Archive for the ‘David Duke’ Category

The Ironic Thing About the Two Black Congressional Baseball Shooting Heroes – ATTN:

The two Capitol Hill Police officers recovering from the Congressional baseball shooting are receiving national praise.

Just met with Capitol Police officers Crystal Griner and David Bailey at the hospital. Thanked them for saving my life.

AsRep. Joseph Scalise(R- La.) lay shot on the baseball field on Wednesday, Special agents Crystal Griner and David Bailey rushed in to help, also taking bullets from shooter James T. Hodgkinson. Although they were already shot, they reportedlyrushed the shooter anyway.

“Crystal is one of the two Capitol Police officers who saved so many lives through her heroism, along with Special Agent David Bailey. They ran right into the fire,” President Donald Trump said to the media on Wednesday. “They ran right into those guns and the bullets, and they saved a lot of lives. America salutes both of their courage. They have great, great courage.”

However, people on Twitter pointed out something ironic about the heroes. Both Griner and Bailey are black and Griner is reportedly married to a woman. Scalisehas been accused of attending a white nationalist meeting; he alsowrote Louisiana’s ban on gay marriageand voted against LGBTrights in Congress. Scalise earned a score of “0” on the Human Right’s Campaign’s Congressional Scorecard for LGBT legislation.

A queer Black woman saved Steve Scalise’s life, so let’s send her & him our best wishes & hope his voting record changes from here on out.

Bravery/Irony. Agents David Bailey & Crystal Griner wounded protecting Rep. Scalise who once called himself “David Duke w/out the baggage.” pic.twitter.com/DHQXftTLKc

Our prayers to Steve Scalise & family. The media poured vicious hatred on Steve for simply being at my meeting defending White civil rights. pic.twitter.com/rvMDyhDf2N

Duke’s tweet referenced a 2002European Unity and Rights Organization event. The New York Times reportedthat Scaliseaccepted a speaking engagement at the event, but when questioned about it in December of 2014 he distancedhimself from Duke, saying he barely remembered the speech and that he didn’t know it was a white nationalist meeting.

After the story received media attention, Scalise apologized for speaking at the event.

“It was a mistake I regret, and I emphatically oppose the divisive racial and religious views groups like these hold,” said Scalisein a statement. However, he also said he didn’t remember speaking at it.

David Duke’s political advisor in 2014, said that Scalisedid speak but may not have knownthe event was hosting white nationalists.

This all came about because I organized the EURO meeting for David Duke as a courtesy after he had moved to Russia. Ive known David for 40 years so I did him a favor. As part of that, I decided to ask Steve, our local representative, to come by and say a few words before the conference started, Knight told The Washington Post in 2014. He agreed, believing it was going to be neighbors, friends, and family. He saw me not as David Dukes guy, but as the president of our civic association.

In the same2014 New YorkTimes article, Stephanie Grace, a Louisiana reporter said that Scalise had previously compared himself to Duke.

He was explaining his politics and we were in this getting-to-know-each-other stage,Grace told the Times in 2014. He told me he was like David Duke without the baggage. I think he meant he supported the same policy ideas as David Duke, but he wasnt David Duke, that he didnt have the same feelings about certain people as David Duke did.

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The Ironic Thing About the Two Black Congressional Baseball Shooting Heroes – ATTN:

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CNN’s Kaye Repeats Debunked Claim Scalise Spoke to David Duke … – NewsBusters (blog)


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CNN's Kaye Repeats Debunked Claim Scalise Spoke to David Duke …
NewsBusters (blog)
In a pre-recorded report on Thursday's New Day, CNN correspondent Randi Kaye repeated a discredited claim that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise 15 years …
David Duke wishes Steve Scalise a speedy recoveryDeath and Taxes
Obama White House Repeatedly Tried to Link Steve Scalise to …Breitbart News

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Four-star David Duke talks his recruiting process – Scout

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – Four-star combo guard David Duke continues to be one of the more intriguing guards on the East Coast, and remains active in the recruiting process.

Four-star combo guardDavid Dukehas seen his stock explode over the last nine months. Duke, who starred for the Mass Rivals in the spring, has picked up numerous offers, and is just now beginning to take a long look at the schools high on his list.

About his spring, Duke said, “I think I played well this spring. We didnt lose any games in the Gauntlet. I have definitely worked hard on my shooting and my ball handling, and just getting my teammates involved and communicating more.”

On the recruiting trail schools such asVillanova,Providence, Indiana,Kansas,Florida,Virginia,Syracuse, andVirginia Techhave all made Duke a top target.

http://www.scout.com/player/215508-david-duke?s=75

Locally the Friars have been extremely active recruiting Duke, and continue to try and land him as well as AAU teammateA.J. Reeves.

“They definitely think that we could win together and that itd be a great thing to keep the local guys home, so that is basically what they say,” said Duke of Providence.

Another school that has been extremely active recruiting Duke is Villanova. The Wildcats are looking to add a guard or two to this class, and Duke is one of their top targets.

“They tell me that I fit their playing style and that I can come in and play right away,” noted Duke. “Also they like that I play both offense and defense, and things like that.”

A school that could get a visit from Duke in August is Florida, and the Gators remain in very close contact with him.

“I definitely like Florida,” noted Duke. “I am in contact with Coach (Darris) Nichols and Mike White a lot. They are as involved in my recruitment as any school.”

Also the Indiana Hoosiers have started to really pick up the interest in Duke, and he has been in consistent contact with the new coaching staff in Bloomington.

“They just talked to me recently,” said Duke. “Coach (Bruiser) Flint and Coach (Archie) Miller are talking to me, and remain very interested. They want to be in that final category with all of those schools.”

For now Duke says he is in no hurry to make a commitment, and that he remains open in the process.

“Im just completely open right now,” said Duke. “Probably by the end of the summer I will be cutting down my list and putting it out.”

He continued, “I am looking at playing style and if it fits me, and also relationship with the coaches and how my parents feel about them. Just basically it is wherever fits me the best.”

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Fact Check: Distortions and Fake News in Virginia Shooting – New York Times


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Fact Check: Distortions and Fake News in Virginia Shooting
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Stephanie Grace, a political reporter in Louisiana, told The New York Times in late 2014 that Mr. Scalise once said he was like David Duke without the baggage, referring to the white supremacist and former Klansman. The Times also reported that Mr.

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Steve Scalise was once linked to David Duke – New York Post

Steve Scalise, the congressman who was shot Wednesday morning during a GOP baseball practice in Virginia, is a long-serving lawmaker who once was linked to the leader of the Ku Klux Klan a claim he blasted as ludicrous.

Scalise spoke at an event hosted by KKK leader David Duke in 2002, he admitted in 2014.

At the time, Scalise said he didnt remember appearing at the European-American Unity and Rights Organization (EURO) conference and denied supporting the group, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

I didnt know who all of these groups were and I detest any kind of hate group. For anyone to suggest that I was involved with a group like that is insulting and ludicrous, Scalise had said.

Scalise, 51, the House majority whip, has served as the No. 3 Republican in the House for about three years and represents the 1st District of Louisiana.

He was first elected to Congress in 2008 after serving in the Louisiana Senate for four months and 12 years in the state House of Representatives.

As whip, hes tasked with making sure there are enough votes to enact Republican-backed legislation and was a key player in the repeal of ObamaCare.

An avid baseball fan, Scalise has played on the congressional team since he started in Congress, CNN reported. His office features pictures from previous years games.

Scalise and his wife, Jennifer, have two children. He was a computer systems engineer before making the move to politics.

Scalise was shot in the hip and was undergoing surgery Wednesday at a DC area hospital, according to a statement from his office.

He was said to be in good spirits.

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Some Background on Steve Scalise, the Republican Congressman Who Was Shot This Morning – Esquire.com

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, two security agents, and an aide were shot this morning in Alexandria, Virginia, during a morning practice for the annual Congressional baseball game. While the suspect is in custody, the story is still very much developing, with details trickling in from the scene about how this happened and who was involved. Here’s some information about the man behind the headline.

The Very Latest on the Steve Scalisse Shooting

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Since 2008, Scalise has presided over this district, which includes the New Orleans suburbs down through the Mississippi delta. He is a career politician, first winning a spot in the Louisiana House of Representatives in 1995 while still in his twenties.

Scalise serves in the House Pro-Life Caucus, Second Amendment Task Force, and Tea Party Caucus. He co-sponsored legislation for a constitutional amendment to define marriage as between a man and a woman, as well as the Birthright Citizenship Act, H.R. 140, which would end birthright citizenship. He strongly supports the repeal and replace of Obamacare.

While Scalise offered a lukewarm endorsement of Trump in 2016, he has made up for it by voting completely in line with President Trump’s policies so far. After Trump’s every move, Scalise tends to release a statement supporting it, as he did days ago with the president’s decision to remove the United States from the Paris accords. “While the previous administration expressed open hostility to American manufacturing, it’s refreshing that President Trump is focused on putting America first by negotiating sound deals that protect and create American jobsincluding the energy jobs that are so critical to our economy in Louisiana,” he said.

In 2002, Scalise spoke to the European Unity and Rights Organization, a group led by Duke, the former Grand Wizard of the KKK. “He told me he was like David Duke without the baggage,” Stephanie Grace, a long-time political reporter, told The New York Times in 2014 of her first meeting with Scalise. “I think he meant he supported the same policy ideas as David Duke, but he wasn’t David Duke, that he didn’t have the same feelings about certain people as David Duke did.” While Scalise admitted to the speech, he later claimed he didn’t know their cause was white supremacy.

The CHOICE Act passed the House last week, legislation that would gut most of the financial regulations passed during the financial crisis in 2008 and largely eliminate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The extreme bill is not expected to pass the Senate in its current form.

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The Alt-Right are complaining about Nazis being killed in video games – New Statesman

The use of minorities as stock villains is something that has plagued entertainment media for years. Now that political correctness has gone thankfully mad, it has become less acceptable to lean on generic brown terrorists, effeminate criminal masterminds or scheming mandarins when finding adversaries for an action hero to plow through. Video games may have lagged behind somewhat but many developers do at least make some effort to to avoid stereotyping.

There is one notable exception, however. One beleaguered minority that seemingly has no voice in wider society. Nobody to stand up and say, “Enough. Leave these poor people alone, you MONSTERS.”

I’m talking, of course, about Nazis.

Yes, the proud Aryans (and affiliates) of the Alt-Right are sick of being the go-to target for self-righteous good-guys. Why should they be treated as scum, fit only for vigorous fragging and expertly chained combos? Where is the respect? The simple human decency?

And what has triggered these snowflake stormtroopers? A vicious piece of anti-Nazi propaganda in the form of a trailer for Bethesda’s latest game – Wolfenstein: The New Colossus.

A brief history of shooting Nazis in the face

There are many, many games that involve the punching, stabbing, shooting and general doing-in of members of the National Socialist party. From the Indiana Jones point-and-click adventures to the full-on assault of Medal of Honour, with plenty of oddities like the superhero antics of Freedom Force vs the Third Reich in between. The gold standard of Nazi-harm, however, is the Wolfenstein series.

Starting in 1981, with the 2D Castle Wolfenstein, the series put you in the shoes of all-American bruiser BJ Blazkowicz, deep behind enemy lines and on a largely stealth-based mission to infiltrate the titular, Nazi-occupied castle. By 1992, the series found its groove with Wolfenstein 3d – one of the earliest first-person shooters and the template for pretty much every game in that genre to this day.

After shooting your way through the primitively-rendered 3D castle, you would finally do battle with a cybernetically-enhanced MECHA-HITLER, thus cementing the franchise’s reputation for cold-edged realism.

Later reboots gave us Return To Castle Wolfenstein and simply ‘Wolfenstein’, both of which featured multiplayer Nazi-duffing as well as a load of occult bits and bobs, because the Nazis were definitely into that, no matter what David Duke says. There was even a Wolfenstein role-playing game for (non-smart)phones, allowing turn-based Nazi foiling you could carry around in your pocket.

Which brings us to the most recent iterations of the Wolfenstein experience. 2014s Wolfenstein: The New Order and this years entrant, Wolfenstein: The New Colossus. These games take place in an alternate reality, a 1960s in which the Nazis defeated the Allies and took over the world. Only you, a revived BJ Blazkowitz, can lead the fightback and kick the ascendant fascists right in the crease of their impeccable uniforms.

Why now?

Im not here to debate the ethics of video game violence. You can see first-person shooters as a malign influence on our Pop Kids or as a harmless exhaust pipe for pent-up frustrations or as anything else you like. Im easy. The recent outpouring of Alt-Right anger does raise one important question, though. Given the fact that we are now well into the fourth decade of digital Nazi slaughter, why is it only now that games like this have put the far right on the defensive?

Reactions to the New Colossus trailer have been mainly positive, with fans of The New Order relishing the chance to get back to that games formula of fast-paced action and light puzzle solving. The game resembles a glossier, Nazi-themed Half Life 2 sequel as much as anything.

Among the criticisms from the Alt-Right are accusations that the game is racist to white people. The evidence for this seems to lie in a black woman character who at one point refers to our man BJ as white boy.

As YouTuber Bob Ross comments, That black Afro whore calling that white man a white boy… More racist agenda against white people.

An anonymous commenter to 4Chan has seen through the real agenda behind the game. Bethesda jews are trying to destroy gaming industry with political correctness fagottry.

Ultimately, as YouTube commenter Bobby Johnson puts it, Why are people hating nazis? You should be hating muslims who are terrorizing, murduring, and raping europeans. And the jews

Wise, if poorly spelled, words, Im sure you will agree.

No, the real issue with Wolfenstein: The New Colossus isnt that it strikes a markedly more critical tone against the would-be Master race. The explosions may get bigger and the guns louder with every new game but the Wolfenstein formula is the same as it ever was.

The problem is Trumps brand of populist, easily consumed, fascism-lite. The problem is the dark corners of the net that put the Alt in Alt-Right . The problem is simply that, more than ever, there are now self-identifying Nazis who are willing to peer out from under their stones, hold up their hands at about 45 degrees and cry foul.

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The Alt-Right are complaining about Nazis being killed in video games – New Statesman

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Naomi Klein: ‘Trump is an idiot, but don’t underestimate how good he is at that’ – The Guardian

Naomi Klein photographed in Toronto for the Observer New Review. Photograph: Christopher Wahl for the Observer

The fact that Naomi Klein predicted the forces that explain the rise to power of Donald Trump gives her no pleasure at all. It is 17 years since Klein, then aged 30, published her first book, No Logo a seductive rage against the branding of public life by globalising corporations and made herself, in the words of the New Yorker, the most visible and influential figure on the American left almost overnight. She ended the book with what sounded then like this crazy idea that you could become your own personal global brand.

Speaking about that idea now, she can only laugh at her former innocence. No Logo was written before social media made personal branding second nature. Trump, she suggests in her new book, No Is Not Enough, exploited that phenomenon to become the first incarnation of president as a brand, doing to the US nation and to the planet what he had first practised on his big gold towers: plastering his name and everything it stands for all over them.

Klein has also charted the other force at work behind the victory of the 45th president. Her 2007 book, The Shock Doctrine, argued that neoliberal capitalism, the ideological love affair with free markets espoused by disciples of the late economist Milton Friedman, was so destructive of social bonds, and so beneficial to the 1% at the expense of the 99%, that a population would only countenance it when in a state of shock, following a crisis a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, a war.

Klein developed this theory first in 2004 when reporting from Baghdad and watching a brutally deregulated market state being imagined by agents of the Bush administration in the rubble of war and the fall of Saddam Hussein. She documented it too in the aftermath of the Boxing Day tsunami in Sri Lanka, when the inundated coastline of former fishing villages was parcelled up and sold off to global hotel chains in the name of regeneration. And she saw it most of all in the fallout of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, when, she argued, disaster was first ignored and exacerbated by government and then exploited for the gain of consultants and developers.

Friedmanites understood that in extreme circumstances bewildered populations longed above all for a sense of control. They would willingly grant exceptional powers to anyone who promised certainty. They understood too that the combination of social media and 24-hour cable news allowed them to manufacture such scenarios almost at will. The libertarian right of the Republican party, in Kleins words, became a movement that prays for crisis the way drought-struck farmers pray for rain.

In 2008, the year after The Shock Doctrine was published, Klein believed that the financial crash would prove a reckoning for this cynical philosophy. That the ways in which the Wall Street elite had enriched itself through manipulation and deregulation would finally be exposed in plain sight. In retrospect, it seems, the monumental frailties of the system, its patent vulnerability, allied with concerns over terrorism and a global refugee crisis, only made populations more desperate and fearful. They appeared to crave anyone who could suggest simple solutions to apparently intractable problems. Anyone who said that they could turn back the clock to make America great again and who had the branded cap to prove it.

I think [Trump] is a showman and he is aware of the way that shows distract people. That is the story of his business

For those of us who cant help looking at those events without turning lines from WB Yeatss The Second Coming over in our heads (what rough beast, its hour come round at last, slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?), Kleins new book which examines in detail both the phenomenon of Trump and how liberal and progressive forces might counter his reality is a brilliant articulation of restless anxiety.

Speaking at her home in Toronto last week, Klein suggested to me that Trumps novelty was to take the shock doctrine and make it a personal superpower. He keeps everyone all the time in a reactive state, she said. It is not like he is taking advantage of an external shock, he is the shock. And every 10 minutes he creates a new one. It is like he has these lasers coming out of his belt.

She wrote the book very fast, much faster than is her usual habit, because she feared that the further into a Trump administration America travels, the less scope there might be for resistance, for building an alternative. In this she believes that there are important precedents for people to understand.

She points hopefully to the example of Spain in 2004, when after the Madrid train bombings the prime minister, Jos Maria Aznar, announced that a state of emergency and special state powers were necessary. The people, remembering Franco, took to the streets to reject that analysis and kicked the government out, voting in a party that would pull Spanish troops out of Iraq. She is fully aware, too, of the alternative in Turkish president Recip Tayyip Erdoans successful plea for dictatorial powers following the chaos of the failed coup in 2016. Kleins book sets out those examples in advance of any comparable shock in America, and makes the case for collective resistance in the event of crisis. I hope none of it happens [in the States] and none of it is useful, she says, but just in case, I wanted to have it out there as soon as possible.

The daughter of American parents, Klein lives in Toronto with dual citizenship. When she thought about putting her book together, her original plan was for an anthology of articles threaded together with interviews, but once she started analysing the presidency she kept writing in a kind of frenzy. One of the benefits of having a deadline and an all-consuming project was that it meant she was forced to use the blocking app Freedom to protect her from the distraction of the internet. I think if I hadnt written this book I just would have stared at Twitter like many others for months on end, watching it unfold, and writing snippy things at people.

That tendency among Trumps critics, she says, is a symptom of his banal influence. She devotes one section of her book to the notion that through Twitter Trump is making the political sphere in his own image and that we all have to kill our inner Trump. Among other things, she says, the president is the embodiment of our splintered attention spans. One essential ingredient of resistance, she suggests, is to retain a belief in telling and understanding complex stories, keeping faith with narrative.

One of the questions that Kleins book does not reach a conclusion about is how conscious Trump is of his shock doctrine tactics. Is he a demagogue in the scheming manner of Putin and Erdoan, or just a useful idiot for the forces around him?

I think he is a showman and that he is aware of the way that shows can distract people, she says. That is the story of his business. He has always understood that he could distract his investors and bankers, his tenants, his clients from the underlying unsoundness of his business, just by putting on the Trump show. That is the core of Trump. He is undoubtedly an idiot, but do not underestimate how good he is at that.

Beyond that he has, presumably wittingly, surrounded himself with some of the worlds most expert crisis profiteers. Men who have made billions out of meltdown and financial crisis, such as Wilbur Ross, the king of bankruptcy who is now secretary of commerce, or the various crash-plutocrats recruited from Goldman Sachs and elsewhere. (In any other moment, Klein says with a laugh, the very fact that the CEO of Exxon Mobil is now the secretary of state would be the central scandal. Here we have a situation where there is so much else to concern us it is barely a footnote.)

Kleins book on Trump comes garlanded with quotes from just about every notable leftwing intellectual celebrity you can think of. Noam Chomsky calls it urgent, timely, and necessary. Yanis Varoufakis describes it as a manual for emancipation by means of the only weapon we have against orchestrated misanthropy: constructive disobedience. Michael Stipe, meanwhile, asks: Who better than Naomi to make sense of this madness, and help us find a way out?

Does she recognise the danger that she is preaching only to the converted, and further entrenching our polarised politics?

She obviously hopes that is not the case, pointing to the parts of the book in which she criticises Hillary Clinton and Obama and (even) Bernie Sanders for failing to connect effectively enough to the lives of the left-behind. Her overriding anxiety is that while the liberal left wrings its hands over the ways that the US election was lost, and gets embroiled in Russian conspiracy theories, not enough attention is being paid to the conspiracy happening in plain sight: the dangers of kleptocracy, and the broken promises to the working class.

I am not saying Russia is not important, she says, but Trumps base is very well defended against that: the liberal media is out to get him, its fake news, and all the rest. While we are all clicking and fixing our eyes on the never-ending Trump show the handshake with Macron, the hand-holding with May he is, she argues, enacting policies that are systematically moving wealth upwards, and crucial questions are not being asked loudly enough: Is your social security safe? Is your healthcare safe? Are your wages going to be driven down? He benefits so much from that focus away from economics.

The analogy that Le Pen equals Donald Trump is not exact. It is more Le Pen equals David Duke

Klein has not been surprised how, at a time of economic downturn and mass migration, nationalism has once again proved such a potent force in successive elections in the west. She makes the argument that the only thing that can rival those forces of white nationalism and xenophobia is a justice-based economic populism on the left. What Hillary Clintons campaign proved, she suggests, is that when you run a centrist free-market candidate against fake populism its a recipe for disaster.

Doesnt the election of Macron in France prove that pragmatic centrism is still a viable force if the right candidate emerges to express it?

Klein believes the jury is out on that question. The fact is Le Pen did better in that election than she ever should have. I think the issue is what happens if Macron governs with the kind of austerity that has fuelled these forces, and his shine wears off? What happens the next time around? The analogy that Le Pen equals Donald Trump is not exact, she says. It is more Le Pen equals David Duke [former leader of the Ku Klux Klan]. If David Duke got the percentage of the vote that Le Pen got, we would be terrified, as well we should be.

Klein welcomes the emergence of unashamedly leftwing candidates, with an ability to inspire enthusiasm, particularly among the young. She points to the nostalgic socialism of Sanders, Jean-Luc Mlenchon and Jeremy Corbyn as evidence of this. But dont they look more like the past than the future?

I dont think any of these guys figured it out, she says. But we should think about the fact that Mlenchon could get 70,000 people at a rally from nowhere, and look at the surge we have seen with Corbyn. Especially given the fact that he is kind of the exact opposite of a charismatic politician. (Once the result was known, Klein emailed to say: The UK election really showed the power of leading with substance and ideas, rather than slick packaging and fear. The more May tried to exploit peoples fear and shock telling them they might need to give up their privacy and human rights to fight terror, that they should delegate their rights to her the more [Corbyns] message of hope, that positive yes looked like the better option to many people.)

In this sense, Klein places a lot of faith in the cyclical nature of cynicism and hope, believing that the generation now in its teens and 20s is much less phobic of electoral politics than her generation ever was. She experienced a version of that cycle in her own growing up. She was in many ways born to protest, the third Klein generation of principled resistance.

It began with her paternal grandparents, Anne and Philip, who met as communists in Newark, New Jersey, in the 1930s. Philip was an animator for Walt Disney. He organised a strike at the studios during the making of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and was fired as a result. He went to work in a shipyard, before he and his wife became part of the nascent green movement, living at the Nature Friends retreat in Paterson, New Jersey, tending their vegetables, listening to Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie.

Kleins parents took that retreat from American life a stage further by moving to Canada, in part in protest over the Vietnam war. Her father worked as a paediatrician in public hospitals. Her mother, Bonnie, a film-maker, helped to create the feminist film collective Studio D and made documentaries about Greenham Common and a polemical film against pornography.

Klein has recalled how she rebelled against her radical upbringing, insisting on makeup and pop culture; how she always resented being dragged along to peace marches and demonstrations, or what she later called another poncho picnic. She was for most of her teens dismissive of her mothers feminism. She credits two particular catastrophic events in changing her mind. First, aged 46, her mother suffered a brain tumour and a series of strokes that left her quadriplegic. Klein helped to nurse her for six months and was inspired by the fortitude and spirit her mother showed in her partial rehabilitation, and the strength she discovered in herself. At around the same time, during her first year at the University of Toronto, a gunman killed 14 women at the cole Polytechnique in Montreal, declaring: I hate feminists. The event motivated Klein into political activism and she has called herself a feminist ever since, though initially she was sceptical of conventional party politics.

Among my generation there was a purist position that any contact with electoral politics was an unforgiveable compromise, she says. I dont see that nearly so much in this generation. Part of it is based in movement building but it also involves running people for office at every level.

She hesitates to suggest her book as a rallying cry for a political party she is wary of making herself anything like a figurehead, hoping to be one voice among many but suggests that there are ideas in it that people might gather around. She is doing a series of (inevitably sold-out) events across the US to support the book, though she says: I have a five-year-old son so I wont be permanently on the road.

The part she hopes will most resonate with her audiences is the Leap manifesto an integrated leap forward on climate action, racial justice, decent jobs. She has created Leap with her husband, Avi Lewis, a documentary film-maker, in conjunction with various activist groups heads of labour federations and unions, directors of major green groups, iconic indigenous and feminist leaders, key organisers and theorists focused on migrant rights, open technology, food justice, housing, faith, and more from across Canada and beyond. The ideas are an extension of the theme of her last book, This Changes Everything, which argued that a new progressive politics had to be built around a radical and sustainable green tech revolution, and an outright rejection of fossil fuels.

The proactive message is at least as important as her deconstruction of Trump, she hopes. When I wrote The Shock Doctrine I really did think that just showing how crisis was exploited would be enough to repel it, she says. Then the crash happened and I watched these social movements fill squares in Portugal and Italy and Spain I lived there for months all chanting We wont pay for your crisis. I ended This Changes Everything with an interview I had with Alexis Tsipras before he was elected in Greece, where he said to me It is enough in this moment to say no.

Klein profoundly disagreed, because no is never enough. Anger and rejection of the status quo will never sustain people on its own. The triumph of neoliberalism is the idea that the alternative is always even worse. To overturn that there has to be a boldness and a recapturing of the utopian imagination. If we cant do that, then I really dont think we have a chance against these guys.

Klein ends her current book talking about these movements that have spontaneously expressed resistance Black Lives Matter, various green and community groups and argues for them to come together. To resist this we have get out of the silos, she says. Environmentalists in one corner, feminists in one corner, racial justice in another. We dont have enough spaces where we can get together.

In expressing this hope, Klein references the example of her mothers stroke and the ways that devastating event shaped her understanding of coping with crisis. She takes it as an example that sudden adversity generates strength and hope as well fear. In a shocked state, with our understanding of the world badly shaken, a great many of us can become childlike and passive, and overly trusting of people who are only too happy to abuse that trust. But I also know, from my own familys navigation of a shocking event, that there can be the inverse response as well. We can evolve and grow up in a crisis, and set aside all kinds of bullshit fast.

My mothers stroke was a really formative moment in my life, she says. And I think because of it I have been attuned to seeing other expressions of that. When I started to write about crisis in The Shock Doctrine, it was with a sense that these moments of trauma could bring out the best in people.

We talk a little about how the terrorist attacks in Manchester and London have again exemplified that fact. How, contrary to the efforts of forces that might have exaggerated the fear and exploited the crisis to divide us, they became occasions to reaffirm tremendous shared humanity and spirit. One aspect of that, I suggest, is that at heart, people arent made to be fearful all the time, life reasserts itself.

The thing about the shock doctrine is that if they try to use it too much it stops being shocking, Klein says. That is the importance of historical memory in these moments and of course Britain has the blitz spirit in its DNA: we are people who do not crumble during crisis.

One of the difficulties that America faces, she suggests, is that it doesnt have that kind of collective memory. Historical struggles that the nation has overcome Jim Crow and civil rights, the internment of Japanese Americans during the second world war have not been shared narratives, and therefore have been harder to unite around.

She hopes that a shared investment in the environment can provide some of that social glue; in this respect, Trumps rejection of the Paris Accord can be a starting pistol for communities to take action into their own hands. The cities and provinces that have pledged to abide by the Paris principles prove the limits of central power. The message is that neoliberals control a lot but they dont control everything. They dont decide how we get our energy or move ourselves. Part of breaking the spell of neoliberalism is having people live an alternative, and cities and communities are where that happens. The institutions that used to be the backbone of social movements are in disarray and so diminished, and so we need to fix it for ourselves.

In this sense she envisages her Leap idea as a piece of open source code: If you make activism a brand, you are in competition with similar brands, doing similar work, she says. With Leap, if you want it, take it, do something cool with it, if you dont want it, who cares?

How optimistic is she about that prospect?

I have good days and bad days, she says. Or good parts of days and bad parts of days. It is undeniably terrifying that at this moment of such intense gravity for the planet this figure of such extreme stupidity has risen to power. But that means that there is more urgency to find solutions. She laughs. Will that do as my message of hope? she asks.

I guess it will for now, I say.

Naomi Klein will be speaking at Royal Festival Hall, London, on 4 July at 7.30pm. No Is Not Enough: Defeating the New Shock Politics is published by Allen Lane (12.99). To order a copy for 11.04 go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846 Free UK p&p over 10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of 1.99

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Naomi Klein: ‘Trump is an idiot, but don’t underestimate how good he is at that’ – The Guardian

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Google has more advertisers bailing out over hate videos – The Philadelphia Tribune

LONDON – Google still has a major problem with extremist and hate videos.

Three advertisers – Etihad Airways, Deliveroo and the United Kingdom’s Labour Party – have pulled their spots from YouTube after discovering they were shown alongside videos made by a hate preacher.

Google-owned YouTube has been under mounting pressure in recent months after more than a dozen organizations pulled their ads over similar complaints.

Etihad, the national carrier of the United Arab Emirates, said in a statement that it was “appalled” by the content of the videos.

“This content is abhorrent, deeply disturbing and the issue needs to be resolved by Google and all other media partners,” it said in a statement.

Deliveroo said it was “extremely concerned.” It said it has withdrawn its ads until YouTube takes action “to improve its content control and protect its viewers and advertisers.”

The latest round of advertiser defections was first reported by The Times.

The newspaper said that Mastercard, Johnson & Johnson, New Balance and Marriott Hotels have also pulled their ads. Those companies did not respond to requests for comment from CNNMoney.

Weight Watchers, also mentioned in The Times report, said it would “not fund this type of activity” and added that it was “not currently” running ads on YouTube.

YouTube, meanwhile, said that it has made progress in addressing the issue.

“We’ve been conducting an extensive review of our advertising policies — and in recent weeks have made significant changes that give brands more control over where their ads appear,” a spokesperson said.

YouTube sells ad time to companies, and their spots are slotted to play before videos. Advertisers don’t directly control where their ads are placed, although they can specify the demographics they’d like to target.

YouTube relies heavily on viewers to flag content. With 300 hours of content a minute uploaded, some fall through the cracks.

The company said that while “no system will be 100 percent perfect,” it has taken steps to “further safeguard our advertisers’ brands.”

The latest round of advertising suspensions included three major political parties in the U.K. The country will hold a general election on Thursday.

The Times reported that the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats had asked for their ads to be removed from the site. The Labour Party confirmed it had taken similar action.

“We will be raising this issue with YouTube and have paused all adverts until we are satisfied Google have taken steps to make sure this does not happen again,” the party said in a statement.

In March, Google faced an advertiser exodus after spots from major brands and the U.K. government ran alongside content from extremist groups.

At the time, the British government summoned the tech firm to explain why taxpayer-funded ads were used on content including videos from former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke.

Google and Facebook own huge chunks of the digital advertising business, and major brands are spending an increasing share of their ad budgets on their platforms.

Companies are becoming cautious about where their advertisements appear, however. Vodafone announced plans on Tuesday to prevent its ads from running on sites that carry hate speech and fake news. – (CNN)

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Google has more advertisers bailing out over hate videos – The Philadelphia Tribune

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The Ironic Thing About the Two Black Congressional Baseball Shooting Heroes – ATTN:

The two Capitol Hill Police officers recovering from the Congressional baseball shooting are receiving national praise. Just met with Capitol Police officers Crystal Griner and David Bailey at the hospital. Thanked them for saving my life. AsRep. Joseph Scalise(R- La.) lay shot on the baseball field on Wednesday, Special agents Crystal Griner and David Bailey rushed in to help, also taking bullets from shooter James T. Hodgkinson. Although they were already shot, they reportedlyrushed the shooter anyway. “Crystal is one of the two Capitol Police officers who saved so many lives through her heroism, along with Special Agent David Bailey. They ran right into the fire,” President Donald Trump said to the media on Wednesday. “They ran right into those guns and the bullets, and they saved a lot of lives. America salutes both of their courage. They have great, great courage.” However, people on Twitter pointed out something ironic about the heroes. Both Griner and Bailey are black and Griner is reportedly married to a woman. Scalisehas been accused of attending a white nationalist meeting; he alsowrote Louisiana’s ban on gay marriageand voted against LGBTrights in Congress. Scalise earned a score of “0” on the Human Right’s Campaign’s Congressional Scorecard for LGBT legislation. A queer Black woman saved Steve Scalise’s life, so let’s send her & him our best wishes & hope his voting record changes from here on out. Bravery/Irony. Agents David Bailey & Crystal Griner wounded protecting Rep. Scalise who once called himself “David Duke w/out the baggage.” pic.twitter.com/DHQXftTLKc Our prayers to Steve Scalise & family. The media poured vicious hatred on Steve for simply being at my meeting defending White civil rights. pic.twitter.com/rvMDyhDf2N Duke’s tweet referenced a 2002European Unity and Rights Organization event. The New York Times reportedthat Scaliseaccepted a speaking engagement at the event, but when questioned about it in December of 2014 he distancedhimself from Duke, saying he barely remembered the speech and that he didn’t know it was a white nationalist meeting. After the story received media attention, Scalise apologized for speaking at the event. “It was a mistake I regret, and I emphatically oppose the divisive racial and religious views groups like these hold,” said Scalisein a statement. However, he also said he didn’t remember speaking at it. David Duke’s political advisor in 2014, said that Scalisedid speak but may not have knownthe event was hosting white nationalists. This all came about because I organized the EURO meeting for David Duke as a courtesy after he had moved to Russia. Ive known David for 40 years so I did him a favor. As part of that, I decided to ask Steve, our local representative, to come by and say a few words before the conference started, Knight told The Washington Post in 2014. He agreed, believing it was going to be neighbors, friends, and family. He saw me not as David Dukes guy, but as the president of our civic association. In the same2014 New YorkTimes article, Stephanie Grace, a Louisiana reporter said that Scalise had previously compared himself to Duke. He was explaining his politics and we were in this getting-to-know-each-other stage,Grace told the Times in 2014. He told me he was like David Duke without the baggage. I think he meant he supported the same policy ideas as David Duke, but he wasnt David Duke, that he didnt have the same feelings about certain people as David Duke did.

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CNN’s Kaye Repeats Debunked Claim Scalise Spoke to David Duke … – NewsBusters (blog)

NewsBusters (blog) CNN's Kaye Repeats Debunked Claim Scalise Spoke to David Duke … NewsBusters (blog) In a pre-recorded report on Thursday's New Day, CNN correspondent Randi Kaye repeated a discredited claim that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise 15 years … David Duke wishes Steve Scalise a speedy recovery Death and Taxes Obama White House Repeatedly Tried to Link Steve Scalise to … Breitbart News all 3 news articles »

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Four-star David Duke talks his recruiting process – Scout

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – Four-star combo guard David Duke continues to be one of the more intriguing guards on the East Coast, and remains active in the recruiting process. Four-star combo guardDavid Dukehas seen his stock explode over the last nine months. Duke, who starred for the Mass Rivals in the spring, has picked up numerous offers, and is just now beginning to take a long look at the schools high on his list. About his spring, Duke said, “I think I played well this spring. We didnt lose any games in the Gauntlet. I have definitely worked hard on my shooting and my ball handling, and just getting my teammates involved and communicating more.” On the recruiting trail schools such asVillanova,Providence, Indiana,Kansas,Florida,Virginia,Syracuse, andVirginia Techhave all made Duke a top target. http://www.scout.com/player/215508-david-duke?s=75 Locally the Friars have been extremely active recruiting Duke, and continue to try and land him as well as AAU teammateA.J. Reeves. “They definitely think that we could win together and that itd be a great thing to keep the local guys home, so that is basically what they say,” said Duke of Providence. Another school that has been extremely active recruiting Duke is Villanova. The Wildcats are looking to add a guard or two to this class, and Duke is one of their top targets. “They tell me that I fit their playing style and that I can come in and play right away,” noted Duke. “Also they like that I play both offense and defense, and things like that.” A school that could get a visit from Duke in August is Florida, and the Gators remain in very close contact with him. “I definitely like Florida,” noted Duke. “I am in contact with Coach (Darris) Nichols and Mike White a lot. They are as involved in my recruitment as any school.” Also the Indiana Hoosiers have started to really pick up the interest in Duke, and he has been in consistent contact with the new coaching staff in Bloomington. “They just talked to me recently,” said Duke. “Coach (Bruiser) Flint and Coach (Archie) Miller are talking to me, and remain very interested. They want to be in that final category with all of those schools.” For now Duke says he is in no hurry to make a commitment, and that he remains open in the process. “Im just completely open right now,” said Duke. “Probably by the end of the summer I will be cutting down my list and putting it out.” He continued, “I am looking at playing style and if it fits me, and also relationship with the coaches and how my parents feel about them. Just basically it is wherever fits me the best.”

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Fact Check: Distortions and Fake News in Virginia Shooting – New York Times

New York Times Fact Check: Distortions and Fake News in Virginia Shooting New York Times Stephanie Grace, a political reporter in Louisiana, told The New York Times in late 2014 that Mr. Scalise once said he was like David Duke without the baggage, referring to the white supremacist and former Klansman. The Times also reported that Mr. and more »

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Steve Scalise was once linked to David Duke – New York Post

Steve Scalise, the congressman who was shot Wednesday morning during a GOP baseball practice in Virginia, is a long-serving lawmaker who once was linked to the leader of the Ku Klux Klan a claim he blasted as ludicrous. Scalise spoke at an event hosted by KKK leader David Duke in 2002, he admitted in 2014. At the time, Scalise said he didnt remember appearing at the European-American Unity and Rights Organization (EURO) conference and denied supporting the group, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune. I didnt know who all of these groups were and I detest any kind of hate group. For anyone to suggest that I was involved with a group like that is insulting and ludicrous, Scalise had said. Scalise, 51, the House majority whip, has served as the No. 3 Republican in the House for about three years and represents the 1st District of Louisiana. He was first elected to Congress in 2008 after serving in the Louisiana Senate for four months and 12 years in the state House of Representatives. As whip, hes tasked with making sure there are enough votes to enact Republican-backed legislation and was a key player in the repeal of ObamaCare. An avid baseball fan, Scalise has played on the congressional team since he started in Congress, CNN reported. His office features pictures from previous years games. Scalise and his wife, Jennifer, have two children. He was a computer systems engineer before making the move to politics. Scalise was shot in the hip and was undergoing surgery Wednesday at a DC area hospital, according to a statement from his office. He was said to be in good spirits.

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Some Background on Steve Scalise, the Republican Congressman Who Was Shot This Morning – Esquire.com

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, two security agents, and an aide were shot this morning in Alexandria, Virginia, during a morning practice for the annual Congressional baseball game. While the suspect is in custody, the story is still very much developing, with details trickling in from the scene about how this happened and who was involved. Here’s some information about the man behind the headline. The Very Latest on the Steve Scalisse Shooting Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Since 2008, Scalise has presided over this district, which includes the New Orleans suburbs down through the Mississippi delta. He is a career politician, first winning a spot in the Louisiana House of Representatives in 1995 while still in his twenties. Scalise serves in the House Pro-Life Caucus, Second Amendment Task Force, and Tea Party Caucus. He co-sponsored legislation for a constitutional amendment to define marriage as between a man and a woman, as well as the Birthright Citizenship Act, H.R. 140, which would end birthright citizenship. He strongly supports the repeal and replace of Obamacare. While Scalise offered a lukewarm endorsement of Trump in 2016, he has made up for it by voting completely in line with President Trump’s policies so far. After Trump’s every move, Scalise tends to release a statement supporting it, as he did days ago with the president’s decision to remove the United States from the Paris accords. “While the previous administration expressed open hostility to American manufacturing, it’s refreshing that President Trump is focused on putting America first by negotiating sound deals that protect and create American jobsincluding the energy jobs that are so critical to our economy in Louisiana,” he said. In 2002, Scalise spoke to the European Unity and Rights Organization, a group led by Duke, the former Grand Wizard of the KKK. “He told me he was like David Duke without the baggage,” Stephanie Grace, a long-time political reporter, told The New York Times in 2014 of her first meeting with Scalise. “I think he meant he supported the same policy ideas as David Duke, but he wasn’t David Duke, that he didn’t have the same feelings about certain people as David Duke did.” While Scalise admitted to the speech, he later claimed he didn’t know their cause was white supremacy. The CHOICE Act passed the House last week, legislation that would gut most of the financial regulations passed during the financial crisis in 2008 and largely eliminate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The extreme bill is not expected to pass the Senate in its current form.

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The Alt-Right are complaining about Nazis being killed in video games – New Statesman

The use of minorities as stock villains is something that has plagued entertainment media for years. Now that political correctness has gone thankfully mad, it has become less acceptable to lean on generic brown terrorists, effeminate criminal masterminds or scheming mandarins when finding adversaries for an action hero to plow through. Video games may have lagged behind somewhat but many developers do at least make some effort to to avoid stereotyping. There is one notable exception, however. One beleaguered minority that seemingly has no voice in wider society. Nobody to stand up and say, “Enough. Leave these poor people alone, you MONSTERS.” I’m talking, of course, about Nazis. Yes, the proud Aryans (and affiliates) of the Alt-Right are sick of being the go-to target for self-righteous good-guys. Why should they be treated as scum, fit only for vigorous fragging and expertly chained combos? Where is the respect? The simple human decency? And what has triggered these snowflake stormtroopers? A vicious piece of anti-Nazi propaganda in the form of a trailer for Bethesda’s latest game – Wolfenstein: The New Colossus. A brief history of shooting Nazis in the face There are many, many games that involve the punching, stabbing, shooting and general doing-in of members of the National Socialist party. From the Indiana Jones point-and-click adventures to the full-on assault of Medal of Honour, with plenty of oddities like the superhero antics of Freedom Force vs the Third Reich in between. The gold standard of Nazi-harm, however, is the Wolfenstein series. Starting in 1981, with the 2D Castle Wolfenstein, the series put you in the shoes of all-American bruiser BJ Blazkowicz, deep behind enemy lines and on a largely stealth-based mission to infiltrate the titular, Nazi-occupied castle. By 1992, the series found its groove with Wolfenstein 3d – one of the earliest first-person shooters and the template for pretty much every game in that genre to this day. After shooting your way through the primitively-rendered 3D castle, you would finally do battle with a cybernetically-enhanced MECHA-HITLER, thus cementing the franchise’s reputation for cold-edged realism. Later reboots gave us Return To Castle Wolfenstein and simply ‘Wolfenstein’, both of which featured multiplayer Nazi-duffing as well as a load of occult bits and bobs, because the Nazis were definitely into that, no matter what David Duke says. There was even a Wolfenstein role-playing game for (non-smart)phones, allowing turn-based Nazi foiling you could carry around in your pocket. Which brings us to the most recent iterations of the Wolfenstein experience. 2014s Wolfenstein: The New Order and this years entrant, Wolfenstein: The New Colossus. These games take place in an alternate reality, a 1960s in which the Nazis defeated the Allies and took over the world. Only you, a revived BJ Blazkowitz, can lead the fightback and kick the ascendant fascists right in the crease of their impeccable uniforms. Why now? Im not here to debate the ethics of video game violence. You can see first-person shooters as a malign influence on our Pop Kids or as a harmless exhaust pipe for pent-up frustrations or as anything else you like. Im easy. The recent outpouring of Alt-Right anger does raise one important question, though. Given the fact that we are now well into the fourth decade of digital Nazi slaughter, why is it only now that games like this have put the far right on the defensive? Reactions to the New Colossus trailer have been mainly positive, with fans of The New Order relishing the chance to get back to that games formula of fast-paced action and light puzzle solving. The game resembles a glossier, Nazi-themed Half Life 2 sequel as much as anything. Among the criticisms from the Alt-Right are accusations that the game is racist to white people. The evidence for this seems to lie in a black woman character who at one point refers to our man BJ as white boy. As YouTuber Bob Ross comments, That black Afro whore calling that white man a white boy… More racist agenda against white people. An anonymous commenter to 4Chan has seen through the real agenda behind the game. Bethesda jews are trying to destroy gaming industry with political correctness fagottry. Ultimately, as YouTube commenter Bobby Johnson puts it, Why are people hating nazis? You should be hating muslims who are terrorizing, murduring, and raping europeans. And the jews Wise, if poorly spelled, words, Im sure you will agree. No, the real issue with Wolfenstein: The New Colossus isnt that it strikes a markedly more critical tone against the would-be Master race. The explosions may get bigger and the guns louder with every new game but the Wolfenstein formula is the same as it ever was. The problem is Trumps brand of populist, easily consumed, fascism-lite. The problem is the dark corners of the net that put the Alt in Alt-Right . The problem is simply that, more than ever, there are now self-identifying Nazis who are willing to peer out from under their stones, hold up their hands at about 45 degrees and cry foul.

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Naomi Klein: ‘Trump is an idiot, but don’t underestimate how good he is at that’ – The Guardian

Naomi Klein photographed in Toronto for the Observer New Review. Photograph: Christopher Wahl for the Observer The fact that Naomi Klein predicted the forces that explain the rise to power of Donald Trump gives her no pleasure at all. It is 17 years since Klein, then aged 30, published her first book, No Logo a seductive rage against the branding of public life by globalising corporations and made herself, in the words of the New Yorker, the most visible and influential figure on the American left almost overnight. She ended the book with what sounded then like this crazy idea that you could become your own personal global brand. Speaking about that idea now, she can only laugh at her former innocence. No Logo was written before social media made personal branding second nature. Trump, she suggests in her new book, No Is Not Enough, exploited that phenomenon to become the first incarnation of president as a brand, doing to the US nation and to the planet what he had first practised on his big gold towers: plastering his name and everything it stands for all over them. Klein has also charted the other force at work behind the victory of the 45th president. Her 2007 book, The Shock Doctrine, argued that neoliberal capitalism, the ideological love affair with free markets espoused by disciples of the late economist Milton Friedman, was so destructive of social bonds, and so beneficial to the 1% at the expense of the 99%, that a population would only countenance it when in a state of shock, following a crisis a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, a war. Klein developed this theory first in 2004 when reporting from Baghdad and watching a brutally deregulated market state being imagined by agents of the Bush administration in the rubble of war and the fall of Saddam Hussein. She documented it too in the aftermath of the Boxing Day tsunami in Sri Lanka, when the inundated coastline of former fishing villages was parcelled up and sold off to global hotel chains in the name of regeneration. And she saw it most of all in the fallout of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, when, she argued, disaster was first ignored and exacerbated by government and then exploited for the gain of consultants and developers. Friedmanites understood that in extreme circumstances bewildered populations longed above all for a sense of control. They would willingly grant exceptional powers to anyone who promised certainty. They understood too that the combination of social media and 24-hour cable news allowed them to manufacture such scenarios almost at will. The libertarian right of the Republican party, in Kleins words, became a movement that prays for crisis the way drought-struck farmers pray for rain. In 2008, the year after The Shock Doctrine was published, Klein believed that the financial crash would prove a reckoning for this cynical philosophy. That the ways in which the Wall Street elite had enriched itself through manipulation and deregulation would finally be exposed in plain sight. In retrospect, it seems, the monumental frailties of the system, its patent vulnerability, allied with concerns over terrorism and a global refugee crisis, only made populations more desperate and fearful. They appeared to crave anyone who could suggest simple solutions to apparently intractable problems. Anyone who said that they could turn back the clock to make America great again and who had the branded cap to prove it. I think [Trump] is a showman and he is aware of the way that shows distract people. That is the story of his business For those of us who cant help looking at those events without turning lines from WB Yeatss The Second Coming over in our heads (what rough beast, its hour come round at last, slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?), Kleins new book which examines in detail both the phenomenon of Trump and how liberal and progressive forces might counter his reality is a brilliant articulation of restless anxiety. Speaking at her home in Toronto last week, Klein suggested to me that Trumps novelty was to take the shock doctrine and make it a personal superpower. He keeps everyone all the time in a reactive state, she said. It is not like he is taking advantage of an external shock, he is the shock. And every 10 minutes he creates a new one. It is like he has these lasers coming out of his belt. She wrote the book very fast, much faster than is her usual habit, because she feared that the further into a Trump administration America travels, the less scope there might be for resistance, for building an alternative. In this she believes that there are important precedents for people to understand. She points hopefully to the example of Spain in 2004, when after the Madrid train bombings the prime minister, Jos Maria Aznar, announced that a state of emergency and special state powers were necessary. The people, remembering Franco, took to the streets to reject that analysis and kicked the government out, voting in a party that would pull Spanish troops out of Iraq. She is fully aware, too, of the alternative in Turkish president Recip Tayyip Erdoans successful plea for dictatorial powers following the chaos of the failed coup in 2016. Kleins book sets out those examples in advance of any comparable shock in America, and makes the case for collective resistance in the event of crisis. I hope none of it happens [in the States] and none of it is useful, she says, but just in case, I wanted to have it out there as soon as possible. The daughter of American parents, Klein lives in Toronto with dual citizenship. When she thought about putting her book together, her original plan was for an anthology of articles threaded together with interviews, but once she started analysing the presidency she kept writing in a kind of frenzy. One of the benefits of having a deadline and an all-consuming project was that it meant she was forced to use the blocking app Freedom to protect her from the distraction of the internet. I think if I hadnt written this book I just would have stared at Twitter like many others for months on end, watching it unfold, and writing snippy things at people. That tendency among Trumps critics, she says, is a symptom of his banal influence. She devotes one section of her book to the notion that through Twitter Trump is making the political sphere in his own image and that we all have to kill our inner Trump. Among other things, she says, the president is the embodiment of our splintered attention spans. One essential ingredient of resistance, she suggests, is to retain a belief in telling and understanding complex stories, keeping faith with narrative. One of the questions that Kleins book does not reach a conclusion about is how conscious Trump is of his shock doctrine tactics. Is he a demagogue in the scheming manner of Putin and Erdoan, or just a useful idiot for the forces around him? I think he is a showman and that he is aware of the way that shows can distract people, she says. That is the story of his business. He has always understood that he could distract his investors and bankers, his tenants, his clients from the underlying unsoundness of his business, just by putting on the Trump show. That is the core of Trump. He is undoubtedly an idiot, but do not underestimate how good he is at that. Beyond that he has, presumably wittingly, surrounded himself with some of the worlds most expert crisis profiteers. Men who have made billions out of meltdown and financial crisis, such as Wilbur Ross, the king of bankruptcy who is now secretary of commerce, or the various crash-plutocrats recruited from Goldman Sachs and elsewhere. (In any other moment, Klein says with a laugh, the very fact that the CEO of Exxon Mobil is now the secretary of state would be the central scandal. Here we have a situation where there is so much else to concern us it is barely a footnote.) Kleins book on Trump comes garlanded with quotes from just about every notable leftwing intellectual celebrity you can think of. Noam Chomsky calls it urgent, timely, and necessary. Yanis Varoufakis describes it as a manual for emancipation by means of the only weapon we have against orchestrated misanthropy: constructive disobedience. Michael Stipe, meanwhile, asks: Who better than Naomi to make sense of this madness, and help us find a way out? Does she recognise the danger that she is preaching only to the converted, and further entrenching our polarised politics? She obviously hopes that is not the case, pointing to the parts of the book in which she criticises Hillary Clinton and Obama and (even) Bernie Sanders for failing to connect effectively enough to the lives of the left-behind. Her overriding anxiety is that while the liberal left wrings its hands over the ways that the US election was lost, and gets embroiled in Russian conspiracy theories, not enough attention is being paid to the conspiracy happening in plain sight: the dangers of kleptocracy, and the broken promises to the working class. I am not saying Russia is not important, she says, but Trumps base is very well defended against that: the liberal media is out to get him, its fake news, and all the rest. While we are all clicking and fixing our eyes on the never-ending Trump show the handshake with Macron, the hand-holding with May he is, she argues, enacting policies that are systematically moving wealth upwards, and crucial questions are not being asked loudly enough: Is your social security safe? Is your healthcare safe? Are your wages going to be driven down? He benefits so much from that focus away from economics. The analogy that Le Pen equals Donald Trump is not exact. It is more Le Pen equals David Duke Klein has not been surprised how, at a time of economic downturn and mass migration, nationalism has once again proved such a potent force in successive elections in the west. She makes the argument that the only thing that can rival those forces of white nationalism and xenophobia is a justice-based economic populism on the left. What Hillary Clintons campaign proved, she suggests, is that when you run a centrist free-market candidate against fake populism its a recipe for disaster. Doesnt the election of Macron in France prove that pragmatic centrism is still a viable force if the right candidate emerges to express it? Klein believes the jury is out on that question. The fact is Le Pen did better in that election than she ever should have. I think the issue is what happens if Macron governs with the kind of austerity that has fuelled these forces, and his shine wears off? What happens the next time around? The analogy that Le Pen equals Donald Trump is not exact, she says. It is more Le Pen equals David Duke [former leader of the Ku Klux Klan]. If David Duke got the percentage of the vote that Le Pen got, we would be terrified, as well we should be. Klein welcomes the emergence of unashamedly leftwing candidates, with an ability to inspire enthusiasm, particularly among the young. She points to the nostalgic socialism of Sanders, Jean-Luc Mlenchon and Jeremy Corbyn as evidence of this. But dont they look more like the past than the future? I dont think any of these guys figured it out, she says. But we should think about the fact that Mlenchon could get 70,000 people at a rally from nowhere, and look at the surge we have seen with Corbyn. Especially given the fact that he is kind of the exact opposite of a charismatic politician. (Once the result was known, Klein emailed to say: The UK election really showed the power of leading with substance and ideas, rather than slick packaging and fear. The more May tried to exploit peoples fear and shock telling them they might need to give up their privacy and human rights to fight terror, that they should delegate their rights to her the more [Corbyns] message of hope, that positive yes looked like the better option to many people.) In this sense, Klein places a lot of faith in the cyclical nature of cynicism and hope, believing that the generation now in its teens and 20s is much less phobic of electoral politics than her generation ever was. She experienced a version of that cycle in her own growing up. She was in many ways born to protest, the third Klein generation of principled resistance. It began with her paternal grandparents, Anne and Philip, who met as communists in Newark, New Jersey, in the 1930s. Philip was an animator for Walt Disney. He organised a strike at the studios during the making of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and was fired as a result. He went to work in a shipyard, before he and his wife became part of the nascent green movement, living at the Nature Friends retreat in Paterson, New Jersey, tending their vegetables, listening to Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie. Kleins parents took that retreat from American life a stage further by moving to Canada, in part in protest over the Vietnam war. Her father worked as a paediatrician in public hospitals. Her mother, Bonnie, a film-maker, helped to create the feminist film collective Studio D and made documentaries about Greenham Common and a polemical film against pornography. Klein has recalled how she rebelled against her radical upbringing, insisting on makeup and pop culture; how she always resented being dragged along to peace marches and demonstrations, or what she later called another poncho picnic. She was for most of her teens dismissive of her mothers feminism. She credits two particular catastrophic events in changing her mind. First, aged 46, her mother suffered a brain tumour and a series of strokes that left her quadriplegic. Klein helped to nurse her for six months and was inspired by the fortitude and spirit her mother showed in her partial rehabilitation, and the strength she discovered in herself. At around the same time, during her first year at the University of Toronto, a gunman killed 14 women at the cole Polytechnique in Montreal, declaring: I hate feminists. The event motivated Klein into political activism and she has called herself a feminist ever since, though initially she was sceptical of conventional party politics. Among my generation there was a purist position that any contact with electoral politics was an unforgiveable compromise, she says. I dont see that nearly so much in this generation. Part of it is based in movement building but it also involves running people for office at every level. She hesitates to suggest her book as a rallying cry for a political party she is wary of making herself anything like a figurehead, hoping to be one voice among many but suggests that there are ideas in it that people might gather around. She is doing a series of (inevitably sold-out) events across the US to support the book, though she says: I have a five-year-old son so I wont be permanently on the road. The part she hopes will most resonate with her audiences is the Leap manifesto an integrated leap forward on climate action, racial justice, decent jobs. She has created Leap with her husband, Avi Lewis, a documentary film-maker, in conjunction with various activist groups heads of labour federations and unions, directors of major green groups, iconic indigenous and feminist leaders, key organisers and theorists focused on migrant rights, open technology, food justice, housing, faith, and more from across Canada and beyond. The ideas are an extension of the theme of her last book, This Changes Everything, which argued that a new progressive politics had to be built around a radical and sustainable green tech revolution, and an outright rejection of fossil fuels. The proactive message is at least as important as her deconstruction of Trump, she hopes. When I wrote The Shock Doctrine I really did think that just showing how crisis was exploited would be enough to repel it, she says. Then the crash happened and I watched these social movements fill squares in Portugal and Italy and Spain I lived there for months all chanting We wont pay for your crisis. I ended This Changes Everything with an interview I had with Alexis Tsipras before he was elected in Greece, where he said to me It is enough in this moment to say no. Klein profoundly disagreed, because no is never enough. Anger and rejection of the status quo will never sustain people on its own. The triumph of neoliberalism is the idea that the alternative is always even worse. To overturn that there has to be a boldness and a recapturing of the utopian imagination. If we cant do that, then I really dont think we have a chance against these guys. Klein ends her current book talking about these movements that have spontaneously expressed resistance Black Lives Matter, various green and community groups and argues for them to come together. To resist this we have get out of the silos, she says. Environmentalists in one corner, feminists in one corner, racial justice in another. We dont have enough spaces where we can get together. In expressing this hope, Klein references the example of her mothers stroke and the ways that devastating event shaped her understanding of coping with crisis. She takes it as an example that sudden adversity generates strength and hope as well fear. In a shocked state, with our understanding of the world badly shaken, a great many of us can become childlike and passive, and overly trusting of people who are only too happy to abuse that trust. But I also know, from my own familys navigation of a shocking event, that there can be the inverse response as well. We can evolve and grow up in a crisis, and set aside all kinds of bullshit fast. My mothers stroke was a really formative moment in my life, she says. And I think because of it I have been attuned to seeing other expressions of that. When I started to write about crisis in The Shock Doctrine, it was with a sense that these moments of trauma could bring out the best in people. We talk a little about how the terrorist attacks in Manchester and London have again exemplified that fact. How, contrary to the efforts of forces that might have exaggerated the fear and exploited the crisis to divide us, they became occasions to reaffirm tremendous shared humanity and spirit. One aspect of that, I suggest, is that at heart, people arent made to be fearful all the time, life reasserts itself. The thing about the shock doctrine is that if they try to use it too much it stops being shocking, Klein says. That is the importance of historical memory in these moments and of course Britain has the blitz spirit in its DNA: we are people who do not crumble during crisis. One of the difficulties that America faces, she suggests, is that it doesnt have that kind of collective memory. Historical struggles that the nation has overcome Jim Crow and civil rights, the internment of Japanese Americans during the second world war have not been shared narratives, and therefore have been harder to unite around. She hopes that a shared investment in the environment can provide some of that social glue; in this respect, Trumps rejection of the Paris Accord can be a starting pistol for communities to take action into their own hands. The cities and provinces that have pledged to abide by the Paris principles prove the limits of central power. The message is that neoliberals control a lot but they dont control everything. They dont decide how we get our energy or move ourselves. Part of breaking the spell of neoliberalism is having people live an alternative, and cities and communities are where that happens. The institutions that used to be the backbone of social movements are in disarray and so diminished, and so we need to fix it for ourselves. In this sense she envisages her Leap idea as a piece of open source code: If you make activism a brand, you are in competition with similar brands, doing similar work, she says. With Leap, if you want it, take it, do something cool with it, if you dont want it, who cares? How optimistic is she about that prospect? I have good days and bad days, she says. Or good parts of days and bad parts of days. It is undeniably terrifying that at this moment of such intense gravity for the planet this figure of such extreme stupidity has risen to power. But that means that there is more urgency to find solutions. She laughs. Will that do as my message of hope? she asks. I guess it will for now, I say. Naomi Klein will be speaking at Royal Festival Hall, London, on 4 July at 7.30pm. No Is Not Enough: Defeating the New Shock Politics is published by Allen Lane (12.99). To order a copy for 11.04 go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846 Free UK p&p over 10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of 1.99

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June 11, 2017   Posted in: David Duke  Comments Closed

Google has more advertisers bailing out over hate videos – The Philadelphia Tribune

LONDON – Google still has a major problem with extremist and hate videos. Three advertisers – Etihad Airways, Deliveroo and the United Kingdom’s Labour Party – have pulled their spots from YouTube after discovering they were shown alongside videos made by a hate preacher. Google-owned YouTube has been under mounting pressure in recent months after more than a dozen organizations pulled their ads over similar complaints. Etihad, the national carrier of the United Arab Emirates, said in a statement that it was “appalled” by the content of the videos. “This content is abhorrent, deeply disturbing and the issue needs to be resolved by Google and all other media partners,” it said in a statement. Deliveroo said it was “extremely concerned.” It said it has withdrawn its ads until YouTube takes action “to improve its content control and protect its viewers and advertisers.” The latest round of advertiser defections was first reported by The Times. The newspaper said that Mastercard, Johnson & Johnson, New Balance and Marriott Hotels have also pulled their ads. Those companies did not respond to requests for comment from CNNMoney. Weight Watchers, also mentioned in The Times report, said it would “not fund this type of activity” and added that it was “not currently” running ads on YouTube. YouTube, meanwhile, said that it has made progress in addressing the issue. “We’ve been conducting an extensive review of our advertising policies — and in recent weeks have made significant changes that give brands more control over where their ads appear,” a spokesperson said. YouTube sells ad time to companies, and their spots are slotted to play before videos. Advertisers don’t directly control where their ads are placed, although they can specify the demographics they’d like to target. YouTube relies heavily on viewers to flag content. With 300 hours of content a minute uploaded, some fall through the cracks. The company said that while “no system will be 100 percent perfect,” it has taken steps to “further safeguard our advertisers’ brands.” The latest round of advertising suspensions included three major political parties in the U.K. The country will hold a general election on Thursday. The Times reported that the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats had asked for their ads to be removed from the site. The Labour Party confirmed it had taken similar action. “We will be raising this issue with YouTube and have paused all adverts until we are satisfied Google have taken steps to make sure this does not happen again,” the party said in a statement. In March, Google faced an advertiser exodus after spots from major brands and the U.K. government ran alongside content from extremist groups. At the time, the British government summoned the tech firm to explain why taxpayer-funded ads were used on content including videos from former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. Google and Facebook own huge chunks of the digital advertising business, and major brands are spending an increasing share of their ad budgets on their platforms. Companies are becoming cautious about where their advertisements appear, however. Vodafone announced plans on Tuesday to prevent its ads from running on sites that carry hate speech and fake news. – (CNN)

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June 10, 2017   Posted in: David Duke  Comments Closed


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