. Indeed, Charlie Hebdo owes not only its very name, but an important piece of its heritage, to Charlie Brown. Yes, that Charlie Brown, the round-headed kid with the zig-zag shirt in Peanuts who says Rats! when things go wrong. In 1970, Peanuts was viewed as a daring enterprise, even to the bad boys who founded Charlie Hebdo, which may be why they featured the strip in the weeklys founding issue that same year.

Whatever could Charlie Brown and Charlie Hebdo have to do with each other? What could link Charles Schulz, the very definition of a cartoonist who hated provocation, with a publication whose very mission was to offend? And what could the editors of Charlie Hebdo, known for being bte et mchant (stupid and mean), ever have seen in Peanuts? I asked Caroline Fourest, a French activist and columnist who has written for Charlie Hebdo, who responded: I am sorry but I don’t understand. There is no link between Charlie Hebdo and Charlie Brown or Snoopy. Charlie Hebdo is a leftist satirical newspaper, antiracist and secularist. With texts and cartoons.

Charlie Brown, Feel-Good Edition? Good Grief

But there is a link. A quick search on the Web took me not to the early issues of Charlie Hebdo (French for Charlie Weekly), which started in 1970, but to Charlie Mensuel (Charlie Monthly), which began the year before. Charlie Mensuel featured many of the same cartoonists and writers as Charlie Hebdo (Cabu, Cavanna, Reiser, Willem, Wolinski) and plenty of cartoons by Schulz. In fact, the very first issue had Snoopy and his doghouse on the cover and a Peanuts strip inside.

Just to be clear, Charlie Mensuel (1969-1986) and Charlie Hebdo (1970-present) are two very different animals, even though they share much of the same blood. As Yve-Alain Bois, an art historian who grew up reading both magazines, has noted, Charlie Mensuel was a remarkable journal that published, among other things, a lot of historical cartoonsDick Tracy, Little Nemo, Li’l Abner, and Popeye among them. In the first issue, the editor, Delfeil de Ton, explained that Charlie Mensuel modeled itself on an Italian, all-comics magazine called Linus (named for another Peanuts character).Why a new journal? he asked: To make you laugh. But also, he wrote, to educate its readers, even to test them. The French public almost totally ignores Peanuts by Schulz … We will publish it every month. We’ll see if you’re as stupid as we have heard. So began Charlie Mensuel.

Charlie Hebdo, meanwhile, rose from the ashes of yet another magazine, Hara-Kiri Hebdo, a publication that was, Bois noted in an understatement, totally irreverent. When Hara-Kiri Hebdo was banned in 1970 for mocking the national outpouring of grief over the death of Charles de Gaulle (an impressive bit of sacrilege), its editors, cartoonists, and writers, many of whom also worked for Charlie Mensuel, took cover under a new name, Charlie Hebdo, while remaining as rude and crude as they had been at Hara-Kiri Hebdo. Although Peanuts wasnt on the cover of the first issue of Charlie Hebdo, it had a place of honor inside. As George Wolinski, one of the murdered cartoonists and an editor in chief at Charlie Mensuel, recalled in Liberation in 2000, For the first issue, which we had prepared in a hurry during the night, we insisted on a Peanuts strip.

The relationship between Charlie Brown and Charlie Mensuel was nevertheless an odd one. The first cover of Charlie Mensuel may have featured Snoopy snoozing on his doghouse, but by the second issue one could already sense the bawdy direction in which the magazine would be heading. Drawn by Al Capp, it features an orange seal, grinning. Look at it again, and you’ll see that it doubles as a smiling phallus. The next two covers featured cartoons by SchulzLinus with his security blanket, Charlie Brown with a valentine. But by the sixth cover, it was back to bawd: Wolinski, maker of many dirty pictures, drew the face of a smiling man with a tiny, scantily clad lady riding on his nose.

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How Charlie Brown Influenced ‘Charlie Hebdo’ The Atlantic

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Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related Killings

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The Kosher supermarket targeted after Januarys attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reopened here Sunday amid heavy security.

We have reopened, Laurent Mimoun, one of Hyper Cacher supermarkets owners, said. It has been two months. As you can imagine we are thinking of the victims. Yesterday night when we were alone in the shop we were thinking of the victims. This was the motivation behind the reopening and we couldn’t wait to reopen and to rebuild what could be rebuilt – the physical things.

Inside, there was little sign of the carnage that left four people dead that day in January. The damage was repaired and a steady crowd of young and old lined up to buy groceries.

I am not afraid, Annie Boukobza, one of the shoppers, said as she purchased boxes of matzo.

We need to reflect on what happened. It was a tragic event. We are all close to what happened. We live here and now we are coming back to shop here again because this is where we used to come regularly and we are not afraid.

The attacks left four people dead at the market, in addition to a policewoman who was shot and 12 people killed at Charlie Hebdos office.

Outside the market, a memorial to the victims, flowers and faded signs, remains. One sign read, We are all Jews, We are all Police, We are all Charlie.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related Killings

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Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims

TIME World France Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims Kenzo TribouillardAFP/Getty Images A picture taken on March 14, 2015, shows the original drawing of the Asterix comic book Les Lauriers de Csar (Asterix and the Laurel Wreath), displayed at Christie’s auction house in Paris Christie’s auction house also waived its commission

The original artwork for an Asterix cartoon from the 1970s was auctioned for more than $150,000 on Sunday, with proceeds going to victims of Januarys attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

The cartoon panels from the iconic comic-book series bore a special dedication from co-creator Albert Uderzo, the BBC reported.

Uderzo, 87, briefly came out of retirement earlier this year to draw two tributes to the 12 victims of the attack on Charlie Hebdos offices in Paris, where two gunmen opened fire on Jan. 7 over the magazines publication of cartoons lampooning the Prophet Mohammed.

Auction house Christies reportedly waived its commission for the sale of the artwork, which comes from the 1971 comic Asterix and the Laurel Wreath.

[BBC]

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Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims

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Charlie Hebdo attack: France police hunt accomplices – Video



Charlie Hebdo attack: France police hunt accomplices
For more Latest and Breaking News Headline SUBSCRIBE: – CHARLIE HEBDO ATTACK FRENCH POLICE HUNT accomplices WORLD NEWS 2015 TAG. One key figure is Hayat Boumeddiene, the …

By: Pime Vecu

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Charlie Hebdo attack: France police hunt accomplices – Video

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Une chanson en hommage Charlie Hebdo – Video



Une chanson en hommage Charlie Hebdo
Mon hommage aux victimes des attentats qui ont secou la France entre le 7 et le 9 janvier 2015. Luz a dit pendant l'enterrement de Charb ” Vous tes Charlie alors prouvez le !!! “. Moi…

By: Benoit M

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Une chanson en hommage Charlie Hebdo – Video

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Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine – Video




Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine Hundreds Protest Shooting at Paris Magazine Aklama. Alex Jones takes calls and hears from a caller who says he was told by someone in the know that at least one of the Charlie Hebdo shooters… By: Marine Remedios

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3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec – Video




3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec 3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec 3 TERRORISTS DEAD -hostage death toll Police at Paris market – Charlie Hebdo terror suspec 3 … By: ada arac

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Charlie Hebdo attack two gunmen firing shots – Video




Charlie Hebdo attack two gunmen firing shots Footage taken from a rooftop in Paris shows two gunmen firing shotsThe police car's windscreen was riddled with bullets but the officers escaped unhurt.The black Citroen is thought to have… By: Channel 58

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Paris Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related …

World News Videos | US News VideosCopy The Kosher supermarket targeted after Januarys attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reopened here Sunday amid heavy security. We have reopened, Laurent Mimoun, one of Hyper Cacher supermarkets owners, said. It has been two months. As you can imagine we are thinking of the victims. Yesterday night when we were alone in the shop we were thinking of the victims. This was the motivation behind the reopening and we couldn’t wait to reopen and to rebuild what could be rebuilt – the physical things. Inside, there was little sign of the carnage that left four people dead that day in January. The damage was repaired and a steady crowd of young and old lined up to buy groceries. I am not afraid, Annie Boukobza, one of the shoppers, said as she purchased boxes of matzo. We need to reflect on what happened. It was a tragic event. We are all close to what happened. We live here and now we are coming back to shop here again because this is where we used to come regularly and we are not afraid. The attacks left four people dead at the market, in addition to a policewoman who was shot and 12 people killed at Charlie Hebdos office. Outside the market, a memorial to the victims, flowers and faded signs, remains. One sign read, We are all Jews, We are all Police, We are all Charlie. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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March 16, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

How Charlie Brown Influenced ‘Charlie Hebdo’ The Atlantic

The French satirical weekly took its nameand morefrom Charles Schulz’ roundheaded hero. A week after the massacre at the Paris offices of the magazine Charlie Hebdo, a story ran on the satirical website The Daily Currant: A confused Sarah Palin appeared on Fox News this morning and blasted Islamic extremists for killing the cartoonists who draw the Charlie Brown comic strip: I just dont get why Muslims hate Charlie Brown so much, she proclaimed. Its good wholesome, family entertainment. I would think religious conservatives would enjoy that kind of thing. But I mean you just cant win with these people. Every little thing you do offends them. First it was burning the Quran Now its Snoopy, Lucy, Pigpen and the whole gang. Well guess what? I dont care if you dont like Snoopy … I can’t stand Dilbert. And don’t even get me started on The Boondocks. But that doesn’t mean I go round shootin’ up the place. The funny thing is that there’s a kernel of truth within that bold mockery: Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine that two months ago lost nine of its employees in a terrorist attack, and Peanuts, the beloved American comic strip, have a deeper bond than might seem plausible. Indeed, Charlie Hebdo owes not only its very name, but an important piece of its heritage, to Charlie Brown. Yes, that Charlie Brown, the round-headed kid with the zig-zag shirt in Peanuts who says Rats! when things go wrong. In 1970, Peanuts was viewed as a daring enterprise, even to the bad boys who founded Charlie Hebdo, which may be why they featured the strip in the weeklys founding issue that same year. Whatever could Charlie Brown and Charlie Hebdo have to do with each other? What could link Charles Schulz, the very definition of a cartoonist who hated provocation, with a publication whose very mission was to offend? And what could the editors of Charlie Hebdo, known for being bte et mchant (stupid and mean), ever have seen in Peanuts? I asked Caroline Fourest, a French activist and columnist who has written for Charlie Hebdo, who responded: I am sorry but I don’t understand. There is no link between Charlie Hebdo and Charlie Brown or Snoopy. Charlie Hebdo is a leftist satirical newspaper, antiracist and secularist. With texts and cartoons. Charlie Brown, Feel-Good Edition? Good Grief But there is a link. A quick search on the Web took me not to the early issues of Charlie Hebdo (French for Charlie Weekly), which started in 1970, but to Charlie Mensuel (Charlie Monthly), which began the year before. Charlie Mensuel featured many of the same cartoonists and writers as Charlie Hebdo (Cabu, Cavanna, Reiser, Willem, Wolinski) and plenty of cartoons by Schulz. In fact, the very first issue had Snoopy and his doghouse on the cover and a Peanuts strip inside. Just to be clear, Charlie Mensuel (1969-1986) and Charlie Hebdo (1970-present) are two very different animals, even though they share much of the same blood. As Yve-Alain Bois, an art historian who grew up reading both magazines, has noted, Charlie Mensuel was a remarkable journal that published, among other things, a lot of historical cartoonsDick Tracy, Little Nemo, Li’l Abner, and Popeye among them. In the first issue, the editor, Delfeil de Ton, explained that Charlie Mensuel modeled itself on an Italian, all-comics magazine called Linus (named for another Peanuts character).Why a new journal? he asked: To make you laugh. But also, he wrote, to educate its readers, even to test them. The French public almost totally ignores Peanuts by Schulz … We will publish it every month. We’ll see if you’re as stupid as we have heard. So began Charlie Mensuel. Charlie Hebdo, meanwhile, rose from the ashes of yet another magazine, Hara-Kiri Hebdo, a publication that was, Bois noted in an understatement, totally irreverent. When Hara-Kiri Hebdo was banned in 1970 for mocking the national outpouring of grief over the death of Charles de Gaulle (an impressive bit of sacrilege), its editors, cartoonists, and writers, many of whom also worked for Charlie Mensuel, took cover under a new name, Charlie Hebdo, while remaining as rude and crude as they had been at Hara-Kiri Hebdo. Although Peanuts wasnt on the cover of the first issue of Charlie Hebdo, it had a place of honor inside. As George Wolinski, one of the murdered cartoonists and an editor in chief at Charlie Mensuel, recalled in Liberation in 2000, For the first issue, which we had prepared in a hurry during the night, we insisted on a Peanuts strip. The relationship between Charlie Brown and Charlie Mensuel was nevertheless an odd one. The first cover of Charlie Mensuel may have featured Snoopy snoozing on his doghouse, but by the second issue one could already sense the bawdy direction in which the magazine would be heading. Drawn by Al Capp, it features an orange seal, grinning. Look at it again, and you’ll see that it doubles as a smiling phallus. The next two covers featured cartoons by SchulzLinus with his security blanket, Charlie Brown with a valentine. But by the sixth cover, it was back to bawd: Wolinski, maker of many dirty pictures, drew the face of a smiling man with a tiny, scantily clad lady riding on his nose.

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Kosher Market Reopens After Charlie Hebdo-Related Killings

World News Videos | US News VideosCopy The Kosher supermarket targeted after Januarys attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reopened here Sunday amid heavy security. We have reopened, Laurent Mimoun, one of Hyper Cacher supermarkets owners, said. It has been two months. As you can imagine we are thinking of the victims. Yesterday night when we were alone in the shop we were thinking of the victims. This was the motivation behind the reopening and we couldn’t wait to reopen and to rebuild what could be rebuilt – the physical things. Inside, there was little sign of the carnage that left four people dead that day in January. The damage was repaired and a steady crowd of young and old lined up to buy groceries. I am not afraid, Annie Boukobza, one of the shoppers, said as she purchased boxes of matzo. We need to reflect on what happened. It was a tragic event. We are all close to what happened. We live here and now we are coming back to shop here again because this is where we used to come regularly and we are not afraid. The attacks left four people dead at the market, in addition to a policewoman who was shot and 12 people killed at Charlie Hebdos office. Outside the market, a memorial to the victims, flowers and faded signs, remains. One sign read, We are all Jews, We are all Police, We are all Charlie. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims

TIME World France Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims Kenzo TribouillardAFP/Getty Images A picture taken on March 14, 2015, shows the original drawing of the Asterix comic book Les Lauriers de Csar (Asterix and the Laurel Wreath), displayed at Christie’s auction house in Paris Christie’s auction house also waived its commission The original artwork for an Asterix cartoon from the 1970s was auctioned for more than $150,000 on Sunday, with proceeds going to victims of Januarys attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. The cartoon panels from the iconic comic-book series bore a special dedication from co-creator Albert Uderzo, the BBC reported. Uderzo, 87, briefly came out of retirement earlier this year to draw two tributes to the 12 victims of the attack on Charlie Hebdos offices in Paris, where two gunmen opened fire on Jan. 7 over the magazines publication of cartoons lampooning the Prophet Mohammed. Auction house Christies reportedly waived its commission for the sale of the artwork, which comes from the 1971 comic Asterix and the Laurel Wreath. [BBC]

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Charlie Hebdo attack: France police hunt accomplices – Video




Charlie Hebdo attack: France police hunt accomplices For more Latest and Breaking News Headline SUBSCRIBE: – CHARLIE HEBDO ATTACK FRENCH POLICE HUNT accomplices WORLD NEWS 2015 TAG. One key figure is Hayat Boumeddiene, the … By: Pime Vecu

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March 13, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Une chanson en hommage Charlie Hebdo – Video




Une chanson en hommage Charlie Hebdo Mon hommage aux victimes des attentats qui ont secou la France entre le 7 et le 9 janvier 2015. Luz a dit pendant l'enterrement de Charb ” Vous tes Charlie alors prouvez le !!! “. Moi… By: Benoit M

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March 12, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed


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