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Charlie Hebdo Cartoonist Who Survived Attack Tweets …

The Charlie Hebdo cartoonist who entered the security code to allow the attackers into the office after they threatened her young daughter has posted a message to both her supporters and her slain colleagues on .

Corinne Rey, who uses the pen name “CoCo,” posted several photos of members of the editorial staff who died in Wednesday’s attack.

She also posted a message directly to the supporters of the satirical newspaper.

“Thank you for your hundreds of messages. Your support. Your affection. We will recover. Come out to demonstrate on Sunday. Thank you,” she wrote, referencing a planned march this weekend.

One of the three photos she posted shows her former boss Stephane “Charb” Charbonnier signing one of his books.

The message, written in French, says: “Neither god nor master … I miss you so much. It remains standing.”

The photo shows Charb drawing on the title page of one of his books, which was titled “Neither God Nor Master!”

The “it” she refers to in her tweet is likely the magazine that was so dear to the editorial team. The remaining staffers have confirmed that they will be putting out an issue on Monday, just five days after the attack that left nine cartoonists and contributors dead, along with the building’s doorman, a police officer and a body guard who had been ordered to protect Charbonnier.

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Charlie Hebdo Cartoonist Who Survived Attack Tweets …

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January 13, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammed on its cover

PARIS (CNNMoney)

Chosen by Charlie Hebdo’s editors on Monday night, the cover was quickly revealed by Liberation, the French newspaper that is sharing its office space with staffers from the satirical magazine. A wide swath of French media outlets have already republished the cover in a show of solidarity.

The chosen cartoon shows Mohammed holding up a sign that says “Je Suis Charlie,” the now-famous slogan that became a rallying cry after 12 people were killed at the magazine’s offices on January 7.

The cover illustration also includes the words “All is Forgiven” — a message that is open to interpretation.

Liberation’s news story about the cover said it was specifically meant to depict Mohammed — a strict taboo within Islam. Many Muslims find depictions of the prophet to be deeply offensive, and there has been speculation that last week’s attackers were motivated in part by past Charlie Hebdo cartoons.

At a press conference on Tuesday, the magazine’s top editor said deciding how to do the cover was “complicated.”

“It had to say something about us, and it had to say something about the event with which we were confronted,” said editor in chief Gerard Briard.

Cartoonist Renald Luzier said he felt “catharsis” after drawing the cartoon on Thursday evening, a day after the attack.

“I didn’t know if it was going to be possible for me to draw, quite honestly.”

Luzier was quite emotional at the press conference, at one point pausing for several seconds as he regained his composure.

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Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammed on its cover

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Charlie Hebdo massacre shows clash of globalization and ideologies raises stakes for satirists

FILE – In this file photo dated Dec. 11, 1991, security guards surround author Salman Rushdie, left, as he addresses an audience at Columbia University’s Low Library, in his first public appearance outside of England since Iran issued a fatwa calling for his death over his novel “The Satanic Verses.” The slaughter of ten journalists and two policemen on Jan. 7, 2015, at the offices of satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo that mocked politicians and prelates with equal glee is grim evidence that humor can be dangerous, another bloody chapter in a story that stretches back to Rushdie’s 1988 novel “The Satanic Verses,” whose comic take on the prophet drew a death edict from Iran’s religious authorities. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, FILE)(The Associated Press)

FILE- In this file photo dated Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, the covered body of Theo van Gogh is seen at left while forensic experts investigate the scene of his murder in Amsterdam, after filmmaker Van Gogh received death threats after making a movie criticizing the treatment of women under Islam. A Muslim fanatic angered by the documentarist’s depiction of Islam is just one incident in the clash of cultures which erupted with the slaughter of ten journalists and two policemen on Jan. 7, 2015, at the offices of satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo that mocked politicians and prelates with equal glee. (AP Photos/Eran Oppenheimer, FILE) NETHERLANDS OUT(The Associated Press)

LONDON These are dark days for those who want to believe that the pen is mightier than the sword.

The attack on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo has caused grief and soul-searching around the world, and exposed the risks humorists can run only intensified in an era of instant global communications where starkly opposed ideologies can collide.

British cartoonist Gerald Scarfe expressed his anguish in the Sunday Times newspaper with the image of a sword slicing off a hand holding a pen. In the Sunday Telegraph, Bob Moran depicted a cartoonist in full body armor under the slogan “Keep Calm and Carry On.”

For centuries, satirical stories and cartoons have mocked the powerful and sacred in the societies that produced them. Often they drew a harsh reaction. Offending an absolute monarch could mean death. Well into the 20th century, comedians from Lenny Bruce to the editors of British magazine Oz were prosecuted for offending society’s sensibilities.

Today, societies in countries like France are more diverse than ever before. Once overwhelmingly Catholic, France is a now an officially secular country with 5 million Muslims, about 7.5 percent of the population. There’s less consensus on what’s taboo and where the boundaries of taste and offense lie.

And now that words and images move around the world at the click of a mouse, there more chance for provocative humor to collide with rigid ideas, whether Islamic fundamentalism or North Korean communism.

When comedian Seth Rogen and his collaborators chose the imagined assassination of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, who presides over one of the world’s most isolated countries, as the plot of slacker comedy “The Interview,” the distant leader took offense. North Korea condemned the movie as an “unpardonable mockery of our sovereignty and dignity of our supreme leader.” There were threats against U.S. movie theaters, and Sony was hit by a cyberattack that spilled sensitive commercial data and embarrassing emails across the Internet. (U.S. authorities have blamed North Korea for the hack, though some cybersecurity experts have their doubts).

Charlie Hebdo springs from a French satirical tradition that reaches back to the republic’s revolutionary roots: rude, scabrous, an enemy of power and piety. Its targets have included popes, politicians and the Prophet Muhammad. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous; Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons could be deliberately crude and outrageous, once showing Muhammad as a star in a porn shoot.

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Charlie Hebdo massacre shows clash of globalization and ideologies raises stakes for satirists

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Charlie Hebdo puts Muhammad cartoon on its next cover

Employees from the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo meet in the offices of the left-wing daily Libration in Paris. Two days after the attacks by terrorists on the weekly, the newspapers remaining staff members gathered to build the next issue while still in shock. Photograph: Bertrand Guay/Pool

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover of its first issue since Islamic extremists killed 12 people at its offices.

The newspaper Libration hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special million-copy print run in numerous languages.

Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late last night, ahead of the satirical magazines publication tomorrow.

Up to three million copies are believed to have been printed ahead of tomorrows publication date well up from its usual run of 60,000.

The cartoon shows a bearded man in a white turban with a tear streaming down his cheek, and holding a sign reading Je suis Charlie (I am Charlie). Overhead was the phrase Tout est Pardonn (All is Forgiven), which French media interpreted as meaning Muhammad is forgiving the cartoonists for lampooning him.

Charlie Hebdos past caricatures of the Muslim prophet appear to have prompted last weeks attacks, part of the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades.

Some witnesses reported that the attackers at the papers offices shouted: We have avenged the prophet. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous.

Earlier, Charlie Hebdo lawyer Richard Malka told French radio that the new issue would obviously feature cartoons of Muhammad.

Three days of violence ended on Friday with a siege at a Jewish deli in Paris where four hostages and a gunman were killed. Shortly before that, police killed the Charlie Hebdo attackers in a separate gun battle at a print works northwest of the city.

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Charlie Hebdo puts Muhammad cartoon on its next cover

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Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammad cartoon on its next cover

Employees from the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo meet in the offices of the left-wing daily Libration in Paris. Two days after the attacks by terrorists on the weekly, the newspapers remaining staff members gathered to build the next issue while still in shock. Photograph: Bertrand Guay/Pool

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover of its first issue since Islamic extremists killed 12 people at its offices.

The newspaper Libration hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special million-copy print run in numerous languages.

Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late last night, ahead of the satirical magazines publication tomorrow.

Up to three million copies are believed to have been printed ahead of tomorrows publication date well up from its usual run of 60,000.

The cartoon shows a bearded man in a white turban with a tear streaming down his cheek, and holding a sign reading Je suis Charlie (I am Charlie). Overhead was the phrase Tout est Pardonn (All is Forgiven), which French media interpreted as meaning Muhammad is forgiving the cartoonists for lampooning him.

Charlie Hebdos past caricatures of the Muslim prophet appear to have prompted last weeks attacks, part of the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades.

Some witnesses reported that the attackers at the papers offices shouted: We have avenged the prophet. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous.

Earlier, Charlie Hebdo lawyer Richard Malka told French radio that the new issue would obviously feature cartoons of Muhammad.

Three days of violence ended on Friday with a siege at a Jewish deli in Paris where four hostages and a gunman were killed. Shortly before that, police killed the Charlie Hebdo attackers in a separate gun battle at a print works northwest of the city.

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Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammad cartoon on its next cover

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Charlie Hebdo Cartoonist Who Survived Attack Tweets …

The Charlie Hebdo cartoonist who entered the security code to allow the attackers into the office after they threatened her young daughter has posted a message to both her supporters and her slain colleagues on . Corinne Rey, who uses the pen name “CoCo,” posted several photos of members of the editorial staff who died in Wednesday’s attack. She also posted a message directly to the supporters of the satirical newspaper. “Thank you for your hundreds of messages. Your support. Your affection. We will recover. Come out to demonstrate on Sunday. Thank you,” she wrote, referencing a planned march this weekend. One of the three photos she posted shows her former boss Stephane “Charb” Charbonnier signing one of his books. The message, written in French, says: “Neither god nor master … I miss you so much. It remains standing.” The photo shows Charb drawing on the title page of one of his books, which was titled “Neither God Nor Master!” The “it” she refers to in her tweet is likely the magazine that was so dear to the editorial team. The remaining staffers have confirmed that they will be putting out an issue on Monday, just five days after the attack that left nine cartoonists and contributors dead, along with the building’s doorman, a police officer and a body guard who had been ordered to protect Charbonnier.

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January 13, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammed on its cover

PARIS (CNNMoney) Chosen by Charlie Hebdo’s editors on Monday night, the cover was quickly revealed by Liberation, the French newspaper that is sharing its office space with staffers from the satirical magazine. A wide swath of French media outlets have already republished the cover in a show of solidarity. The chosen cartoon shows Mohammed holding up a sign that says “Je Suis Charlie,” the now-famous slogan that became a rallying cry after 12 people were killed at the magazine’s offices on January 7. The cover illustration also includes the words “All is Forgiven” — a message that is open to interpretation. Liberation’s news story about the cover said it was specifically meant to depict Mohammed — a strict taboo within Islam. Many Muslims find depictions of the prophet to be deeply offensive, and there has been speculation that last week’s attackers were motivated in part by past Charlie Hebdo cartoons. At a press conference on Tuesday, the magazine’s top editor said deciding how to do the cover was “complicated.” “It had to say something about us, and it had to say something about the event with which we were confronted,” said editor in chief Gerard Briard. Cartoonist Renald Luzier said he felt “catharsis” after drawing the cartoon on Thursday evening, a day after the attack. “I didn’t know if it was going to be possible for me to draw, quite honestly.” Luzier was quite emotional at the press conference, at one point pausing for several seconds as he regained his composure.

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Charlie Hebdo massacre shows clash of globalization and ideologies raises stakes for satirists

FILE – In this file photo dated Dec. 11, 1991, security guards surround author Salman Rushdie, left, as he addresses an audience at Columbia University’s Low Library, in his first public appearance outside of England since Iran issued a fatwa calling for his death over his novel “The Satanic Verses.” The slaughter of ten journalists and two policemen on Jan. 7, 2015, at the offices of satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo that mocked politicians and prelates with equal glee is grim evidence that humor can be dangerous, another bloody chapter in a story that stretches back to Rushdie’s 1988 novel “The Satanic Verses,” whose comic take on the prophet drew a death edict from Iran’s religious authorities. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, FILE)(The Associated Press) FILE- In this file photo dated Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, the covered body of Theo van Gogh is seen at left while forensic experts investigate the scene of his murder in Amsterdam, after filmmaker Van Gogh received death threats after making a movie criticizing the treatment of women under Islam. A Muslim fanatic angered by the documentarist’s depiction of Islam is just one incident in the clash of cultures which erupted with the slaughter of ten journalists and two policemen on Jan. 7, 2015, at the offices of satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo that mocked politicians and prelates with equal glee. (AP Photos/Eran Oppenheimer, FILE) NETHERLANDS OUT(The Associated Press) LONDON These are dark days for those who want to believe that the pen is mightier than the sword. The attack on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo has caused grief and soul-searching around the world, and exposed the risks humorists can run only intensified in an era of instant global communications where starkly opposed ideologies can collide. British cartoonist Gerald Scarfe expressed his anguish in the Sunday Times newspaper with the image of a sword slicing off a hand holding a pen. In the Sunday Telegraph, Bob Moran depicted a cartoonist in full body armor under the slogan “Keep Calm and Carry On.” For centuries, satirical stories and cartoons have mocked the powerful and sacred in the societies that produced them. Often they drew a harsh reaction. Offending an absolute monarch could mean death. Well into the 20th century, comedians from Lenny Bruce to the editors of British magazine Oz were prosecuted for offending society’s sensibilities. Today, societies in countries like France are more diverse than ever before. Once overwhelmingly Catholic, France is a now an officially secular country with 5 million Muslims, about 7.5 percent of the population. There’s less consensus on what’s taboo and where the boundaries of taste and offense lie. And now that words and images move around the world at the click of a mouse, there more chance for provocative humor to collide with rigid ideas, whether Islamic fundamentalism or North Korean communism. When comedian Seth Rogen and his collaborators chose the imagined assassination of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, who presides over one of the world’s most isolated countries, as the plot of slacker comedy “The Interview,” the distant leader took offense. North Korea condemned the movie as an “unpardonable mockery of our sovereignty and dignity of our supreme leader.” There were threats against U.S. movie theaters, and Sony was hit by a cyberattack that spilled sensitive commercial data and embarrassing emails across the Internet. (U.S. authorities have blamed North Korea for the hack, though some cybersecurity experts have their doubts). Charlie Hebdo springs from a French satirical tradition that reaches back to the republic’s revolutionary roots: rude, scabrous, an enemy of power and piety. Its targets have included popes, politicians and the Prophet Muhammad. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous; Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons could be deliberately crude and outrageous, once showing Muhammad as a star in a porn shoot.

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Charlie Hebdo puts Muhammad cartoon on its next cover

Employees from the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo meet in the offices of the left-wing daily Libration in Paris. Two days after the attacks by terrorists on the weekly, the newspapers remaining staff members gathered to build the next issue while still in shock. Photograph: Bertrand Guay/Pool French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover of its first issue since Islamic extremists killed 12 people at its offices. The newspaper Libration hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special million-copy print run in numerous languages. Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late last night, ahead of the satirical magazines publication tomorrow. Up to three million copies are believed to have been printed ahead of tomorrows publication date well up from its usual run of 60,000. The cartoon shows a bearded man in a white turban with a tear streaming down his cheek, and holding a sign reading Je suis Charlie (I am Charlie). Overhead was the phrase Tout est Pardonn (All is Forgiven), which French media interpreted as meaning Muhammad is forgiving the cartoonists for lampooning him. Charlie Hebdos past caricatures of the Muslim prophet appear to have prompted last weeks attacks, part of the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades. Some witnesses reported that the attackers at the papers offices shouted: We have avenged the prophet. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous. Earlier, Charlie Hebdo lawyer Richard Malka told French radio that the new issue would obviously feature cartoons of Muhammad. Three days of violence ended on Friday with a siege at a Jewish deli in Paris where four hostages and a gunman were killed. Shortly before that, police killed the Charlie Hebdo attackers in a separate gun battle at a print works northwest of the city.

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January 13, 2015   Posted in: Charlie Hebdo  Comments Closed

Charlie Hebdo puts Mohammad cartoon on its next cover

Employees from the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo meet in the offices of the left-wing daily Libration in Paris. Two days after the attacks by terrorists on the weekly, the newspapers remaining staff members gathered to build the next issue while still in shock. Photograph: Bertrand Guay/Pool French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover of its first issue since Islamic extremists killed 12 people at its offices. The newspaper Libration hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special million-copy print run in numerous languages. Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late last night, ahead of the satirical magazines publication tomorrow. Up to three million copies are believed to have been printed ahead of tomorrows publication date well up from its usual run of 60,000. The cartoon shows a bearded man in a white turban with a tear streaming down his cheek, and holding a sign reading Je suis Charlie (I am Charlie). Overhead was the phrase Tout est Pardonn (All is Forgiven), which French media interpreted as meaning Muhammad is forgiving the cartoonists for lampooning him. Charlie Hebdos past caricatures of the Muslim prophet appear to have prompted last weeks attacks, part of the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades. Some witnesses reported that the attackers at the papers offices shouted: We have avenged the prophet. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous. Earlier, Charlie Hebdo lawyer Richard Malka told French radio that the new issue would obviously feature cartoons of Muhammad. Three days of violence ended on Friday with a siege at a Jewish deli in Paris where four hostages and a gunman were killed. Shortly before that, police killed the Charlie Hebdo attackers in a separate gun battle at a print works northwest of the city.

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