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Charlottesville: David Duke Still Matters — Who Knew? – Townhall

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Posted: Aug 17, 2017 12:01 AM

Who knew David Duke mattered?

Cable news made the former wizard of the KKK quite visible in Charlottesville, at what planners billed as the largest gathering of the “alt-right community.” The “Unite the Right” rally encouraged the like-minded to go to and demonstrate in Charlottesville, Virginia. Counter-protesters, of course, showed up, and many violent clashes ensued. When the dust settled, a woman had been killed and 19 injured when a suspect apparently intentionally drove his car into a crowd of people, although the matter remains under investigation. Two police officers died when their patrol helicopter crashed.

Duke got considerable airtime in Charlottesville. Never mind that the last time he was taken even remotely seriously was in 1991 when he ran for governor of Louisiana. Not a single Republican congressional lawmaker supported him. Mary Matalin, chief of staff of the Republican National Committee, said: “He is not a Republican. We never considered him a Republican. There will be no involvement in his campaign whatsoever.” He lost by a large margin. He sought office four more times, losing each race. He also served time for mail fraud and tax evasion.

President George Herbert Walker Bush issued this scathing dismissal: “When someone asserts the Holocaust never took place, then I don’t believe that person ever deserves one iota of public trust. When someone has so recently endorsed Nazism, it is inconceivable that someone can reasonably aspire to a leadership role in a free society.”

Were it not for cable news digging Duke up from time to time, he’d probably be working road construction under an assumed name in Kalamazoo.

Can we agree to denounce all bigots — whether a David Duke or Maxine Waters or Rev. Al Sharpton? After all, Waters called President Donald Trump’s cabinet members “scumbags” and said, “I’ve never seen anybody as disgusting or as disrespectful as he is.” She recently even called Democrat Alan Dershowitz a “racist.”

As for Sharpton, he has a long list of racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic comments that in a rational world would long ago have consigned him to the ash bin of history. This is the man who, among many outrages over his career as a “civil rights activist,” falsely accused a white man of raping a black teenager and to this day has never apologized. He helped to incite three days of anti-Semitic rioting in Crown Heights, New York, a tragedy that one Columbia University professor called “a modern-day pogrom.” Yet this bigot who whipped up the Crown Heights atmosphere by bellowing, “If the Jews want to get it on, tell them to pin their yarmulkes back and come over to my house,” somehow visited the Obama White House, according to The Washington Post, 72 times during Obama’s first six years.

But it’s Trump aide Steven Bannon whom Trump critics malign as an “anti-Semite.”

After the violence in Charlottesville, Trump issued a statement denouncing “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” But he got hammered for “not calling out” the white nationalist groups by name and for assigning blame to both sides. Critics accused Trump of making a “moral equivalence” — equating white nationalists and Nazi sympathizers to those who oppose them. Normal people thought he meant both sides of the people fighting in the streets. But Trump’s critics accused him of equating Nazis with anti-Nazis — or something like that. So he issued another statement.

Trump said: “Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

Critics then called it too little, too late, especially coming from the man they consider the bigot in chief. Had Trump called out the bad guys by name, critics would’ve blasted him for not giving out their Social Security numbers, too.

The bigot in the White House actually got a smaller share of the white vote than did Mitt Romney in 2012, while getting a larger percentage of the black, Hispanic and Asian votes than Romney did. Apparently blacks, Hispanics and Asians are too stupid to realize that they voted for a man who, right in front of them, reached out to people who hate them. Apparently, the white racists that Trump reached out to are too stupid to realize they’ve attached themselves to a guy who is attracting the very people that white racists hate — people of color.

Two related “race” themes, fervently believed by the left, drive this hatred for Trump. First, the left believes, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that whites’ anti-black racism remains a major problem — even after America became the only predominantly white country in the world to elect a black person to lead it. Second, they believe that Trump won by catering to white racists. Neither is true. But the left’s desire to embrace these two narratives is, to them, much like climate change. It’s settled science.

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Charlottesville: David Duke Still Matters — Who Knew? – Townhall

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David Duke and Donald Trump and the long ties of history – Chicago Tribune

What happened in Charlottesville didn’t start with Donald Trump.

It didn’t start with David Duke either, but there’s a long, durable thread from Duke to Trump that’s worth thinking about.

Despite his dubious Twitter profile claim to be “one of 100 most read and quoted people in the world,” Duke may be an obscure character to many people these days.

But his dying fame has flickered back to life in the Trump era, and there he was on Saturday in Virginia, in the thick of the white nationalist protesters, talking to the media.

“This represents a turning point for the people of this country,” he said, shortly before the protest turned violent. “We are determined to take our country back, we’re going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump, and that’s what we believed in, that’s why we voted for Donald Trump.”

Duke is 67, older than his surgically rejuvenated face and his beefcake Twitter photo suggest, no longer the jaunty young Hitler wannabe I first met at a Mardi Gras parade in 1989.

On that long-ago Tuesday, Duke was in Metairie, a suburb of New Orleans, campaigning for a seat in the state legislature. Metairie was almost entirely white, filled with people who fled New Orleans when the schools were integrated. I was covering the South for the Tribune.

As Duke marched past the flirty women, the awestruck boys and the men who clapped him on the back he tossed doubloons inscribed with his campaign message: “Equal Rights for All. Special Privilege for None. The Courage to Be Different.”

His campaign had roiled Louisiana, where the economy was depressed and white people’s fear of black people ran deep, but he was barely known in Chicago or much anywhere else. The story I wrote for the Tribune, the first time he rated more than a mention, ran on page 23.

A few days later, Duke won the race. That story about the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard who had been a Republican for only a few weeks ran on page one.

Reading those old stories the other day, after a white nationalist drove a car into a crowd of Charlottesville counterprotesters and killed a woman, I was struck by how similar Duke’s surprise rise was to Trump’s a generation later.

In 1989, there was no Breitbart News, no Fox News Channel, no Drudge Report. The word “alt-right” hadn’t been invented. And yet the old stories on Duke sound thoroughly contemporary.

“We’ve finally found somebody who’s brave enough to say what everybody thinks but won’t say,” one Duke supporter said at the Mardi Gras parade.

Sound familiar?

“What you have here,” a New Orleans political scientist told me, predicting a trend that would extend well beyond the South, “is the roots of fascism as we know it the middle class and lower middle class besieged by difficult economic conditions, people who are finding their skills made obsolete by computers, people having trouble paying for college for their kids.”

Sound familiar?

Some people fretted that Duke’s election would be fodder for “Saturday Night Live.”

A lot has changed since then, and Trump and Duke aren’t the same guy. Trump is rich and powerful. Duke is neither. Trump tries to downplay his debt to white nationalists. Duke has proudly built his life on being one.

And yet the two men, like the eras that enabled them, have a lot in common.

Both were Republican interlopers, both repudiated by the party’s mainstream, a rejection that turned into an advantage. Both exhibit a grandiosity they seem to confuse with greatness. Both have built their power by exploiting racial fears and economic insecurity.

Duke, who long ago traded his white KKK robe for a stylish dark suit, was a pioneer in the modern art of whitewashing white nationalism. Trump benefits from the generation he helped cultivate.

After that Mardi Gras parade, I drove with Duke to his white frame home he was an erratic driver and sat in his cluttered basement, next to books on Adolf Hitler and the Klan, while he explained his theories on race and the persecution of white people.

He said he didn’t think black people were inferior. They just have their own kind of music. They’re better than whites at many sports. They don’t do as well on IQ tests.

A week later, he was elected.

Duke’s political career quickly fizzled, but he kept his brand going long enough to help elect the current president. Even if he takes more credit for that than he deserves, and though Trump tries to distance himself, the lineage is real.

On Tuesday, after Trump stirred another storm by saying agitators on the left were also responsible for the violence in Charlottesville, Duke’s approving tweet made the rounds of the mainstream media:

“Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville.”

Ashley Parker and David Nakamura

Racial fear and bigotry are baked into our history, transferred through generations by people who cling to a misbegotten view of honesty, courage and truth.

But the resistance to those views is strong and loud, filled with people, young and old, of various skin colors, who know better. Many of them were in Charlottesville too, and because of them we can believe that what happened there Saturday wasn’t a move backward.

It was a display of what it looks like to move forward, angrily and hopefully, lugging the past with us.

mschmich@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @MarySchmich

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David Duke and Donald Trump and the long ties of history – Chicago Tribune

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Lindsey Graham: The party of Lincoln will not become the party of David Duke – Washington Times

Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina warned President Trump on Wednesday that his words are dividing Americans, not healing them in the wake of the bloody clashes in Virginia that has sparked a national conversation about white supremacists and race.

Mr. Graham also vowed that Republicans will fight back against the idea that the party of Lincoln has a welcome mat out for the David Dukes of the world.

Through his statements yesterday, President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. [Heather] Heyer, Mr. Graham said, alluding to the 32-year-old who died after a man drove a car into a crowd of counterprotesters. I, along with many others, do not endorse this moral equivalency.

Mr. Trump has said that there is a lot of blame to go around following the violent clashes in Charlottesville, drawing blowback from Republicans and Democrats.

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Lindsey Graham: The party of Lincoln will not become the party of David Duke – Washington Times

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David Duke Praises Trump For Remarks Defending Pro-Confederate Protesters – TPM

Former top Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke praised President Donald Trump on Tuesday for his latest remarks regarding the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, which was organized ostensibly as a protest of the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Duke, in his praise of Trump, re-posted a video of the President wondering aloud if the removal of monuments to Confederate figures would end up with the removal of monuments dedicated to early American slaveholders, including Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.

The video also included Trump saying not everyone at the rally on the side of white supremacists was a neo-Nazi or a white nationalist.

You had people and Im not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned, totally but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay? Trump said in the video re-posted by Duke. And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly.

Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people, but you also had trouble-makers, and you see them come with the black outfits, and with the helmets, and with the baseball bats, Trumpadded. You had a lot of bad people in the other group, too.

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David Duke Praises Trump For Remarks Defending Pro-Confederate Protesters – TPM

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If David Duke traced his DNA, would he find a surprise? – Orlando Sentinel

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the one-drop rule, codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered black. I wonder what wed learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the white nationalists who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr., a Harvard professor, discovered in Finding Your Roots, his PBS series on race in America, that there are no purebred humans. Gates himself discovered through a DNA test that he is descended from an Irish immigrant and a slave.

Duke and his neo-Nazi followers are responsible for the deaths of three people and for injuring 19 others as surely as if they had driven that car into the crowd themselves or crashed the Virginia state police helicopter dispatched to control the protestors, which claimed the lives of two officers.

The white supremacists marching in Charlottesville said they want to take America back. Take it back from whom and for what purpose? The left and the right occasionally convey a similar message. What is it about America that makes some people want to seize it from other people? Among other things, the demonstrators were upset that streets and statues memorializing men who led the South during the Civil War are being removed and replaced by those honoring men and women untainted by the stain of slavery.

The place to make their case is before elected representatives, or peacefully in the public square. They might ask how far those who want to abolish history wish to go. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned slaves. Are their accomplishments enough to overcome their flawed belief that African-Americans were inherently inferior to whites and, therefore, tailor-made for subjugation? Should the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial be destroyed or renamed? Should the images of Jefferson or Washington be removed from our currency?

Washington, our first president, led the Revolutionary War and is considered the founder of the nation. Jefferson founded the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and penned words in the Declaration of Independence that Frederick Douglass in the 19th century and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 20th century would refer to in an effort to hold America to Jeffersons statement that rights come from our Creator, not government.

President Trump said Saturday that he condemned the egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides. Many sides? This was not a case of moral equivalency, but of moral clarity. On Sunday, smarting from criticism that he hadnt explicitly condemned white nationalists, a White House spokesperson released a statement denouncing the violence and naming white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazi and all extremist groups. Trump finally bowed to growing pressure on Monday and uttered the words himself.

The Washington Post editorial board, with which I am not usually in agreement, was correct when it said Mr. Trump should have gone further. It suggested he might have said the following: Under whatever labels and using whatever code words heritage, tradition, nationalism, the idea that whites or any other ethnic, national or racial group is superior to another is not acceptable.

During last years presidential campaign, David Duke endorsed Donald Trump. It took Trump a while to reject that endorsement. Duke claimed in Charlottesville that whites elected Trump. Sufficient numbers of white voters also elected Barack Obama twice so whats his point?

The president should say no electoral victory is worth receiving votes from people who hate their fellow countrymen. He should also say that while he cannot prevent anyone from voting for whomever they wish, he will reject any endorsements coming from hate groups.

Not much can bring us together these days, but this kind of hatred should unite all Americans who have a spark of decency in their hearts.

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If David Duke traced his DNA, would he find a surprise? – Orlando Sentinel

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David Duke: Charlottesville Rally Fulfills The Promises …

During a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. on Saturday, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Dukesaid the event is in line with President Trumps promises.

This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back, Duke said. We are going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump. Thats what we believed in. Thats why we voted for Donald Trump, because he said hes going to take our country back.

Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler organized the Saturday rally to protest Charlottesvilles decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has declared a state of emergency in response.

Duke never shied away from his support for Trump since the Republican primary in 2016, in whichTrump also came under fire for not initially disavowing the former KKK leaders endorsement.

Previously, Duke served one term as a Louisiana state representative. Dukes most recent foray into politics involved a failed run for the Louisiana Senate.

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David Duke: Charlottesville Rally Fulfills The Promises …

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Trump’s defense of the ‘very fine people’ at Charlottesville white nationalist march has David Duke gushing – CNN

The President’s abrupt and belligerent about-face Tuesday, in which he lashed out at the media for mischaracterizing white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, drew the swift condemnation of a number of lawmakers, including Republicans, and shocked the people who witnessed them.

“Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,” was the full tweet from an account that is not verified by Twitter but appears to represent Duke and features videos apparently posted by and of him.

Trump used language familiar to the “alt-right” and white supremacists when he bemoaned “changing culture” that would results from the tearing down of statues honoring confederate generals like Robert E. Lee, who Trump equated with founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who were slave owners.

Trump was also asked Tuesday specifically about Duke, who took part in the Charlottesville march.

“I didn’t know David Duke was there,” Trump said, before arguing he was slow to react to the racists at the march because he wanted to get all the facts.

Trump drew criticism for refusing to condemn Duke during a contentious interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper in February 2016.

He later argued a faulty earpiece had made him not understand the question. Watch that exchange here:

Correction: This story misquoted Trump. He said some of the people marching along the white nationalists were “very fine,” not “good.”

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Trump’s defense of the ‘very fine people’ at Charlottesville white nationalist march has David Duke gushing – CNN

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Eboni Williams to Trump: ‘David Duke Certainly Knows Who You Are’ – Fox News Insider

‘Unlike You, I Like to Know the Facts First’: Trump Scuffles With Reporters Over Charlottesville

‘Is It George Washington Next Week?’: Trump Blasts Monument Removals as ‘Changing History’

Eboni Williams opened the “Fox News Specialists” on Tuesday by blasting President Trump’s responses to questions about the Charlottesville violence.

She said that Trump had not heeded her advice to him yesterday, when she said that he was likely not a racist, but that he appears to be OK with having the support of those factions.

Williams said at the time that Trump must make a second statement on the matter and fully condemn the white nationalist part of his base.

Tuesday, she said that Trump was “playing dumb” on having the support of David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, and his following.

She noted that Duke took to Twitter on Tuesday to thank Trump for his “honesty and courage” to call out left-wing “terrorists” during the Q&A.

“How long does that narrative even remain something we can entertain?” Williams asked.

Katherine Timpf called the press conference “one of the biggest messes I’ve ever seen” and “disgusting.”

Williams reiterated her stance, saying that she had asked Trump to call out Duke and the racist factions by name.

“Well, sir, David Duke certainly knows who you are and what you stand for,” Trump said.

‘F*** Law’: Lincoln Memorial Vandalized in Wake of Charlottesville Unrest

‘I Want the Wall Built’: Alabamian Diners Sound Off on Senate Election Day

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Eboni Williams to Trump: ‘David Duke Certainly Knows Who You Are’ – Fox News Insider

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David Duke Supports BDS and Roger Waters, Too – Algemeiner

Former KKK leader David Duke narrates a YouTube video titled Jews admit organizing White Genocide. Photo: Screenshot.

Leftists are rightly up in arms over David Dukes appearance at the neo-Nazi, white nationalist rally in Charlottesville.

But they are strangely silent when he shows his support forBDSand Roger Waters.

If you are going to denounce Jew-hatred, you dont get to pick and choose. And if you do, it shows that you are using antisemitism to make a political point.

But we already knew that with the silence that most progressives have toward officially-sanctioned antisemitism by Arab governments, by Palestinians, byUNRWAand by some on the Left.

August 15, 2017 4:53 pm

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David Duke Supports BDS and Roger Waters, Too – Algemeiner

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Charlottesville: David Duke Still Matters — Who Knew? – Townhall

| Posted: Aug 17, 2017 12:01 AM Who knew David Duke mattered? Cable news made the former wizard of the KKK quite visible in Charlottesville, at what planners billed as the largest gathering of the “alt-right community.” The “Unite the Right” rally encouraged the like-minded to go to and demonstrate in Charlottesville, Virginia. Counter-protesters, of course, showed up, and many violent clashes ensued. When the dust settled, a woman had been killed and 19 injured when a suspect apparently intentionally drove his car into a crowd of people, although the matter remains under investigation. Two police officers died when their patrol helicopter crashed. Duke got considerable airtime in Charlottesville. Never mind that the last time he was taken even remotely seriously was in 1991 when he ran for governor of Louisiana. Not a single Republican congressional lawmaker supported him. Mary Matalin, chief of staff of the Republican National Committee, said: “He is not a Republican. We never considered him a Republican. There will be no involvement in his campaign whatsoever.” He lost by a large margin. He sought office four more times, losing each race. He also served time for mail fraud and tax evasion. President George Herbert Walker Bush issued this scathing dismissal: “When someone asserts the Holocaust never took place, then I don’t believe that person ever deserves one iota of public trust. When someone has so recently endorsed Nazism, it is inconceivable that someone can reasonably aspire to a leadership role in a free society.” Were it not for cable news digging Duke up from time to time, he’d probably be working road construction under an assumed name in Kalamazoo. Can we agree to denounce all bigots — whether a David Duke or Maxine Waters or Rev. Al Sharpton? After all, Waters called President Donald Trump’s cabinet members “scumbags” and said, “I’ve never seen anybody as disgusting or as disrespectful as he is.” She recently even called Democrat Alan Dershowitz a “racist.” As for Sharpton, he has a long list of racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic comments that in a rational world would long ago have consigned him to the ash bin of history. This is the man who, among many outrages over his career as a “civil rights activist,” falsely accused a white man of raping a black teenager and to this day has never apologized. He helped to incite three days of anti-Semitic rioting in Crown Heights, New York, a tragedy that one Columbia University professor called “a modern-day pogrom.” Yet this bigot who whipped up the Crown Heights atmosphere by bellowing, “If the Jews want to get it on, tell them to pin their yarmulkes back and come over to my house,” somehow visited the Obama White House, according to The Washington Post, 72 times during Obama’s first six years. But it’s Trump aide Steven Bannon whom Trump critics malign as an “anti-Semite.” After the violence in Charlottesville, Trump issued a statement denouncing “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” But he got hammered for “not calling out” the white nationalist groups by name and for assigning blame to both sides. Critics accused Trump of making a “moral equivalence” — equating white nationalists and Nazi sympathizers to those who oppose them. Normal people thought he meant both sides of the people fighting in the streets. But Trump’s critics accused him of equating Nazis with anti-Nazis — or something like that. So he issued another statement. Trump said: “Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.” Critics then called it too little, too late, especially coming from the man they consider the bigot in chief. Had Trump called out the bad guys by name, critics would’ve blasted him for not giving out their Social Security numbers, too. The bigot in the White House actually got a smaller share of the white vote than did Mitt Romney in 2012, while getting a larger percentage of the black, Hispanic and Asian votes than Romney did. Apparently blacks, Hispanics and Asians are too stupid to realize that they voted for a man who, right in front of them, reached out to people who hate them. Apparently, the white racists that Trump reached out to are too stupid to realize they’ve attached themselves to a guy who is attracting the very people that white racists hate — people of color. Two related “race” themes, fervently believed by the left, drive this hatred for Trump. First, the left believes, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that whites’ anti-black racism remains a major problem — even after America became the only predominantly white country in the world to elect a black person to lead it. Second, they believe that Trump won by catering to white racists. Neither is true. But the left’s desire to embrace these two narratives is, to them, much like climate change. It’s settled science.

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David Duke and Donald Trump and the long ties of history – Chicago Tribune

What happened in Charlottesville didn’t start with Donald Trump. It didn’t start with David Duke either, but there’s a long, durable thread from Duke to Trump that’s worth thinking about. Despite his dubious Twitter profile claim to be “one of 100 most read and quoted people in the world,” Duke may be an obscure character to many people these days. But his dying fame has flickered back to life in the Trump era, and there he was on Saturday in Virginia, in the thick of the white nationalist protesters, talking to the media. “This represents a turning point for the people of this country,” he said, shortly before the protest turned violent. “We are determined to take our country back, we’re going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump, and that’s what we believed in, that’s why we voted for Donald Trump.” Duke is 67, older than his surgically rejuvenated face and his beefcake Twitter photo suggest, no longer the jaunty young Hitler wannabe I first met at a Mardi Gras parade in 1989. On that long-ago Tuesday, Duke was in Metairie, a suburb of New Orleans, campaigning for a seat in the state legislature. Metairie was almost entirely white, filled with people who fled New Orleans when the schools were integrated. I was covering the South for the Tribune. As Duke marched past the flirty women, the awestruck boys and the men who clapped him on the back he tossed doubloons inscribed with his campaign message: “Equal Rights for All. Special Privilege for None. The Courage to Be Different.” His campaign had roiled Louisiana, where the economy was depressed and white people’s fear of black people ran deep, but he was barely known in Chicago or much anywhere else. The story I wrote for the Tribune, the first time he rated more than a mention, ran on page 23. A few days later, Duke won the race. That story about the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard who had been a Republican for only a few weeks ran on page one. Reading those old stories the other day, after a white nationalist drove a car into a crowd of Charlottesville counterprotesters and killed a woman, I was struck by how similar Duke’s surprise rise was to Trump’s a generation later. In 1989, there was no Breitbart News, no Fox News Channel, no Drudge Report. The word “alt-right” hadn’t been invented. And yet the old stories on Duke sound thoroughly contemporary. “We’ve finally found somebody who’s brave enough to say what everybody thinks but won’t say,” one Duke supporter said at the Mardi Gras parade. Sound familiar? “What you have here,” a New Orleans political scientist told me, predicting a trend that would extend well beyond the South, “is the roots of fascism as we know it the middle class and lower middle class besieged by difficult economic conditions, people who are finding their skills made obsolete by computers, people having trouble paying for college for their kids.” Sound familiar? Some people fretted that Duke’s election would be fodder for “Saturday Night Live.” A lot has changed since then, and Trump and Duke aren’t the same guy. Trump is rich and powerful. Duke is neither. Trump tries to downplay his debt to white nationalists. Duke has proudly built his life on being one. And yet the two men, like the eras that enabled them, have a lot in common. Both were Republican interlopers, both repudiated by the party’s mainstream, a rejection that turned into an advantage. Both exhibit a grandiosity they seem to confuse with greatness. Both have built their power by exploiting racial fears and economic insecurity. Duke, who long ago traded his white KKK robe for a stylish dark suit, was a pioneer in the modern art of whitewashing white nationalism. Trump benefits from the generation he helped cultivate. After that Mardi Gras parade, I drove with Duke to his white frame home he was an erratic driver and sat in his cluttered basement, next to books on Adolf Hitler and the Klan, while he explained his theories on race and the persecution of white people. He said he didn’t think black people were inferior. They just have their own kind of music. They’re better than whites at many sports. They don’t do as well on IQ tests. A week later, he was elected. Duke’s political career quickly fizzled, but he kept his brand going long enough to help elect the current president. Even if he takes more credit for that than he deserves, and though Trump tries to distance himself, the lineage is real. On Tuesday, after Trump stirred another storm by saying agitators on the left were also responsible for the violence in Charlottesville, Duke’s approving tweet made the rounds of the mainstream media: “Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville.” Ashley Parker and David Nakamura Racial fear and bigotry are baked into our history, transferred through generations by people who cling to a misbegotten view of honesty, courage and truth. But the resistance to those views is strong and loud, filled with people, young and old, of various skin colors, who know better. Many of them were in Charlottesville too, and because of them we can believe that what happened there Saturday wasn’t a move backward. It was a display of what it looks like to move forward, angrily and hopefully, lugging the past with us. mschmich@chicagotribune.com Twitter @MarySchmich

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Lindsey Graham: The party of Lincoln will not become the party of David Duke – Washington Times

Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina warned President Trump on Wednesday that his words are dividing Americans, not healing them in the wake of the bloody clashes in Virginia that has sparked a national conversation about white supremacists and race. Mr. Graham also vowed that Republicans will fight back against the idea that the party of Lincoln has a welcome mat out for the David Dukes of the world. Through his statements yesterday, President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. [Heather] Heyer, Mr. Graham said, alluding to the 32-year-old who died after a man drove a car into a crowd of counterprotesters. I, along with many others, do not endorse this moral equivalency. Mr. Trump has said that there is a lot of blame to go around following the violent clashes in Charlottesville, drawing blowback from Republicans and Democrats.

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David Duke Praises Trump For Remarks Defending Pro-Confederate Protesters – TPM

Former top Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke praised President Donald Trump on Tuesday for his latest remarks regarding the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, which was organized ostensibly as a protest of the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Duke, in his praise of Trump, re-posted a video of the President wondering aloud if the removal of monuments to Confederate figures would end up with the removal of monuments dedicated to early American slaveholders, including Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. The video also included Trump saying not everyone at the rally on the side of white supremacists was a neo-Nazi or a white nationalist. You had people and Im not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned, totally but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay? Trump said in the video re-posted by Duke. And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly. Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people, but you also had trouble-makers, and you see them come with the black outfits, and with the helmets, and with the baseball bats, Trumpadded. You had a lot of bad people in the other group, too.

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If David Duke traced his DNA, would he find a surprise? – Orlando Sentinel

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the one-drop rule, codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered black. I wonder what wed learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the white nationalists who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup? Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr., a Harvard professor, discovered in Finding Your Roots, his PBS series on race in America, that there are no purebred humans. Gates himself discovered through a DNA test that he is descended from an Irish immigrant and a slave. Duke and his neo-Nazi followers are responsible for the deaths of three people and for injuring 19 others as surely as if they had driven that car into the crowd themselves or crashed the Virginia state police helicopter dispatched to control the protestors, which claimed the lives of two officers. The white supremacists marching in Charlottesville said they want to take America back. Take it back from whom and for what purpose? The left and the right occasionally convey a similar message. What is it about America that makes some people want to seize it from other people? Among other things, the demonstrators were upset that streets and statues memorializing men who led the South during the Civil War are being removed and replaced by those honoring men and women untainted by the stain of slavery. The place to make their case is before elected representatives, or peacefully in the public square. They might ask how far those who want to abolish history wish to go. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned slaves. Are their accomplishments enough to overcome their flawed belief that African-Americans were inherently inferior to whites and, therefore, tailor-made for subjugation? Should the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial be destroyed or renamed? Should the images of Jefferson or Washington be removed from our currency? Washington, our first president, led the Revolutionary War and is considered the founder of the nation. Jefferson founded the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and penned words in the Declaration of Independence that Frederick Douglass in the 19th century and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 20th century would refer to in an effort to hold America to Jeffersons statement that rights come from our Creator, not government. President Trump said Saturday that he condemned the egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides. Many sides? This was not a case of moral equivalency, but of moral clarity. On Sunday, smarting from criticism that he hadnt explicitly condemned white nationalists, a White House spokesperson released a statement denouncing the violence and naming white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazi and all extremist groups. Trump finally bowed to growing pressure on Monday and uttered the words himself. The Washington Post editorial board, with which I am not usually in agreement, was correct when it said Mr. Trump should have gone further. It suggested he might have said the following: Under whatever labels and using whatever code words heritage, tradition, nationalism, the idea that whites or any other ethnic, national or racial group is superior to another is not acceptable. During last years presidential campaign, David Duke endorsed Donald Trump. It took Trump a while to reject that endorsement. Duke claimed in Charlottesville that whites elected Trump. Sufficient numbers of white voters also elected Barack Obama twice so whats his point? The president should say no electoral victory is worth receiving votes from people who hate their fellow countrymen. He should also say that while he cannot prevent anyone from voting for whomever they wish, he will reject any endorsements coming from hate groups. Not much can bring us together these days, but this kind of hatred should unite all Americans who have a spark of decency in their hearts.

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David Duke: Charlottesville Rally Fulfills The Promises …

During a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. on Saturday, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Dukesaid the event is in line with President Trumps promises. This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back, Duke said. We are going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump. Thats what we believed in. Thats why we voted for Donald Trump, because he said hes going to take our country back. Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler organized the Saturday rally to protest Charlottesvilles decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has declared a state of emergency in response. Duke never shied away from his support for Trump since the Republican primary in 2016, in whichTrump also came under fire for not initially disavowing the former KKK leaders endorsement. Previously, Duke served one term as a Louisiana state representative. Dukes most recent foray into politics involved a failed run for the Louisiana Senate.

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Trump’s defense of the ‘very fine people’ at Charlottesville white nationalist march has David Duke gushing – CNN

The President’s abrupt and belligerent about-face Tuesday, in which he lashed out at the media for mischaracterizing white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, drew the swift condemnation of a number of lawmakers, including Republicans, and shocked the people who witnessed them. “Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,” was the full tweet from an account that is not verified by Twitter but appears to represent Duke and features videos apparently posted by and of him. Trump used language familiar to the “alt-right” and white supremacists when he bemoaned “changing culture” that would results from the tearing down of statues honoring confederate generals like Robert E. Lee, who Trump equated with founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who were slave owners. Trump was also asked Tuesday specifically about Duke, who took part in the Charlottesville march. “I didn’t know David Duke was there,” Trump said, before arguing he was slow to react to the racists at the march because he wanted to get all the facts. Trump drew criticism for refusing to condemn Duke during a contentious interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper in February 2016. He later argued a faulty earpiece had made him not understand the question. Watch that exchange here: Correction: This story misquoted Trump. He said some of the people marching along the white nationalists were “very fine,” not “good.”

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Eboni Williams to Trump: ‘David Duke Certainly Knows Who You Are’ – Fox News Insider

‘Unlike You, I Like to Know the Facts First’: Trump Scuffles With Reporters Over Charlottesville ‘Is It George Washington Next Week?’: Trump Blasts Monument Removals as ‘Changing History’ Eboni Williams opened the “Fox News Specialists” on Tuesday by blasting President Trump’s responses to questions about the Charlottesville violence. She said that Trump had not heeded her advice to him yesterday, when she said that he was likely not a racist, but that he appears to be OK with having the support of those factions. Williams said at the time that Trump must make a second statement on the matter and fully condemn the white nationalist part of his base. Tuesday, she said that Trump was “playing dumb” on having the support of David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, and his following. She noted that Duke took to Twitter on Tuesday to thank Trump for his “honesty and courage” to call out left-wing “terrorists” during the Q&A. “How long does that narrative even remain something we can entertain?” Williams asked. Katherine Timpf called the press conference “one of the biggest messes I’ve ever seen” and “disgusting.” Williams reiterated her stance, saying that she had asked Trump to call out Duke and the racist factions by name. “Well, sir, David Duke certainly knows who you are and what you stand for,” Trump said. ‘F*** Law’: Lincoln Memorial Vandalized in Wake of Charlottesville Unrest ‘I Want the Wall Built’: Alabamian Diners Sound Off on Senate Election Day

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August 16, 2017   Posted in: David Duke  Comments Closed

David Duke Supports BDS and Roger Waters, Too – Algemeiner

Former KKK leader David Duke narrates a YouTube video titled Jews admit organizing White Genocide. Photo: Screenshot. Leftists are rightly up in arms over David Dukes appearance at the neo-Nazi, white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. But they are strangely silent when he shows his support forBDSand Roger Waters. If you are going to denounce Jew-hatred, you dont get to pick and choose. And if you do, it shows that you are using antisemitism to make a political point. But we already knew that with the silence that most progressives have toward officially-sanctioned antisemitism by Arab governments, by Palestinians, byUNRWAand by some on the Left. August 15, 2017 4:53 pm I was inspired by this tweet:

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