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BWW Review: COSMIC TRIGGER THE PLAY, Cockpit Theatre – Broadway World

So what, then, is Cosmic Trigger The Play? At times, yeah, a play, but at other times a cabaret, a documentary, a history lesson, a biography, a tribute, a literary adventure, a tragedy and a comedy. Is it, dare I use the word, perhaps most aptly labelled “A Happening”?

No matter how you describe it, it is four hours of great fun that constantly threatens to go off the rails, but just about stays on track, as the drugs, the paranoia and the joie-de-vivre pile on top of each other in a great tower of 70s hokum – with the glinting edge of relevance to 2017 cutting through any cynical dismissal of its key themes.

We’re in the swinging Sixties at the offices of Playboy where Robert Anton Wilson sifts through the bonkers conspiracy letters that arrive by the sackload. Realising that they are on to something, he and fellow scribbler Robert Shea decide to weave all the crazy stuff into a book they call Illuminatus, a project that takes over their lives and soon garners a global cult following (Dan Brown must have been looking on and thinking, “Hmm…”). Wilson jumps headfirst into the emerging counterculture, hobnobbing with Timothy Leary, William S Burroughs and the Charles Mansonesque figure (without the murders) Kerry Thornley – pass the hookah please.

Daisy Campbell’s twisting, tantalising, treat of a script isn’t satisfied with just telling that story – she also tells the story of her father’s (cult director Ken Campbell) 1976 staging of Illuminatus in Liverpool and later at the National Theatre in its Mary Whitehouse baiting days. Cue plenty of excellent jokes about the excesses of radical experimental theatre and dollops of goat blood!

And, topping off these narratives layered upon narratives, there’s Cosmic Trigger itself, the book about the book and the source for the play based on the book about the book – well, you know, sort of.

Got all that? Well, it doesn’t really matter if you haven’t, because, over its four hours running time, you will, as the metas stack up . Amazingly, it’s never difficult to follow, a testimony to the clarity of vision in the writing, the skills of actors playing multiple roles (sometimes naked – you have been warned) and a staging that maintains an audience-friendly pace through the New Age mumbo-jumbo and the incipient psychosis that, unlike in the case of Phillip K Dick (with whom he shared many traits), Wilson just about keeps at bay. In his case, the trips are a lot of fun and only a little scary!

It’s funny and clever and delightful too. Our heroes may not have much respect for straight society, but they are decent people who love each other and the world around them (though, of course, not everyone came out the other side unscathed). Oliver Senton plays Wilson as a guide and sardonic commentator on the craziness of the consumer-driven capitalism driving the USA (and, soon, the world) to a state where one can never have enough. Kate Alderton’s Arlen Wilson is a bra-burning feminist poet, but (if that’s the right word) full of love for her husband and her children, who are as sweet as can be.

If Mr and Mrs Wilson (how plain those names sound for such unplain individuals) hold the centre of the plot together, there are plenty of splendid performances swirling around them. Jethro Skinner is full of bonhomie and voracious sexuality as Timothy Leary, not even cowed by prison, inspiring a bravura song and dance number every bit as good as Dr Evil’s “It’s A Hard Knock Life”. Leigh Kelly’s Goat Man is (how can I put this?) eye-catching and Josh Darcy’s Ken Campbell is an uncanny impersonation of the old rogue, all unpredictable charisma and commitment.

Though 8 is a little steep for the programme, it does include a superb essay by John Higgs (who wrote the definitive story of pop anarchists, The KLF, who trace their roots back to Ken Campbell’s seminal show) which brings us right up to date with the hijacking of the fun element of conspiracy theories by the alt-right in the post-truth world of 2017 – though, rightly, he claims that we have always lived in a “post-truth” world, it’s just that its creators are more brazen and more powerful than ever. When the images of boobs and balls and a squid singing Radiohead’s “Creep” (every bit as brilliant as it sounds) fade from the mind, Wilson’s ideas (like Phillip K Dick’s smuggled into the mainstream) seem closer and closer to reality every day.

There probably isn’t a cult directing our world from Sirius (at his outer limits, Wilson can go a bit David Icke, never without a twinkle in his eye though), but, in an interconnected world of instant communication, the question of who is working with whom and to what end, is no less relevant to the Left and the non-political, for all of its appropriation by the Right, led by their champion, tweeting outlandish allegations at 3.00am from The White House. How the world can escape from the Chapel perilous into which it is being led and away from a state of paranoia into agnosticism, is the key question for our times.

Cosmic Trigger The Play is a Love & Will production at the Cockpit Theatre until 27 May.

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BWW Review: COSMIC TRIGGER THE PLAY, Cockpit Theatre – Broadway World

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May 7, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

The historic sex abuse investigation needs a dose of common sense – Spectator.co.uk (blog)

Amid the tidal wave of allegations of historic sexual abuse by so-called VIP paedophiles, yet another high-profile police investigation has stalled. Wiltshire Police, who are looking into claims made against the late Sir Edward Heath, revealed two weeks ago that they had released the only other two people arrested, saying theyface no further action. Despite this, officers told Radio 4s Today programme that Operation Conifer remains an ongoing investigation and that there are a significant number of allegations made by a separate number of individuals. But its unclear where else the investigation can go.

Following the abandonment of another probe that of Operation Midland by the Metropolitan Police, the former Conservative MP Harvey Proctor isreportedto be suing the anonymouswitnessknown only as Nick, who has accused him and others of decades-old sex crimes. Following an independent review by a retired high court judge, Sir Richard Henriques, Nick has been described as a fantasist. Northumbria Police are also considering whether to charge him for attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Mr Proctor is now suing the Metropolitan Police for damages; so too are former army chief Lord Bramall and the celebrity DJ Paul Gambaccini, who have also been falsely accused of abuse and face no further action. The claims could collectively cost the Met an estimated 3 million but the damage and financial cost to these mens reputations is incalculable. The question is, just how many others are facing historic accusations which are false?

Police across the UK have been so overwhelmed by the onslaught of child abuse allegations including current, non-recent, online and peer-to-peer abuse that many forces have reached saturation point, according to Britains most senior child protection police officer. Simon Bailey, Chief Constable of the Norfolk Constabulary, is so concerned by the unprecedented volume that he has proposed the decriminalisation of offenders who do not pose a physical threat to children, such as those viewing low level online child pornography. Instead, they should be dealt with through counselling and rehabilitation, he saidin February.

Mr Baileys radical suggestion comes in the wake ofstatisticsthat are truly staggering. The number of child abuse reports has leapt by 80 per cent in just three years, with police receiving an average of 112 complaints a day. There are now more than 70,000 complaints a year, with forces preparing an estimated 40,000 reports of abuse from the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. That inquiry set up in the wake of revelations that Jimmy Savile was a predatory paedophile is projected to cost 100 million over the next five years.

Why are so many people coming forward now? Sociologists might call this a moral panic, an explosive amplification of genuine public concern victims are told they should know they will be believed. This has been coupled with a burgeoning and increasingly powerful survivor movement, a growth in the number of psychotherapists helping the vulnerable recover repressed memories, and compensation specialists at theAssociation of Child Abuse Lawyersactively soliciting allegations all fuelled by social media and the anonymous ether of Twitterland.

So how to deal with the sheer volume of accusations, especially when some go back decades? One filter the police could use is plausibility; instead of simply believing victims outright, officers need to consider that some claims might be false, elicited in dubious recovered memory psychotherapy, or motivated by the prospect of compensation. One area in which this should apply is in claims of so-called Satanic ritual abuse, where accusers claim there is an international network of devil-worshipping paedophiles who breed babies for sacrifice, murder, rape, drink blood and even eat body parts in occult ceremonies. It sounds ridiculous and it is a government-funded inquiry as far back as 1994 concluded that ritual abuse was amyth. But, incredibly, some recent allegations made to police involvesuch claims.

Operation Hydrant set up to oversee investigations of non-recent child sex abuse within institutions or by people of public prominence has looked at some of the most controversial cases. These include the high-profile Operation Midland which was abandoned aftercosting a staggering 2.5 million and the farcical Operation Conifer, which cost more than1 million.

Last November, the Mail on Sundayreportedthat four of Sir Edwards accusers, all women, had shared lurid stories of sexual abuse, child sacrifice and murder in occult ceremonies. A confidential report by Dr Rachel Hoskins, an expert on religion-based ritual crime, who was called in to examine witness statements and other evidence gathered by police, concluded that the Satanic claims were preposterous and that the women knew each other well and had swapped tales. In February, the Daily Mailreportedthat the women had talked about possible compensation payouts and that one may even have already submitted a claim.

Despite this, the outlandish allegations against Sir Edward are now common currency in the blogosphere and on Twitter. They include those made by David Icke, the former sports presenter and Green Party spokesman, who alleges thatSavile was a Satanistwho procured children for the former prime minister and others at the Haut de la Garenne childrens home in Jersey, the subject of an earlierhigh-profile police investigation.

One common denominator in the VIP Satanic paedophile ring motif is a belief shared by some psychotherapists involved in counselling victims. As Dr Hoskins made clear, the main woman accuser who sparked Operation Conifer known as Lucy X recovered her abuse memories whilein therapy underhypnosisin the 1980s at the height of the recovered memory movement. She also noted that Nickhad been helped to rememberby separate psychotherapists using similar (recovered memory) techniques.

Clearly Nick and Lucy X have suffered severe issues and possibly need sensitive professional help. But when memories turn to Satanic ritual abuse, shouldnt police exercise some common sense and judgment, especially when investigating a dead former prime minister who cannot defend himself? And, amid the growing mass of historic allegations nationally, shouldnt police be more sceptical and ask: wheres the evidence?

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The historic sex abuse investigation needs a dose of common sense – Spectator.co.uk (blog)

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May 5, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

‘Elvis Presley is alive’ and 10 more conspiracy theories – The Week UK

Music legend Elvis Presley died on 16 August 1977 – or did he? If the latest conspiracy theory is to be believed, the King of Rock and Roll faked his own death and now works as a groundsman in Graceland.

Grainy footage of a bearded man has been posted on YouTube by “The Shadow”, who claims the figure is an 81-year-old Elvis.

In the caption for the video, which has been viewed nearly 700,000 times, The Shadow writes: “He raises his 2 fingers to the top of his left head as a proof of life signal. In Chaldean Numerology the numerical value of V sign in Numerology is: 9. Proof of life!!!….he told us he is alive with the simple V sign. Number 9 ,’I’m Alive’ He is giving us a clue that he knows we are all there watching him and to his most loyal fans that he is indeed with us.”

While some say the claims are “idiotic” and Elvis should be left to “rest in peace”, the belief that the King is out there looks unlikely to fade away.

It is among the remarkably resilient conspiracy theories of the past century. Here are 11 more:

As far back as 2008, some Americans began to claim that Barack Obama was not born in the United States, but in Kenya. These claims have been promoted by fringe theorists, known as ‘birthers’, some of whom have sought court rulings to prove that Obama is ineligible to be the president.None of these attempts has been successful. Obama has released the full version of his birth certificate, which shows he was born in Hawaii.

However, birthers claim it is a forgery. There has been what the Daily Telegraph describes as “a persistent campaign of misinformation on the subject”, led at one stage by Donald Trump, the president-elect. According to a recent poll by New York Daily News, 61 per cent of self-identified Trump supporters said they believed the president was not born in the US. Obama has nevertheless made light of the conspiracy and in 2011, during an address at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, even went so far as to release his “birth video”: a scene from Disney’s The Lion King.

Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared on 8March 2014 and has yet to be found despite an extensive search operation.

A little more than four months later, on 17 July 2014, another Malaysia Airlines flight, MH17, crashed in eastern Ukraine, near the Russian border after apparently having been shot down by a missile.

To most people the two tragedies looked like a terrible coincidence, but to conspiracy theorists there are no coincidences and MH370 and MH17 were in fact the same plane.

Worldtruth.tv is one of the many sites that argues that MH370 was hijacked and flown to US military base Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean.

The “US propaganda machine” then staged the shooting down of MH17 so that the Russians would lose credibility.

The theory fails to explain why the same propaganda victory could not have been achieved, assuming it was desired, simply by shooting down any passenger aircraft over the Ukraine-Russia border.Read our in-depth article on MH370 conspiracies here.

Not all conspiracy theories are benign, of course. After her loss to Donald Trump in the US presidential election, Hillary Clinton decried what she called the “epidemic” of fake news in the lead-up to the vote.

In an apparent reference to a conspiracy theory known as “Pizzagate”, Clinton warned that fraudulent stories online had “real world consequences” and were putting “lives at risk”.

The Pizzagate conspiracy theory originally began to circulate on the anonymous message boards of image-sharing site 4chan.

It stemmed back to the WikiLeaks release of emails hacked from the account of Clinton aide John Podesta, in which there were references to James Alefantis, the owner of Washington DC pizza restaurant Comet Ping Pong and a Democrat fundraiser.

After finding pictures of children on Alefantis’ssocial media accounts, conspiracy theorists concluded top members of the Democrat Party had turned the basement of his pizzeria into a dungeon and it was ground zero for a massive child sex-trafficking operation involving prominent politicians and political donors.

“We don’t even have a basement,” Alefantis told the BBC. “Sometimes an innocent picture of a child in a basket is just an innocent picture of a child in a basket and not proof of a child-sex trafficking ring.”

However, the theory turned nasty in December when Edgar Welch, 28, from North Carolina, travelledto Comet Ping Pong, 250 miles from his registered home address,and allegedly threatened an employee and fired an assault rifle into the floor, NBC reports.

Welch told the New York Times he had only intended to give the restaurant a “closer look” and regretted how he handled the situation. “The intel on this wasn’t 100 per cent,” he said.

The “reptoid hypothesis” is a conspiracy theory which advances the argument that reptilian humanoids live among us with the intention of enslaving the human race. It has been championed by former BBC sports presenter David Icke, who believes the likes of Bob Hope, members of the royal family and former US presidents George W Bush and Bill Clinton are part of the “Anunnaki” race who came to earth for “monatomic gold”.

Critics accused Icke of anti-Semitism, alleging that his talk of reptiles was code for Jews but he clarified that the lizards to which he referred were literal, not metaphorical.

Remember the classic Paul is Dead conspiracy? The theory that Paul McCartney was killed in a car accident at the height of the Beatles’s fame and replaced by a lookalike? Well, the 21st century music industry now has its own twist on the tale. And in keeping with its modern origin, it’s a little more tech-savvy.

In recent years, a small but vocal subculture has argued that the Beyonce we all remember from the days when she was lead singer with Destiny’s Child has been replaced by a clone.

The outlandish theory was first spotted by The Root, which shared the following screenshot of a Facebook post showing the supposedly clear physical difference between the ‘old’ Beyonce and her cyborg replacement.

The Daily Dot has unearthed a video uploaded to YouTube showing the pop goddess at a basketball game behaving in a way considered a little bitclone-ish.

It’s far from the first conspiracy theory to involve Queen Bey, who was accused of faking her pregnancy and is frequently identified by Illuminati enthusiasts as one of the leading players in the so-called New World Order. But as far as we can tell, it’s easily the wackiest.

In 1947 claims that an “alien spacecraft” had landed in Roswell, New Mexico, were dismissed by the US military, which said the alien craft was merely a weather balloon.

Ufologists believe the spacecraft was taken into Area 51 a division of Edwards Air Force Base and the US government has been researching alien technology and life forms on the site ever since.

Video footage of an alleged “alien autopsy” has been shown to be fake, but Area 51 is known to be a secretive and heavily guarded base. The reasons, however, may be more earthly than the conspiracy theories suggest: the U-2 spy plane, and several other top-secret aircraft, were developed and tested here.

On 11 September 2001, four planes were hijacked by al-Qaeda and two of them were flown into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York, killing 2,996 people.

However, some believe that the attack was an inside job, orchestrated in order to cement the US’s place as the top global power or to secure the oil reserves in the Middle East.

Another theory is that the building’s owners were responsible for the event (they stood to gain $500m in insurance profits). For more detail, read our feature on the top ten 9/11 conspiracy theories.

Neil Armstrong’s giant leap kicked off one of the most persistent conspiracy theories of the 20th century – that the 1969 landings, and all those that followed, were faked by Nasa and that no human being has ever set foot on the surface of the moon.

Even though there is substantial evidence to the contrary (including moon rocks brought back to Earth and manmade objects left on the moon) some remain adamant that film director Stanley Kubrick was hired to produce the footage after his experience on 2001: A Space Odyssey.

In November 1963, John F Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. Lee Harvey Oswald, a former US Marine who defected to the Soviet Union before returning to the US, was accused of the crime but was shot dead before he could stand trial. But was he just a scapegoat? Did the real killers get away with murder?

No official investigation has turned up evidence of a conspiracy, but theories implicating everyone from the KGB to Jackie Kennedy continue to circulate. Read more about the JFK conspiracy theory here.

To the most dedicated conspiracy theorists, none of these plots on their own is sufficient to explain the sustained malevolence of the world in which we live. Instead, each one is a manifestation of what RationalWiki describes as “an interlocking hierarchy of conspiracies”, in which all the world’s events are controlled by a single evil entity.

It is a complex and self-reflexive premise: if it is correct, then it must be the case that awareness of the Grand Unified Conspiracy Theory is itself a part of the conspirators plan and so, of course, is this list.

Even the most rational people buy into conspiracy theories as a way of reacting to uncertainty and powerlessness in the modern world, says the New York Times. “Believers are more likely to be cynical about the world in general and politics in particular,” the paper says citing a 2010 study.

US psychologist Rob Brotherton, the author of Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories, says many as 90 per cent of people acknowledge entertaining one conspiracy theory or another. “Given a handful of dots, our pattern-seeking brains can’t resist trying to connect them,” he says.

But Brotherton also suggests we shouldn’t be so quick to reject even the stranger notions. “Dismissing all conspiracy theories (and theorists) as crazy is just as intellectually lazy as credulously accepting every wild allegation,” he writes in the Los Angeles Times.

“If you had claimed, in the early 1970s, that a hotel burglary was, in fact, a plot by White House officials to illegally spy on political rivals and ensure President Nixon’s re-election, you might have been accused of conspiracy theorising,” he says.

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‘Elvis Presley is alive’ and 10 more conspiracy theories – The Week UK

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Serbian Capital to Host Conspiracy Theorist David Icke – Balkan Insight

Former British TV sports broadcaster and conspiracy theorist David Icke, who is known for delivering long lectures, will hold a 12-hour lecture in Belgrades Sava Centar on April 29.

Icke, best known for his theory that a reptilian alien cabal rules the world, praised Serbia for resisting the EU and warned about the alleged power of billionaire philanthropist George Soros.

“I think it is a great thing that Serbia successfully resisted the constant pressure to be pushed into the EU and NATO … But be careful, the hidden hand is at work in Serbia too. It is everywhere, Icke told the Serbian newspaper Vecernje Novosti, which is organising his visit.

Vecernje Novosti also asked Icke about the Hungarian-born Soros, who is often targeted by pro-government media in Serbia for his support for civil society organisations.

“Soros is part of that hidden, powerful hand that controls both the Democratic and Republican party in the US. His power has not disappeared, he is part of the shadows that rule, not just in America, but other countries as well,” Icke said.

Icke worked as a sports broadcaster for the BBC in the 1980s and was at one time a prominent figure in the UK Green party.

Later, he became more known for his often bizarre sounding theories that many of the most important people in history were members of a reptilian race who had come from outer space – and that much of what humans perceive as reality is just a hologram broadcast to earth by these same reptiles.

His numerous books have sold hundreds of thousands of copies. He has also been accused of antisemitism for endorsing the notorious literary forgery, “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion”, as well as for questioning some aspects of the Holocaust.

The web page DavidIckeSerbia.com, which promotes Ickes Serbian visit, calls Icke a “writer and researcher who spent 25 years uncovering the networks of power that rule the world”.

“Even the most persistent sceptics, who shook their heads at the thought of a power or a group of people secretly running the world, in time started to admit that David Icke was right,” the introduction on the website reads.

Conspiracy theories are music to the ears of Serbian tabloids who have long thrived on claims that foreign powers are working in mysterious combinations against the Serbian government and people.

Serbia’s Prime Minister and president-elect, Aleksandar Vucic, has launched his own theory that the current protests against him are run from the same centre as recent protests in Brazil and Russia, because they all use the same symbol of a yellow rubber duck.

“I do not believe in coincidences. Do not expect me to believe that different people came up with the same symbol in Belgrade, Brazil and Moscow,” Vucic said during a visit to Russia in March.

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Serbian Capital to Host Conspiracy Theorist David Icke – Balkan Insight

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Mayday election a chance for real change – Belfast Live

There was a major announcement this week and we were given a heads up about it in advance. It was to happen at 11.15am on Tuesday, an announcement by Theresa May.

I was kind of expecting her to reveal David Icke was right all along, then shed her human suit and order us to bow down and welcome our lizard alien overlords. Unfortunately, it wasnt that exciting or dramatic.

After recently stating categorically she would never call a snap election, last week Theresa, you guessed it folks, announced a snap election in June.

I know its hard to imagine a politician going back on their word but there you go and here we are.

We currently dont have an Assembly to speak of, which seemed to elude the PM, but maybe thats an indication of how little regard we are held in, in this great United Kingdom we are part of.

The PMs intention is to cement stability and unity apparently but that can be roughly translated as cementing Conservative Party rule in Great Britain.

If you remember, May wasnt actually elected into No10 in the first place, it was pretty much thrust upon her in the midst of no confidence and Cabinet knife-wielding that made Game Of Thrones look like Are You Being Served? with a dash of Allo Allo! thrown in for good measure, particularly the attitude toward the EU.

May is the Brexit Prime Minister, no matter which way the extrication with Europe goes, that will be her legacy.

That and the weird laugh thing she did in Parliament which made her look like a penguin consuming a particularly difficult fish.

Brexit will go down as the most important British historical political decision of the 21st Century, maybe second only to a potential impending world war that America and North Korea appear to be gearing up for. Handcarts at the ready, hell is round the corner.

This will be the fourth UK election in two years and the fifth for Northern Ireland. Tedious, isnt it?

There is a real danger of election fatigue setting in which will put off a lot of floating voters and the more liberal ones.

Hardliners love an aul election and forgive me for being cynical, almost paranoid, but that seems to be the intention.

Those with more extreme political views (and here in NI, religious beliefs as that seems to be the grease that oils the wheels of Stormont) will always turn out.

Elections in my opinion, and particularly at this time in our rudderless government, are not good.

A lot of attention and energy expended to win over votes and keep the faithful onside, when really what we need now is for them all to sit down and agree on sharing power and getting their finger out and governing the country properly.

Its a small task but when you think about it its their job.

I do fear this will produce a low turnout. Low turnouts always see the results go to tribal voting and that hasnt got us very far up until now, has it?

Ive had numerous discussions and debates with committed non-voters over the years and at times I can see their perspective.

When presented with the kind of politician or party that you feel doesnt/cant/wont represent you adequately and with your best interest in mind, why would you bother voting at all?

A great phrase from Richard Linklaters film Slacker, referenced in REMs Whats The Frequency, Kenneth? comes to mind, Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy. Totally understandable and often relatable.

We have politicians here who openly express their homophobia, racism and sexism with apparent impunity and people still vote for them. An awful reflection of us.

Hardline voters breed hardline opinions and figures. To not vote gives them a voice and position of power to shout louder.

The coming weeks until June 8 will see the lampposts be festooned once again this year with election posters (a pal of mine dubbed them Scrotum Poles, chortle!), the Party Political Broadcasts will be screened and spin will be spun, hands shaken, smiles pasted on (both) faces, the great seduction will begin. Ever get the feeling youre being cheated?

No matter, it is important, however, that you do use your vote. We have a voice louder than them, but without a platform. Apart from the polling booth. Thats where we can be heard.

They only have the power we give them. If the major parties dont represent your view, look to the alternatives.

There are plenty out there and it is not a wasted vote.

Look how much ground the Greens and People Before Profit gained in the last 12 months and could gain further ground in the next election.

Im not advocating voting for either of them particularly, they are just examples. There is no such thing as a wasted vote.

But not voting is a wasted opportunity.

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Mayday election a chance for real change – Belfast Live

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Quite a journey for Lineker and the Leicester City fans – Belfast Telegraph

When I was just a small boy living in a lonely world, born and raised in south Ballymena, the biggest journey I faced was a short trip on the No.122 bus with my mum with the promise of chips and a slice of fresh cream-filled chocolate Swiss roll if I was lucky.

It was a trip you made more than once I hear you cry, and indeed it was, meaning that my learning curve required less learning and I became more curvy, but for Leicester City fans their journey went on and on, and on, and on.

Or it did until Tuesday when the Foxes were in their own den for the visit of Atletico Madrid and for Gary Lineker, Don’t Stop Believing was the mantra as Leicester sought to turn around a first-leg deficit.

Home boy Lineker was our tour guide for the journey on BT Sport, standing on his own surrounded by flags, he may have been in Ballymena but on closer inspection he was in one of the stands at the King Power Stadium.

“It’s going to be atmospheric, it’s colourful already, it’s going to be vibrant and it’s going to be expectant,” he told us, as we waited for Willie Thorne, Engelbert Humperdinck, Kasabian, David Icke, the remains of Richard III and the lead singer from Showaddywaddy to be brought out to whip the crowd into even more of a frenzy.

They did not appear, but there was another former Leicester hero in the building, Martin O’Neill, sitting alongside Rio Ferdinand and Steven Gerrard in the studio, who confirmed that it was “a big, big game, an extravagant match”.

Tragically, Robbie Savage had made the journey too but for once he had to play second fiddle in the biased cheerleading stakes to Lineker, who couldn’t be more excited had he found David Attenborough in a packet of crisps. (I am quickly running out of famous people from Leicester).

“Can the Foxes of Leicester make it another fantastic, memorable night? I hope so,” hinted Lineker.

“Here we go, Leicester City versus Atletico Madrid playing for a place in the semi-finals of the Champions League, words I thought I would never utter under any circumstances,” he added. I know, who would have thought Atletico would get this far?

“The next 90 minutes can make the fairytale come true,” said commentator Darren Fletcher, not realising this was a journey and not make believe.

“It’s colourful and noisy and it’s emotional,” he continued and I think he meant the crowd and not Savage, who was sitting beside him.

“The atmosphere inside the King Power is electric,” said Savage. Well, it would have to be really and Fletcher agreed it was “New Year’s Eve and the fourth of July rolled into one here”, which should make the journey home a nightmare.

Things didn’t go according to plan, the Spanish minnows scoring an away goal meaning Leicester needed to score three without reply in the second half.

“Arrrrrghhh, the dreaded away goal, Leicester need a miracle, about 5,000-1, could be,” said Lineker at the break and O’Neill had a simple message – “don’t die wondering”.

My search for famous Leicester people provided something that had made me wonder and quite possibly provided a chance of death, in Phil Shaw, who, it is claimed, invented Extreme Ironing in 1997.

I don’t care if this is true or not, but me lugging an ironing board and a Rowenta onto the 122 and then up a mountain to take the creases out of a pair of slacks was about as likely as Leicester turning the tie around and so it proved.

Jamie Vardy scored to level matters on the night and at full-time Fletcher summed things up.

“What a journey it has been for Leicester City, from Belgium to Denmark, Portugal to Spain, it has been a magical ride,” he concluded.

“Leicester have done their manager proud (and I’m sure Claudio Ranieri too), they’ve done their fans proud, they’ve done their league proud. The end of a magnificent journey,” agreed Lineker.

“It has been a really great journey,” said O’Neill, while Gerrard thought of the fans and “the journey that these players have took them on” while Ferdinand was silent.

“Leicester’s Champions League dream is over, but what a ride it has been,” finished Lineker, with loud banging in the background as a smooth operator with a board was off to see if it’s possible to iron while dancing in the sand. Don’t stop believing, Rio, enjoy the journey.

THE GOOD: Cycling God and non-son of Stan, Chris Boardman, put the 1k race into context for us on the BBCs highlights of the World Championships. Like gladiators risking it all for the possibility of a single moment of intense glory, riders can spend an entire career preparing for a minute of explosive competition, he said, but by then my head could only picture Russell Crowe tossing his Chopper at an irate lion and legging it past Sir Chrisius Hoyius on the way out.

THE BAD: And on a similar note, it was clearly a case of eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die at the bowls on Sky, where any thoughts of dispelling any myths about the age dynamic of the spectators was hard to take seriously in a competition sponsored by Co-op Funeral Care, where a dead end brought the bowler a spot prize of a coffin, a hearse and two gravediggers. I may have made that last bit up.

THE UGLY: Childish snigger of the week came from Channel Fours terrible two, cheeky chappies David Coulthard and Mark Webber embarking on their grid walk in Bahrain. We havent seen you since Melbourne, whats been tickling your fancy Down Under? enquired Coulthard, but sadly Webber didnt tell us.

Belfast Telegraph

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Quite a journey for Lineker and the Leicester City fans – Belfast Telegraph

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

[Investigation] Sex and lies: Russia’s EU news – EUobserver

Rape, paedophilia, incest, and sodomy – Russian media have been targeting France and Germany for years with hundreds of fake or distorted stories, many of which were designed to incite sexual revulsion toward asylum seekers and the politicians who gave them shelter.

Conspiracy theories about false-flag terrorist attacks and about Nazism have also featured in Moscows propaganda campaign as France and Germany head for elections.

News of Lisa, a 13-year old girl of Russian origin in Germany who was said, last year, to have been raped by migrants, is the best known of its type.

Lisa left home for a few days and told her family that she had been kidnapped and raped by Arabic men. German police said it was not true and she later confessed to having made it up.

But it was reported as fact by every big Russian news agency and personally endorsed by the Russian foreign minister.

It was also circulated, for months, by pro-Russian local language websites all over Europe, for instance in Czech, English, Hungarian, and Slovak, and spread wider still by Russian trolls and bots on social media.

A leading Russian TV station, Pervyi Kanal, on 17 January last year, even aired a fake interview on YouTube with Lisas aunt and uncle which it later took down.

Part of the Russian line was that German authorities had hushed it up, which meant that official denials reinforced the message and the story stayed alive long after it had been debunked.

The Lisa story was designed to harm German chancellor Angela Merkel, an advocate of EU sanctions on Russia, by indicating that her policy of welcoming refugees had put Germans in peril.

It was also designed to sow ethnic hatred in German society and was accompanied by street protests organised by Russian expat groups.

The story exposed Russias modus operandi – how media giants such as RT and Sputnik work hand-in-glove with fringe websites and with individual bloggers, trolls, and bots to propagate disinformation. It showed how publications in one EU language end up being translated and cross-posted into other ones.

It was also just one of dozens that used sexual taboos to manipulate peoples feelings.

EUobserver studied the 2,951 examples of Russian fake news collected and published by East Stratcom, a counter-propaganda cell in the EU foreign service, since October 2015.

The bulk of the material was designed to legitimise Russian foreign policy, such as its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine or its military intervention in Syria.

It was also designed to legitimise Russian leader Vladimir Putins increasingly totalitarian rule at home by claiming that the West and Nato were trying to encircle Russia, but the Lisa story was just the beginning of a long stream.

Out of 189 stories identified by East Stratcom as having directly targeted France and Germany, 28 of them (15 percent) were based on sexual slurs against migrants or the LGBTI community in those countries.

Dozens more used sexual content that targeted other EU states, especially in the Nordic region, to paint a misleading picture of a Europe-wide emergency caused by Merkel, as well as by French president Francois Hollande and by EU institutions.

East Stratcom relies on journalists and NGOs around Europe to send alerts on Russian fake news.

The real number of fake stories on France and Germany was far higher than 200, but the EU cell has more correspondents in former Soviet states and in central and eastern European countries than it does in the west and in the north of Europe, creating blind spots in its research.

A European diplomat, who asked not to be named, told EUobserver that the use of sex as a propaganda weapon was no accident.

Sex sticks to memory, the diplomat said.

It creates a lot of emotions and when your objective isnt to inform people, but to divide them, destabilise them, make them more fragmented, more afraid, more angry, this is precisely the kind of message youre looking for, he said.

Jakub Janda, a Czech expert at the European Values think tank in Prague who works with East Stratcom, added: Sex is used because its emotionally mobilising and supports the narrative that Western/German mainstream political leadership is soft or unable or unwilling to defend our own people.

The Lisa story came out in conjunction with distorted reports about sexual assaults by Arabs against German women on New Years Eve in Cologne in 2016.

Assaults did take place, but Russian media falsely claimed that Merkel refused to condemn them and that German police did not intervene out of political correctness.

In June last year, Russian TV reported that a migrant had pushed a young German woman under a train. The attack was real, but the attacker was not a migrant.

In September, Russian media claimed, without giving any evidence, that women in many German cities were afraid to go out at night for fear of being raped by migrants.

They also claimed, without evidence, that German courts were inundated by migrant sex crimes and that German police could not keep up with migrant crime statistics.

In February of this year, Russian bloggers circulated false reports that migrants had sexually assaulted women on New Years Eve in Frankfurt.

The dirty tricks were similar in France.

In May last year, Russias flagship TV show, Vesti nedeli, quoted Raphaelle Tourne, a French woman, as saying that migrants had verbally abused her and that she was scared to go out in her own neighbourhood, but the quotes were made up.

In November last year, a Czech pro-Russian blogger planted a fake story that the French government had secretly agreed with Islamic radicals to create zones governed by Islamic sharia laws, which oppressed women, in parts of France.

Turning the rape motif on its head, Russian media in February this year falsely reported that a German soldier in a Nato unit in Lithuania had raped a local girl.

Varying the motif again, a pro-Russian Facebook account in February said migrants had attacked a Catholic priest in Avignon, France, even though the assault in question had taken place four years ago.

Russian sources also replicated migrant sex stories in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway, and Sweden.

They reported that migrants had raped schoolgirls in Finland without giving any evidence.

They claimed Austria had acquitted a migrant who raped a 10-year old boy even though the alleged rapist had not been acquitted.

They said falsely that migrants had made five nuns pregnant at a monastery in Milan, Italy, that gave them shelter, and said that a migrant had sexually assaulted a 17-year old girl in Denmark in a story that used photos from an incident years ago.

They made hollow claims of mass rapes by migrants in Belgium and in Sweden, which hosts the most refugees per capita in Europe, and which, Russian reports said, had, due to this, become the rape capital of Europe.

The campaign to provoke sexual-political revulsion also used more exotic content.

Last January, pro-Russian media said Germany had hired Czech prostitutes to have sex with migrants so that they would spread sexually transmitted diseases in the Czech Republic in revenge for Pragues refusal to join EU migrant-relocation quotas.

Last February, they made the unsubstantiated claim that bestiality was on the rise in Germany due to African immigrants.

In November 2015, a pro-Russian Czech website said that Germany planned to legalise paedophilia in the EU.

In April last year, a Russian blogger reported that Western countries were to legalise incest, cannibalism, and necrophilia.

Last May, Russian newspaper Pravda said Merkel was a lesbian who wanted to legalise paedophilia, while in October, Russias Ren TV claimed that European men wanted to practice polygamy because they were jealous of Muslim migrants who had more than one wife.

In another variation of the theme in January, a Russian social media user planted a fake allegation that Swedish foreign minister Margot Wallstroem was such an extreme feminist that she advocated mass-scale castration of white males.

No one has carried out detailed polling on the impact of such stories on French or German public opinion.

But a survey by American pollster Pew last year indicated that Russian propaganda had already carved out a sizable constituency in Europe.

It said that between 25 to 30 percent of people in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain believed, for instance, that there were no Russian troops fighting in east Ukraine, despite a wealth of hard evidence to the contrary.

There is also no detailed study of how big Russian media work with fringe websites and individual bloggers, which ones of the smaller publishers are Kremlin agents and which ones replicate fake content because they believe that it is true.

This huge [media] ecosystem has different parts with different aims and our knowledge about it is still very small. Its quite scary and its obvious they know our audiences much better than we know them, the European diplomat said.

We need to know how many disinformation-oriented multipliers there are, who is there more for planting the story, who is there more for providing material for disinformation-oriented outlets in other languages, who is there for reaching out to the general audience and who is reaching out to opinion makers, he said.

He said some parts of it [the ecosystem] definitely work independently from Russias central brain.

But he added that if European media or bloggers echoed the central brain in good faith then that would be the ideal result of this incredible information carpet bombing.

These cases are actually even more dangerous, when a non-Kremlin outlet spreads pro-Kremlin disinformation, the disinformation receives more credibility, he said.

He also said that the small readership of some pro-Russian outlets did not mean that they were harmless because they targeted opinion makers.

Look at it like an advertising campaign, he said.

You might have some doubts whether a printed ad in a magazine read by 500 people was worth the money, especially when the same company has ads in TV and radio and internet But if the company knows that those 500 readers are important for them, and that they might have influence on other audiences, it was money well spent.

The migrant rape stories are part of a wider narrative that portrays Putin and pro-Putin far-right parties in Europe as guardians of orthodox values.

They run alongside homophobic fake news designed to incite revulsion against the LGBTI community in Europe and against liberal politicians, such as Merkel or Emmanuel Macron, a French presidential candidate, or against EU institutions who defend the rights of sexual minorities.

In one direct attack on the French presidential campaign, Russian TV, in March, spread unsubstantiated rumours that Macron, a Russia-critical and pro-EU politician, had a gay love affair.

Russian TV last February also said the European Parliament was promoting homosexuality in France in order to erase the difference between men and women.

Russian media said last summer that French people were shocked by Russian football hooligans because their ideas of masculinity had been degraded by watching men take part in Gay Pride marches.

The homophobic content also had a pan-EU dimension.

In one typical example, a pro-Russian newspaper in Georgia last May said EU elites had been captured by LGBT activists. A Russian website in June said people in Europe were being forced to become gay.

As with the story on the priest attack in Avignon, the homophobic theme worked in conjunction with fake news on religion.

In January last year, Igor Druz, a pro-Russian fighter in Ukraine who was cited as an expert at the Russian Institute of Strategic Studies, told a Russian website that EU leaders were trying to eradicate Christianity.

Pro-Russian media last year also said the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg was planning to ban baptism and that people in EU countries were being fined for wearing jewellery with Christian crosses while walking down the street.

The Kremlins foreign influence operations often lack coherence.

Russia portrays itself as a bulwark against the purported rise of fascism in Europe while supporting neo-Nazi parties such as the NPD or the extreme-right Pegida movement in Germany.

It backs mainly far-right parties, such as the National Front in France or the AfD in Germany, but it also backs far-left anti-EU parties such as the Communist Party and Left Party in France and Die Linke in Germany.

In this context, the central place of homophobia in the Kremlins anti-EU ideology is made clear by its non-cooperation with Geert Wilders, the leading anti-EU politician in the Netherlands.

Anton Shekhovtsov, an expert on Russia at the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna, told EUobserver that Wilders did not fit the bill due to his sexual politics.

Russian actors who are engaged in building relations with the European far right are homophobic – that could damage Wilders, who positions himself as pro-LGBTI, Shekhovtsov said.

Sex aside, the Russian campaign against France and Germany also exploited the hot-button issue of terrorism and the historical trauma of Nazism.

The Russian propaganda in this area also lacked coherence.

In one line, EU leaders were accused of being too weak to protect their citizens from terrorists of migrant origin.

In another line, seen time and again in individual reports on France and Germany, EU and US leaders were accused of secretly organising false-flag jihadist attacks because they served as a pretext to impose supranational rule.

The stream began with reports in German and in Czech that French authorities had staged the shooting at Charlie Hebdo, a satirical magazine, in Paris in January 2015 to justify a crackdown on the anti-EU National Front party.

In March 2016, Russian sources said Merkel had organised the Brussels bombings and published what they said was a selfie of the chancellor with one of the attackers, but which was, in fact, a photo of an unrelated Syrian refugee.

They said the US staged the truck assault in Nice, France, last July, to punish French people for protesting against an EU-US free-trade pact.

At a lower level, they accused Merkels intelligence services of having organised the Cologne New Years Eve sex attacks.

They also made the unsubstantiated claim that German intelligence services had carried out an arson attack against Frauke Petry, the leader of Germanys main anti-EU party, the AfD.

Another propaganda theme says Merkel is a crypto-Nazi who wants to impose German rule in Europe.

It is designed to foment Germanophobia among EU nations, many of which suffered huge losses in World War II, and to legitimise Putins authoritarianism and revanchism by alusion to Stalin, whose totalitarian regime defeated Hitlers forces.

It is also designed to promote anti-EU parties in Europe by presenting the EU as a vehicle for Merkels purported agenda.

Russias Ren TV broadcaster in December 2015 made the unsubstantiated claim that Nazism is on the rise in Germany because it had re-published Hitlers autobiography Mein Kampf.

A story planted in Georgian media in April last year said Merkel was Hitlers daughter.

Several articles in June last year and in February this year claimed that German soldiers posted to Lithuania as part of a Nato battalion designed to deter Russian aggression were occupation forces on the model of Operation Barbarossa – Hitlers plan to conquer the Soviet Union.

A story in Czech media in February also claimed that Poland has been co-opted into Germanys Fourth Reich.

Anti-EU articles in February last year said the European Commission was founded on Nazi ideas by reference to Walter Hallstein, its first president, who had served in the German army in occupied France, but who had, in fact, rejected Nazi ideology.

Another stream of stories in Czech, English, and Russian-language media last May described the EU as a continuation of Nazi plans.

They said the EU was a totalitarian regime that enforced loyalty to Merkel and that European children were being made to cuddle up to Hitler dolls at bedtime.

Some fake stories ventured even further into the realms of nutty conspiracy theories.

Sputnik reported that the design of a new Nato building in Brussels was modelled on the insignia of Nazi SS brigades.

Infowars.com, a British blog, cited David Icke, an English former TV presenter who believes the world is ruled by alien lizards, as saying the EU and US had organised the migration crisis to impose a new world order.

A pro-Russian newspaper in Georgia also said last June that EU leaders had taken part in a Satanic ritual in a rail tunnel in Switzerland.

The European diplomat told EUobserver that conspiracy theories were a smaller but essential part of Russias disinformation campaign that targeted disenfranchised minorities in European society.

Look at how anti-Jewish conspiracies worked for Hitler. For a destabilised society, conspiracies are a very pleasant message, they tell them that it is not their fault, that they have someone else to blame, he said.

They do find their audiences and they help the general messaging: Trust no-one. Nothing is sure. Be afraid, he said.

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[Investigation] Sex and lies: Russia’s EU news – EUobserver

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

That moment Pete Price got called a lizard at Ladies Day – Liverpool Echo

Its hard work being Pete Price. Between his work as a panto star, talk show host and comedian – he also has to put up with constant shouts of Pete youre a lizard .

And Ladies Day 2017 proved no different for the Radio City presenter – as one of his fellow racegoers took the opportunity to shout the famous putdown.

Pete stopped for a catch up with the ECHO and said: It is so relaxed, it is so gentle here today and there are the most beautiful people on this earth here.

But just as Pete finished his sentence – once passerby shouted: Youre a lizard.

However, rather than his usual outspoken stance, Mr Price took a more gentle approach to the perpetrator – and offered him a hug instead.

Its not the first time Pete has been caught in a spat at Aintree – last year he was heckled by a racegoer who called him a t***.

The broadcaster, who has worked in the industry for over 30 years, has become famous for his meltdowns at prank callers to his talk show , who often bombard him with the bizarre taunt – and even shout it to him when hes out and about in public.

One particular caller started the trend, which at one point became so popular that it trended worldwide on Twitter.

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Pete explains: It all started when I tried to get a guest called David Icke on the show.

Hes famous for thinking that the royal family are reptiles disguised as humans – but every time we tried to get him on my show he would cancel at the last minute and we could never manage it.

Then we got a phone call from what seemed like a normal caller, and mid-sentence he just started saying Pete youre a lizard and said thats why David Icke wouldnt come on the show.

The catchphrase reached its peak when a flag was held up by a member of the crowd at a packed out ECHO arena wrestling show, displaying the message Pete Price is a lizard.

A tweet with the photograph was retweeted thousands of times, and a Pete Price lizard hashtag even started to trend on Twitter.

More recently, wrestler Hulk Hogan was photographed next to a fan, who was holding up the famous Pete Price is a lizard sign.

The picture racked up thousands of likes and shares online and caused a social media storm, forcing the DJ to beg his followers to stop using the phrase.

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That moment Pete Price got called a lizard at Ladies Day – Liverpool Echo

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April 7, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Pete Price lizard: Hulk Hogan poses with sign at WWE’s Wrestlemania – Daily Star

HULK Hogan is the latest person to endorse the view that Merseyside-based radio presenter Pete Price is, in fact, a lizard.

The WWE superstar was pictured holding a sign reading “Pete Price is a lizard” with a fan.

And after the image went viral, it’s safe to say Pete was shocked.

The radio star soon took to Twitter expressing his amazement and asking “will this ever end?”.

GETTY/TWITTER

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As Im out and about in town I can spot the people that are going to call me a lizard

Pete hosts Radio City 2 and Radio City Talk in Merseyside.

His apparently-reptilian credentials were first highlighted when he attempted to interview David Icke on his show.

Icke is infamous for his belief that the Royal Family are reptiles disguised as humans but Pete’s interview bid backfired as it ended with him being accused of being a lizard.

“It all started when I tried to get a guest called David Icke on the show,” he told the Liverpool Echo.

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“Every time we tried to get him on my show he would cancel at the last minute and we could never manage it.

“Then we got a phone call from what seemed like a normal caller, and mid-sentence he just started saying ‘Pete you’re a lizard’ and said that’s why David Icke wouldn’t come on the show.”

It soon stuck and it shows no likelihood of wearing off any time soon with people shouting “you’re a lizard” at him on the street.

And although he takes it in good humour, Pete has admitted it’s getting a little tiresome.

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The Undertaker leaves his famous hat and trenchcoat in the ring: was this his final fight?

He added: “I do find it quite amusing because its just so strange. Its so random.

What I dont like is when people are two faced they come up to me and ask for a selfie and then I can count to 10 and I hear Pete, you’re a lizard! its just two faced and its cowardly.

As Im out and about in town I can spot the people that are going to call me a lizard, Im walking through town and I count them in my head. I can spot them a mile off.

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Pete Price lizard: Hulk Hogan poses with sign at WWE’s Wrestlemania – Daily Star

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April 4, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

BWW Review: COSMIC TRIGGER THE PLAY, Cockpit Theatre – Broadway World

So what, then, is Cosmic Trigger The Play? At times, yeah, a play, but at other times a cabaret, a documentary, a history lesson, a biography, a tribute, a literary adventure, a tragedy and a comedy. Is it, dare I use the word, perhaps most aptly labelled “A Happening”? No matter how you describe it, it is four hours of great fun that constantly threatens to go off the rails, but just about stays on track, as the drugs, the paranoia and the joie-de-vivre pile on top of each other in a great tower of 70s hokum – with the glinting edge of relevance to 2017 cutting through any cynical dismissal of its key themes. We’re in the swinging Sixties at the offices of Playboy where Robert Anton Wilson sifts through the bonkers conspiracy letters that arrive by the sackload. Realising that they are on to something, he and fellow scribbler Robert Shea decide to weave all the crazy stuff into a book they call Illuminatus, a project that takes over their lives and soon garners a global cult following (Dan Brown must have been looking on and thinking, “Hmm…”). Wilson jumps headfirst into the emerging counterculture, hobnobbing with Timothy Leary, William S Burroughs and the Charles Mansonesque figure (without the murders) Kerry Thornley – pass the hookah please. Daisy Campbell’s twisting, tantalising, treat of a script isn’t satisfied with just telling that story – she also tells the story of her father’s (cult director Ken Campbell) 1976 staging of Illuminatus in Liverpool and later at the National Theatre in its Mary Whitehouse baiting days. Cue plenty of excellent jokes about the excesses of radical experimental theatre and dollops of goat blood! And, topping off these narratives layered upon narratives, there’s Cosmic Trigger itself, the book about the book and the source for the play based on the book about the book – well, you know, sort of. Got all that? Well, it doesn’t really matter if you haven’t, because, over its four hours running time, you will, as the metas stack up . Amazingly, it’s never difficult to follow, a testimony to the clarity of vision in the writing, the skills of actors playing multiple roles (sometimes naked – you have been warned) and a staging that maintains an audience-friendly pace through the New Age mumbo-jumbo and the incipient psychosis that, unlike in the case of Phillip K Dick (with whom he shared many traits), Wilson just about keeps at bay. In his case, the trips are a lot of fun and only a little scary! It’s funny and clever and delightful too. Our heroes may not have much respect for straight society, but they are decent people who love each other and the world around them (though, of course, not everyone came out the other side unscathed). Oliver Senton plays Wilson as a guide and sardonic commentator on the craziness of the consumer-driven capitalism driving the USA (and, soon, the world) to a state where one can never have enough. Kate Alderton’s Arlen Wilson is a bra-burning feminist poet, but (if that’s the right word) full of love for her husband and her children, who are as sweet as can be. If Mr and Mrs Wilson (how plain those names sound for such unplain individuals) hold the centre of the plot together, there are plenty of splendid performances swirling around them. Jethro Skinner is full of bonhomie and voracious sexuality as Timothy Leary, not even cowed by prison, inspiring a bravura song and dance number every bit as good as Dr Evil’s “It’s A Hard Knock Life”. Leigh Kelly’s Goat Man is (how can I put this?) eye-catching and Josh Darcy’s Ken Campbell is an uncanny impersonation of the old rogue, all unpredictable charisma and commitment. Though 8 is a little steep for the programme, it does include a superb essay by John Higgs (who wrote the definitive story of pop anarchists, The KLF, who trace their roots back to Ken Campbell’s seminal show) which brings us right up to date with the hijacking of the fun element of conspiracy theories by the alt-right in the post-truth world of 2017 – though, rightly, he claims that we have always lived in a “post-truth” world, it’s just that its creators are more brazen and more powerful than ever. When the images of boobs and balls and a squid singing Radiohead’s “Creep” (every bit as brilliant as it sounds) fade from the mind, Wilson’s ideas (like Phillip K Dick’s smuggled into the mainstream) seem closer and closer to reality every day. There probably isn’t a cult directing our world from Sirius (at his outer limits, Wilson can go a bit David Icke, never without a twinkle in his eye though), but, in an interconnected world of instant communication, the question of who is working with whom and to what end, is no less relevant to the Left and the non-political, for all of its appropriation by the Right, led by their champion, tweeting outlandish allegations at 3.00am from The White House. How the world can escape from the Chapel perilous into which it is being led and away from a state of paranoia into agnosticism, is the key question for our times. Cosmic Trigger The Play is a Love & Will production at the Cockpit Theatre until 27 May.

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May 7, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

The historic sex abuse investigation needs a dose of common sense – Spectator.co.uk (blog)

Amid the tidal wave of allegations of historic sexual abuse by so-called VIP paedophiles, yet another high-profile police investigation has stalled. Wiltshire Police, who are looking into claims made against the late Sir Edward Heath, revealed two weeks ago that they had released the only other two people arrested, saying theyface no further action. Despite this, officers told Radio 4s Today programme that Operation Conifer remains an ongoing investigation and that there are a significant number of allegations made by a separate number of individuals. But its unclear where else the investigation can go. Following the abandonment of another probe that of Operation Midland by the Metropolitan Police, the former Conservative MP Harvey Proctor isreportedto be suing the anonymouswitnessknown only as Nick, who has accused him and others of decades-old sex crimes. Following an independent review by a retired high court judge, Sir Richard Henriques, Nick has been described as a fantasist. Northumbria Police are also considering whether to charge him for attempting to pervert the course of justice. Mr Proctor is now suing the Metropolitan Police for damages; so too are former army chief Lord Bramall and the celebrity DJ Paul Gambaccini, who have also been falsely accused of abuse and face no further action. The claims could collectively cost the Met an estimated 3 million but the damage and financial cost to these mens reputations is incalculable. The question is, just how many others are facing historic accusations which are false? Police across the UK have been so overwhelmed by the onslaught of child abuse allegations including current, non-recent, online and peer-to-peer abuse that many forces have reached saturation point, according to Britains most senior child protection police officer. Simon Bailey, Chief Constable of the Norfolk Constabulary, is so concerned by the unprecedented volume that he has proposed the decriminalisation of offenders who do not pose a physical threat to children, such as those viewing low level online child pornography. Instead, they should be dealt with through counselling and rehabilitation, he saidin February. Mr Baileys radical suggestion comes in the wake ofstatisticsthat are truly staggering. The number of child abuse reports has leapt by 80 per cent in just three years, with police receiving an average of 112 complaints a day. There are now more than 70,000 complaints a year, with forces preparing an estimated 40,000 reports of abuse from the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. That inquiry set up in the wake of revelations that Jimmy Savile was a predatory paedophile is projected to cost 100 million over the next five years. Why are so many people coming forward now? Sociologists might call this a moral panic, an explosive amplification of genuine public concern victims are told they should know they will be believed. This has been coupled with a burgeoning and increasingly powerful survivor movement, a growth in the number of psychotherapists helping the vulnerable recover repressed memories, and compensation specialists at theAssociation of Child Abuse Lawyersactively soliciting allegations all fuelled by social media and the anonymous ether of Twitterland. So how to deal with the sheer volume of accusations, especially when some go back decades? One filter the police could use is plausibility; instead of simply believing victims outright, officers need to consider that some claims might be false, elicited in dubious recovered memory psychotherapy, or motivated by the prospect of compensation. One area in which this should apply is in claims of so-called Satanic ritual abuse, where accusers claim there is an international network of devil-worshipping paedophiles who breed babies for sacrifice, murder, rape, drink blood and even eat body parts in occult ceremonies. It sounds ridiculous and it is a government-funded inquiry as far back as 1994 concluded that ritual abuse was amyth. But, incredibly, some recent allegations made to police involvesuch claims. Operation Hydrant set up to oversee investigations of non-recent child sex abuse within institutions or by people of public prominence has looked at some of the most controversial cases. These include the high-profile Operation Midland which was abandoned aftercosting a staggering 2.5 million and the farcical Operation Conifer, which cost more than1 million. Last November, the Mail on Sundayreportedthat four of Sir Edwards accusers, all women, had shared lurid stories of sexual abuse, child sacrifice and murder in occult ceremonies. A confidential report by Dr Rachel Hoskins, an expert on religion-based ritual crime, who was called in to examine witness statements and other evidence gathered by police, concluded that the Satanic claims were preposterous and that the women knew each other well and had swapped tales. In February, the Daily Mailreportedthat the women had talked about possible compensation payouts and that one may even have already submitted a claim. Despite this, the outlandish allegations against Sir Edward are now common currency in the blogosphere and on Twitter. They include those made by David Icke, the former sports presenter and Green Party spokesman, who alleges thatSavile was a Satanistwho procured children for the former prime minister and others at the Haut de la Garenne childrens home in Jersey, the subject of an earlierhigh-profile police investigation. One common denominator in the VIP Satanic paedophile ring motif is a belief shared by some psychotherapists involved in counselling victims. As Dr Hoskins made clear, the main woman accuser who sparked Operation Conifer known as Lucy X recovered her abuse memories whilein therapy underhypnosisin the 1980s at the height of the recovered memory movement. She also noted that Nickhad been helped to rememberby separate psychotherapists using similar (recovered memory) techniques. Clearly Nick and Lucy X have suffered severe issues and possibly need sensitive professional help. But when memories turn to Satanic ritual abuse, shouldnt police exercise some common sense and judgment, especially when investigating a dead former prime minister who cannot defend himself? And, amid the growing mass of historic allegations nationally, shouldnt police be more sceptical and ask: wheres the evidence?

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May 5, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

‘Elvis Presley is alive’ and 10 more conspiracy theories – The Week UK

Music legend Elvis Presley died on 16 August 1977 – or did he? If the latest conspiracy theory is to be believed, the King of Rock and Roll faked his own death and now works as a groundsman in Graceland. Grainy footage of a bearded man has been posted on YouTube by “The Shadow”, who claims the figure is an 81-year-old Elvis. In the caption for the video, which has been viewed nearly 700,000 times, The Shadow writes: “He raises his 2 fingers to the top of his left head as a proof of life signal. In Chaldean Numerology the numerical value of V sign in Numerology is: 9. Proof of life!!!….he told us he is alive with the simple V sign. Number 9 ,’I’m Alive’ He is giving us a clue that he knows we are all there watching him and to his most loyal fans that he is indeed with us.” While some say the claims are “idiotic” and Elvis should be left to “rest in peace”, the belief that the King is out there looks unlikely to fade away. It is among the remarkably resilient conspiracy theories of the past century. Here are 11 more: As far back as 2008, some Americans began to claim that Barack Obama was not born in the United States, but in Kenya. These claims have been promoted by fringe theorists, known as ‘birthers’, some of whom have sought court rulings to prove that Obama is ineligible to be the president.None of these attempts has been successful. Obama has released the full version of his birth certificate, which shows he was born in Hawaii. However, birthers claim it is a forgery. There has been what the Daily Telegraph describes as “a persistent campaign of misinformation on the subject”, led at one stage by Donald Trump, the president-elect. According to a recent poll by New York Daily News, 61 per cent of self-identified Trump supporters said they believed the president was not born in the US. Obama has nevertheless made light of the conspiracy and in 2011, during an address at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, even went so far as to release his “birth video”: a scene from Disney’s The Lion King. Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared on 8March 2014 and has yet to be found despite an extensive search operation. A little more than four months later, on 17 July 2014, another Malaysia Airlines flight, MH17, crashed in eastern Ukraine, near the Russian border after apparently having been shot down by a missile. To most people the two tragedies looked like a terrible coincidence, but to conspiracy theorists there are no coincidences and MH370 and MH17 were in fact the same plane. Worldtruth.tv is one of the many sites that argues that MH370 was hijacked and flown to US military base Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean. The “US propaganda machine” then staged the shooting down of MH17 so that the Russians would lose credibility. The theory fails to explain why the same propaganda victory could not have been achieved, assuming it was desired, simply by shooting down any passenger aircraft over the Ukraine-Russia border.Read our in-depth article on MH370 conspiracies here. Not all conspiracy theories are benign, of course. After her loss to Donald Trump in the US presidential election, Hillary Clinton decried what she called the “epidemic” of fake news in the lead-up to the vote. In an apparent reference to a conspiracy theory known as “Pizzagate”, Clinton warned that fraudulent stories online had “real world consequences” and were putting “lives at risk”. The Pizzagate conspiracy theory originally began to circulate on the anonymous message boards of image-sharing site 4chan. It stemmed back to the WikiLeaks release of emails hacked from the account of Clinton aide John Podesta, in which there were references to James Alefantis, the owner of Washington DC pizza restaurant Comet Ping Pong and a Democrat fundraiser. After finding pictures of children on Alefantis’ssocial media accounts, conspiracy theorists concluded top members of the Democrat Party had turned the basement of his pizzeria into a dungeon and it was ground zero for a massive child sex-trafficking operation involving prominent politicians and political donors. “We don’t even have a basement,” Alefantis told the BBC. “Sometimes an innocent picture of a child in a basket is just an innocent picture of a child in a basket and not proof of a child-sex trafficking ring.” However, the theory turned nasty in December when Edgar Welch, 28, from North Carolina, travelledto Comet Ping Pong, 250 miles from his registered home address,and allegedly threatened an employee and fired an assault rifle into the floor, NBC reports. Welch told the New York Times he had only intended to give the restaurant a “closer look” and regretted how he handled the situation. “The intel on this wasn’t 100 per cent,” he said. The “reptoid hypothesis” is a conspiracy theory which advances the argument that reptilian humanoids live among us with the intention of enslaving the human race. It has been championed by former BBC sports presenter David Icke, who believes the likes of Bob Hope, members of the royal family and former US presidents George W Bush and Bill Clinton are part of the “Anunnaki” race who came to earth for “monatomic gold”. Critics accused Icke of anti-Semitism, alleging that his talk of reptiles was code for Jews but he clarified that the lizards to which he referred were literal, not metaphorical. Remember the classic Paul is Dead conspiracy? The theory that Paul McCartney was killed in a car accident at the height of the Beatles’s fame and replaced by a lookalike? Well, the 21st century music industry now has its own twist on the tale. And in keeping with its modern origin, it’s a little more tech-savvy. In recent years, a small but vocal subculture has argued that the Beyonce we all remember from the days when she was lead singer with Destiny’s Child has been replaced by a clone. The outlandish theory was first spotted by The Root, which shared the following screenshot of a Facebook post showing the supposedly clear physical difference between the ‘old’ Beyonce and her cyborg replacement. The Daily Dot has unearthed a video uploaded to YouTube showing the pop goddess at a basketball game behaving in a way considered a little bitclone-ish. It’s far from the first conspiracy theory to involve Queen Bey, who was accused of faking her pregnancy and is frequently identified by Illuminati enthusiasts as one of the leading players in the so-called New World Order. But as far as we can tell, it’s easily the wackiest. In 1947 claims that an “alien spacecraft” had landed in Roswell, New Mexico, were dismissed by the US military, which said the alien craft was merely a weather balloon. Ufologists believe the spacecraft was taken into Area 51 a division of Edwards Air Force Base and the US government has been researching alien technology and life forms on the site ever since. Video footage of an alleged “alien autopsy” has been shown to be fake, but Area 51 is known to be a secretive and heavily guarded base. The reasons, however, may be more earthly than the conspiracy theories suggest: the U-2 spy plane, and several other top-secret aircraft, were developed and tested here. On 11 September 2001, four planes were hijacked by al-Qaeda and two of them were flown into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York, killing 2,996 people. However, some believe that the attack was an inside job, orchestrated in order to cement the US’s place as the top global power or to secure the oil reserves in the Middle East. Another theory is that the building’s owners were responsible for the event (they stood to gain $500m in insurance profits). For more detail, read our feature on the top ten 9/11 conspiracy theories. Neil Armstrong’s giant leap kicked off one of the most persistent conspiracy theories of the 20th century – that the 1969 landings, and all those that followed, were faked by Nasa and that no human being has ever set foot on the surface of the moon. Even though there is substantial evidence to the contrary (including moon rocks brought back to Earth and manmade objects left on the moon) some remain adamant that film director Stanley Kubrick was hired to produce the footage after his experience on 2001: A Space Odyssey. In November 1963, John F Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. Lee Harvey Oswald, a former US Marine who defected to the Soviet Union before returning to the US, was accused of the crime but was shot dead before he could stand trial. But was he just a scapegoat? Did the real killers get away with murder? No official investigation has turned up evidence of a conspiracy, but theories implicating everyone from the KGB to Jackie Kennedy continue to circulate. Read more about the JFK conspiracy theory here. To the most dedicated conspiracy theorists, none of these plots on their own is sufficient to explain the sustained malevolence of the world in which we live. Instead, each one is a manifestation of what RationalWiki describes as “an interlocking hierarchy of conspiracies”, in which all the world’s events are controlled by a single evil entity. It is a complex and self-reflexive premise: if it is correct, then it must be the case that awareness of the Grand Unified Conspiracy Theory is itself a part of the conspirators plan and so, of course, is this list. Even the most rational people buy into conspiracy theories as a way of reacting to uncertainty and powerlessness in the modern world, says the New York Times. “Believers are more likely to be cynical about the world in general and politics in particular,” the paper says citing a 2010 study. US psychologist Rob Brotherton, the author of Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories, says many as 90 per cent of people acknowledge entertaining one conspiracy theory or another. “Given a handful of dots, our pattern-seeking brains can’t resist trying to connect them,” he says. But Brotherton also suggests we shouldn’t be so quick to reject even the stranger notions. “Dismissing all conspiracy theories (and theorists) as crazy is just as intellectually lazy as credulously accepting every wild allegation,” he writes in the Los Angeles Times. “If you had claimed, in the early 1970s, that a hotel burglary was, in fact, a plot by White House officials to illegally spy on political rivals and ensure President Nixon’s re-election, you might have been accused of conspiracy theorising,” he says.

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Serbian Capital to Host Conspiracy Theorist David Icke – Balkan Insight

Former British TV sports broadcaster and conspiracy theorist David Icke, who is known for delivering long lectures, will hold a 12-hour lecture in Belgrades Sava Centar on April 29. Icke, best known for his theory that a reptilian alien cabal rules the world, praised Serbia for resisting the EU and warned about the alleged power of billionaire philanthropist George Soros. “I think it is a great thing that Serbia successfully resisted the constant pressure to be pushed into the EU and NATO … But be careful, the hidden hand is at work in Serbia too. It is everywhere, Icke told the Serbian newspaper Vecernje Novosti, which is organising his visit. Vecernje Novosti also asked Icke about the Hungarian-born Soros, who is often targeted by pro-government media in Serbia for his support for civil society organisations. “Soros is part of that hidden, powerful hand that controls both the Democratic and Republican party in the US. His power has not disappeared, he is part of the shadows that rule, not just in America, but other countries as well,” Icke said. Icke worked as a sports broadcaster for the BBC in the 1980s and was at one time a prominent figure in the UK Green party. Later, he became more known for his often bizarre sounding theories that many of the most important people in history were members of a reptilian race who had come from outer space – and that much of what humans perceive as reality is just a hologram broadcast to earth by these same reptiles. His numerous books have sold hundreds of thousands of copies. He has also been accused of antisemitism for endorsing the notorious literary forgery, “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion”, as well as for questioning some aspects of the Holocaust. The web page DavidIckeSerbia.com, which promotes Ickes Serbian visit, calls Icke a “writer and researcher who spent 25 years uncovering the networks of power that rule the world”. “Even the most persistent sceptics, who shook their heads at the thought of a power or a group of people secretly running the world, in time started to admit that David Icke was right,” the introduction on the website reads. Conspiracy theories are music to the ears of Serbian tabloids who have long thrived on claims that foreign powers are working in mysterious combinations against the Serbian government and people. Serbia’s Prime Minister and president-elect, Aleksandar Vucic, has launched his own theory that the current protests against him are run from the same centre as recent protests in Brazil and Russia, because they all use the same symbol of a yellow rubber duck. “I do not believe in coincidences. Do not expect me to believe that different people came up with the same symbol in Belgrade, Brazil and Moscow,” Vucic said during a visit to Russia in March.

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Mayday election a chance for real change – Belfast Live

There was a major announcement this week and we were given a heads up about it in advance. It was to happen at 11.15am on Tuesday, an announcement by Theresa May. I was kind of expecting her to reveal David Icke was right all along, then shed her human suit and order us to bow down and welcome our lizard alien overlords. Unfortunately, it wasnt that exciting or dramatic. After recently stating categorically she would never call a snap election, last week Theresa, you guessed it folks, announced a snap election in June. I know its hard to imagine a politician going back on their word but there you go and here we are. We currently dont have an Assembly to speak of, which seemed to elude the PM, but maybe thats an indication of how little regard we are held in, in this great United Kingdom we are part of. The PMs intention is to cement stability and unity apparently but that can be roughly translated as cementing Conservative Party rule in Great Britain. If you remember, May wasnt actually elected into No10 in the first place, it was pretty much thrust upon her in the midst of no confidence and Cabinet knife-wielding that made Game Of Thrones look like Are You Being Served? with a dash of Allo Allo! thrown in for good measure, particularly the attitude toward the EU. May is the Brexit Prime Minister, no matter which way the extrication with Europe goes, that will be her legacy. That and the weird laugh thing she did in Parliament which made her look like a penguin consuming a particularly difficult fish. Brexit will go down as the most important British historical political decision of the 21st Century, maybe second only to a potential impending world war that America and North Korea appear to be gearing up for. Handcarts at the ready, hell is round the corner. This will be the fourth UK election in two years and the fifth for Northern Ireland. Tedious, isnt it? There is a real danger of election fatigue setting in which will put off a lot of floating voters and the more liberal ones. Hardliners love an aul election and forgive me for being cynical, almost paranoid, but that seems to be the intention. Those with more extreme political views (and here in NI, religious beliefs as that seems to be the grease that oils the wheels of Stormont) will always turn out. Elections in my opinion, and particularly at this time in our rudderless government, are not good. A lot of attention and energy expended to win over votes and keep the faithful onside, when really what we need now is for them all to sit down and agree on sharing power and getting their finger out and governing the country properly. Its a small task but when you think about it its their job. I do fear this will produce a low turnout. Low turnouts always see the results go to tribal voting and that hasnt got us very far up until now, has it? Ive had numerous discussions and debates with committed non-voters over the years and at times I can see their perspective. When presented with the kind of politician or party that you feel doesnt/cant/wont represent you adequately and with your best interest in mind, why would you bother voting at all? A great phrase from Richard Linklaters film Slacker, referenced in REMs Whats The Frequency, Kenneth? comes to mind, Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy. Totally understandable and often relatable. We have politicians here who openly express their homophobia, racism and sexism with apparent impunity and people still vote for them. An awful reflection of us. Hardline voters breed hardline opinions and figures. To not vote gives them a voice and position of power to shout louder. The coming weeks until June 8 will see the lampposts be festooned once again this year with election posters (a pal of mine dubbed them Scrotum Poles, chortle!), the Party Political Broadcasts will be screened and spin will be spun, hands shaken, smiles pasted on (both) faces, the great seduction will begin. Ever get the feeling youre being cheated? No matter, it is important, however, that you do use your vote. We have a voice louder than them, but without a platform. Apart from the polling booth. Thats where we can be heard. They only have the power we give them. If the major parties dont represent your view, look to the alternatives. There are plenty out there and it is not a wasted vote. Look how much ground the Greens and People Before Profit gained in the last 12 months and could gain further ground in the next election. Im not advocating voting for either of them particularly, they are just examples. There is no such thing as a wasted vote. But not voting is a wasted opportunity.

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Quite a journey for Lineker and the Leicester City fans – Belfast Telegraph

When I was just a small boy living in a lonely world, born and raised in south Ballymena, the biggest journey I faced was a short trip on the No.122 bus with my mum with the promise of chips and a slice of fresh cream-filled chocolate Swiss roll if I was lucky. It was a trip you made more than once I hear you cry, and indeed it was, meaning that my learning curve required less learning and I became more curvy, but for Leicester City fans their journey went on and on, and on, and on. Or it did until Tuesday when the Foxes were in their own den for the visit of Atletico Madrid and for Gary Lineker, Don’t Stop Believing was the mantra as Leicester sought to turn around a first-leg deficit. Home boy Lineker was our tour guide for the journey on BT Sport, standing on his own surrounded by flags, he may have been in Ballymena but on closer inspection he was in one of the stands at the King Power Stadium. “It’s going to be atmospheric, it’s colourful already, it’s going to be vibrant and it’s going to be expectant,” he told us, as we waited for Willie Thorne, Engelbert Humperdinck, Kasabian, David Icke, the remains of Richard III and the lead singer from Showaddywaddy to be brought out to whip the crowd into even more of a frenzy. They did not appear, but there was another former Leicester hero in the building, Martin O’Neill, sitting alongside Rio Ferdinand and Steven Gerrard in the studio, who confirmed that it was “a big, big game, an extravagant match”. Tragically, Robbie Savage had made the journey too but for once he had to play second fiddle in the biased cheerleading stakes to Lineker, who couldn’t be more excited had he found David Attenborough in a packet of crisps. (I am quickly running out of famous people from Leicester). “Can the Foxes of Leicester make it another fantastic, memorable night? I hope so,” hinted Lineker. “Here we go, Leicester City versus Atletico Madrid playing for a place in the semi-finals of the Champions League, words I thought I would never utter under any circumstances,” he added. I know, who would have thought Atletico would get this far? “The next 90 minutes can make the fairytale come true,” said commentator Darren Fletcher, not realising this was a journey and not make believe. “It’s colourful and noisy and it’s emotional,” he continued and I think he meant the crowd and not Savage, who was sitting beside him. “The atmosphere inside the King Power is electric,” said Savage. Well, it would have to be really and Fletcher agreed it was “New Year’s Eve and the fourth of July rolled into one here”, which should make the journey home a nightmare. Things didn’t go according to plan, the Spanish minnows scoring an away goal meaning Leicester needed to score three without reply in the second half. “Arrrrrghhh, the dreaded away goal, Leicester need a miracle, about 5,000-1, could be,” said Lineker at the break and O’Neill had a simple message – “don’t die wondering”. My search for famous Leicester people provided something that had made me wonder and quite possibly provided a chance of death, in Phil Shaw, who, it is claimed, invented Extreme Ironing in 1997. I don’t care if this is true or not, but me lugging an ironing board and a Rowenta onto the 122 and then up a mountain to take the creases out of a pair of slacks was about as likely as Leicester turning the tie around and so it proved. Jamie Vardy scored to level matters on the night and at full-time Fletcher summed things up. “What a journey it has been for Leicester City, from Belgium to Denmark, Portugal to Spain, it has been a magical ride,” he concluded. “Leicester have done their manager proud (and I’m sure Claudio Ranieri too), they’ve done their fans proud, they’ve done their league proud. The end of a magnificent journey,” agreed Lineker. “It has been a really great journey,” said O’Neill, while Gerrard thought of the fans and “the journey that these players have took them on” while Ferdinand was silent. “Leicester’s Champions League dream is over, but what a ride it has been,” finished Lineker, with loud banging in the background as a smooth operator with a board was off to see if it’s possible to iron while dancing in the sand. Don’t stop believing, Rio, enjoy the journey. THE GOOD: Cycling God and non-son of Stan, Chris Boardman, put the 1k race into context for us on the BBCs highlights of the World Championships. Like gladiators risking it all for the possibility of a single moment of intense glory, riders can spend an entire career preparing for a minute of explosive competition, he said, but by then my head could only picture Russell Crowe tossing his Chopper at an irate lion and legging it past Sir Chrisius Hoyius on the way out. THE BAD: And on a similar note, it was clearly a case of eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die at the bowls on Sky, where any thoughts of dispelling any myths about the age dynamic of the spectators was hard to take seriously in a competition sponsored by Co-op Funeral Care, where a dead end brought the bowler a spot prize of a coffin, a hearse and two gravediggers. I may have made that last bit up. THE UGLY: Childish snigger of the week came from Channel Fours terrible two, cheeky chappies David Coulthard and Mark Webber embarking on their grid walk in Bahrain. We havent seen you since Melbourne, whats been tickling your fancy Down Under? enquired Coulthard, but sadly Webber didnt tell us. Belfast Telegraph

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

[Investigation] Sex and lies: Russia’s EU news – EUobserver

Rape, paedophilia, incest, and sodomy – Russian media have been targeting France and Germany for years with hundreds of fake or distorted stories, many of which were designed to incite sexual revulsion toward asylum seekers and the politicians who gave them shelter. Conspiracy theories about false-flag terrorist attacks and about Nazism have also featured in Moscows propaganda campaign as France and Germany head for elections. News of Lisa, a 13-year old girl of Russian origin in Germany who was said, last year, to have been raped by migrants, is the best known of its type. Lisa left home for a few days and told her family that she had been kidnapped and raped by Arabic men. German police said it was not true and she later confessed to having made it up. But it was reported as fact by every big Russian news agency and personally endorsed by the Russian foreign minister. It was also circulated, for months, by pro-Russian local language websites all over Europe, for instance in Czech, English, Hungarian, and Slovak, and spread wider still by Russian trolls and bots on social media. A leading Russian TV station, Pervyi Kanal, on 17 January last year, even aired a fake interview on YouTube with Lisas aunt and uncle which it later took down. Part of the Russian line was that German authorities had hushed it up, which meant that official denials reinforced the message and the story stayed alive long after it had been debunked. The Lisa story was designed to harm German chancellor Angela Merkel, an advocate of EU sanctions on Russia, by indicating that her policy of welcoming refugees had put Germans in peril. It was also designed to sow ethnic hatred in German society and was accompanied by street protests organised by Russian expat groups. The story exposed Russias modus operandi – how media giants such as RT and Sputnik work hand-in-glove with fringe websites and with individual bloggers, trolls, and bots to propagate disinformation. It showed how publications in one EU language end up being translated and cross-posted into other ones. It was also just one of dozens that used sexual taboos to manipulate peoples feelings. EUobserver studied the 2,951 examples of Russian fake news collected and published by East Stratcom, a counter-propaganda cell in the EU foreign service, since October 2015. The bulk of the material was designed to legitimise Russian foreign policy, such as its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine or its military intervention in Syria. It was also designed to legitimise Russian leader Vladimir Putins increasingly totalitarian rule at home by claiming that the West and Nato were trying to encircle Russia, but the Lisa story was just the beginning of a long stream. Out of 189 stories identified by East Stratcom as having directly targeted France and Germany, 28 of them (15 percent) were based on sexual slurs against migrants or the LGBTI community in those countries. Dozens more used sexual content that targeted other EU states, especially in the Nordic region, to paint a misleading picture of a Europe-wide emergency caused by Merkel, as well as by French president Francois Hollande and by EU institutions. East Stratcom relies on journalists and NGOs around Europe to send alerts on Russian fake news. The real number of fake stories on France and Germany was far higher than 200, but the EU cell has more correspondents in former Soviet states and in central and eastern European countries than it does in the west and in the north of Europe, creating blind spots in its research. A European diplomat, who asked not to be named, told EUobserver that the use of sex as a propaganda weapon was no accident. Sex sticks to memory, the diplomat said. It creates a lot of emotions and when your objective isnt to inform people, but to divide them, destabilise them, make them more fragmented, more afraid, more angry, this is precisely the kind of message youre looking for, he said. Jakub Janda, a Czech expert at the European Values think tank in Prague who works with East Stratcom, added: Sex is used because its emotionally mobilising and supports the narrative that Western/German mainstream political leadership is soft or unable or unwilling to defend our own people. The Lisa story came out in conjunction with distorted reports about sexual assaults by Arabs against German women on New Years Eve in Cologne in 2016. Assaults did take place, but Russian media falsely claimed that Merkel refused to condemn them and that German police did not intervene out of political correctness. In June last year, Russian TV reported that a migrant had pushed a young German woman under a train. The attack was real, but the attacker was not a migrant. In September, Russian media claimed, without giving any evidence, that women in many German cities were afraid to go out at night for fear of being raped by migrants. They also claimed, without evidence, that German courts were inundated by migrant sex crimes and that German police could not keep up with migrant crime statistics. In February of this year, Russian bloggers circulated false reports that migrants had sexually assaulted women on New Years Eve in Frankfurt. The dirty tricks were similar in France. In May last year, Russias flagship TV show, Vesti nedeli, quoted Raphaelle Tourne, a French woman, as saying that migrants had verbally abused her and that she was scared to go out in her own neighbourhood, but the quotes were made up. In November last year, a Czech pro-Russian blogger planted a fake story that the French government had secretly agreed with Islamic radicals to create zones governed by Islamic sharia laws, which oppressed women, in parts of France. Turning the rape motif on its head, Russian media in February this year falsely reported that a German soldier in a Nato unit in Lithuania had raped a local girl. Varying the motif again, a pro-Russian Facebook account in February said migrants had attacked a Catholic priest in Avignon, France, even though the assault in question had taken place four years ago. Russian sources also replicated migrant sex stories in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway, and Sweden. They reported that migrants had raped schoolgirls in Finland without giving any evidence. They claimed Austria had acquitted a migrant who raped a 10-year old boy even though the alleged rapist had not been acquitted. They said falsely that migrants had made five nuns pregnant at a monastery in Milan, Italy, that gave them shelter, and said that a migrant had sexually assaulted a 17-year old girl in Denmark in a story that used photos from an incident years ago. They made hollow claims of mass rapes by migrants in Belgium and in Sweden, which hosts the most refugees per capita in Europe, and which, Russian reports said, had, due to this, become the rape capital of Europe. The campaign to provoke sexual-political revulsion also used more exotic content. Last January, pro-Russian media said Germany had hired Czech prostitutes to have sex with migrants so that they would spread sexually transmitted diseases in the Czech Republic in revenge for Pragues refusal to join EU migrant-relocation quotas. Last February, they made the unsubstantiated claim that bestiality was on the rise in Germany due to African immigrants. In November 2015, a pro-Russian Czech website said that Germany planned to legalise paedophilia in the EU. In April last year, a Russian blogger reported that Western countries were to legalise incest, cannibalism, and necrophilia. Last May, Russian newspaper Pravda said Merkel was a lesbian who wanted to legalise paedophilia, while in October, Russias Ren TV claimed that European men wanted to practice polygamy because they were jealous of Muslim migrants who had more than one wife. In another variation of the theme in January, a Russian social media user planted a fake allegation that Swedish foreign minister Margot Wallstroem was such an extreme feminist that she advocated mass-scale castration of white males. No one has carried out detailed polling on the impact of such stories on French or German public opinion. But a survey by American pollster Pew last year indicated that Russian propaganda had already carved out a sizable constituency in Europe. It said that between 25 to 30 percent of people in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain believed, for instance, that there were no Russian troops fighting in east Ukraine, despite a wealth of hard evidence to the contrary. There is also no detailed study of how big Russian media work with fringe websites and individual bloggers, which ones of the smaller publishers are Kremlin agents and which ones replicate fake content because they believe that it is true. This huge [media] ecosystem has different parts with different aims and our knowledge about it is still very small. Its quite scary and its obvious they know our audiences much better than we know them, the European diplomat said. We need to know how many disinformation-oriented multipliers there are, who is there more for planting the story, who is there more for providing material for disinformation-oriented outlets in other languages, who is there for reaching out to the general audience and who is reaching out to opinion makers, he said. He said some parts of it [the ecosystem] definitely work independently from Russias central brain. But he added that if European media or bloggers echoed the central brain in good faith then that would be the ideal result of this incredible information carpet bombing. These cases are actually even more dangerous, when a non-Kremlin outlet spreads pro-Kremlin disinformation, the disinformation receives more credibility, he said. He also said that the small readership of some pro-Russian outlets did not mean that they were harmless because they targeted opinion makers. Look at it like an advertising campaign, he said. You might have some doubts whether a printed ad in a magazine read by 500 people was worth the money, especially when the same company has ads in TV and radio and internet But if the company knows that those 500 readers are important for them, and that they might have influence on other audiences, it was money well spent. The migrant rape stories are part of a wider narrative that portrays Putin and pro-Putin far-right parties in Europe as guardians of orthodox values. They run alongside homophobic fake news designed to incite revulsion against the LGBTI community in Europe and against liberal politicians, such as Merkel or Emmanuel Macron, a French presidential candidate, or against EU institutions who defend the rights of sexual minorities. In one direct attack on the French presidential campaign, Russian TV, in March, spread unsubstantiated rumours that Macron, a Russia-critical and pro-EU politician, had a gay love affair. Russian TV last February also said the European Parliament was promoting homosexuality in France in order to erase the difference between men and women. Russian media said last summer that French people were shocked by Russian football hooligans because their ideas of masculinity had been degraded by watching men take part in Gay Pride marches. The homophobic content also had a pan-EU dimension. In one typical example, a pro-Russian newspaper in Georgia last May said EU elites had been captured by LGBT activists. A Russian website in June said people in Europe were being forced to become gay. As with the story on the priest attack in Avignon, the homophobic theme worked in conjunction with fake news on religion. In January last year, Igor Druz, a pro-Russian fighter in Ukraine who was cited as an expert at the Russian Institute of Strategic Studies, told a Russian website that EU leaders were trying to eradicate Christianity. Pro-Russian media last year also said the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg was planning to ban baptism and that people in EU countries were being fined for wearing jewellery with Christian crosses while walking down the street. The Kremlins foreign influence operations often lack coherence. Russia portrays itself as a bulwark against the purported rise of fascism in Europe while supporting neo-Nazi parties such as the NPD or the extreme-right Pegida movement in Germany. It backs mainly far-right parties, such as the National Front in France or the AfD in Germany, but it also backs far-left anti-EU parties such as the Communist Party and Left Party in France and Die Linke in Germany. In this context, the central place of homophobia in the Kremlins anti-EU ideology is made clear by its non-cooperation with Geert Wilders, the leading anti-EU politician in the Netherlands. Anton Shekhovtsov, an expert on Russia at the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna, told EUobserver that Wilders did not fit the bill due to his sexual politics. Russian actors who are engaged in building relations with the European far right are homophobic – that could damage Wilders, who positions himself as pro-LGBTI, Shekhovtsov said. Sex aside, the Russian campaign against France and Germany also exploited the hot-button issue of terrorism and the historical trauma of Nazism. The Russian propaganda in this area also lacked coherence. In one line, EU leaders were accused of being too weak to protect their citizens from terrorists of migrant origin. In another line, seen time and again in individual reports on France and Germany, EU and US leaders were accused of secretly organising false-flag jihadist attacks because they served as a pretext to impose supranational rule. The stream began with reports in German and in Czech that French authorities had staged the shooting at Charlie Hebdo, a satirical magazine, in Paris in January 2015 to justify a crackdown on the anti-EU National Front party. In March 2016, Russian sources said Merkel had organised the Brussels bombings and published what they said was a selfie of the chancellor with one of the attackers, but which was, in fact, a photo of an unrelated Syrian refugee. They said the US staged the truck assault in Nice, France, last July, to punish French people for protesting against an EU-US free-trade pact. At a lower level, they accused Merkels intelligence services of having organised the Cologne New Years Eve sex attacks. They also made the unsubstantiated claim that German intelligence services had carried out an arson attack against Frauke Petry, the leader of Germanys main anti-EU party, the AfD. Another propaganda theme says Merkel is a crypto-Nazi who wants to impose German rule in Europe. It is designed to foment Germanophobia among EU nations, many of which suffered huge losses in World War II, and to legitimise Putins authoritarianism and revanchism by alusion to Stalin, whose totalitarian regime defeated Hitlers forces. It is also designed to promote anti-EU parties in Europe by presenting the EU as a vehicle for Merkels purported agenda. Russias Ren TV broadcaster in December 2015 made the unsubstantiated claim that Nazism is on the rise in Germany because it had re-published Hitlers autobiography Mein Kampf. A story planted in Georgian media in April last year said Merkel was Hitlers daughter. Several articles in June last year and in February this year claimed that German soldiers posted to Lithuania as part of a Nato battalion designed to deter Russian aggression were occupation forces on the model of Operation Barbarossa – Hitlers plan to conquer the Soviet Union. A story in Czech media in February also claimed that Poland has been co-opted into Germanys Fourth Reich. Anti-EU articles in February last year said the European Commission was founded on Nazi ideas by reference to Walter Hallstein, its first president, who had served in the German army in occupied France, but who had, in fact, rejected Nazi ideology. Another stream of stories in Czech, English, and Russian-language media last May described the EU as a continuation of Nazi plans. They said the EU was a totalitarian regime that enforced loyalty to Merkel and that European children were being made to cuddle up to Hitler dolls at bedtime. Some fake stories ventured even further into the realms of nutty conspiracy theories. Sputnik reported that the design of a new Nato building in Brussels was modelled on the insignia of Nazi SS brigades. Infowars.com, a British blog, cited David Icke, an English former TV presenter who believes the world is ruled by alien lizards, as saying the EU and US had organised the migration crisis to impose a new world order. A pro-Russian newspaper in Georgia also said last June that EU leaders had taken part in a Satanic ritual in a rail tunnel in Switzerland. The European diplomat told EUobserver that conspiracy theories were a smaller but essential part of Russias disinformation campaign that targeted disenfranchised minorities in European society. Look at how anti-Jewish conspiracies worked for Hitler. For a destabilised society, conspiracies are a very pleasant message, they tell them that it is not their fault, that they have someone else to blame, he said. They do find their audiences and they help the general messaging: Trust no-one. Nothing is sure. Be afraid, he said.

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

That moment Pete Price got called a lizard at Ladies Day – Liverpool Echo

Its hard work being Pete Price. Between his work as a panto star, talk show host and comedian – he also has to put up with constant shouts of Pete youre a lizard . And Ladies Day 2017 proved no different for the Radio City presenter – as one of his fellow racegoers took the opportunity to shout the famous putdown. Pete stopped for a catch up with the ECHO and said: It is so relaxed, it is so gentle here today and there are the most beautiful people on this earth here. But just as Pete finished his sentence – once passerby shouted: Youre a lizard. However, rather than his usual outspoken stance, Mr Price took a more gentle approach to the perpetrator – and offered him a hug instead. Its not the first time Pete has been caught in a spat at Aintree – last year he was heckled by a racegoer who called him a t***. The broadcaster, who has worked in the industry for over 30 years, has become famous for his meltdowns at prank callers to his talk show , who often bombard him with the bizarre taunt – and even shout it to him when hes out and about in public. One particular caller started the trend, which at one point became so popular that it trended worldwide on Twitter. Video Unavailable Click to play Tap to play Play now Watch this video again Video will play in Pete explains: It all started when I tried to get a guest called David Icke on the show. Hes famous for thinking that the royal family are reptiles disguised as humans – but every time we tried to get him on my show he would cancel at the last minute and we could never manage it. Then we got a phone call from what seemed like a normal caller, and mid-sentence he just started saying Pete youre a lizard and said thats why David Icke wouldnt come on the show. The catchphrase reached its peak when a flag was held up by a member of the crowd at a packed out ECHO arena wrestling show, displaying the message Pete Price is a lizard. A tweet with the photograph was retweeted thousands of times, and a Pete Price lizard hashtag even started to trend on Twitter. More recently, wrestler Hulk Hogan was photographed next to a fan, who was holding up the famous Pete Price is a lizard sign. The picture racked up thousands of likes and shares online and caused a social media storm, forcing the DJ to beg his followers to stop using the phrase.

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April 7, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed

Pete Price lizard: Hulk Hogan poses with sign at WWE’s Wrestlemania – Daily Star

HULK Hogan is the latest person to endorse the view that Merseyside-based radio presenter Pete Price is, in fact, a lizard. The WWE superstar was pictured holding a sign reading “Pete Price is a lizard” with a fan. And after the image went viral, it’s safe to say Pete was shocked. The radio star soon took to Twitter expressing his amazement and asking “will this ever end?”. GETTY/TWITTER . As Im out and about in town I can spot the people that are going to call me a lizard Pete hosts Radio City 2 and Radio City Talk in Merseyside. His apparently-reptilian credentials were first highlighted when he attempted to interview David Icke on his show. Icke is infamous for his belief that the Royal Family are reptiles disguised as humans but Pete’s interview bid backfired as it ended with him being accused of being a lizard. “It all started when I tried to get a guest called David Icke on the show,” he told the Liverpool Echo. . . “Every time we tried to get him on my show he would cancel at the last minute and we could never manage it. “Then we got a phone call from what seemed like a normal caller, and mid-sentence he just started saying ‘Pete you’re a lizard’ and said that’s why David Icke wouldn’t come on the show.” It soon stuck and it shows no likelihood of wearing off any time soon with people shouting “you’re a lizard” at him on the street. And although he takes it in good humour, Pete has admitted it’s getting a little tiresome. The Undertaker wowed the world with his 21-0 winning streak at Wrestlemania. Is Wrestlemania the last we’ll see of this living legend? 1 / 24 The Undertaker leaves his famous hat and trenchcoat in the ring: was this his final fight? He added: “I do find it quite amusing because its just so strange. Its so random. What I dont like is when people are two faced they come up to me and ask for a selfie and then I can count to 10 and I hear Pete, you’re a lizard! its just two faced and its cowardly. As Im out and about in town I can spot the people that are going to call me a lizard, Im walking through town and I count them in my head. I can spot them a mile off.

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April 4, 2017   Posted in: David Icke  Comments Closed


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