Archive for the ‘Council of Conservative Citizens’ Category

Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens

Combating Hate: Domestic Extremism & Terrorism

December1,2001

The St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens traces its roots directly to the racist, anti-integrationist White Citizens’ Councils of the 1950s and 1960s. Its current leader, atorney Gordon Lee Baum, was an organizer for the WCC and built the Council of Conservative Citizens in part from the old group’s mailing lists. Like its predecessor, the CCC inflames fears and resentments, particularly among Southern whites, with regard to black-on-white crime, nonwhite immigration, attacks on the Confederate flag and other issues related to “traditional” Southern culture. Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups and its publications, Web sites and meetings all promote the purportedly innate superiority of whites. Despite its record, the CCC has been successful in drawing southern politicians to its events: the 1998 revelation that then Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had been a frequent speaker before the group drew substantial media attention. Mississippi governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators and several state representatives have appeared in recent years.

Read the full report, Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens (PDF).

Read more from the original source:

Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens

Fair Usage Law

October 13, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Americas virulent racists: The sick ideas and perverted science of the American Renaissance Foundation

The American Renaissance Foundation is an extremely conservative right-wing organization that also publishes a monthly magazine of the same name, American Renaissance (AR). The magazines first issue appeared in November 1990. The foundation was established by Jared Taylor (1952) who serves as president of the New Century Foundation and as editor of AR. Taylor has ties to a variety of domestic and international racists and extremists. He is on the editorial advisory board of Citizens Informer, the newspaper of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a virulently racist group whose website has referred to blacks as a retrograde species of humanity. He has contributed writings to The Occidental Quarterly, a racist journal. He also has been a member of the board of directors of the National Policy Institute, a self-styled racist think tank, and has received funding from this institute.

Taylor has close ties with members of various neo-Nazi groups and with Gordon Baum, the CEO of Council of Conservative Citizens. He is a frequent radio guest of Don Blacks, operator of Stormfront, a white supremacist online forum that also advertises American Renaissance conferences. He also has ties to Mark Weber, head of the Institute for Historical Review. European racists are among his close associates, including members of the British National Party, a racist, far-right political party in England, and the National Front, a racist, far-right political party in France. Nick Griffin, the head of the British National Party, has been a speaker at two American Renaissance conferences. Frdric Legrand, a member of the National Front, is a frequent contributor to American Renaissance.

Jared Taylor has written and edited a number of books with racist themes. One of ARs and Taylors favorite and oft-used quotes, recalling fifteenth-century polygenecist thought, is that of zoologist Raymond Hall from an early issue of Mankind Quarterly: Two subspecies of the same species do not occur in the same geographic area. Taylor believes that slavery may have been wrong but the alternative was Negro pandemonium. He complains that civil rights laws prohibiting racial discrimination have turned common sense into a crime. In 2005, he wrote in AR: When blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilizationany kind of civilizationdisappears. He argues that racial diversity is a negative for society and that racial integration has failed. Taylor promotes the main Pioneer Fund themes of a genetic basis for differences in intelligence between the races, the benefits of racial homogeneity, a propensity of African Americans to commit crimes at higher rates than whites, and the need to reverse an alleged reconquest of the American Southwest by Mexicans.

Both the American Renaissance Foundation and its magazine are dedicated to the ideal that the United States is a white European nation. Its publications and biennial conferences state that the foundations goal is to demonstrate the purported superiority of the white race and the threat nonwhite minorities pose to American society. The stated purpose of the journal, from the outset, was to create a literate, undeceived journal of race, immigration and the decline of civility. It held that for a nation to be a nationand not just a crowdit must consist of people that share the same culture, language, history and aspirations. To the foundation, race is an essential ingredient for citizenship. Blacks and Third World immigrants did not really belong in the United States and certainly could not be real Americans.

ARs list of some of its subscribers provides insight into the historical underpinnings and views of the American Renaissance Foundation. Included on its list of Americans Who Have Advanced White Interests are Jared Taylor; David Duke; Robert E. Lee; Arthur Jensen; William Shockley; Wilmot Robertson, who viewed Hitler as defender of the white race; Revilo P. Oliver, who argued that Hitler should be recognized as a semi-divine figure; William Pierce, founder of the Nazi group National Alliance; George Wallace, past governor of Alabama; Madison Grant; and Theodore Bilbo. In a survey of subscribers, Adolf Hitler ranked first (by a large margin) among Foreigners Who Have Advanced White Interests. Hitler also ranked as first among Foreigners Who Have Damaged White Interests, probably because his policies were a public relations disaster for the racist and anti-Semitic causes. Among the list of Americans Who Have Damaged White Interests is every U.S. president since 1932 except Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan. The first four people on this list are Lyndon Johnson, Franklin Roosevelt, William Clinton, and Abraham Lincoln (the list was compiled before Obamas presidency).

A major debate that has been extensively covered in the pages of AR is the question of what of two strategies whites should follow in order to preserve racial survival in the face of the brown threat. The first strategy is racial segregation and immigration restriction and, if that is not effective, to enter into negotiations with black and Hispanic nationalists to establish racially based nations within the United States. The second alternative, as articulated by Samuel Francis, a regular contributor to AR, is to exercise the white mans instinctual . . . proclivity to expand and conquer and thus achieve a reconquest of the United States. To accomplish this goal, Francis believes that the phony rights of nonwhites should be revoked. These include voting, holding office, attending schools with whites, serving on juries, marrying across racial lines, serving in the armed forces, buying homes near whites, and eating at lunch counters with, riding on buses with, holding jobs with, or even associating with superior whites. Further, he proposes that we should seal the nations borders and impose fertility controls on nonwhites. Francis also points out that the first solution of partitioning nonwhites would pose problems related to the definition of Eastern and southern Europeans, Jews, and even the Irish.

For Francis, the statement in the Declaration of Independence that all men are created equal was one of the most dangerous sentences ever written, one of the major blunders of American History. So we see in the pages of the AR a reflection of the history of polygenics and racism, mirroring ideas that have persisted through the ages, beginning with the Spanish Inquisition, going through colonization, slavery, the eugenics movement, Nazism, and the fight against the civil rights movement.

The American Renaissance conferences, which began in 1994, have become a gathering place for white supremacists, white nationalists, white separatists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, Holocaust deniers, and eugenicists. It has become a place where many of the usual Pioneer Fund proponents can voice their vitriolic racial hatred to a mostly friendly audience. The conferences are open to the public and usually attended by 200300 people. Frequent speakers at the conferences have included Richard Lynn, J. Philippe Rushton, Jared Taylor, and many Pioneer Fund grantees. Many of these amazingly racist lectures can be viewed on YouTube.

Many of the papers in AR and lectures at American Renaissance conferences are given by the same old Pioneer Fund people. Here are just a few examples, as pointed out by Tucker. Arthur Jensen in an AR conversation stated that the countrys attempt to build a multiracial nation is doomed to failure. He also claimed that at least one-quarter of all blacks are mentally retarded and not really educatable. Glayde Whitney, as a contributing editor of AR, wrote a regular column in which he suggested that different races did not belong in the same species. Lynn wrote in AR that environment has no effect on IQ scores and that differences between blacks and whites are entirely genetic. In a lecture at an AR conference, Rushton said that race differences were natures way of allowing people to distinguish friend from foe. Michael Levin declared at a conference that whites dominate mankind in all of the important criteria for evaluating accomplishments in society, and in AR he wrote that the average black is not as good a person as the average white. Levin also believed that whites would realize this and once again discriminate against blacks in housing, employment, and schools. Taylor approved of Levins predictions and speculated that his inspired vision would lead to policies strikingly similar to those of the pre-civil rights American South. At the 2000 AR conference, Taylor was greeted with a burst of applause when he speculated that whites may have lost so much ground in the last century because of Jews.

In 2010, the American Renaissance conference was scheduled to be held in Washington, D.C., as usual. However, the conference had to be canceled because of protests by a number of groups over the racist content of the upcoming conference. Late in October 2010, American Renaissance was planning to hold the conference in February 2011 at an undisclosed location in Charlotte, N.C. This was the first time in over a decade that the conference was not held in the Washington, D.C., area, and the first time it was to be held in an off year for the biennial conference. After it was discovered that the conference was to be held at the Airport Sheraton and the underlying theme of the conference became known, the hotel canceled the groups reservations. Other hotels in the area followed suit, also shutting their doors to the conference. Taylor was eventually forced to cancel the event. Instead, he held a session in another hotel where the planned speakers and a few spectators gathered to videotape the speeches.

See original here:

Americas virulent racists: The sick ideas and perverted science of the American Renaissance Foundation

Fair Usage Law

October 12, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

ADL Backgrounder – The Council of Conservative Citizens

December 21, 1998

Founded in the mid-1980s, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) bills itself as a “grassroots” organization working on issues of concern to conservatives. It currently has chapters in over 20 states across the nation. The group claims to be fighting the “leftist war” against Americas Christian heritage and civil liberties. It opposes affirmative action, “big” government, gun control and increased immigration.

In fact, the CCC has its roots in the Citizens Councils of America, a racist and anti-Semitic organization formed in the 1950s and dedicated to states rights and preserving segregation in the South. The Citizens Councils, known for intimidating and harassing Blacks involved in the civil rights movement, printed and distributed pamphlets containing inflammatory racist speeches by various segregationists. The pamphlets had titles such as “Segregation and the South,” which described Black Americans as “having an inherent deficiency in mental ability,” and ” a natural indolence,” and “The Ugly Truth About the NAACP,” which accused the organization of being controlled by Communists intent on destroying America.

Gordon Lee Baum, the current Chief Executive Officer of the CCC was at one time a field director for the Citizens Councils of America. In 1989, the CCC absorbed that organization. In addition, CCC named its newspaper Citizens Informer after the publication of the Citizens Councils. The CCC claims that it does not advocate racism. However, material on its web site and its choice of speakers points to the groups apparent desire to continue the legacy of its predecessor. The group often invites speakers with extremist views to address its constituents. Various white supremacists and Christian Identity (a doctrine that maintains that Anglo-Saxons are the Biblical “chosen people,” that nonwhites are “mud people” on the level of animals, and that Jews are the “children of Satan”) preachers have been asked to speak at local and national events.

The CCCs web site features numerous articles and essays that expose its pro-white, anti-minority stance. In addition, the site contains pieces labeling Martin Luther King, Jr. a Communist, lamenting the Souths loss in the Civil War, and defending the use of the Confederate flag.

The fact that the CCC in the past invited mainstream politicians such as Mississippi Senator Trent Lott and Georgia Congressman Bob Barr (both of whom have since distanced themselves from the group) to be keynote speakers at its conferences lends the group a false air of legitimacy. However, many speakers who have addressed CCC meetings are unabashedly racist and anti-Semitic.

Continue reading here:

ADL Backgrounder – The Council of Conservative Citizens

Fair Usage Law

September 14, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

The Council of Conservative Citizens: Chronology of a Scandal

Last Updated February 4, 1999

What follows is a chronology of events and reporting of a peculiar scandal surrounding Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and Georgia Congressman Robert “Bob” Barr over the nature and extent of connections they may have had with a racist group known as the Council of Conservative Citizens. This group, sporting about 15,000 members, mostly in the South, is essentially a descendant of the white Citizens Councils that formerly opposed integration in the South. Headed by Gordon Lee Baum, a St. Louis lawyer, its issues involve the protection of “European-American” heritage against the hordes of minorities.

To someone who follows the extreme right, as I do, what happened in the winter of 1998-99 was not really “news,” for the Council had long trumpeted its association with politicians such as Trent Lott. Outside the circles of the extreme right, however, this was not widely known. When it was brought to the attention of the mainstream media, it became big news. The situation is reminiscent of the 1996 presidential primary season, when one of Patrick Buchanans campaign chairmen was forced to resign after his ties with white supremacist and other extremist groups became known to the mainstream media. Watchdog groups, of course, had long known Larry Pratts extensive involvement with the extreme right.

Nevertheless, it is indeed an important issue that major leaders in the United States have been accused of connections with racist groups. We should be pleased that the media has given it the attention that it has.

To allow someone to follow the scandal and its history, I have provided this chronology, based on public source information. The dates in the chronology are actually the dates in which the articles on which the chronology is based were printed, not the date that Person X said Quote Y. This was done to allow people to find the articles more easily. One exception is that Associated Press reports are usually released on the same day, not the day after. This is also true of television shows.

There are other relevant sites, too:

I have also included some other materials along with this chronology, taken from the Militia Watchdog archives. These include:

Read more from the original source:

The Council of Conservative Citizens: Chronology of a Scandal

Fair Usage Law

August 31, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Keli Goff: Why KKK's latest efforts could be a good sign

Last week CNN sparked a backlash with its headline, “Can the Klan rebrand?” The network’s story was a look at the Ku Klux Klan’s efforts to distance itself from its reputation as a violence-inciting hate group in the wake of former Klan Grand Dragon Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, being charged in a shooting spree that left three people dead at two Jewish facilities in Kansas.

Apparently, having a high-profile hate murderer affiliated with one’s group can put a damper on your image.

But Cross isn’t the only one keeping the KKK in the news. It was just announced that a Klan chapter in Fairview Township, Pa., has launched a neighborhood watch. I guess they think that if George Zimmerman’s shooting of Trayvon Martin has taught us anything, it’s that we need more people who buy into dangerous racial stereotypes patrolling neighborhoods in a quest to keep them “safe.”

A few weeks ago, the Klan began leafleting other neighborhoods in Pennsylvania, as well as Texas, Illinois and Louisiana, with fliers intended to recruit new members.

On Easter Sunday another incident believed to be the work of hate groups made the news. During an Easter egg hunt, residents of Henrico County, Va., discovered Easter eggs filled with racist messages. Among them, “Diversity = white genocide” and “Mass immigration and forced assimilation of nonwhites into our lands is genocide.”

Though the Klan has not specifically been linked to the egg incident, the message being perpetuated by it is certainly one the Klan would likely appreciate, which is this: America is becoming unlivable for those who yearn for the America of yesterday. An America that didn’t have a black president, and not just black, but one who is the product of a relationship between a black man and a white woman. And an America in which minorities are rapidly becoming the majority.

In 2012 I interviewed Gordon Baum, longtime head of the white supremacist group Council of Conservative Citizens. During one interview he expressed concern about the fact that white babies no longer made up the majority of babies being born, noting at the time, “Well, we’ve been warning about that.” He added: “Do we want to see our country become more like where these people (racial minorities) are from or not? Now that’s a quantitative judgment. And we as an organization prefer to see it remain as it was … when Europeans had America.”

Perhaps he’s never heard of Native Americans but I digress.

Baum was certainly not alone in his thinking. As I later wrote for The Root, white supremacist sites were overwhelmed with traffic in the days following President Barack Obama’s election.

Which is why I believe these latest efforts by the Klan, as disheartening as they are, really could be a good sign.Intolerance is at its most passionate and visible not when inequality reigns supreme but when equality gains ground.

View original post here:

Keli Goff: Why KKK's latest efforts could be a good sign

Fair Usage Law

April 28, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Conservapedia

From Conservapedia

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an extremist American right-wing paleoconservative organization that supports a large variety of conservative causes. It is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, and its most active chapter is in Mississippi. However, it is active throughout the United States. The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, by various leaders of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes referred to as the “White Citizens’ Council”, the American Populist Party, and others.

The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives and they also seek to promote some of the ideals of the Confederate States of America. Its specific issues include states rights, race relations, and conservative Christianity. The Council of Conservative Citizens is currently fighting against immigration by non-whites, affirmative action and racial quotas, interracial marriage, homosexuality, forced busing for school integration, and gun control. It opposes Communism in favour of a Constitutional Republic. Due to its bigoted attitude to interracial marriage, its support of segregation and its ties to the Ku Klux Klan it has been criticized for being a hate group.

Official Website

Excerpt from:

Council of Conservative Citizens – Conservapedia

Fair Usage Law

April 13, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

League of the South Protests Mark Herring in Richmond – Video



League of the South Protests Mark Herring in Richmond
Video of the League of the South's and the Council of Conservative Citizens' demonstration protesting Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring's refusal to def…

By: RedShirtArmy

View original post here:

League of the South Protests Mark Herring in Richmond – Video

Fair Usage Law

April 10, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Wikipedia, the free …

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American political organization that supports a large variety of conservative and paleoconservative causes in addition to white nationalism,[1] and white separatism.[2] Several members of the CofCC Board of Directors are former leaders of the segregationist Citizens’ Councils of America, founded by Major Bob Patterson, which is commonly referred to as the White Citizens’ Council.[3] The organization is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Other US states with active chapters include Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Texas, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, California and New York. Sporadic CofCC activities occur in other parts of the country as well.

The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and then relocated to St. Louis, Missouri, and then relocated in 2013 to Irving, Texas.[citation needed] The CofCC was formed by various Republicans, Conservative Democrats, and some former members of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes called the White Citizens Council, a segregationist organization that was prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. Lester Maddox, former governor of Georgia, was a charter member.[4] Gordon Lee Baum is the current CEO. Tom Dover, head of Dover Cylinder Repair is the president. Leonard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord, Sr., Carroll County Coroner, former head of the Carroll Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board.

The organization often holds meetings with various other paleo-conservative organizations in the United States, and sometimes meets with Nationalist organizations from Europe. In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen with a Confederate flag, which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building.[5]

Following several articles detailing some of its members past involvement with the White Citizens Council, several conservative politicians distanced themselves from the organization. One such politician was Bob Barr, who had spoken at CofCC functions, saying he found the group’s racial views to be “repugnant,” and didn’t realize the nature of the group when he agreed to speak at the group’s meeting.[6]

In later years, additional media articles on the involvement of other Republican Party leaders and conservative Democrats with the CofCC attempted to force a distinct denunciation of their association with the organization. For instance, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also been a member of the CofCC. Following the report, the CofCC was denounced by the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, for holding “racist and nationalist views” and demanded that Lott formally denounce the organization. Although Lott refused to denounce the organization, he stated that he had resigned his membership. Subsequently, Nicholson, demanded Lott denounce his former segregationist views following a speech he gave at Senator Strom Thurmond’s birthday dinner when he applauded the Senator’s former Dixiecrat Presidential campaign.[7] Following the ensuring controversy Nicholson’s demands initiated, Lott once again apologized for his past support for segregation, his past associations, and his remarks at Thurmond’s birthday. This caused his loss of support from a number of important conservatives, not least, Thurmond himself. Consequently, Lott resigned his post as Senate Minority Leader. Similarly, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended an event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor the “Metro-South Citizens Council” shortly before the name change in the mid-1980s. This was an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake.[8] However, rather than gain him support, his denunciation appears to have cost him votes in Democratic primaries for the Presidency.[citation needed] Similarly, in 1993, Mike Huckabee, then the Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, agreed to speak at the CofCC’s national convention in Memphis, Tennessee in his pursuit of the Governorship of Arkansas. By the time of the CofCC convention, Huckabee was unable to leave Arkansas. Instead, he sent a videotaped speech, which “was viewed and extremely well received by the audience,” according to the CofCC newsletter.[9] However, following his success in the election, in April 1994, Huckabee withdrew from a speaking engagement before the CofCC. He commented, “I will not participate in any program that has racist overtones. I’ve spent a lifetime fighting racism and anti-Semitism.”[10]

Other prominent conservative national and state politicians who were members refused to denounce, distance, or resign their membership, and continued attending meetings and giving speeches remained prominent political leaders within the conservative movement including former Senator Jesse Helms. Senator Helms remained supportive of the CofCC and consistently won his elections, and support from the CofCC was considered decisive enough that the organization was influential in office throughout his terms in the Senate. Similarly, former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, as well as Senator Strom Thurmond remained active members and/or gave speeches to the organization. Strom Thurmond remained in the Senate until he retired in 2002.

The SPLC and the Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004.[11] The ADL states the following politicians are members or have spoken at meetings: Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. People who have also spoken at CofCC meetings include Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi is said to have attended as well.[12]

In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held its National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference.

The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives; it supports national self-determination, immigration restriction, federalism and home rule, and opposes free trade and global capitalism. Its specific issues include states’ rights, race relations (especially interracial marriage, which it opposes), and conservative Christian values. They have criticized Martin Luther King, Jr., who is considered by the organization as a left-wing agitator of Black American communities with notable ties to communism, and holding personal sexual morals unworthy of a person deserving national recognition.[13] They consider the American Civil Rights Movement and the Frankfurt School as elementally subversive to the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of European culture, specifically the British Protestant tradition. The Council of Conservative Citizens is active in organizing the restriction, reduction, or moratorium of immigration, enforcing laws and regulations against illegal aliens, ending what they see as racial discrimination against whites through affirmative action and racial quotas, overturning Supreme Court rulings and Congressional Acts such as forced busing and gun control, ending free trade economic policy, and supporting a conservative sexual morality which includes promotion of the Defense of Marriage Act and opposition to the inclusion of homosexuality as a civil right.

In 2005, after several dozen conservative organizations were designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the CofCC staged a protest in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama.[citation needed] About 72 members organized a demonstration of several hundred protesters receiving state-wide publicity and focusing attention on the SPLC’s fundraising and raising suspicions of demagoguery by the center. The CofCC continues protesting speaking engagements by Morris Dees in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina, declaring him to be a threat to free speech and a fraud.

More:

Council of Conservative Citizens – Wikipedia, the free …

Fair Usage Law

January 6, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Metapedia

From Metapedia

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American paleoconservative political organization that supports a large variety of localized grassroots causes and which opposes forced integration, multiculturalism and political correctness. Some members of the CofCC board of directors are former leaders of the Citizen Councils of America, founded by Maj. Bob Patterson. It is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, and its most active chapter is in Mississippi. Other states with active chapters include Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and New York. The group is estimated to have 15,000 members.[1]

The CofCC publishes the Citizens Informer newspaper quarterly. Previously edited by the late Samuel Francis, Joel T. LeFevre took over, and the editorial board includes Baum, Virginia Abernethy, Sam G. Dickson, Wayne Lutten, and Jared Taylor. Recent contributors to the Citizen Informer have included Ilana Mercer, Lawrence Auster, and Robert Locke. It has also printed syndicated columns of Joseph Sobran, Patrick Buchanan and Congressional speeches of Ron Paul. The CofCC has a non-profit foundation, the Conservative Citizens Foundation, which is currently raising money for a Confederate monument project.

The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neoconservatives and they also seek to promote some of the ideals of the Confederate States of America. Its specific issues include states rights, race relations, and conservative Christianity. They have attacked communist Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, the so-called Civil Rights Movement, and the Frankfurt School on their website. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of the European cultural tradition. The Council of Conservative Citizens is currently fighting against immigration by non-whites, affirmative action and racial quotas, interracial marriage, homosexuality, forced busing for school integration, and gun control. The CofCC also looks favorably towards European nationalist and anti-immigration groups such as British National Party, Front National, and Vlaams Belang.

The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and is now headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Lester Maddox, the late former governor of Georgia, was a charter member. Gordon Lee Baum is the current CEO. Tom Dover, head of Dover Cylinder Repair is the president. Lenard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord Sr, Carrol County Coroner, former head of the Carrol Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board.

In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s Front National party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen a Confederate flag; which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building.

The CofCC became involved in national politics during the 1990s when journalists attacked the group and reported that many politicians, including Bob Barr, had belonged to or spoken at CofCC functions, had either attended the group’s meetings, corresponded with its leaders, and/or spoken favorably of it. U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also spoken at a CofCC meeting. In the ensuing controversy the CofCC was denounced by the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, for holding “racist and nationalist views”. Other national and state politicians who have given speeches or attended CofCC meetings include former Senator Jesse Helms, and former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. Former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor the “Metro-South Citizens Council” shortly before the name change in the mid-1980s an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake. The Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004. Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, also have spoke at CofCC meetings. U.S. Rep. Roger Wicker is said to have attended meetings of the group. In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held their National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference.

In 2005 the CofCC staged the largest protest ever held in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama. About 72 members demonstrated and received state-wide publicity. The CofCC has also protested speaking engagements by Morris Dees (accused child molestor and far-left extremist associated with the Southern Poverty Law Center) in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina. An April 2005 photo essay on the CCC website shows gruesome pictures of decapitated, burnt and mangled bodies of white victims of violence in South Africa, while the caption states that whites may one day become a minority in the United States.

In Mississippi there are several chapters that are working closely with private academies. These academies (many of which were originally called council schools) in Mississippi are inexpensive private schools that provide whites with an alternative to sending their children to majority-black public schools.

Mississippi is the only state that has major politicians who are open CofCC members, including State Senators and Representatives. The CofCC once claimed 34 members in the Mississippi legislature.

See the rest here:

Council of Conservative Citizens – Metapedia

Fair Usage Law

January 6, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens

Combating Hate: Domestic Extremism & Terrorism December1,2001 The St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens traces its roots directly to the racist, anti-integrationist White Citizens’ Councils of the 1950s and 1960s. Its current leader, atorney Gordon Lee Baum, was an organizer for the WCC and built the Council of Conservative Citizens in part from the old group’s mailing lists. Like its predecessor, the CCC inflames fears and resentments, particularly among Southern whites, with regard to black-on-white crime, nonwhite immigration, attacks on the Confederate flag and other issues related to “traditional” Southern culture. Although the group claims not to be racist, its leaders traffic with other white supremacist groups and its publications, Web sites and meetings all promote the purportedly innate superiority of whites. Despite its record, the CCC has been successful in drawing southern politicians to its events: the 1998 revelation that then Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had been a frequent speaker before the group drew substantial media attention. Mississippi governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators and several state representatives have appeared in recent years. Read the full report, Extremism in America: Council of Conservative Citizens (PDF).

Fair Usage Law

October 13, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Americas virulent racists: The sick ideas and perverted science of the American Renaissance Foundation

The American Renaissance Foundation is an extremely conservative right-wing organization that also publishes a monthly magazine of the same name, American Renaissance (AR). The magazines first issue appeared in November 1990. The foundation was established by Jared Taylor (1952) who serves as president of the New Century Foundation and as editor of AR. Taylor has ties to a variety of domestic and international racists and extremists. He is on the editorial advisory board of Citizens Informer, the newspaper of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a virulently racist group whose website has referred to blacks as a retrograde species of humanity. He has contributed writings to The Occidental Quarterly, a racist journal. He also has been a member of the board of directors of the National Policy Institute, a self-styled racist think tank, and has received funding from this institute. Taylor has close ties with members of various neo-Nazi groups and with Gordon Baum, the CEO of Council of Conservative Citizens. He is a frequent radio guest of Don Blacks, operator of Stormfront, a white supremacist online forum that also advertises American Renaissance conferences. He also has ties to Mark Weber, head of the Institute for Historical Review. European racists are among his close associates, including members of the British National Party, a racist, far-right political party in England, and the National Front, a racist, far-right political party in France. Nick Griffin, the head of the British National Party, has been a speaker at two American Renaissance conferences. Frdric Legrand, a member of the National Front, is a frequent contributor to American Renaissance. Jared Taylor has written and edited a number of books with racist themes. One of ARs and Taylors favorite and oft-used quotes, recalling fifteenth-century polygenecist thought, is that of zoologist Raymond Hall from an early issue of Mankind Quarterly: Two subspecies of the same species do not occur in the same geographic area. Taylor believes that slavery may have been wrong but the alternative was Negro pandemonium. He complains that civil rights laws prohibiting racial discrimination have turned common sense into a crime. In 2005, he wrote in AR: When blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilizationany kind of civilizationdisappears. He argues that racial diversity is a negative for society and that racial integration has failed. Taylor promotes the main Pioneer Fund themes of a genetic basis for differences in intelligence between the races, the benefits of racial homogeneity, a propensity of African Americans to commit crimes at higher rates than whites, and the need to reverse an alleged reconquest of the American Southwest by Mexicans. Both the American Renaissance Foundation and its magazine are dedicated to the ideal that the United States is a white European nation. Its publications and biennial conferences state that the foundations goal is to demonstrate the purported superiority of the white race and the threat nonwhite minorities pose to American society. The stated purpose of the journal, from the outset, was to create a literate, undeceived journal of race, immigration and the decline of civility. It held that for a nation to be a nationand not just a crowdit must consist of people that share the same culture, language, history and aspirations. To the foundation, race is an essential ingredient for citizenship. Blacks and Third World immigrants did not really belong in the United States and certainly could not be real Americans. ARs list of some of its subscribers provides insight into the historical underpinnings and views of the American Renaissance Foundation. Included on its list of Americans Who Have Advanced White Interests are Jared Taylor; David Duke; Robert E. Lee; Arthur Jensen; William Shockley; Wilmot Robertson, who viewed Hitler as defender of the white race; Revilo P. Oliver, who argued that Hitler should be recognized as a semi-divine figure; William Pierce, founder of the Nazi group National Alliance; George Wallace, past governor of Alabama; Madison Grant; and Theodore Bilbo. In a survey of subscribers, Adolf Hitler ranked first (by a large margin) among Foreigners Who Have Advanced White Interests. Hitler also ranked as first among Foreigners Who Have Damaged White Interests, probably because his policies were a public relations disaster for the racist and anti-Semitic causes. Among the list of Americans Who Have Damaged White Interests is every U.S. president since 1932 except Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan. The first four people on this list are Lyndon Johnson, Franklin Roosevelt, William Clinton, and Abraham Lincoln (the list was compiled before Obamas presidency). A major debate that has been extensively covered in the pages of AR is the question of what of two strategies whites should follow in order to preserve racial survival in the face of the brown threat. The first strategy is racial segregation and immigration restriction and, if that is not effective, to enter into negotiations with black and Hispanic nationalists to establish racially based nations within the United States. The second alternative, as articulated by Samuel Francis, a regular contributor to AR, is to exercise the white mans instinctual . . . proclivity to expand and conquer and thus achieve a reconquest of the United States. To accomplish this goal, Francis believes that the phony rights of nonwhites should be revoked. These include voting, holding office, attending schools with whites, serving on juries, marrying across racial lines, serving in the armed forces, buying homes near whites, and eating at lunch counters with, riding on buses with, holding jobs with, or even associating with superior whites. Further, he proposes that we should seal the nations borders and impose fertility controls on nonwhites. Francis also points out that the first solution of partitioning nonwhites would pose problems related to the definition of Eastern and southern Europeans, Jews, and even the Irish. For Francis, the statement in the Declaration of Independence that all men are created equal was one of the most dangerous sentences ever written, one of the major blunders of American History. So we see in the pages of the AR a reflection of the history of polygenics and racism, mirroring ideas that have persisted through the ages, beginning with the Spanish Inquisition, going through colonization, slavery, the eugenics movement, Nazism, and the fight against the civil rights movement. The American Renaissance conferences, which began in 1994, have become a gathering place for white supremacists, white nationalists, white separatists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, Holocaust deniers, and eugenicists. It has become a place where many of the usual Pioneer Fund proponents can voice their vitriolic racial hatred to a mostly friendly audience. The conferences are open to the public and usually attended by 200300 people. Frequent speakers at the conferences have included Richard Lynn, J. Philippe Rushton, Jared Taylor, and many Pioneer Fund grantees. Many of these amazingly racist lectures can be viewed on YouTube. Many of the papers in AR and lectures at American Renaissance conferences are given by the same old Pioneer Fund people. Here are just a few examples, as pointed out by Tucker. Arthur Jensen in an AR conversation stated that the countrys attempt to build a multiracial nation is doomed to failure. He also claimed that at least one-quarter of all blacks are mentally retarded and not really educatable. Glayde Whitney, as a contributing editor of AR, wrote a regular column in which he suggested that different races did not belong in the same species. Lynn wrote in AR that environment has no effect on IQ scores and that differences between blacks and whites are entirely genetic. In a lecture at an AR conference, Rushton said that race differences were natures way of allowing people to distinguish friend from foe. Michael Levin declared at a conference that whites dominate mankind in all of the important criteria for evaluating accomplishments in society, and in AR he wrote that the average black is not as good a person as the average white. Levin also believed that whites would realize this and once again discriminate against blacks in housing, employment, and schools. Taylor approved of Levins predictions and speculated that his inspired vision would lead to policies strikingly similar to those of the pre-civil rights American South. At the 2000 AR conference, Taylor was greeted with a burst of applause when he speculated that whites may have lost so much ground in the last century because of Jews. In 2010, the American Renaissance conference was scheduled to be held in Washington, D.C., as usual. However, the conference had to be canceled because of protests by a number of groups over the racist content of the upcoming conference. Late in October 2010, American Renaissance was planning to hold the conference in February 2011 at an undisclosed location in Charlotte, N.C. This was the first time in over a decade that the conference was not held in the Washington, D.C., area, and the first time it was to be held in an off year for the biennial conference. After it was discovered that the conference was to be held at the Airport Sheraton and the underlying theme of the conference became known, the hotel canceled the groups reservations. Other hotels in the area followed suit, also shutting their doors to the conference. Taylor was eventually forced to cancel the event. Instead, he held a session in another hotel where the planned speakers and a few spectators gathered to videotape the speeches.

Fair Usage Law

October 12, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

ADL Backgrounder – The Council of Conservative Citizens

December 21, 1998 Founded in the mid-1980s, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) bills itself as a “grassroots” organization working on issues of concern to conservatives. It currently has chapters in over 20 states across the nation. The group claims to be fighting the “leftist war” against Americas Christian heritage and civil liberties. It opposes affirmative action, “big” government, gun control and increased immigration. In fact, the CCC has its roots in the Citizens Councils of America, a racist and anti-Semitic organization formed in the 1950s and dedicated to states rights and preserving segregation in the South. The Citizens Councils, known for intimidating and harassing Blacks involved in the civil rights movement, printed and distributed pamphlets containing inflammatory racist speeches by various segregationists. The pamphlets had titles such as “Segregation and the South,” which described Black Americans as “having an inherent deficiency in mental ability,” and ” a natural indolence,” and “The Ugly Truth About the NAACP,” which accused the organization of being controlled by Communists intent on destroying America. Gordon Lee Baum, the current Chief Executive Officer of the CCC was at one time a field director for the Citizens Councils of America. In 1989, the CCC absorbed that organization. In addition, CCC named its newspaper Citizens Informer after the publication of the Citizens Councils. The CCC claims that it does not advocate racism. However, material on its web site and its choice of speakers points to the groups apparent desire to continue the legacy of its predecessor. The group often invites speakers with extremist views to address its constituents. Various white supremacists and Christian Identity (a doctrine that maintains that Anglo-Saxons are the Biblical “chosen people,” that nonwhites are “mud people” on the level of animals, and that Jews are the “children of Satan”) preachers have been asked to speak at local and national events. The CCCs web site features numerous articles and essays that expose its pro-white, anti-minority stance. In addition, the site contains pieces labeling Martin Luther King, Jr. a Communist, lamenting the Souths loss in the Civil War, and defending the use of the Confederate flag. The fact that the CCC in the past invited mainstream politicians such as Mississippi Senator Trent Lott and Georgia Congressman Bob Barr (both of whom have since distanced themselves from the group) to be keynote speakers at its conferences lends the group a false air of legitimacy. However, many speakers who have addressed CCC meetings are unabashedly racist and anti-Semitic.

Fair Usage Law

September 14, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

The Council of Conservative Citizens: Chronology of a Scandal

Last Updated February 4, 1999 What follows is a chronology of events and reporting of a peculiar scandal surrounding Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and Georgia Congressman Robert “Bob” Barr over the nature and extent of connections they may have had with a racist group known as the Council of Conservative Citizens. This group, sporting about 15,000 members, mostly in the South, is essentially a descendant of the white Citizens Councils that formerly opposed integration in the South. Headed by Gordon Lee Baum, a St. Louis lawyer, its issues involve the protection of “European-American” heritage against the hordes of minorities. To someone who follows the extreme right, as I do, what happened in the winter of 1998-99 was not really “news,” for the Council had long trumpeted its association with politicians such as Trent Lott. Outside the circles of the extreme right, however, this was not widely known. When it was brought to the attention of the mainstream media, it became big news. The situation is reminiscent of the 1996 presidential primary season, when one of Patrick Buchanans campaign chairmen was forced to resign after his ties with white supremacist and other extremist groups became known to the mainstream media. Watchdog groups, of course, had long known Larry Pratts extensive involvement with the extreme right. Nevertheless, it is indeed an important issue that major leaders in the United States have been accused of connections with racist groups. We should be pleased that the media has given it the attention that it has. To allow someone to follow the scandal and its history, I have provided this chronology, based on public source information. The dates in the chronology are actually the dates in which the articles on which the chronology is based were printed, not the date that Person X said Quote Y. This was done to allow people to find the articles more easily. One exception is that Associated Press reports are usually released on the same day, not the day after. This is also true of television shows. There are other relevant sites, too: I have also included some other materials along with this chronology, taken from the Militia Watchdog archives. These include:

Fair Usage Law

August 31, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Keli Goff: Why KKK's latest efforts could be a good sign

Last week CNN sparked a backlash with its headline, “Can the Klan rebrand?” The network’s story was a look at the Ku Klux Klan’s efforts to distance itself from its reputation as a violence-inciting hate group in the wake of former Klan Grand Dragon Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, being charged in a shooting spree that left three people dead at two Jewish facilities in Kansas. Apparently, having a high-profile hate murderer affiliated with one’s group can put a damper on your image. But Cross isn’t the only one keeping the KKK in the news. It was just announced that a Klan chapter in Fairview Township, Pa., has launched a neighborhood watch. I guess they think that if George Zimmerman’s shooting of Trayvon Martin has taught us anything, it’s that we need more people who buy into dangerous racial stereotypes patrolling neighborhoods in a quest to keep them “safe.” A few weeks ago, the Klan began leafleting other neighborhoods in Pennsylvania, as well as Texas, Illinois and Louisiana, with fliers intended to recruit new members. On Easter Sunday another incident believed to be the work of hate groups made the news. During an Easter egg hunt, residents of Henrico County, Va., discovered Easter eggs filled with racist messages. Among them, “Diversity = white genocide” and “Mass immigration and forced assimilation of nonwhites into our lands is genocide.” Though the Klan has not specifically been linked to the egg incident, the message being perpetuated by it is certainly one the Klan would likely appreciate, which is this: America is becoming unlivable for those who yearn for the America of yesterday. An America that didn’t have a black president, and not just black, but one who is the product of a relationship between a black man and a white woman. And an America in which minorities are rapidly becoming the majority. In 2012 I interviewed Gordon Baum, longtime head of the white supremacist group Council of Conservative Citizens. During one interview he expressed concern about the fact that white babies no longer made up the majority of babies being born, noting at the time, “Well, we’ve been warning about that.” He added: “Do we want to see our country become more like where these people (racial minorities) are from or not? Now that’s a quantitative judgment. And we as an organization prefer to see it remain as it was … when Europeans had America.” Perhaps he’s never heard of Native Americans but I digress. Baum was certainly not alone in his thinking. As I later wrote for The Root, white supremacist sites were overwhelmed with traffic in the days following President Barack Obama’s election. Which is why I believe these latest efforts by the Klan, as disheartening as they are, really could be a good sign.Intolerance is at its most passionate and visible not when inequality reigns supreme but when equality gains ground.

Fair Usage Law

April 28, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Conservapedia

From Conservapedia The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an extremist American right-wing paleoconservative organization that supports a large variety of conservative causes. It is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, and its most active chapter is in Mississippi. However, it is active throughout the United States. The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, by various leaders of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes referred to as the “White Citizens’ Council”, the American Populist Party, and others. The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives and they also seek to promote some of the ideals of the Confederate States of America. Its specific issues include states rights, race relations, and conservative Christianity. The Council of Conservative Citizens is currently fighting against immigration by non-whites, affirmative action and racial quotas, interracial marriage, homosexuality, forced busing for school integration, and gun control. It opposes Communism in favour of a Constitutional Republic. Due to its bigoted attitude to interracial marriage, its support of segregation and its ties to the Ku Klux Klan it has been criticized for being a hate group. Official Website

Fair Usage Law

April 13, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

League of the South Protests Mark Herring in Richmond – Video




League of the South Protests Mark Herring in Richmond Video of the League of the South's and the Council of Conservative Citizens' demonstration protesting Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring's refusal to def… By: RedShirtArmy

Fair Usage Law

April 10, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Wikipedia, the free …

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American political organization that supports a large variety of conservative and paleoconservative causes in addition to white nationalism,[1] and white separatism.[2] Several members of the CofCC Board of Directors are former leaders of the segregationist Citizens’ Councils of America, founded by Major Bob Patterson, which is commonly referred to as the White Citizens’ Council.[3] The organization is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Other US states with active chapters include Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Texas, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, California and New York. Sporadic CofCC activities occur in other parts of the country as well. The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and then relocated to St. Louis, Missouri, and then relocated in 2013 to Irving, Texas.[citation needed] The CofCC was formed by various Republicans, Conservative Democrats, and some former members of the Citizens’ Councils of America, sometimes called the White Citizens Council, a segregationist organization that was prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. Lester Maddox, former governor of Georgia, was a charter member.[4] Gordon Lee Baum is the current CEO. Tom Dover, head of Dover Cylinder Repair is the president. Leonard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord, Sr., Carroll County Coroner, former head of the Carroll Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board. The organization often holds meetings with various other paleo-conservative organizations in the United States, and sometimes meets with Nationalist organizations from Europe. In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen with a Confederate flag, which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building.[5] Following several articles detailing some of its members past involvement with the White Citizens Council, several conservative politicians distanced themselves from the organization. One such politician was Bob Barr, who had spoken at CofCC functions, saying he found the group’s racial views to be “repugnant,” and didn’t realize the nature of the group when he agreed to speak at the group’s meeting.[6] In later years, additional media articles on the involvement of other Republican Party leaders and conservative Democrats with the CofCC attempted to force a distinct denunciation of their association with the organization. For instance, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also been a member of the CofCC. Following the report, the CofCC was denounced by the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, for holding “racist and nationalist views” and demanded that Lott formally denounce the organization. Although Lott refused to denounce the organization, he stated that he had resigned his membership. Subsequently, Nicholson, demanded Lott denounce his former segregationist views following a speech he gave at Senator Strom Thurmond’s birthday dinner when he applauded the Senator’s former Dixiecrat Presidential campaign.[7] Following the ensuring controversy Nicholson’s demands initiated, Lott once again apologized for his past support for segregation, his past associations, and his remarks at Thurmond’s birthday. This caused his loss of support from a number of important conservatives, not least, Thurmond himself. Consequently, Lott resigned his post as Senate Minority Leader. Similarly, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended an event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor the “Metro-South Citizens Council” shortly before the name change in the mid-1980s. This was an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake.[8] However, rather than gain him support, his denunciation appears to have cost him votes in Democratic primaries for the Presidency.[citation needed] Similarly, in 1993, Mike Huckabee, then the Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, agreed to speak at the CofCC’s national convention in Memphis, Tennessee in his pursuit of the Governorship of Arkansas. By the time of the CofCC convention, Huckabee was unable to leave Arkansas. Instead, he sent a videotaped speech, which “was viewed and extremely well received by the audience,” according to the CofCC newsletter.[9] However, following his success in the election, in April 1994, Huckabee withdrew from a speaking engagement before the CofCC. He commented, “I will not participate in any program that has racist overtones. I’ve spent a lifetime fighting racism and anti-Semitism.”[10] Other prominent conservative national and state politicians who were members refused to denounce, distance, or resign their membership, and continued attending meetings and giving speeches remained prominent political leaders within the conservative movement including former Senator Jesse Helms. Senator Helms remained supportive of the CofCC and consistently won his elections, and support from the CofCC was considered decisive enough that the organization was influential in office throughout his terms in the Senate. Similarly, former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, as well as Senator Strom Thurmond remained active members and/or gave speeches to the organization. Strom Thurmond remained in the Senate until he retired in 2002. The SPLC and the Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004.[11] The ADL states the following politicians are members or have spoken at meetings: Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. People who have also spoken at CofCC meetings include Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi is said to have attended as well.[12] In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held its National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference. The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neo-conservatives; it supports national self-determination, immigration restriction, federalism and home rule, and opposes free trade and global capitalism. Its specific issues include states’ rights, race relations (especially interracial marriage, which it opposes), and conservative Christian values. They have criticized Martin Luther King, Jr., who is considered by the organization as a left-wing agitator of Black American communities with notable ties to communism, and holding personal sexual morals unworthy of a person deserving national recognition.[13] They consider the American Civil Rights Movement and the Frankfurt School as elementally subversive to the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of European culture, specifically the British Protestant tradition. The Council of Conservative Citizens is active in organizing the restriction, reduction, or moratorium of immigration, enforcing laws and regulations against illegal aliens, ending what they see as racial discrimination against whites through affirmative action and racial quotas, overturning Supreme Court rulings and Congressional Acts such as forced busing and gun control, ending free trade economic policy, and supporting a conservative sexual morality which includes promotion of the Defense of Marriage Act and opposition to the inclusion of homosexuality as a civil right. In 2005, after several dozen conservative organizations were designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the CofCC staged a protest in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama.[citation needed] About 72 members organized a demonstration of several hundred protesters receiving state-wide publicity and focusing attention on the SPLC’s fundraising and raising suspicions of demagoguery by the center. The CofCC continues protesting speaking engagements by Morris Dees in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina, declaring him to be a threat to free speech and a fraud.

Fair Usage Law

January 6, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed

Council of Conservative Citizens – Metapedia

From Metapedia The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American paleoconservative political organization that supports a large variety of localized grassroots causes and which opposes forced integration, multiculturalism and political correctness. Some members of the CofCC board of directors are former leaders of the Citizen Councils of America, founded by Maj. Bob Patterson. It is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, and its most active chapter is in Mississippi. Other states with active chapters include Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and New York. The group is estimated to have 15,000 members.[1] The CofCC publishes the Citizens Informer newspaper quarterly. Previously edited by the late Samuel Francis, Joel T. LeFevre took over, and the editorial board includes Baum, Virginia Abernethy, Sam G. Dickson, Wayne Lutten, and Jared Taylor. Recent contributors to the Citizen Informer have included Ilana Mercer, Lawrence Auster, and Robert Locke. It has also printed syndicated columns of Joseph Sobran, Patrick Buchanan and Congressional speeches of Ron Paul. The CofCC has a non-profit foundation, the Conservative Citizens Foundation, which is currently raising money for a Confederate monument project. The CofCC considers itself a traditional conservative group opposing liberals and neoconservatives and they also seek to promote some of the ideals of the Confederate States of America. Its specific issues include states rights, race relations, and conservative Christianity. They have attacked communist Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, the so-called Civil Rights Movement, and the Frankfurt School on their website. Consistent with paleoconservatism, they regard American culture as an offshoot of the European cultural tradition. The Council of Conservative Citizens is currently fighting against immigration by non-whites, affirmative action and racial quotas, interracial marriage, homosexuality, forced busing for school integration, and gun control. The CofCC also looks favorably towards European nationalist and anti-immigration groups such as British National Party, Front National, and Vlaams Belang. The CofCC was founded in 1988 in Atlanta, Georgia, and is now headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Lester Maddox, the late former governor of Georgia, was a charter member. Gordon Lee Baum is the current CEO. Tom Dover, head of Dover Cylinder Repair is the president. Lenard Wilson, a former Alabama State Committeeman for both Republican and Democratic parties, sits on the CofCC Executive Board. Bill Lord Sr, Carrol County Coroner, former head of the Carrol Academy School Board, also sits of the Executive Board. In 1997, several members of the CofCC attended an event hosted by Jean-Marie Le Pen’s Front National party. The delegation from the CofCC presented Le Pen a Confederate flag; which had been flown over the South Carolina state capitol building. The CofCC became involved in national politics during the 1990s when journalists attacked the group and reported that many politicians, including Bob Barr, had belonged to or spoken at CofCC functions, had either attended the group’s meetings, corresponded with its leaders, and/or spoken favorably of it. U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had also spoken at a CofCC meeting. In the ensuing controversy the CofCC was denounced by the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Jim Nicholson, for holding “racist and nationalist views”. Other national and state politicians who have given speeches or attended CofCC meetings include former Senator Jesse Helms, and former governors H. Guy Hunt of Alabama and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi. Former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt also attended event of the organization’s St. Louis predecessor the “Metro-South Citizens Council” shortly before the name change in the mid-1980s an event he has repeatedly referred to as a mistake. The Miami Herald tallied a further 38 federal, state, and local politicians who appeared at CofCC events between 2000 and 2004. Senator Trent Lott, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, Mississippi state senators Gary Jackson, and Dean Kirby, several Mississippi state representatives. Ex-Governors Guy Hunt of Alabama, and Kirk Fordice of Mississippi, also have spoke at CofCC meetings. U.S. Rep. Roger Wicker is said to have attended meetings of the group. In 2005, the Council of Conservative Citizens held their National Conference in Montgomery, Alabama. George Wallace Jr., an Alabama Public Service Commissioner and former State Treasurer who was then running for Lieutenant Governor, and Sonny Landham, an actor, spoke at the conference. In 2005 the CofCC staged the largest protest ever held in front of the offices of the SPLC in Montgomery, Alabama. About 72 members demonstrated and received state-wide publicity. The CofCC has also protested speaking engagements by Morris Dees (accused child molestor and far-left extremist associated with the Southern Poverty Law Center) in Alabama, Mississippi, Missouri, Indiana, and South Carolina. An April 2005 photo essay on the CCC website shows gruesome pictures of decapitated, burnt and mangled bodies of white victims of violence in South Africa, while the caption states that whites may one day become a minority in the United States. In Mississippi there are several chapters that are working closely with private academies. These academies (many of which were originally called council schools) in Mississippi are inexpensive private schools that provide whites with an alternative to sending their children to majority-black public schools. Mississippi is the only state that has major politicians who are open CofCC members, including State Senators and Representatives. The CofCC once claimed 34 members in the Mississippi legislature.

Fair Usage Law

January 6, 2014   Posted in: Council of Conservative Citizens  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."