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Council of Conservative Citizens, is tied to … – POLITICO

Dylann Roof mentioned Earl Holt, the leader of a white supremacist group, in his alleged manifesto.

By Nick Gass

06/22/15 07:43 AM EDT

Updated 06/23/15 02:26 PM EDT

The leader of a white supremacist group mentioned by Dylann Roof in his alleged manifesto has donated tens of thousands of dollars to Republican campaigns in recent years.

Earl Holt, president of the St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens, has given to prominent 2016 candidates Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Rick Santorum over the years, among others, while provocative statements in his name have been posted online, including on the conservative news site TheBlaze, under the user name Earl P. Holt III.

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Jared Taylor, a former director of the CofCC, told The Guardian, which first reported the donations, that if theres a statement that is Earl P. Holt III, he probably made it.

If you think you can educate them, or embarrass them, or reason with them, or that your Christian compassion will be reciprocated, then you are the kind of person who will be completely baffled when they kill you, rape your entire family, and burn your house to the ground, Earl P. Holt III wrote in a comment last year.

According to one account of a witness report, Roof said before opening fire, You rape our women and youre taking over our country. Roof stands charged with the murders of nine black parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, last Wednesday night.

Another comment from Holt in 2011 referred to black people as the laziest, stupidest and most criminally-inclined race in the history of the world.

The author of the manifesto on LastRhodesian.com, widely reported to be Roof, wrote that the CofCC website informed him about brutal black on white murders after the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin in 2012.

In a statement posted on the groups website on Sunday, Holt said it was not surprising Roof credits the site for his knowledge of black-on-white violent crime.

The CofCC website exists because media either spike such stories, or intentionally obscure the race of black offenders, Indeed, at its national convention some years ago, the Society of Professional Journalists adopted this tactic as a formal policy, Holt wrote. He added that the CofCC does not advocate illegal activities of any kind, and never has.

I would gladly compare the honesty and law-abiding nature of our membership against that of any other group, Holt added.

Since 2012, Holt has given $8,500 to Cruz and his political action committee, according to Federal Election Commission filings.

Cruzs campaign responded to both The Guardian and The New York Times, saying that it will be refunding any contributions.

Upon review, we discovered that Mr. Holt did make a contribution. We will be immediately refunding the donation, Cruz spokesman Rick Tyler told The Guardian. A spokesman for Santorum told the paper that the former senator does not condone or respect racist or hateful comments of any kind. Period.

Holt also contributed $1,750 to Pauls PAC, as well as $2,000 to Mitt Romneys 2012 presidential campaign.

Pauls campaign told POLITICO on Monday that it would be donating the RandPAC money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund.

Holt has also given to several GOP congressional campaigns for current or former lawmakers, including Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Rob Portman of Ohio and Jeff Flake of Arizona; former Missouri Rep. Todd Akin, and former presidential candidate and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann.

Spokespeople for Tillis and Flake said both senators would be donating the money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund, as well.

On Monday, Cotton said he was planning to return the money.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks groups like CofCC, said that the donations are only the tip of the iceberg.

SPLC President Richard Cohen told POLITICO that Far more damning than Earl Holts campaign contributions to Republican candidates is the long history of support the GOP has given to the group he leads, the Council of Conservative Citizens. The partys ties to the white supremacist group run long and deep. Dozens of Southern politicians people like Trent Lott and Haley Barbour have cozied up to the group, giving the [CofCC] a legitimacy it doesnt deserve.

We have initiated a refund of Mr. Holts contribution. I do not agree with his hateful beliefs and language and believe they are hurtful to our country, Cotton said in a statement.

POLITICO also found Monday that Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-Mont.) received a $500 donation in 2014 in the name of Richard B. Spencer, the head of the Montana-based National Policy Institute, which is listed as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

In response to this story, Spencer said he did not make the donation.

I would never support a Republican, especially not Zinke, Spencer wrote in an email to POLITICO. I know it sounds far-fetched, but I think someone might be trying to smear Zinke by connecting him to me. I have no other explanation.

The FEC filing reviewed by POLITICO, from September 2014, contains the same Montana address as a property owned by Spencers group.

Zinkes office said that it was not aware of the donation, but upon learning of its source said that the congressman would also be donating the money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund.

Daniel Strauss contributed to this report.

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Citizens’ Councils – Wikipedia

Citizens’ Councils (White Citizens’ Councils)

Citizens’ Councils logo

Membership

Founder

The Citizens’ Councils (also referred to as White Citizens’ Councils) were an associated network of white supremacist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South. The first was formed on July 11, 1954.[1] After 1956, it was known as the Citizens’ Councils of America. With about 60,000 members across the United States,[2] mostly in the South, the groups were founded primarily to oppose racial integration of schools, but they also opposed voter registration efforts and integration of public facilities during the 1950s and 1960s. Members used severe intimidation tactics including economic boycotts, firing people from jobs, propaganda, and violence against citizens and civil-rights activists.

By the 1970s, following passage of federal civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s and enforcement of constitutional rights by the federal government, the influence of the Councils had waned considerably yet remained an institutional basis for the majority of white residents in Mississippi. The successor organization to the White Citizens’ Councils is the St. Louis based Council of Conservative Citizens, founded in 1985[2] to continue collaborations between Ku Klux Klan and white supremacist political agendas in America. Republican politician and past Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi was a member[3] while SC Senator Jesse Helms and GA Representative Bob Barr were both strong supporters of the Council of Conservative Citizens; David Duke also spoke at a fund raising event, while Patrick Buchanan’s campaign manager was linked to both Duke and the Council.[4] In 1996, a Charleston, SC, drive-by shooting by Klan members of three African American males occurred after a Council rally; Dylann Roof, responsible for the 2015 murder of nine Emanuel AME church members in Charleston, espoused Council of Conservative Citizens rhetoric in a manifesto.[5]

In 1954 the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. Some sources claim that the White Citizens’ Council first started after this in Greenwood, Mississippi.[6] Others say that it originated in Indianola, Mississippi.[7] The recognized leader was Robert B. Patterson of Indianola,[1][8] a plantation manager and a former captain of the Mississippi State University football team. Additional chapters spread to other southern towns. At this time, most southern states enforced racial segregation of all public facilities; in places where local laws did not require segregation, Jim Crow harassment enforced it. After preliminary post-Civil War Reconstruction efforts led by blacks and poorer whites, the subsequent period from 1890 to 1908 led to disfranchisement of most blacks through the passing of new constitutions and other laws making voter registration and elections more difficult, and led to the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite civil rights organizations winning some legal challenges, most blacks in the 1950s were still retaliated against for registering to vote, as well as for riding buses and sitting at lunch counters,[9] in the South and remained so even after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Patterson and his followers formed the White Citizens Council in part to respond with economic retaliation and violence to increased civil rights activism. The Regional Council of Negro Leadership (RCNL), a grassroots civil rights organization founded in 1951 by T. R. M. Howard of the all-black town Mound Bayou, Mississippi was also 40 miles from Indianola. Aaron Henry, a later official in the RCNL and the future head of the Mississippi NAACP[10] had met Patterson during their childhood.

Within a few months, the White Citizens Council had attracted similar racist members; new chapters developed beyond Mississippi in the rest of the Deep South. The Council often had the support of the leading white citizens of many communities, including business, law enforcement, civic and sometimes religious leaders, many of whom were members. Member businesses, such as newspaper publishing, legal representation, medical service, were known for collectively acting against registered voters whose names were first published in local papers before additional retaliatory actions were taken against them.

Unlike the Ku Klux Klan but working in unison, the White Citizens Council met openly, and was seen superficially as “pursuing the agenda of the Klan with the demeanor of the Rotary Club.”[11] Although the White Citizens Council publicly eschewed the use of violence,[1] the economic and political tactics used against registered voters and activists embraced institutional violence. The White Citizens Council members collaborated to threaten jobs, causing people to be fired or evicted from rental homes; they boycotted businesses, ensured that activists could not get loans, among other tactics.[6] As historian Charles Payne notes, “Despite the official disclaimers, violence often followed in the wake of Council intimidation campaigns.”[11] Occasionally some Councils directly incited violence, such as lynchings, shootings, rapes, and arson.

For instance, in Montgomery, Alabama, during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, at which Senator James Eastland “ranted against the NAACP”[12] at a large openly held Council meeting in the Garrett Coliseum, a mimeographed flyer publicly espousing extreme racial White Citizens Council and Ku Klux Klan rhetoric was distributed, saying:

When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary to abolish the Negro race, proper methods should be used. Among these are guns, bows and arrows, sling shots and knives. We hold these truths to be self-evident that all whites are created equal with certain rights; among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of dead niggers.[13]

The Citizens’ Councils used economic tactics against African Americans whom they considered as supportive of desegregation and voting rights, or for belonging to the NAACP, or even suspected of being activists; the tactics included “calling in” the mortgages of black citizens, denying loans and business credit, pressing employers to fire certain people, and boycotting black-owned businesses.[14] In some cities, the Councils published lists of names of NAACP supporters and signers of anti-segregation petitions in local newspapers in order to encourage economic retaliation.[15] For instance, in Yazoo City, Mississippi in 1955, the Citizens’ Council published in the local paper the names of 53 signers of a petition for school integration. Soon afterward, the petitioners lost their jobs and had their credit cut off.[16] As Charles Payne puts it, the Councils operated by “unleashing a wave of economic reprisals against anyone, Black or white, seen as a threat to the status quo.”[11] Their targets included black professionals such as teachers, as well as farmers, high school and college students, shop owners, and housewives.

Medgar Evers’ first work for the NAACP on a national level involved interviewing Mississippians who had been intimidated by the White Citizens’ Councils and preparing affidavits for use as evidence against the Councils if necessary.[17] Evers was assassinated in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council as well as the Ku Klux Klan.[18] The Citizens’ Council paid his legal expenses in his two trials in 1964, which both resulted in hung juries.[19] In 1994, Beckwith was tried by the state of Mississippi based on new evidence, in part revealed by a lengthy investigation by the Jackson Clarion Ledger; he was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.[20]

Many leading state and local politicians were members of the Councils; in some states, this gave the organization immense influence over state legislatures. In Mississippi, the State Sovereignty Commission funded the Citizens’ Councils, in some years providing as much as $50,000. This state agency, funded by the taxes paid by all citizens, also shared information with the Councils that it had collected through investigation and surveillance of integration activists.[21] For example, Dr. M. Ney Williams was both a director of the Citizens’ Council and an adviser to governor Ross Barnett of Mississippi.[22] Barnett was a member of the Council, as was Jackson mayor Allen C. Thompson.[23] In 1955, in the midst of the bus boycott, all three members of the Montgomery city commission in Alabama announced on television that they had joined the Citizens’ Council.[24]

Numan Bartley wrote, “In Louisiana the Citizens’ Council organization began as (and to a large extent remained) a projection of the Joint Legislative Committee to Maintain Segregation.”[25] In Louisiana, leaders of the original Citizens’ Council included State Senator and gubernatorial candidate William M. Rainach, U.S. Representative Joe D. Waggonner, Jr., the publisher Ned Touchstone, and Judge Leander Perez, considered the political boss of Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes near New Orleans.[26] After he left the editorship of the Shreveport Journal in 1971, George W. Shannon relocated to Jackson, Mississippi, to work on The Citizen, a monthly magazine of the Citizens’ Council. The Citizen halted publication in January 1979, by which time Shannon had returned to Shreveport.[27]

On July 16, 1956, “under pressure from the White Citizens Councils,”[28] the Louisiana State Legislature passed a law mandating racial segregation in nearly every aspect of public life; much of the segregation already existed under Jim Crow custom. The bill was signed into law by governor Earl Long on 16 July 1956 and went into effect on 15 October 1956. The act read, in part:

An Act to prohibit all interracial dancing, social functions, entertainments, athletic training, games, sports, or contests and other such activities; to provide for separate seating and other facilities for white and negroes [lower case in original]… That all persons, firms, and corporations are prohibited from sponsoring, arranging, participating in or permitting on premises under their control… such activities involving personal and social contact in which the participants are members of the white and negro races… That white persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for members of the negro race. That negro persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for white persons.[28]

Throughout the last half of the 1950s, the White Citizens’ Councils produced racist children’s books that taught that heaven (in the Christian conception) is segregated.[29] The White Citizens’ Council in Mississippi prevented school integration until 1964.[30] As school desegregation increased in some parts of the South, in some communities the White Citizens’ Council sponsored “council schools,” private institutions set up for white children, as these were beyond the reach of the ruling on public schools.[31] Many of these private “segregation academies” continue to operate today.

By the 1970s, as white Southerners’ attitudes toward desegregation began to change following passage of federal civil rights legislation and enforcement of integration and voting rights in the 1960s, the activities of the White Citizens’ Councils began to wane. The Council of Conservative Citizens, founded by former White Citizens’ Council members,[2] continued the agendas of the earlier Councils.

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Council of Conservative Citizens – Wikipedia

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American far-right organization that supports a large variety of conservative and paleoconservative causes in addition to white nationalism,[2] and white separatism.[3] Its Statement of Principles says that they “oppose all efforts to mix the races of mankind”. Several members of the CofCC Board of Directors are former leaders of the segregationist Citizens’ Councils of America, founded by Bob Patterson, which is commonly referred to as the White Citizens’ Council.[4] The organization is headquartered in St. Louis, MO.[1] Its president is Earl Holt, while Jared Taylor is the group’s spokesman and Paul Fromm is its international director.[5]

The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and then relocated to St. Louis, Missouri. The CofCC was formed by various Republicans, conservative Democrats, and some former members of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes called the White Citizens Council, a segregationist organization that was prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. Lester Maddox, former governor of Georgia, was a charter member.[6] Gordon Lee Baum, a retired personal injury lawyer, was CEO until he died in March 2015.[7][8] Earl P. Holt III of Longview, Texas[9][10] is the president. Leonard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord, Sr., Carroll County Coroner, former head of the Carroll Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board.[citation needed]

The organization often holds meetings with various other paleoconservative organizations in the United States, and sometimes meets with nationalist organizations from Europe. In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen with a Confederate flag, which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building.[11]

Following several articles detailing some of its members’ past involvement with the White Citizens’ Council, several conservative politicians distanced themselves from the organization. One such politician was Bob Barr, who had spoken at CofCC functions, saying he found the group’s racial views to be “repugnant,” and did not realize the nature of the group when he agreed to speak at the group’s meeting.[12] Barr gave the keynote speech at its 1998 national convention.[13]

In later years, additional media articles on the involvement of other Republican Party leaders and conservative Democrats with the CofCC attempted to force a distinct denunciation of their association with the organization. For instance, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also been a member of the CofCC. Following the report, the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, denounced the CofCC for holding “racist and nationalist views” and demanded that Lott formally denounce the organization. Although Lott refused to denounce the organization, he stated that he had resigned his membership. Subsequently, Nicholson demanded Lott denounce his former segregationist views following a speech he gave at Senator Strom Thurmond’s birthday dinner when he applauded the Senator’s 1948 Dixiecrat presidential campaign.[14] Following the controversy Nicholson’s demands initiated, Lott apologized for his past support for segregation, his past associations, and his remarks at Thurmond’s birthday. This caused him loss of support from a number of important conservatives, not least Thurmond himself. Consequently, Lott resigned his post as Senate Minority Leader. Similarly, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended an event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor, the “Metro-South Citizens Council”, shortly before the name was changed in the mid-1980s. This was an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake.[15] In 1993, Mike Huckabee, then the Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, agreed to speak at the CofCC’s national convention in Memphis, Tennessee in his pursuit of the governorship of Arkansas. By the time of the CofCC convention, Huckabee was unable to leave Arkansas. Instead, he sent a videotaped speech, which “was viewed and extremely well received by the audience,” according to the CofCC newsletter.[16] However, following his success in the election, in April 1994, Huckabee withdrew from a speaking engagement before the CofCC. He commented, “I will not participate in any program that has racist overtones. I’ve spent a lifetime fighting racism and anti-Semitism.”[17]

Other conservative national and state politicians who refused to denounce, distance, or resign their membership and continued attending meetings and giving speeches remained prominent political leaders within the conservative movement. Former Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina remained supportive of the CofCC and consistently won his elections, and support from the CofCC was considered decisive enough that the organization was influential in office throughout his terms in the Senate. Similarly, former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, as well as Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina remained active members and/or gave speeches to the organization. Strom Thurmond remained in the Senate until he retired in 2002.

The SPLC and the Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004.[18] The ADL states the following politicians are members or have spoken at meetings: Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. People who have also spoken at CofCC meetings include Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi is said to have attended as well.[19]

In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held its National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference.

Mississippi is the only state that has major politicians who are open CofCC members, including State Senators and State Representatives. The CofCC once claimed 34 members in the Mississippi legislature.[20]

The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives; it supports national self-determination, immigration restriction, federalism, and home rule, and opposes free trade and global capitalism. Its specific issues include states’ rights, race relations (especially interracial marriage, which it opposes), and conservative Christian values. They have criticized Martin Luther King, Jr., who is considered by the organization as a left-wing agitator of Black American communities with notable ties to communism, and holding personal sexual morals unworthy of a person deserving national recognition.[21] They consider the American Civil Rights Movement and the Frankfurt School as elementally subversive to the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of European culture, specifically the British Protestant tradition.[citation needed] The Council of Conservative Citizens is active in organizing the restriction, reduction, or moratorium of immigration, enforcing laws and regulations against illegal aliens, ending what they see as racial discrimination against whites through affirmative action and racial quotas, overturning Supreme Court rulings and Congressional Acts such as forced busing and gun control, ending free trade economic policy, and supporting a conservative sexual morality, which includes promotion of the Defense of Marriage Act and opposition to the inclusion of homosexuality as a civil right.

In 2005, after several dozen conservative organizations were designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the CofCC staged a protest in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama.[citation needed] The CofCC continues protesting speaking engagements by Morris Dees in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina, declaring him to be a threat to free speech and a fraud.

According to its supporters, the Council of Conservative Citizens opposes globalism, multiculturalism, racism against whites, and an intrusive Federal government. The group says it has a key role in reporting the racial overtones of violence against whites, both in the United States and elsewhere. An April 2005 photo essay on the CofCC website claimed that images of decapitated, burnt and mangled bodies of whites are victims of black violence in South Africa. The website closes with the statement that someday American whites will be a minority and will be subject to the same form of violence.[22]

The CofCC’s statement of principles condemns the federal government’s intervention into state and local affairs in forcing racial integration (item 2), free-trade and globalism, immigration by non-Europeans (item 2), homosexuality, and interracial marriage (item 6).[3]

The CofCC publishes the Citizens Informer newspaper quarterly. Previous editors include Samuel T. Francis and web designer Joel T. LeFevre.[23]

Various critics describe the organization as a hate group. The New York Times called it a white separatist group with a thinly veiled white supremacist agenda.[24] The Anti-Defamation League said “Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups”.[19] The CofCC is considered by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) to be part of the “neo-confederate movement”. In general, organizations such as the NAACP, League of United Latin American Citizens, SPLC (which lists it as a hate group[25]) and the Anti-Defamation League consider it a threat. Max Blumenthal has called it America’s premier racist organization and elementally dangerous to America.[26]

Columnist Ann Coulter has defended the group against charges of racism, stating on the basis of a viewing of their website that there is “no evidence” that the CofCC supports segregation.[27] Coulter and Pat Buchanan are listed as being recommended columnists on the organization’s official website.

Suspected mass murderer Dylann Roof searched the Internet for information on “black on White crime”, and the first website he found was the CofCC website. He cited its portrayal of “black on White murders” as something that radically changed him (“I have never been the same since that day”).[28][29] The CofCC issued a statement on its website “unequivocally condemn[ing]” the attack, but that Roof has some “legitimate grievances” against black people. An additional statement from Earl Holt III, president of the CofCC, disavowed responsibility for the crime and stated that the group’s website “accurately and honestly report[s] black-on-white violent crime”.[30] In the days following Roof’s arrest and subsequent investigation it was revealed that Holt had made campaign contributions to several conservative politicians including 2016 Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, Scott Walker and Rand Paul, as well as Tom Cotton and Mia Love; all subsequently announced that they would return Holt’s contributions or donate them to a fund for the families of Roof’s victims.[31][32][33]

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The Council Of Conservative Citizens: Dylann Roof’s …

Charleston church shooter Dylann Roofs manifesto cited the hate group Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) as his gateway into the world of white nationalism. The CCC is the modern reincarnation of the old White Citizens Councils, which were formed in the 1950s and 1960s to battle school desegregation in the South.

For decades, this racist group has had the ear of a number of prominent politicians, both state and federal, many of whom were members of the group and/or attended events put on the by CCC — a group that has referred to African Americans as a retrograde species of humanity.

In 1998, a scandal erupted over prominent Southern politicians’ ties to the brazenly racist group. After it was revealed that former Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.) gave the keynote speech at the CCC’s 1998 national convention and that then-Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) had spoken to the group five times, both claimed they knew nothing about the CCC. As evidence of widespread association between Southern GOP officeholders and the CCC mounted, Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson took the unusual step in 1998 of asking party members to resign from the group because of its racist views. But six years later, many Southern lawmakers were still pandering to and meeting with the CCC and still pleading ignorance. According to a 2004 Intelligence Report review of the Citizens Informer, no fewer than 38 federal, state and local elected officials had attended CCC events between 2000 and 2004, most of them giving speeches to local chapters of the hate group.

Since the mid-2000s the groups influence and access to politicians has dwindled considerably. In South Carolina, some influential CCC figures remain actively involved in the politics at the state level.

Roan Garcia-Quintana is one of these characters. Garcia-Quintana is a lifetime member of the CCC and sits on the organizations board. Despite these associations, the Cuban-born white nationalist has remained very active in the state politics. Garcia-Quintana ran for the South Carolina state Senates District 7 seat as the Republican nominee in 2008 and came in second with 27 percent of the vote. Garcia-Quintana also sat on S.C. Gov. Nikki Haleys campaign re-election steering committee, before he was forced to resign in 2013 after his ties to the CCC were made public. In comments after his resignation from Haleys committee, he went on to talk about her physical characteristics (she is the daughter of Indian immigrants) in relation to white people. She has the features of a Caucasian: her nose, her eyes, her cheeks, her mouth. Thats really how you describe it.

CCC webmaster, white nationalist Kyle Rogers, is another South Carolina-based CCC member who was active in state politics until recently. Rogers served as a delegate to the Charleston County Republican convention in 2007, and Dorchester County, S.C., GOP officials confirmed to SPLC in 2013 that he was a member of that countys Republican Executive Committee. Republican politicians there expressed embarrassment about Rogers participation, saying they had asked him to resign but were unable legally to eject him. Rogers also manages a flag store, Patriotic-Flags.com, which you can visit by clicking an ad on the CCC website. Rogers store sells the flag of the government of Rhodesia, the same flag sewn on the jacket worn by Roof in his Facebook profile.

In the hours since the authorization of Dylann Roofs manifesto, the CCC website has crashed and the group is remaining tight-lipped. The longtime CCC leader Gordon Baum died earlier this year and the CCC are yet to name his successor. That individual is going to have to answer to that fact that the hate group was named by Roof, a man who murdered nine African Americans on Wednesday, as the group that acted as his gateway to white nationalism.

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Council Of Conservative Citizens Founding Member Gordon …

Marcus Cicero Daily Stormer March 13, 2015

One of the leading figures in the pro-White movement has departed from this world, leaving us with the task of attempting to carry on the work of saving a civilization before the final bell tolls.

Gordon Lee Baum, one of the founding members of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a stable and logical element in an otherwise overly dramatic and often chaotic Traditionalist/Racialist scene, passed awaylast Thursday at the age of 74.

Active throughout his life in causes that were always intended to safeguard a proper moral White society for those who come after us, Mr. Baum was not afraid to speak his mind on issues, drawing forth the hatred of those who wish to see us broken down and eventually exterminated, such as the sociopolitical abomination known as the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

The memory of this great man can be best summed up in the words of his own son-in-law, who wrote a touching memoriam piece a couple of days ago.

Occidental Dissent:

As many of you are aware by now, my father-in-law, Gordon Lee Baum, Esq., a founder and the present CEO of the Council of Conservative Citizens, passed away last Thursday after a long battle with cancer. He was 74 years old.

Gordon was not someone who admitted defeat, who gave up, and that is putting it mildly. Since he was 16-years-old, he spent his entire adult life completely devoted to the cause of our people literally days before his death, while he recovered from pneumonia, he was telling us to call various CofCC members. Even then, his mind was still focused on the cause. In this way, he reminded me of one of my heroes, the South Carolina fire eater Robert Barnwell Rhett, who once said, I will keep up the fire, if like a lost hunter in a prairie, I have to kindle it alone, with my gun flint, and watch by the blaze, rifle in hand to keep off the wolves.

That was my father-in-law in his time: when the Civil Rights of Act of 1964 was passed, when the Citizens Councils movement collapsed, when George Wallace, Strom Thurmond, and all the rest repudiated segregation and proclaimed their newfound faith in racial equality, when others quit, Gordon Lee Baum stood firm. As the world entered the present Dark Age, Gordon was there to keep up the fire of resistance. Together with other veterans of the Citizens Councils, he rebuilt the defunct organization as the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) in the 1980s, which has remained down to the present day an island of stability in the pro-White movement in the United States.

Gordon Lee Baum fought to the end of his life to secure the future existence of his people. One day I will be able to tell my son, which is his grandson, that his grandfather, unlike so many other people, chose to confront this evil for the sake of his future. Thats the example that I want to live up to.

Not wishing to negate the heartfelt emotion in the tribute, nothing more need be said other than the fact that this was a man all of us of European descentshould learn to emulate.

Note: Whether one agrees with everything Gordon believed in andfought for or not, please keep the comments section civil on this piece. As Whites, we do not disrespect honorable men andwomen who have passed on, as it is not part of our genetic or cultural makeup.

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Citizens’ Councils – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Citizens’ Councils (White Citizens’ Councils)

Citizens’ Councils logo

Membership

Founder

The Citizens’ Councils (also referred to as White Citizens’ Councils) were an associated network of white supremacist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South. The first was formed on July 11, 1954[1] After 1956, it was known as the Citizens’ Councils of America. With about 60,000 members across the United States,[2] mostly in the South, the groups were founded primarily to oppose racial integration of schools, but they also opposed voter registration efforts and integration of public facilities during the 1950s and 1960s. Members used severe intimidation tactics including economic boycotts, firing people from jobs, propaganda, and violence against citizens and civil-rights activists.

By the 1970s, following passage of federal civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s and enforcement of constitutional rights by the federal government, the influence of the Councils had waned considerably yet remained an institutional basis for the majority of white residents in Mississippi. The successor organization to the White Citizens’ Councils is the St. Louis based Council of Conservative Citizens, founded in 1985[2] to continue collaborations between Ku Klux Klan and white supremacist political agendas in America. Republican politician and past Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi was a member[3] while SC Senator Jesse Helms and GA Representative Bob Barr were both strong supporters of the Council of Conservative Citizens; David Duke also spoke at a fund raising event, while Patrick Buchanan’s campaign manager was linked to both Duke and the Council.[4] In 1996, a Charleston, SC, drive-by shooting by Klan members of three African American males occurred after a Council rally; Dylann Roof, responsible for the 2015 murder of nine Emanuel AME church members in Charleston, espoused Council of Conservative Citizens rhetoric in a manifesto.[5]

In 1954 the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. Some sources claim that the White Citizens’ Council first started after this in Greenwood, Mississippi.[6] Others say that it originated in Indianola, Mississippi.[7] The recognized leader was Robert B. Patterson of Indianola,[1][8] a plantation manager and a former captain of the Mississippi State University football team. Additional chapters spread to other southern towns. At this time, most southern states enforced racial segregation of all public facilities; in places where local laws did not require segregation, Jim Crow harassment enforced it. After preliminary post-Civil War Reconstruction efforts led by blacks and poorer whites, the subsequent period from 1890 to 1908 led to disfranchisement of most blacks through the passing of new constitutions and other laws making voter registration and elections more difficult, and led to the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite civil rights organizations winning some legal challenges, most blacks in the 1950s were still retaliated against for registering to vote, as well as for riding buses and sitting at lunch counters,[9] in the South and remained so even after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Patterson and his followers formed the White Citizens Council in part to respond with economic retaliation and violence to increased civil rights activism. The Regional Council of Negro Leadership (RCNL), a grassroots civil rights organization founded in 1951 by T. R. M. Howard of the all-black town Mound Bayou, Mississippi was also 40 miles from Indianola. Aaron Henry, a later official in the RCNL and the future head of the Mississippi NAACP[10] had met Patterson during their childhood.

Within a few months, the White Citizens Council had attracted similar racist members; new chapters developed beyond Mississippi in the rest of the Deep South. The Council often had the support of the leading white citizens of many communities, including business, law enforcement, civic and sometimes religious leaders, many of whom were members. Member businesses, such as newspaper publishing, legal representation, medical service, were known for collectively acting against registered voters whose names were first published in local papers before additional retaliatory actions were taken against them.

Unlike the Ku Klux Klan but working in unison, the White Citizens Council met openly, and was seen superficially as “pursuing the agenda of the Klan with the demeanor of the Rotary Club.”[11] Although the White Citizens Council publicly eschewed the use of violence,[1] the economic and political tactics used against registered voters and activists embraced institutional violence. The White Citizens Council members collaborated to threaten jobs, causing people to be fired or evicted from rental homes; they boycotted businesses, ensured that activists could not get loans, among other tactics.[6] As historian Charles Payne notes, “Despite the official disclaimers, violence often followed in the wake of Council intimidation campaigns.”[11] Occasionally some Councils directly incited violence, such as lynchings, shootings, rapes, and arson.

For instance, in Montgomery, Alabama, during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, at which Senator James Eastland “ranted against the NAACP”[12] at a large openly held Council meeting in the Garrett Coliseum, a mimeographed flyer publicly espousing extreme racial White Citizens Council and Ku Klux Klan rhetoric was distributed, saying:

When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary to abolish the Negro race, proper methods should be used. Among these are guns, bows and arrows, sling shots and knives. We hold these truths to be self-evident that all whites are created equal with certain rights; among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of dead niggers.[13]

The Citizens’ Councils used economic tactics against African Americans whom they considered as supportive of desegregation and voting rights, or for belonging to the NAACP, or even suspected of being activists; the tactics included “calling in” the mortgages of black citizens, denying loans and business credit, pressing employers to fire certain people, and boycotting black-owned businesses.[14] In some cities, the Councils published lists of names of NAACP supporters and signers of anti-segregation petitions in local newspapers in order to encourage economic retaliation.[15] For instance, in Yazoo City, Mississippi in 1955, the Citizens’ Council published in the local paper the names of 53 signers of a petition for school integration. Soon afterward, the petitioners lost their jobs and had their credit cut off.[16] As Charles Payne puts it, the Councils operated by “unleashing a wave of economic reprisals against anyone, Black or white, seen as a threat to the status quo.”[11] Their targets included black professionals such as teachers, as well as farmers, high school and college students, shop owners, and housewives.

Medgar Evers’ first work for the NAACP on a national level involved interviewing Mississippians who had been intimidated by the White Citizens’ Councils and preparing affidavits for use as evidence against the Councils if necessary.[17] Evers was assassinated in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council as well as the Ku Klux Klan.[18] The Citizens’ Council paid his legal expenses in his two trials in 1964, which both resulted in hung juries.[19] In 1994, Beckwith was tried by the state of Mississippi based on new evidence, in part revealed by a lengthy investigation by the Jackson Clarion Ledger; he was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.[20]

Many leading state and local politicians were members of the Councils; in some states, this gave the organization immense influence over state legislatures. In Mississippi, the State Sovereignty Commission funded the Citizens’ Councils, in some years providing as much as $50,000. This state agency, funded by the taxes paid by all citizens, also shared information with the Councils that it had collected through investigation and surveillance of integration activists.[21] For example, Dr. M. Ney Williams was both a director of the Citizens’ Council and an adviser to governor Ross Barnett of Mississippi.[22] Barnett was a member of the Council, as was Jackson mayor Allen C. Thompson.[23] In 1955, in the midst of the bus boycott, all three members of the Montgomery city commission in Alabama announced on television that they had joined the Citizens’ Council.[24]

Numan Bartley wrote, “In Louisiana the Citizens’ Council organization began as (and to a large extent remained) a projection of the Joint Legislative Committee to Maintain Segregation.”[25] In Louisiana, leaders of the original Citizens’ Council included State Senator and gubernatorial candidate William M. Rainach, U.S. Representative Joe D. Waggonner, Jr., the publisher Ned Touchstone, and Judge Leander Perez, considered the political boss of Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes near New Orleans.[26] After he left the editorship of the Shreveport Journal in 1971, George W. Shannon relocated to Jackson, Mississippi, to work on The Citizen, a monthly magazine of the Citizens’ Council. The Citizen halted publication in January 1979, by which time Shannon had returned to Shreveport.[27]

On July 16, 1956, “under pressure from the White Citizens Councils,”[28] the Louisiana State Legislature passed a law mandating racial segregation in nearly every aspect of public life; much of the segregation already existed under Jim Crow custom. The bill was signed into law by governor Earl Long on 16 July 1956 and went into effect on 15 October 1956. The act read, in part:

An Act to prohibit all interracial dancing, social functions, entertainments, athletic training, games, sports, or contests and other such activities; to provide for separate seating and other facilities for white and negroes [lower case in original]… That all persons, firms, and corporations are prohibited from sponsoring, arranging, participating in or permitting on premises under their control… such activities involving personal and social contact in which the participants are members of the white and negro races… That white persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for members of the negro race. That negro persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for white persons.[28]

Throughout the last half of the 1950s, the White Citizens’ Councils produced racist children’s books that taught that heaven (in the Christian conception) is segregated.[29] The White Citizens’ Council in Mississippi prevented school integration until 1964.[30] As school desegregation increased in some parts of the South, in some communities the White Citizens’ Council sponsored “council schools,” private institutions set up for white children, as these were beyond the reach of the ruling on public schools.[31] Many of these private “segregation academies” continue to operate today.

By the 1970s, as white Southerners’ attitudes toward desegregation began to change following passage of federal civil rights legislation and enforcement of integration and voting rights in the 1960s, the activities of the White Citizens’ Councils began to wane. The Council of Conservative Citizens, founded by former White Citizens’ Council members,[2] continued the agendas of the earlier Councils and by the 1990s was intertwined with efforts by the Republican Party establishment to regain control of both the House and Senate in Washington, DC.

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Citizens’ Councils – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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July 28, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Isnt it time you joined? – Conservative Headlines

Welcome to the Council of Conservative Citizens National Website!

The CofCC is the countrys most effective conservative activist group. Dr. Sam Francis, (RIP 1947 2005) Nationally Syndicated Columnist, Former Writer for the Washington Times, Former Editor of the Citizens Informer, Author of the CofCC Statement of Principles.

Read what Sam Francis had to say about the Council of Conservative Citizens in this column published in the Washington Times.

Check out this classic interview with CofCC CEO Gordon Baum from Media Bypass magazine. Gordon Baum describes the Art of Cultural Activism.

This is not some DC based paper tiger, where all the money goes to salaries and fund-raising. This is a group with real members, real chapters, and real activism. No one in the CofCC draws a salary.

Membership is only $36 a year for an individual or a married couple!

All new members will receive: 1. Membership Card 2. Booklet on the MLK Holiday by Dr. Sam Francis & Sen. Jesse Helms 3. Issue 7 of the Occasional Papers from the Conservative Citizens Foundation 4. FREE DVD: The Frankfurt School (limited time only) Watch video clip. 5. Council Reporter Newsletter: Once a year mailing for National Conference. 6. Subscription to the Citizens Informer, published quarterly.

Each issue of the Citizens Informer contains a section called Council News, that details some of the activities of our local chapters.

The Council of Conservative Citizens, the no longer silent majority, is a genuinely active national organization effectively organizing and winning!

The C of CC was organized by conservative leaders from throughout the nation, who met in Atlanta, Georgia to build an updated organization in which the silent majority could participate at the local, state, and national levels.

Were organizing conservative activists, developing unity, and successfully building a network of chapters and supporters at the grass-roots level nationwide to serve as a responsible, effective voice and active advocate for the no-longer silent conservative majority. This is a unification movement that is desperately needed and long overdue.

Individualistic-minded conservatives have failed to properly organize while the Left (being more collectivist-minded) has developed organization into an art form. Most politicians will cater to those blocs that they perceive as being able to help (or hurt) them the most at the ballot box.

However, a purely national group has little local influence and all politics is local. On the other hand, purely local groups with no national or regional structural coordination fractionate our efforts and dissipate our resources. Single issue groups, while performing an important role, are too narrowly focused.

We know that conservatives can rebuild their political power only by beginning at the grass roots, unifying our efforts and focusing our resources. Our local groups work at the local level on local issues, and cooperate nationally to bring their power to bear on the important national issues. Others put their faith in Washington lobbyists to accomplish the difficult job of getting the conservative viewpoint before Congress. We rely on the people back home. Others put their faith in political parties to get the conservative message to federal, state, and local officials. We rely on the members of our local chapters to tell officials directly what conservatives want, if necessary at the ballot box, and encouraging sound conservatives to run for office, and volunteers and workers to support the candidates. And its working!

Were winning the attention of politicians and the confidence of voters. After only a short time, the CofCC has had a major effect simply because we recognize that a victory achieved or election won at the local level is far more important than any number of prestigious contests or races lost.

We have winning experience. The Council of Conservative Citizens is unique in another way it was founded and is staffed by men and women whose political experience comes from every responsible social movement, conservative organization, and effective political party in America. Our founders, officers, and members include conservative academics, expert political organizers, union officers, farmers, businessmen, professionals, and elected officials. Together, we represent the total experience of the conservative movement in America.

We know who we are through our affiliation with the new Conservative Citizens Foundation. The Foundation (which does not advocate or oppose legislation or candidates) conducts in depth surveys and studies of the views, attitudes, and priorities both of conservatives and of the public at large something no other conservative group is doing. Using information supplied by the non-partisan CCF, the Council educates Americans on and organizes them around the issues they themselves feel to be important, issues that are critical for America.

To win we must build locally, and unify and focus our resources and efforts.

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Council of Conservative Citizens | Southern Poverty Law Center

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) is the modern reincarnation of the old White Citizens Councils, which were formed in the 1950s and 1960s to battle school desegregation in the South. Created in 1985 from the mailing lists of its predecessor organization, the CCC, which initially tried to project a “mainstream” image, has evolved into a crudely white supremacist group whose website has run pictures comparing pop singer Michael Jackson to an ape and referred to blacks as “a retrograde species of humanity.” The group’s newspaper, Citizens Informer, regularly publishes articles condemning “race mixing,” decrying the evils of illegal immigration, and lamenting the decline of white, European civilization.

In Its Own Words “God is the author of racism. God is the One who divided mankind into different types. … Mixing the races is rebelliousness against God.” Council of Conservative Citizens website, 2001

“We believe the United States is a European country and that Americans are part of the European people. We therefore oppose the massive immigration of non-European and non-Western peoples into the United States that threatens to transform our nation into a non-European majority in our lifetime. We believe that illegal immigration must be stopped, if necessary by military force and placing troops on our national borders; that illegal aliens must be returned to their own countries; and that legal immigration must be severely restricted or halted through appropriate changes in our laws and policies. We also oppose all efforts to mix the races of mankind, to promote non-white races over the European-American people through so-called affirmative action’ and similar measures, to destroy or denigrate the European-American heritage, including the heritage of the Southern people, and to force the integration of the races.” Statement of Principles, Citizens Informer, 2007

“Controlling immigration is about the security of this republic [terrorists illegally crossing the borders] and making sure countries like Mexico stop dumping their murderers, rapists, those carrying AIDS and other communicable diseases and gang members on America’s door step.” Devvy Kidd, Citizens Informer, 2006

Background Founded in 1985 by Gordon Baum, a worker’s compensation attorney and longtime racist activist, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) rose from the ashes of the Citizens Councils of America (CCA), commonly called “White Citizens Councils,” a coalition of white-supremacist groups and individuals formed throughout the South to defend school segregation after the Supreme Court outlawed the policy in 1954 in Brown vs. Board of Education.

Unlike the KKK, the CCA groups had a veneer of civic respectability, inspiring future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall to refer to it as the “uptown Klan.” While there were plenty of bare-knuckle racists attracted to the councils’ anti-integration slogan, “Never!,” the members also included bankers, merchants, judges, newspaper editors and politicians folks given more to wearing suits and ties than hoods and robes. During the White Citizens Councils’ heyday, the groups claimed more than 1 million members. Although they weren’t immune to violence Byron De La Beckwith, who murdered civil-rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963, was a member the councils generally used their political and financial pull to offset the effects of “forced integration.”

Once the segregation battle was lost, the air went out of the White Citizens Councils. The councils steadily lost members throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Sensing the need for a new direction, Baum, formerly the CCA’s Midwest field director, called together a group of 30 white men, including former Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox and future Louisiana Congressman John Rarick, for a meeting in Atlanta in 1985. Together, they cooked up a successor organization: the Council of Conservative Citizens.

Like the original White Citizens Councils, the CCC is made up of local chapters, some of which are active in civic affairs beyond the national group’s racist agenda. And until the 2000s, some of the group’s “uptown” attitude remained, as meetings resembled Rotary Club events more than Klan outings and regularly featured politicians as keynote speakers.

Most Americans learned of the CCC in late 1998, when a scandal erupted over prominent Southern politicians’ ties to the brazenly racist group. After it was revealed that former Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.) gave the keynote speech at the CCC’s 1998 national convention and that then-Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) had spoken to the group five times, both claimed they knew nothing about the CCC. However, an Intelligence Report investigation, publicized by national television and newspaper reports, made clear what the CCC really was: a hate group that routinely denigrated blacks as “genetically inferior,” complained about “Jewish power brokers,” called LGBT people “perverted sodomites,” accused immigrants of turning America into a “slimy brown mass of glop,” and named Lester Maddox, the now-deceased, ax handle-wielding, arch-segregationist former governor of Georgia, “Patriot of the Century.”

As evidence of widespread association between Southern GOP officeholders and the CCC mounted, Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson took the unusual step in 1998 of asking party members to resign from the group because of its racist views. A resolution moved through the U.S. Congress “condemning the racism and bigotry espoused by the Council of Conservative Citizens,” although it ultimately failed. (Congress had earlier condemned the black supremacist Nation of Islamin a similar manner, but failed to do the same with the CCC. Republican Party leaders, likely embarrassed by Lott’s very public connection to the CCC, managed to defeat the censure effort.)

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Council of Conservative Citizens — Extremism in America

Combating Hate: Domestic Extremism & Terrorism

December1,2001

The St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens traces its roots directly to the racist, anti-integrationist White Citizens’ Councils of the 1950s and 1960s. Its current leader, atorney Gordon Lee Baum, was an organizer for the WCC and built the Council of Conservative Citizens in part from the old group’s mailing lists. Like its predecessor, the CCC inflames fears and resentments, particularly among Southern whites, with regard to black-on-white crime, nonwhite immigration, attacks on the Confederate flag and other issues related to “traditional” Southern culture. Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups and its publications, Web sites and meetings all promote the purportedly innate superiority of whites. Despite its record, the CCC has been successful in drawing southern politicians to its events: the 1998 revelation that then Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had been a frequent speaker before the group drew substantial media attention. Mississippi governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators and several state representatives have appeared in recent years.

Read the full report, Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens (PDF).

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Council of Conservative Citizens — Extremism in America

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Council of Conservative Citizens, is tied to … – POLITICO

Dylann Roof mentioned Earl Holt, the leader of a white supremacist group, in his alleged manifesto. By Nick Gass 06/22/15 07:43 AM EDT Updated 06/23/15 02:26 PM EDT The leader of a white supremacist group mentioned by Dylann Roof in his alleged manifesto has donated tens of thousands of dollars to Republican campaigns in recent years. Earl Holt, president of the St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens, has given to prominent 2016 candidates Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Rick Santorum over the years, among others, while provocative statements in his name have been posted online, including on the conservative news site TheBlaze, under the user name Earl P. Holt III. Story Continued Below Jared Taylor, a former director of the CofCC, told The Guardian, which first reported the donations, that if theres a statement that is Earl P. Holt III, he probably made it. If you think you can educate them, or embarrass them, or reason with them, or that your Christian compassion will be reciprocated, then you are the kind of person who will be completely baffled when they kill you, rape your entire family, and burn your house to the ground, Earl P. Holt III wrote in a comment last year. According to one account of a witness report, Roof said before opening fire, You rape our women and youre taking over our country. Roof stands charged with the murders of nine black parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, last Wednesday night. Another comment from Holt in 2011 referred to black people as the laziest, stupidest and most criminally-inclined race in the history of the world. The author of the manifesto on LastRhodesian.com, widely reported to be Roof, wrote that the CofCC website informed him about brutal black on white murders after the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin in 2012. In a statement posted on the groups website on Sunday, Holt said it was not surprising Roof credits the site for his knowledge of black-on-white violent crime. The CofCC website exists because media either spike such stories, or intentionally obscure the race of black offenders, Indeed, at its national convention some years ago, the Society of Professional Journalists adopted this tactic as a formal policy, Holt wrote. He added that the CofCC does not advocate illegal activities of any kind, and never has. I would gladly compare the honesty and law-abiding nature of our membership against that of any other group, Holt added. Since 2012, Holt has given $8,500 to Cruz and his political action committee, according to Federal Election Commission filings. Cruzs campaign responded to both The Guardian and The New York Times, saying that it will be refunding any contributions. Upon review, we discovered that Mr. Holt did make a contribution. We will be immediately refunding the donation, Cruz spokesman Rick Tyler told The Guardian. A spokesman for Santorum told the paper that the former senator does not condone or respect racist or hateful comments of any kind. Period. Holt also contributed $1,750 to Pauls PAC, as well as $2,000 to Mitt Romneys 2012 presidential campaign. Pauls campaign told POLITICO on Monday that it would be donating the RandPAC money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund. Holt has also given to several GOP congressional campaigns for current or former lawmakers, including Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Rob Portman of Ohio and Jeff Flake of Arizona; former Missouri Rep. Todd Akin, and former presidential candidate and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann. Spokespeople for Tillis and Flake said both senators would be donating the money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund, as well. On Monday, Cotton said he was planning to return the money. The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks groups like CofCC, said that the donations are only the tip of the iceberg. SPLC President Richard Cohen told POLITICO that Far more damning than Earl Holts campaign contributions to Republican candidates is the long history of support the GOP has given to the group he leads, the Council of Conservative Citizens. The partys ties to the white supremacist group run long and deep. Dozens of Southern politicians people like Trent Lott and Haley Barbour have cozied up to the group, giving the [CofCC] a legitimacy it doesnt deserve. We have initiated a refund of Mr. Holts contribution. I do not agree with his hateful beliefs and language and believe they are hurtful to our country, Cotton said in a statement. POLITICO also found Monday that Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-Mont.) received a $500 donation in 2014 in the name of Richard B. Spencer, the head of the Montana-based National Policy Institute, which is listed as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. In response to this story, Spencer said he did not make the donation. I would never support a Republican, especially not Zinke, Spencer wrote in an email to POLITICO. I know it sounds far-fetched, but I think someone might be trying to smear Zinke by connecting him to me. I have no other explanation. The FEC filing reviewed by POLITICO, from September 2014, contains the same Montana address as a property owned by Spencers group. Zinkes office said that it was not aware of the donation, but upon learning of its source said that the congressman would also be donating the money to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund. Daniel Strauss contributed to this report.

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Citizens’ Councils – Wikipedia

Citizens’ Councils (White Citizens’ Councils) Citizens’ Councils logo Membership Founder The Citizens’ Councils (also referred to as White Citizens’ Councils) were an associated network of white supremacist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South. The first was formed on July 11, 1954.[1] After 1956, it was known as the Citizens’ Councils of America. With about 60,000 members across the United States,[2] mostly in the South, the groups were founded primarily to oppose racial integration of schools, but they also opposed voter registration efforts and integration of public facilities during the 1950s and 1960s. Members used severe intimidation tactics including economic boycotts, firing people from jobs, propaganda, and violence against citizens and civil-rights activists. By the 1970s, following passage of federal civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s and enforcement of constitutional rights by the federal government, the influence of the Councils had waned considerably yet remained an institutional basis for the majority of white residents in Mississippi. The successor organization to the White Citizens’ Councils is the St. Louis based Council of Conservative Citizens, founded in 1985[2] to continue collaborations between Ku Klux Klan and white supremacist political agendas in America. Republican politician and past Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi was a member[3] while SC Senator Jesse Helms and GA Representative Bob Barr were both strong supporters of the Council of Conservative Citizens; David Duke also spoke at a fund raising event, while Patrick Buchanan’s campaign manager was linked to both Duke and the Council.[4] In 1996, a Charleston, SC, drive-by shooting by Klan members of three African American males occurred after a Council rally; Dylann Roof, responsible for the 2015 murder of nine Emanuel AME church members in Charleston, espoused Council of Conservative Citizens rhetoric in a manifesto.[5] In 1954 the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. Some sources claim that the White Citizens’ Council first started after this in Greenwood, Mississippi.[6] Others say that it originated in Indianola, Mississippi.[7] The recognized leader was Robert B. Patterson of Indianola,[1][8] a plantation manager and a former captain of the Mississippi State University football team. Additional chapters spread to other southern towns. At this time, most southern states enforced racial segregation of all public facilities; in places where local laws did not require segregation, Jim Crow harassment enforced it. After preliminary post-Civil War Reconstruction efforts led by blacks and poorer whites, the subsequent period from 1890 to 1908 led to disfranchisement of most blacks through the passing of new constitutions and other laws making voter registration and elections more difficult, and led to the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite civil rights organizations winning some legal challenges, most blacks in the 1950s were still retaliated against for registering to vote, as well as for riding buses and sitting at lunch counters,[9] in the South and remained so even after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Patterson and his followers formed the White Citizens Council in part to respond with economic retaliation and violence to increased civil rights activism. The Regional Council of Negro Leadership (RCNL), a grassroots civil rights organization founded in 1951 by T. R. M. Howard of the all-black town Mound Bayou, Mississippi was also 40 miles from Indianola. Aaron Henry, a later official in the RCNL and the future head of the Mississippi NAACP[10] had met Patterson during their childhood. Within a few months, the White Citizens Council had attracted similar racist members; new chapters developed beyond Mississippi in the rest of the Deep South. The Council often had the support of the leading white citizens of many communities, including business, law enforcement, civic and sometimes religious leaders, many of whom were members. Member businesses, such as newspaper publishing, legal representation, medical service, were known for collectively acting against registered voters whose names were first published in local papers before additional retaliatory actions were taken against them. Unlike the Ku Klux Klan but working in unison, the White Citizens Council met openly, and was seen superficially as “pursuing the agenda of the Klan with the demeanor of the Rotary Club.”[11] Although the White Citizens Council publicly eschewed the use of violence,[1] the economic and political tactics used against registered voters and activists embraced institutional violence. The White Citizens Council members collaborated to threaten jobs, causing people to be fired or evicted from rental homes; they boycotted businesses, ensured that activists could not get loans, among other tactics.[6] As historian Charles Payne notes, “Despite the official disclaimers, violence often followed in the wake of Council intimidation campaigns.”[11] Occasionally some Councils directly incited violence, such as lynchings, shootings, rapes, and arson. For instance, in Montgomery, Alabama, during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, at which Senator James Eastland “ranted against the NAACP”[12] at a large openly held Council meeting in the Garrett Coliseum, a mimeographed flyer publicly espousing extreme racial White Citizens Council and Ku Klux Klan rhetoric was distributed, saying: When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary to abolish the Negro race, proper methods should be used. Among these are guns, bows and arrows, sling shots and knives. We hold these truths to be self-evident that all whites are created equal with certain rights; among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of dead niggers.[13] The Citizens’ Councils used economic tactics against African Americans whom they considered as supportive of desegregation and voting rights, or for belonging to the NAACP, or even suspected of being activists; the tactics included “calling in” the mortgages of black citizens, denying loans and business credit, pressing employers to fire certain people, and boycotting black-owned businesses.[14] In some cities, the Councils published lists of names of NAACP supporters and signers of anti-segregation petitions in local newspapers in order to encourage economic retaliation.[15] For instance, in Yazoo City, Mississippi in 1955, the Citizens’ Council published in the local paper the names of 53 signers of a petition for school integration. Soon afterward, the petitioners lost their jobs and had their credit cut off.[16] As Charles Payne puts it, the Councils operated by “unleashing a wave of economic reprisals against anyone, Black or white, seen as a threat to the status quo.”[11] Their targets included black professionals such as teachers, as well as farmers, high school and college students, shop owners, and housewives. Medgar Evers’ first work for the NAACP on a national level involved interviewing Mississippians who had been intimidated by the White Citizens’ Councils and preparing affidavits for use as evidence against the Councils if necessary.[17] Evers was assassinated in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council as well as the Ku Klux Klan.[18] The Citizens’ Council paid his legal expenses in his two trials in 1964, which both resulted in hung juries.[19] In 1994, Beckwith was tried by the state of Mississippi based on new evidence, in part revealed by a lengthy investigation by the Jackson Clarion Ledger; he was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.[20] Many leading state and local politicians were members of the Councils; in some states, this gave the organization immense influence over state legislatures. In Mississippi, the State Sovereignty Commission funded the Citizens’ Councils, in some years providing as much as $50,000. This state agency, funded by the taxes paid by all citizens, also shared information with the Councils that it had collected through investigation and surveillance of integration activists.[21] For example, Dr. M. Ney Williams was both a director of the Citizens’ Council and an adviser to governor Ross Barnett of Mississippi.[22] Barnett was a member of the Council, as was Jackson mayor Allen C. Thompson.[23] In 1955, in the midst of the bus boycott, all three members of the Montgomery city commission in Alabama announced on television that they had joined the Citizens’ Council.[24] Numan Bartley wrote, “In Louisiana the Citizens’ Council organization began as (and to a large extent remained) a projection of the Joint Legislative Committee to Maintain Segregation.”[25] In Louisiana, leaders of the original Citizens’ Council included State Senator and gubernatorial candidate William M. Rainach, U.S. Representative Joe D. Waggonner, Jr., the publisher Ned Touchstone, and Judge Leander Perez, considered the political boss of Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes near New Orleans.[26] After he left the editorship of the Shreveport Journal in 1971, George W. Shannon relocated to Jackson, Mississippi, to work on The Citizen, a monthly magazine of the Citizens’ Council. The Citizen halted publication in January 1979, by which time Shannon had returned to Shreveport.[27] On July 16, 1956, “under pressure from the White Citizens Councils,”[28] the Louisiana State Legislature passed a law mandating racial segregation in nearly every aspect of public life; much of the segregation already existed under Jim Crow custom. The bill was signed into law by governor Earl Long on 16 July 1956 and went into effect on 15 October 1956. The act read, in part: An Act to prohibit all interracial dancing, social functions, entertainments, athletic training, games, sports, or contests and other such activities; to provide for separate seating and other facilities for white and negroes [lower case in original]… That all persons, firms, and corporations are prohibited from sponsoring, arranging, participating in or permitting on premises under their control… such activities involving personal and social contact in which the participants are members of the white and negro races… That white persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for members of the negro race. That negro persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for white persons.[28] Throughout the last half of the 1950s, the White Citizens’ Councils produced racist children’s books that taught that heaven (in the Christian conception) is segregated.[29] The White Citizens’ Council in Mississippi prevented school integration until 1964.[30] As school desegregation increased in some parts of the South, in some communities the White Citizens’ Council sponsored “council schools,” private institutions set up for white children, as these were beyond the reach of the ruling on public schools.[31] Many of these private “segregation academies” continue to operate today. By the 1970s, as white Southerners’ attitudes toward desegregation began to change following passage of federal civil rights legislation and enforcement of integration and voting rights in the 1960s, the activities of the White Citizens’ Councils began to wane. The Council of Conservative Citizens, founded by former White Citizens’ Council members,[2] continued the agendas of the earlier Councils.

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October 27, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Wikipedia

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American far-right organization that supports a large variety of conservative and paleoconservative causes in addition to white nationalism,[2] and white separatism.[3] Its Statement of Principles says that they “oppose all efforts to mix the races of mankind”. Several members of the CofCC Board of Directors are former leaders of the segregationist Citizens’ Councils of America, founded by Bob Patterson, which is commonly referred to as the White Citizens’ Council.[4] The organization is headquartered in St. Louis, MO.[1] Its president is Earl Holt, while Jared Taylor is the group’s spokesman and Paul Fromm is its international director.[5] The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and then relocated to St. Louis, Missouri. The CofCC was formed by various Republicans, conservative Democrats, and some former members of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes called the White Citizens Council, a segregationist organization that was prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. Lester Maddox, former governor of Georgia, was a charter member.[6] Gordon Lee Baum, a retired personal injury lawyer, was CEO until he died in March 2015.[7][8] Earl P. Holt III of Longview, Texas[9][10] is the president. Leonard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord, Sr., Carroll County Coroner, former head of the Carroll Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board.[citation needed] The organization often holds meetings with various other paleoconservative organizations in the United States, and sometimes meets with nationalist organizations from Europe. In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen with a Confederate flag, which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building.[11] Following several articles detailing some of its members’ past involvement with the White Citizens’ Council, several conservative politicians distanced themselves from the organization. One such politician was Bob Barr, who had spoken at CofCC functions, saying he found the group’s racial views to be “repugnant,” and did not realize the nature of the group when he agreed to speak at the group’s meeting.[12] Barr gave the keynote speech at its 1998 national convention.[13] In later years, additional media articles on the involvement of other Republican Party leaders and conservative Democrats with the CofCC attempted to force a distinct denunciation of their association with the organization. For instance, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also been a member of the CofCC. Following the report, the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, denounced the CofCC for holding “racist and nationalist views” and demanded that Lott formally denounce the organization. Although Lott refused to denounce the organization, he stated that he had resigned his membership. Subsequently, Nicholson demanded Lott denounce his former segregationist views following a speech he gave at Senator Strom Thurmond’s birthday dinner when he applauded the Senator’s 1948 Dixiecrat presidential campaign.[14] Following the controversy Nicholson’s demands initiated, Lott apologized for his past support for segregation, his past associations, and his remarks at Thurmond’s birthday. This caused him loss of support from a number of important conservatives, not least Thurmond himself. Consequently, Lott resigned his post as Senate Minority Leader. Similarly, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended an event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor, the “Metro-South Citizens Council”, shortly before the name was changed in the mid-1980s. This was an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake.[15] In 1993, Mike Huckabee, then the Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, agreed to speak at the CofCC’s national convention in Memphis, Tennessee in his pursuit of the governorship of Arkansas. By the time of the CofCC convention, Huckabee was unable to leave Arkansas. Instead, he sent a videotaped speech, which “was viewed and extremely well received by the audience,” according to the CofCC newsletter.[16] However, following his success in the election, in April 1994, Huckabee withdrew from a speaking engagement before the CofCC. He commented, “I will not participate in any program that has racist overtones. I’ve spent a lifetime fighting racism and anti-Semitism.”[17] Other conservative national and state politicians who refused to denounce, distance, or resign their membership and continued attending meetings and giving speeches remained prominent political leaders within the conservative movement. Former Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina remained supportive of the CofCC and consistently won his elections, and support from the CofCC was considered decisive enough that the organization was influential in office throughout his terms in the Senate. Similarly, former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, as well as Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina remained active members and/or gave speeches to the organization. Strom Thurmond remained in the Senate until he retired in 2002. The SPLC and the Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004.[18] The ADL states the following politicians are members or have spoken at meetings: Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. People who have also spoken at CofCC meetings include Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi is said to have attended as well.[19] In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held its National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference. Mississippi is the only state that has major politicians who are open CofCC members, including State Senators and State Representatives. The CofCC once claimed 34 members in the Mississippi legislature.[20] The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives; it supports national self-determination, immigration restriction, federalism, and home rule, and opposes free trade and global capitalism. Its specific issues include states’ rights, race relations (especially interracial marriage, which it opposes), and conservative Christian values. They have criticized Martin Luther King, Jr., who is considered by the organization as a left-wing agitator of Black American communities with notable ties to communism, and holding personal sexual morals unworthy of a person deserving national recognition.[21] They consider the American Civil Rights Movement and the Frankfurt School as elementally subversive to the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of European culture, specifically the British Protestant tradition.[citation needed] The Council of Conservative Citizens is active in organizing the restriction, reduction, or moratorium of immigration, enforcing laws and regulations against illegal aliens, ending what they see as racial discrimination against whites through affirmative action and racial quotas, overturning Supreme Court rulings and Congressional Acts such as forced busing and gun control, ending free trade economic policy, and supporting a conservative sexual morality, which includes promotion of the Defense of Marriage Act and opposition to the inclusion of homosexuality as a civil right. In 2005, after several dozen conservative organizations were designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the CofCC staged a protest in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama.[citation needed] The CofCC continues protesting speaking engagements by Morris Dees in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina, declaring him to be a threat to free speech and a fraud. According to its supporters, the Council of Conservative Citizens opposes globalism, multiculturalism, racism against whites, and an intrusive Federal government. The group says it has a key role in reporting the racial overtones of violence against whites, both in the United States and elsewhere. An April 2005 photo essay on the CofCC website claimed that images of decapitated, burnt and mangled bodies of whites are victims of black violence in South Africa. The website closes with the statement that someday American whites will be a minority and will be subject to the same form of violence.[22] The CofCC’s statement of principles condemns the federal government’s intervention into state and local affairs in forcing racial integration (item 2), free-trade and globalism, immigration by non-Europeans (item 2), homosexuality, and interracial marriage (item 6).[3] The CofCC publishes the Citizens Informer newspaper quarterly. Previous editors include Samuel T. Francis and web designer Joel T. LeFevre.[23] Various critics describe the organization as a hate group. The New York Times called it a white separatist group with a thinly veiled white supremacist agenda.[24] The Anti-Defamation League said “Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups”.[19] The CofCC is considered by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) to be part of the “neo-confederate movement”. In general, organizations such as the NAACP, League of United Latin American Citizens, SPLC (which lists it as a hate group[25]) and the Anti-Defamation League consider it a threat. Max Blumenthal has called it America’s premier racist organization and elementally dangerous to America.[26] Columnist Ann Coulter has defended the group against charges of racism, stating on the basis of a viewing of their website that there is “no evidence” that the CofCC supports segregation.[27] Coulter and Pat Buchanan are listed as being recommended columnists on the organization’s official website. Suspected mass murderer Dylann Roof searched the Internet for information on “black on White crime”, and the first website he found was the CofCC website. He cited its portrayal of “black on White murders” as something that radically changed him (“I have never been the same since that day”).[28][29] The CofCC issued a statement on its website “unequivocally condemn[ing]” the attack, but that Roof has some “legitimate grievances” against black people. An additional statement from Earl Holt III, president of the CofCC, disavowed responsibility for the crime and stated that the group’s website “accurately and honestly report[s] black-on-white violent crime”.[30] In the days following Roof’s arrest and subsequent investigation it was revealed that Holt had made campaign contributions to several conservative politicians including 2016 Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, Scott Walker and Rand Paul, as well as Tom Cotton and Mia Love; all subsequently announced that they would return Holt’s contributions or donate them to a fund for the families of Roof’s victims.[31][32][33]

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October 21, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

The Council Of Conservative Citizens: Dylann Roof’s …

Charleston church shooter Dylann Roofs manifesto cited the hate group Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) as his gateway into the world of white nationalism. The CCC is the modern reincarnation of the old White Citizens Councils, which were formed in the 1950s and 1960s to battle school desegregation in the South. For decades, this racist group has had the ear of a number of prominent politicians, both state and federal, many of whom were members of the group and/or attended events put on the by CCC — a group that has referred to African Americans as a retrograde species of humanity. In 1998, a scandal erupted over prominent Southern politicians’ ties to the brazenly racist group. After it was revealed that former Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.) gave the keynote speech at the CCC’s 1998 national convention and that then-Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) had spoken to the group five times, both claimed they knew nothing about the CCC. As evidence of widespread association between Southern GOP officeholders and the CCC mounted, Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson took the unusual step in 1998 of asking party members to resign from the group because of its racist views. But six years later, many Southern lawmakers were still pandering to and meeting with the CCC and still pleading ignorance. According to a 2004 Intelligence Report review of the Citizens Informer, no fewer than 38 federal, state and local elected officials had attended CCC events between 2000 and 2004, most of them giving speeches to local chapters of the hate group. Since the mid-2000s the groups influence and access to politicians has dwindled considerably. In South Carolina, some influential CCC figures remain actively involved in the politics at the state level. Roan Garcia-Quintana is one of these characters. Garcia-Quintana is a lifetime member of the CCC and sits on the organizations board. Despite these associations, the Cuban-born white nationalist has remained very active in the state politics. Garcia-Quintana ran for the South Carolina state Senates District 7 seat as the Republican nominee in 2008 and came in second with 27 percent of the vote. Garcia-Quintana also sat on S.C. Gov. Nikki Haleys campaign re-election steering committee, before he was forced to resign in 2013 after his ties to the CCC were made public. In comments after his resignation from Haleys committee, he went on to talk about her physical characteristics (she is the daughter of Indian immigrants) in relation to white people. She has the features of a Caucasian: her nose, her eyes, her cheeks, her mouth. Thats really how you describe it. CCC webmaster, white nationalist Kyle Rogers, is another South Carolina-based CCC member who was active in state politics until recently. Rogers served as a delegate to the Charleston County Republican convention in 2007, and Dorchester County, S.C., GOP officials confirmed to SPLC in 2013 that he was a member of that countys Republican Executive Committee. Republican politicians there expressed embarrassment about Rogers participation, saying they had asked him to resign but were unable legally to eject him. Rogers also manages a flag store, Patriotic-Flags.com, which you can visit by clicking an ad on the CCC website. Rogers store sells the flag of the government of Rhodesia, the same flag sewn on the jacket worn by Roof in his Facebook profile. In the hours since the authorization of Dylann Roofs manifesto, the CCC website has crashed and the group is remaining tight-lipped. The longtime CCC leader Gordon Baum died earlier this year and the CCC are yet to name his successor. That individual is going to have to answer to that fact that the hate group was named by Roof, a man who murdered nine African Americans on Wednesday, as the group that acted as his gateway to white nationalism.

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August 23, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council Of Conservative Citizens Founding Member Gordon …

Marcus Cicero Daily Stormer March 13, 2015 One of the leading figures in the pro-White movement has departed from this world, leaving us with the task of attempting to carry on the work of saving a civilization before the final bell tolls. Gordon Lee Baum, one of the founding members of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a stable and logical element in an otherwise overly dramatic and often chaotic Traditionalist/Racialist scene, passed awaylast Thursday at the age of 74. Active throughout his life in causes that were always intended to safeguard a proper moral White society for those who come after us, Mr. Baum was not afraid to speak his mind on issues, drawing forth the hatred of those who wish to see us broken down and eventually exterminated, such as the sociopolitical abomination known as the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). The memory of this great man can be best summed up in the words of his own son-in-law, who wrote a touching memoriam piece a couple of days ago. Occidental Dissent: As many of you are aware by now, my father-in-law, Gordon Lee Baum, Esq., a founder and the present CEO of the Council of Conservative Citizens, passed away last Thursday after a long battle with cancer. He was 74 years old. Gordon was not someone who admitted defeat, who gave up, and that is putting it mildly. Since he was 16-years-old, he spent his entire adult life completely devoted to the cause of our people literally days before his death, while he recovered from pneumonia, he was telling us to call various CofCC members. Even then, his mind was still focused on the cause. In this way, he reminded me of one of my heroes, the South Carolina fire eater Robert Barnwell Rhett, who once said, I will keep up the fire, if like a lost hunter in a prairie, I have to kindle it alone, with my gun flint, and watch by the blaze, rifle in hand to keep off the wolves. That was my father-in-law in his time: when the Civil Rights of Act of 1964 was passed, when the Citizens Councils movement collapsed, when George Wallace, Strom Thurmond, and all the rest repudiated segregation and proclaimed their newfound faith in racial equality, when others quit, Gordon Lee Baum stood firm. As the world entered the present Dark Age, Gordon was there to keep up the fire of resistance. Together with other veterans of the Citizens Councils, he rebuilt the defunct organization as the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) in the 1980s, which has remained down to the present day an island of stability in the pro-White movement in the United States. Gordon Lee Baum fought to the end of his life to secure the future existence of his people. One day I will be able to tell my son, which is his grandson, that his grandfather, unlike so many other people, chose to confront this evil for the sake of his future. Thats the example that I want to live up to. Not wishing to negate the heartfelt emotion in the tribute, nothing more need be said other than the fact that this was a man all of us of European descentshould learn to emulate. Note: Whether one agrees with everything Gordon believed in andfought for or not, please keep the comments section civil on this piece. As Whites, we do not disrespect honorable men andwomen who have passed on, as it is not part of our genetic or cultural makeup.

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August 10, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Citizens’ Councils – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Citizens’ Councils (White Citizens’ Councils) Citizens’ Councils logo Membership Founder The Citizens’ Councils (also referred to as White Citizens’ Councils) were an associated network of white supremacist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South. The first was formed on July 11, 1954[1] After 1956, it was known as the Citizens’ Councils of America. With about 60,000 members across the United States,[2] mostly in the South, the groups were founded primarily to oppose racial integration of schools, but they also opposed voter registration efforts and integration of public facilities during the 1950s and 1960s. Members used severe intimidation tactics including economic boycotts, firing people from jobs, propaganda, and violence against citizens and civil-rights activists. By the 1970s, following passage of federal civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s and enforcement of constitutional rights by the federal government, the influence of the Councils had waned considerably yet remained an institutional basis for the majority of white residents in Mississippi. The successor organization to the White Citizens’ Councils is the St. Louis based Council of Conservative Citizens, founded in 1985[2] to continue collaborations between Ku Klux Klan and white supremacist political agendas in America. Republican politician and past Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi was a member[3] while SC Senator Jesse Helms and GA Representative Bob Barr were both strong supporters of the Council of Conservative Citizens; David Duke also spoke at a fund raising event, while Patrick Buchanan’s campaign manager was linked to both Duke and the Council.[4] In 1996, a Charleston, SC, drive-by shooting by Klan members of three African American males occurred after a Council rally; Dylann Roof, responsible for the 2015 murder of nine Emanuel AME church members in Charleston, espoused Council of Conservative Citizens rhetoric in a manifesto.[5] In 1954 the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. Some sources claim that the White Citizens’ Council first started after this in Greenwood, Mississippi.[6] Others say that it originated in Indianola, Mississippi.[7] The recognized leader was Robert B. Patterson of Indianola,[1][8] a plantation manager and a former captain of the Mississippi State University football team. Additional chapters spread to other southern towns. At this time, most southern states enforced racial segregation of all public facilities; in places where local laws did not require segregation, Jim Crow harassment enforced it. After preliminary post-Civil War Reconstruction efforts led by blacks and poorer whites, the subsequent period from 1890 to 1908 led to disfranchisement of most blacks through the passing of new constitutions and other laws making voter registration and elections more difficult, and led to the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite civil rights organizations winning some legal challenges, most blacks in the 1950s were still retaliated against for registering to vote, as well as for riding buses and sitting at lunch counters,[9] in the South and remained so even after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Patterson and his followers formed the White Citizens Council in part to respond with economic retaliation and violence to increased civil rights activism. The Regional Council of Negro Leadership (RCNL), a grassroots civil rights organization founded in 1951 by T. R. M. Howard of the all-black town Mound Bayou, Mississippi was also 40 miles from Indianola. Aaron Henry, a later official in the RCNL and the future head of the Mississippi NAACP[10] had met Patterson during their childhood. Within a few months, the White Citizens Council had attracted similar racist members; new chapters developed beyond Mississippi in the rest of the Deep South. The Council often had the support of the leading white citizens of many communities, including business, law enforcement, civic and sometimes religious leaders, many of whom were members. Member businesses, such as newspaper publishing, legal representation, medical service, were known for collectively acting against registered voters whose names were first published in local papers before additional retaliatory actions were taken against them. Unlike the Ku Klux Klan but working in unison, the White Citizens Council met openly, and was seen superficially as “pursuing the agenda of the Klan with the demeanor of the Rotary Club.”[11] Although the White Citizens Council publicly eschewed the use of violence,[1] the economic and political tactics used against registered voters and activists embraced institutional violence. The White Citizens Council members collaborated to threaten jobs, causing people to be fired or evicted from rental homes; they boycotted businesses, ensured that activists could not get loans, among other tactics.[6] As historian Charles Payne notes, “Despite the official disclaimers, violence often followed in the wake of Council intimidation campaigns.”[11] Occasionally some Councils directly incited violence, such as lynchings, shootings, rapes, and arson. For instance, in Montgomery, Alabama, during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, at which Senator James Eastland “ranted against the NAACP”[12] at a large openly held Council meeting in the Garrett Coliseum, a mimeographed flyer publicly espousing extreme racial White Citizens Council and Ku Klux Klan rhetoric was distributed, saying: When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary to abolish the Negro race, proper methods should be used. Among these are guns, bows and arrows, sling shots and knives. We hold these truths to be self-evident that all whites are created equal with certain rights; among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of dead niggers.[13] The Citizens’ Councils used economic tactics against African Americans whom they considered as supportive of desegregation and voting rights, or for belonging to the NAACP, or even suspected of being activists; the tactics included “calling in” the mortgages of black citizens, denying loans and business credit, pressing employers to fire certain people, and boycotting black-owned businesses.[14] In some cities, the Councils published lists of names of NAACP supporters and signers of anti-segregation petitions in local newspapers in order to encourage economic retaliation.[15] For instance, in Yazoo City, Mississippi in 1955, the Citizens’ Council published in the local paper the names of 53 signers of a petition for school integration. Soon afterward, the petitioners lost their jobs and had their credit cut off.[16] As Charles Payne puts it, the Councils operated by “unleashing a wave of economic reprisals against anyone, Black or white, seen as a threat to the status quo.”[11] Their targets included black professionals such as teachers, as well as farmers, high school and college students, shop owners, and housewives. Medgar Evers’ first work for the NAACP on a national level involved interviewing Mississippians who had been intimidated by the White Citizens’ Councils and preparing affidavits for use as evidence against the Councils if necessary.[17] Evers was assassinated in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council as well as the Ku Klux Klan.[18] The Citizens’ Council paid his legal expenses in his two trials in 1964, which both resulted in hung juries.[19] In 1994, Beckwith was tried by the state of Mississippi based on new evidence, in part revealed by a lengthy investigation by the Jackson Clarion Ledger; he was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.[20] Many leading state and local politicians were members of the Councils; in some states, this gave the organization immense influence over state legislatures. In Mississippi, the State Sovereignty Commission funded the Citizens’ Councils, in some years providing as much as $50,000. This state agency, funded by the taxes paid by all citizens, also shared information with the Councils that it had collected through investigation and surveillance of integration activists.[21] For example, Dr. M. Ney Williams was both a director of the Citizens’ Council and an adviser to governor Ross Barnett of Mississippi.[22] Barnett was a member of the Council, as was Jackson mayor Allen C. Thompson.[23] In 1955, in the midst of the bus boycott, all three members of the Montgomery city commission in Alabama announced on television that they had joined the Citizens’ Council.[24] Numan Bartley wrote, “In Louisiana the Citizens’ Council organization began as (and to a large extent remained) a projection of the Joint Legislative Committee to Maintain Segregation.”[25] In Louisiana, leaders of the original Citizens’ Council included State Senator and gubernatorial candidate William M. Rainach, U.S. Representative Joe D. Waggonner, Jr., the publisher Ned Touchstone, and Judge Leander Perez, considered the political boss of Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes near New Orleans.[26] After he left the editorship of the Shreveport Journal in 1971, George W. Shannon relocated to Jackson, Mississippi, to work on The Citizen, a monthly magazine of the Citizens’ Council. The Citizen halted publication in January 1979, by which time Shannon had returned to Shreveport.[27] On July 16, 1956, “under pressure from the White Citizens Councils,”[28] the Louisiana State Legislature passed a law mandating racial segregation in nearly every aspect of public life; much of the segregation already existed under Jim Crow custom. The bill was signed into law by governor Earl Long on 16 July 1956 and went into effect on 15 October 1956. The act read, in part: An Act to prohibit all interracial dancing, social functions, entertainments, athletic training, games, sports, or contests and other such activities; to provide for separate seating and other facilities for white and negroes [lower case in original]… That all persons, firms, and corporations are prohibited from sponsoring, arranging, participating in or permitting on premises under their control… such activities involving personal and social contact in which the participants are members of the white and negro races… That white persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for members of the negro race. That negro persons are prohibited from sitting in or using any part of seating arrangements and sanitary or other facilities set apart for white persons.[28] Throughout the last half of the 1950s, the White Citizens’ Councils produced racist children’s books that taught that heaven (in the Christian conception) is segregated.[29] The White Citizens’ Council in Mississippi prevented school integration until 1964.[30] As school desegregation increased in some parts of the South, in some communities the White Citizens’ Council sponsored “council schools,” private institutions set up for white children, as these were beyond the reach of the ruling on public schools.[31] Many of these private “segregation academies” continue to operate today. By the 1970s, as white Southerners’ attitudes toward desegregation began to change following passage of federal civil rights legislation and enforcement of integration and voting rights in the 1960s, the activities of the White Citizens’ Councils began to wane. The Council of Conservative Citizens, founded by former White Citizens’ Council members,[2] continued the agendas of the earlier Councils and by the 1990s was intertwined with efforts by the Republican Party establishment to regain control of both the House and Senate in Washington, DC.

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July 28, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Isnt it time you joined? – Conservative Headlines

Welcome to the Council of Conservative Citizens National Website! The CofCC is the countrys most effective conservative activist group. Dr. Sam Francis, (RIP 1947 2005) Nationally Syndicated Columnist, Former Writer for the Washington Times, Former Editor of the Citizens Informer, Author of the CofCC Statement of Principles. Read what Sam Francis had to say about the Council of Conservative Citizens in this column published in the Washington Times. Check out this classic interview with CofCC CEO Gordon Baum from Media Bypass magazine. Gordon Baum describes the Art of Cultural Activism. This is not some DC based paper tiger, where all the money goes to salaries and fund-raising. This is a group with real members, real chapters, and real activism. No one in the CofCC draws a salary. Membership is only $36 a year for an individual or a married couple! All new members will receive: 1. Membership Card 2. Booklet on the MLK Holiday by Dr. Sam Francis & Sen. Jesse Helms 3. Issue 7 of the Occasional Papers from the Conservative Citizens Foundation 4. FREE DVD: The Frankfurt School (limited time only) Watch video clip. 5. Council Reporter Newsletter: Once a year mailing for National Conference. 6. Subscription to the Citizens Informer, published quarterly. Each issue of the Citizens Informer contains a section called Council News, that details some of the activities of our local chapters. The Council of Conservative Citizens, the no longer silent majority, is a genuinely active national organization effectively organizing and winning! The C of CC was organized by conservative leaders from throughout the nation, who met in Atlanta, Georgia to build an updated organization in which the silent majority could participate at the local, state, and national levels. Were organizing conservative activists, developing unity, and successfully building a network of chapters and supporters at the grass-roots level nationwide to serve as a responsible, effective voice and active advocate for the no-longer silent conservative majority. This is a unification movement that is desperately needed and long overdue. Individualistic-minded conservatives have failed to properly organize while the Left (being more collectivist-minded) has developed organization into an art form. Most politicians will cater to those blocs that they perceive as being able to help (or hurt) them the most at the ballot box. However, a purely national group has little local influence and all politics is local. On the other hand, purely local groups with no national or regional structural coordination fractionate our efforts and dissipate our resources. Single issue groups, while performing an important role, are too narrowly focused. We know that conservatives can rebuild their political power only by beginning at the grass roots, unifying our efforts and focusing our resources. Our local groups work at the local level on local issues, and cooperate nationally to bring their power to bear on the important national issues. Others put their faith in Washington lobbyists to accomplish the difficult job of getting the conservative viewpoint before Congress. We rely on the people back home. Others put their faith in political parties to get the conservative message to federal, state, and local officials. We rely on the members of our local chapters to tell officials directly what conservatives want, if necessary at the ballot box, and encouraging sound conservatives to run for office, and volunteers and workers to support the candidates. And its working! Were winning the attention of politicians and the confidence of voters. After only a short time, the CofCC has had a major effect simply because we recognize that a victory achieved or election won at the local level is far more important than any number of prestigious contests or races lost. We have winning experience. The Council of Conservative Citizens is unique in another way it was founded and is staffed by men and women whose political experience comes from every responsible social movement, conservative organization, and effective political party in America. Our founders, officers, and members include conservative academics, expert political organizers, union officers, farmers, businessmen, professionals, and elected officials. Together, we represent the total experience of the conservative movement in America. We know who we are through our affiliation with the new Conservative Citizens Foundation. The Foundation (which does not advocate or oppose legislation or candidates) conducts in depth surveys and studies of the views, attitudes, and priorities both of conservatives and of the public at large something no other conservative group is doing. Using information supplied by the non-partisan CCF, the Council educates Americans on and organizes them around the issues they themselves feel to be important, issues that are critical for America. To win we must build locally, and unify and focus our resources and efforts.

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June 18, 2016   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens | Southern Poverty Law Center

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) is the modern reincarnation of the old White Citizens Councils, which were formed in the 1950s and 1960s to battle school desegregation in the South. Created in 1985 from the mailing lists of its predecessor organization, the CCC, which initially tried to project a “mainstream” image, has evolved into a crudely white supremacist group whose website has run pictures comparing pop singer Michael Jackson to an ape and referred to blacks as “a retrograde species of humanity.” The group’s newspaper, Citizens Informer, regularly publishes articles condemning “race mixing,” decrying the evils of illegal immigration, and lamenting the decline of white, European civilization. In Its Own Words “God is the author of racism. God is the One who divided mankind into different types. … Mixing the races is rebelliousness against God.” Council of Conservative Citizens website, 2001 “We believe the United States is a European country and that Americans are part of the European people. We therefore oppose the massive immigration of non-European and non-Western peoples into the United States that threatens to transform our nation into a non-European majority in our lifetime. We believe that illegal immigration must be stopped, if necessary by military force and placing troops on our national borders; that illegal aliens must be returned to their own countries; and that legal immigration must be severely restricted or halted through appropriate changes in our laws and policies. We also oppose all efforts to mix the races of mankind, to promote non-white races over the European-American people through so-called affirmative action’ and similar measures, to destroy or denigrate the European-American heritage, including the heritage of the Southern people, and to force the integration of the races.” Statement of Principles, Citizens Informer, 2007 “Controlling immigration is about the security of this republic [terrorists illegally crossing the borders] and making sure countries like Mexico stop dumping their murderers, rapists, those carrying AIDS and other communicable diseases and gang members on America’s door step.” Devvy Kidd, Citizens Informer, 2006 Background Founded in 1985 by Gordon Baum, a worker’s compensation attorney and longtime racist activist, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) rose from the ashes of the Citizens Councils of America (CCA), commonly called “White Citizens Councils,” a coalition of white-supremacist groups and individuals formed throughout the South to defend school segregation after the Supreme Court outlawed the policy in 1954 in Brown vs. Board of Education. Unlike the KKK, the CCA groups had a veneer of civic respectability, inspiring future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall to refer to it as the “uptown Klan.” While there were plenty of bare-knuckle racists attracted to the councils’ anti-integration slogan, “Never!,” the members also included bankers, merchants, judges, newspaper editors and politicians folks given more to wearing suits and ties than hoods and robes. During the White Citizens Councils’ heyday, the groups claimed more than 1 million members. Although they weren’t immune to violence Byron De La Beckwith, who murdered civil-rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963, was a member the councils generally used their political and financial pull to offset the effects of “forced integration.” Once the segregation battle was lost, the air went out of the White Citizens Councils. The councils steadily lost members throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Sensing the need for a new direction, Baum, formerly the CCA’s Midwest field director, called together a group of 30 white men, including former Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox and future Louisiana Congressman John Rarick, for a meeting in Atlanta in 1985. Together, they cooked up a successor organization: the Council of Conservative Citizens. Like the original White Citizens Councils, the CCC is made up of local chapters, some of which are active in civic affairs beyond the national group’s racist agenda. And until the 2000s, some of the group’s “uptown” attitude remained, as meetings resembled Rotary Club events more than Klan outings and regularly featured politicians as keynote speakers. Most Americans learned of the CCC in late 1998, when a scandal erupted over prominent Southern politicians’ ties to the brazenly racist group. After it was revealed that former Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.) gave the keynote speech at the CCC’s 1998 national convention and that then-Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) had spoken to the group five times, both claimed they knew nothing about the CCC. However, an Intelligence Report investigation, publicized by national television and newspaper reports, made clear what the CCC really was: a hate group that routinely denigrated blacks as “genetically inferior,” complained about “Jewish power brokers,” called LGBT people “perverted sodomites,” accused immigrants of turning America into a “slimy brown mass of glop,” and named Lester Maddox, the now-deceased, ax handle-wielding, arch-segregationist former governor of Georgia, “Patriot of the Century.” As evidence of widespread association between Southern GOP officeholders and the CCC mounted, Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson took the unusual step in 1998 of asking party members to resign from the group because of its racist views. A resolution moved through the U.S. Congress “condemning the racism and bigotry espoused by the Council of Conservative Citizens,” although it ultimately failed. (Congress had earlier condemned the black supremacist Nation of Islamin a similar manner, but failed to do the same with the CCC. Republican Party leaders, likely embarrassed by Lott’s very public connection to the CCC, managed to defeat the censure effort.)

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May 20, 2015   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens — Extremism in America

Combating Hate: Domestic Extremism & Terrorism December1,2001 The St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens traces its roots directly to the racist, anti-integrationist White Citizens’ Councils of the 1950s and 1960s. Its current leader, atorney Gordon Lee Baum, was an organizer for the WCC and built the Council of Conservative Citizens in part from the old group’s mailing lists. Like its predecessor, the CCC inflames fears and resentments, particularly among Southern whites, with regard to black-on-white crime, nonwhite immigration, attacks on the Confederate flag and other issues related to “traditional” Southern culture. Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups and its publications, Web sites and meetings all promote the purportedly innate superiority of whites. Despite its record, the CCC has been successful in drawing southern politicians to its events: the 1998 revelation that then Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had been a frequent speaker before the group drew substantial media attention. Mississippi governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators and several state representatives have appeared in recent years. Read the full report, Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens (PDF).

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May 20, 2015   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed


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